New York

26 October 2021

Secretary-General's remarks to the High-Level Meeting on Delivering Climate Action - for People, Planet & Prosperity

[bilingual, as delivered] [scroll down for all-English and all-French versions]

Mr. President of the General Assembly — thank you very for convening us and for your commitment and leadership mobilizing us all for climate action.

Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen.

The United Nations and this assembly were created precisely for the kind of challenge that brings us together today.

The climate crisis is a code red for humanity.

This assembly — and governments around the world — face a moment of truth.

In six days, world leaders will be put to the test at COP26 in Glasgow.

Their actions — or inactions — will show their seriousness about addressing this planetary emergency.

The warning signs are hard to miss.  

Pollution kills nine million people every year.

Every day, dozens of species go extinct.

Scorching temperatures are turning farmlands into parched landscapes.

Cities and entire countries are watching sea levels rise around them.

Increasing temperatures will make vast stretches of our planet unlivable by century’s end.

And last week, a new report from The Lancet described climate change as the “defining narrative of human health” in the years to come — a crisis defined by widespread hunger, respiratory illness, deadly disasters and infectious disease outbreaks that could be even worse than COVID-19.

Despite these alarm bells ringing at fever pitch, we see new evidence today in the Emissions Gap Report that governments’ actions so far simply do not add up to what is so desperately needed.

We are still on track for a global temperature rise of 2.7 degrees Celsius.

A far cry from the 1.5 degree Celsius target to which the world agreed under the Paris Agreement.

A target that science tells us is the only sustainable pathway for our world.

And one that is entirely achievable.

If we can reduce [global] emissions by 45 per cent compared to 2010 levels this decade.

If we can achieve global net-zero by 2050.

And if world leaders arrive in Glasgow with bold, ambitious and verifiable 2030 targets, and new, concrete policies to reverse this disaster.

G20 leaders — in particular — need to deliver.

The time has passed for diplomatic niceties.

If governments — especially G20 governments — do not stand up and lead this effort, we are headed for terrible human suffering.
 
But all countries need to realize that the old, carbon-burning model of development is a death sentence for their economies and for our planet.

We need decarbonization now, across every sector in every country.

We need to shift subsidies from fossil fuels to renewable energy and tax pollution, not people. 

We need to put a price on carbon, and channel that back towards resilient infrastructures and jobs. 

And we need to phase-out coal — by 2030 in OECD countries and by 2040 in all other countries.

Governments are increasingly agreeing to stop financing coal — now private finance needs to do the same, urgently.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Les citoyens attendent – à juste titre – de leurs gouvernements qu’ils montrent l’exemple.

Mais il incombe à chacune et chacun d’entre nous de préserver notre avenir collectif.

Les entreprises doivent réduire leur impact sur le climat et prendre des mesures crédibles pour que leurs activités et leurs flux financiers soient pleinement compatibles avec un avenir à zéro émission nette. Plus d’excuses. Plus d’écoblanchiment.

Il est indispensable que les investisseurs – publics et privés – en fassent de même. Ils doivent se rallier à des initiatives précurseurs tels que l’Alliance Bancaire Net Zéro et la caisse des pensions du personnel des Nations Unies, qui a atteint et même dépassé ses objectifs en matière de réduction de l’empreinte carbone de ses investissements avant la date prévue, affichant une baisse de 32 % en 2021.

Dans toutes les sociétés, les citoyens doivent faire des choix plus judicieux et plus responsables, qu’il s’agisse de leur alimentation, de leurs déplacements ou de leurs achats en tant que consommateurs.

Les jeunes – et les militants pour le climat – doivent poursuivre sur leur lancée et exiger des actes de la part de leurs dirigeants.

À tous les niveaux, la solidarité mondiale est nécessaire pour aider tous les pays à opérer cette transition.

Les pays en développement sont en proie à des crises de la dette et des liquidités.

Ils doivent être soutenus.

Les banques de développement publiques et multilatérales doivent élargir considérablement leurs portefeuilles d’investissements climat et redoubler d’efforts pour aider les pays à bâtir des économies résilientes et conformes à l’objectif de zéro émission nette.

Et le monde développé doit de toute urgence honorer son engagement de consacrer au moins 100 milliards de dollars par an au financement de l’action climatique dans les pays en développement.

Je demande une nouvelle fois aux donateurs et aux banques multilatérales [de développement] de faire en sorte qu’au moins 50 % des montants qu’ils versent pour le climat soient consacrés à l’adaptation et à la résilience dans le monde en développement.

Excellencies,

Over the last 76 years, this Assembly has gathered the world around crisis after crisis to build consensus for action.

But rarely have we faced a crisis like this one.

A truly existential crisis that — if not addressed — threatens not only us, but succeeding generations.

There is one path forward.

A 1.5 degree future is the only livable future for humanity.

I urge leaders to get on with the job, before it’s too late.

Thank you.

***

[all-English]

Mr. President of the General Assembly — thank you very for convening us and for your commitment and leadership mobilizing us all for climate action.

Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen.

