Outreach Programme on the 1994 Genocide Against
the Tutsi in Rwanda and the United Nations

Portrait of Secretary-General António Guterres
We must say no to hate speech and xenophobia, and reject the forces of polarization, nationalism and protectionism. Only by recognizing that we are all one human family sharing the same planet will we be able to rise to the many global challenges that confront us – from COVID-19 to climate change.

Important Note

Due to COVID-19, the traditional commemorative meeting of the General Assembly to mark the International Day of Reflection on the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda was postponed. However, the public is invited to reflect on 7 April on one of the darkest chapters in human history when more than one million people – overwhelmingly Tutsi, but also moderate Hutu, Twa and others who opposed the genocide – were systematically killed in less than three months and to honour those who were murdered and reflect on the suffering of those who survived.

The public is also encouraged to join the virtual observance on 7 April, featuring messages by the Secretary-General and the President of the General Assembly, and to share United Nations social media cards along with their own messages of solidarity.

#PreventGenocide #Kwibuka

Around the world

Commemorative and educational activities are organized by UN information centres around the world. Please note: schedule may be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

UNESCO: Critical thinking and learning about the past are key to preventing future genocides

Video Clips

Secretary-General's Message
(00:01:09)

General Assembly President's Statement
(00:01:15)

Jacqueline Murekatete is a lawyer, human rights activist and founder of the nonprofit organization Genocide Survivors Foundation. Aged nine, Ms. Murekatete lost her entire immediate family and most of her extended family to the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda.

(00:06:15)