Letter dated 10 June 1982  from the Permanent Representative

of Belgium to the United Nations addressed to the

Secretary-General

I have the honour to draw your attention to the annexed statement on the situation in Lebanon issued by the Ministers for Foreign Affairs of the ten member States of the European Community at Bonn on 9 June 1982.

I request you, Sir, to have the text of this statement circulated as a document of the General Assembly, under  item 34 of the preliminary list,  and of the Security Council.

(Signed) Edmond DEVER

Ambassador

Permanent Representative of

Belgium to the United Nations

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*    A/37/50/Rev.l.

ANNEX

Statement on the situation in Lebanon issued by the Ministers for
Foreign Affairs of the ten member States of the European Community

at Bonn on 9 June 1982

The member States of the European Community vigorously condemn the new Israeli invasion of Lebanon.

Like the bombardments which preceded it and which caused intolerably high loss of human life, this action cannot be justified.  It constitutes a flagrant violation of international law and of the most basic humanitarian principles. Furthermore, it compromises the efforts to achieve a peaceful settlement of the problems of the Middle East and creates the imminent danger of a generalized conflict.

The Ten reaffirm the importance they attach to the independence, sovereignty, territorial integrity and national unity of Lebanon, which are indispensable for peace in the region.

The Ten strongly support the appeals made by the Secretary-General of the United Nations. They urgently call on all the parties concerned to act in accordance with Security Council resolutions 508 (1982) and 509 (1982) and in particular on Israel to withdraw all its forces immediately and unconditionally from Lebanon and to place the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) in a position to accomplish its mission without hindrance-Should Israel continue to refuse compliance with the above resolutions, the Ten will examine the possibilities for future action.

The objective of the Ten is to work for a Lebanon free from the cycle of violence which they have repeatedly condemned in the past.  This cannot be dissociated from the establishment of a global, just and lasting peace in the region. They are ready to assist in bringing the parties concerned to accept measures intended to lower the level of tension, re-establish confidence and facilitate a negotiated solution.

The Ten will urgently examine within the institutions of the Community the use of the means at the disposal of the Community to give aid to the victims of these events.

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