The United Nations and this assembly were created precisely for the kind of challenge that brings us together today.

The climate crisis is a code red for humanity.

This assembly — and governments around the world — face a moment of truth.

In six days, world leaders will be put to the test at COP26 in Glasgow.

Their actions — or inactions — will show their seriousness about addressing this planetary emergency.

The warning signs are hard to miss. 

Pollution kills nine million people every year.

Every day, dozens of species go extinct.

Scorching temperatures are turning farmlands into parched landscapes.

Cities and entire countries are watching sea levels rise around them.

Increasing temperatures will make vast stretches of our planet unlivable by century’s end.

And last week, a new report from The Lancet described climate change as the “defining narrative of human health” in the years to come — a crisis defined by widespread hunger, respiratory illness, deadly disasters and infectious disease outbreaks that could be even worse than COVID-19.

Despite these alarm bells ringing at fever pitch, we see new evidence today in the Emissions Gap Report that governments’ actions so far simply do not add up to what is so desperately needed.

We are still on track for a global temperature rise of 2.7 degrees Celsius.

A far cry from the 1.5 degree Celsius target to which the world agreed under the Paris Agreement.

A target that science tells us is the only sustainable pathway for our world.

And one that is entirely achievable.

If we can reduce [global] emissions by 45 per cent compared to 2010 levels this decade.

If we can achieve global net-zero by 2050.

And if world leaders arrive in Glasgow with bold, ambitious and verifiable 2030 targets, and new, concrete policies to reverse this disaster.

G20 leaders — in particular — need to deliver.

The time has passed for diplomatic niceties.

If governments — especially G20 governments — do not stand up and lead this effort, we are headed for terrible human suffering.
 
But all countries need to realize that the old, carbon-burning model of development is a death sentence for their economies and for our planet.

We need decarbonization now, across every sector in every country.

We need to shift subsidies from fossil fuels to renewable energy and tax pollution, not people. 

We need to put a price on carbon, and channel that back towards resilient infrastructures and jobs. 

And we need to phase-out coal — by 2030 in OECD countries and by 2040 in all other countries.

Governments are increasingly agreeing to stop financing coal — now private finance needs to do the same, urgently.

Excellencies,

People rightly expect their governments to lead.

But we all have a responsibility to safeguard our collective future.  

Businesses need to reduce their climate impact, and fully and credibly align their operations and financial flows to a net-zero future. No more excuses. No more greenwashing.

Investors — public and private alike — must do the same. They should join front runners like the net-zero asset owners alliance, and the UN’s own pension fund, which met its 2021 carbon reduction investment objectives ahead of time and above its target, with a 32 per cent reduction this year.

Individuals in every society need to make better, more responsible choices — in what they eat, how they travel, and what they purchase as consumers. 

And young people — and climate activists — need to keep doing what they’re doing: demanding action from their leaders.

Throughout, we need global solidarity to help all countries make this shift.

Developing countries are grappling with debt and liquidity crises.

They need support.

Public and multilateral development banks must significantly increase their climate portfolios and redouble their efforts to help countries transition to net-zero, resilient economies.

And the developed world must urgently meet its commitment of at least $100 billion in annual climate finance for developing countries.

I repeat my call to donors and multilateral development banks to devote at least 50 per cent of their climate support towards adaptation and resilience in the developing world.

Excellencies,

Over the last 76 years, this Assembly has gathered the world around crisis after crisis to build consensus for action.

But rarely have we faced a crisis like this one.

A truly existential crisis that — if not addressed — threatens not only us, but succeeding generations.

There is one path forward.

A 1.5 degree future is the only livable future for humanity.

I urge leaders to get on with the job, before it’s too late.

Thank you.

***

[all-French]

Monsieur le Président de l’Assemblée générale – merci de nous avoir réunis ici et pour votre engagement et votre leadership qui nous mobilise pour l'action climatique.

Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs, 

L’Organisation des Nations Unies et cette assemblée ont été créées précisément pour relever des défis comme celui qui nous réunit aujourd’hui. 

La crise climatique représente une alerte rouge pour l’humanité.  

Pour cette assemblée – et pour les gouvernements du monde entier – c’est un moment de vérité. 

Dans six jours, les dirigeants du monde seront mis à l’épreuve lors de la COP26, à Glasgow.

Leur action – ou leur inaction – démontrera leur sérieux face à cette urgence planétaire.

Il est difficile de ne pas voir les signes avant-coureurs de la catastrophe.   

La pollution tue neuf millions de personnes chaque année. 

Chaque jour, des dizaines d’espèces disparaissent. 

Des températures caniculaires transforment les terres agricoles en paysages desséchés. 

Des villes et des pays entiers voient monter autour d’eux le niveau des mers. 

La hausse des températures rendra invivables de vastes étendues de notre planète d’ici la fin du siècle. 

Et la semaine dernière, dans un nouveau rapport, la revue The Lancet a qualifié les changements climatiques de déterminants de la santé humaine pour les années à venir, annonçant une crise à grande échelle caractérisée par la faim, des maladies respiratoires, des catastrophes meurtrières et des épidémies de maladies infectieuses peut-être pires encore que la COVID-19. 

Ces sonnettes d’alarme sont assourdissantes. Et pourtant, le Rapport sur l’écart entre les besoins et les perspectives en matière de réduction des émissions nous apporte aujourd’hui de nouvelles preuves que les mesures prises jusqu’à présent par les gouvernements ne sont tout simplement pas à la hauteur de ce dont le monde a si désespérément besoin.

Nous continuons de nous rapprocher d’une élévation de la température mondiale de 2,7 degrés Celsius. 

Nous sommes bien loin de l’objectif de 1,5 degré que le monde s’est engagé à atteindre dans l’Accord de Paris. 

Objectif dont la science nous dit qu’il est la seule solution viable pour notre planète. 

Et qui est tout à fait réalisable. 

Si nous pouvons au cours de cette décennie réduire les émissions mondiales de 45 % par rapport aux niveaux de 2010. 

Si nous parvenons à l’objectif mondial de zéro émission nette d’ici à 2050. 

Et si les dirigeants mondiaux se rendent à Glasgow avec des objectifs audacieux, ambitieux et vérifiables pour 2030, et avec de nouvelles politiques concrètes pour conjurer cette catastrophe. 

Les dirigeants du G20 – en particulier – doivent tenir leurs promesses. 

Le temps des subtilités diplomatiques est révolu. 

Si les gouvernements – en particulier ceux du G20 – ne font pas front et ne prennent pas la tête de cet effort, l’humanité s’achemine tout droit vers de terribles souffrances.
 
Mais tous les pays doivent prendre conscience que le modèle de développement traditionnel fondé sur la combustion de carbone est un arrêt de mort pour leurs économies et pour notre planète. 

Nous devons décarboniser dès maintenant, dans tous les secteurs et dans tous les pays. 

Nous devons subventionner non plus les combustibles fossiles mais les énergies renouvelables, et taxer la pollution, pas les populations.  

Nous devons imposer les émissions de carbone et réinvestir les fonds dans des infrastructures et des emplois résilients.  

Et nous devons abandonner progressivement le charbon – d’ici à 2030 dans les pays de l’OCDE et d’ici à 2040 dans tous les autres. Les gouvernements sont de plus en plus nombreux à accepter de ne plus financer le charbon – et le secteur privé doit faire de même, de toute urgence. 

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Les citoyens attendent – à juste titre – de leurs gouvernements qu’ils montrent l’exemple. 

Mais il incombe à chacune et chacun d’entre nous de préserver notre avenir collectif.

Les entreprises doivent réduire leur impact sur le climat et prendre des mesures crédibles pour que leurs activités et leurs flux financiers soient pleinement compatibles avec un avenir à zéro émission nette. Plus d’excuses. Plus d’écoblanchiment.

Il est indispensable que les investisseurs – publics et privés – en fassent de même. Ils doivent se rallier à des initiatives précurseurs tels que l’Alliance Bancaire Net Zéro et la caisse des pensions du personnel des Nations Unies, qui a atteint et même dépassé ses objectifs en matière de réduction de l’empreinte carbone de ses investissements avant la date prévue, affichant une baisse de 32 % en 2021.

Dans toutes les sociétés, les citoyens doivent faire des choix plus judicieux et plus responsables, qu’il s’agisse de leur alimentation, de leurs déplacements ou de leurs achats en tant que consommateurs.

Les jeunes – et les militants pour le climat – doivent poursuivre sur leur lancée et exiger des actes de la part de leurs dirigeants. 

À tous les niveaux, la solidarité mondiale est nécessaire pour aider tous les pays à opérer cette transition. 

Les pays en développement sont en proie à des crises de la dette et des liquidités. 

Ils doivent être soutenus. 

Les banques de développement publiques et multilatérales doivent élargir considérablement leurs portefeuilles d’investissements climat et redoubler d’efforts pour aider les pays à bâtir des économies résilientes et conformes à l’objectif de zéro émission nette.

Et le monde développé doit de toute urgence honorer son engagement de consacrer au moins 100 milliards de dollars par an au financement de l’action climatique dans les pays en développement. 

Je demande une nouvelle fois aux donateurs et aux banques multilatérales [de développement] de faire en sorte qu’au moins 50 % des montants qu’ils versent pour le climat soient consacrés à l’adaptation et à la résilience dans le monde en développement.

Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs, 

Depuis 76 ans, cette Assemblée réunit les représentants du monde entier pour trouver des solutions consensuelles, crise après crise. 

Mais nous avons rarement affronté une crise comme celle-ci. 

Il s’agit cette fois d’une crise véritablement existentielle que nous devons surmonter pour préserver non seulement notre génération, mais aussi les générations futures. 

Nous n’avons pas le choix. 

Un avenir où l’augmentation de la température ne dépasse pas 1,5 degré Celsius est le seul avenir viable pour l’humanité. 

J’exhorte les dirigeants à s’activer avant qu’il ne soit trop tard.

Je vous remercie.