New York

10 September 2021

Secretary-General's remarks to the General Assembly presenting “Our Common Agenda” [scroll down for bilingual (as delivered); all-English and all-French versions]

[Bilingual; as delivered. Scroll further down for all English and all French] 

Mr. President of the General Assembly, Excellencies,Ladies and gentlemen,

On almost every front, our world is under enormous stress.

We are not at ease with each other, or our planet.

Covid-19 is a wake-up call – and we are oversleeping.

The pandemic has demonstrated our collective failure to come together and make joint decisions for the common good, even in the face of an immediate, life-threatening global emergency.

This paralysis extends far beyond COVID-19.  From the climate crisis to our suicidal war on nature and the collapse of biodiversity, our global response has been too little, too late. 

Unchecked inequality is undermining social cohesion, creating fragilities that affect us all. Technology is moving ahead without guard rails to protect us from its unforeseen consequences.

Global decision-making is fixed on immediate gain, ignoring the long-term consequences of decisions — or indecision. 

Multilateral institutions have proven too weak and fragmented for today’s global challenges and risks.

As a result, we risk a future of serious instability and climate chaos. 

Last year, in the Leaders’ Declaration marking the 75th Anniversary of the United Nations, you charged me with providing recommendations to advance Our Common Agenda, to address these challenges for global governance.

Today, after an in-depth process of consultation and reflection, I am presenting my response.

Excellencies,

In preparing this report, we built on a year-long global listening exercise.  We engaged Member States, thought leaders, young people, civil society, the United Nations system and its many partners. 

One message rang throughout our consultations: our world needs more, and better, multilateralism, based on deeper solidarity, to deal with the crises we face, and to reverse today’s dangerous trends.

There was broad recognition that we are at a pivotal moment.

Business as usual could result in breakdown of the global order, into a world of perpetual crisis and winner-takes-all.

Or we could decide to change course, heralding a breakthrough to a greener, better, safer future for all. 

This report represents my vision, informed by your contributions, for a path towards the breakthrough scenario. 

Our Common Agenda is above all an agenda of action, designed to strengthen and accelerate multilateral cooperation – particularly around the 2030 Agenda – and make a tangible difference to people’s lives.

And it is an agenda driven by solidarity – the principle of working together, recognizing that we are bound to each other and that no community or country, however powerful, can solve its challenges alone.

Excellencies,

I will set out my vision for Our Common Agenda under four broad headings: strengthening global governance; focusing on the future; renewing the social contract; and ensuring a United Nations fit for a new era.

First, the international community is manifestly failing to protect our most precious global commons: the oceans, the atmosphere, outer space, and the pristine wilderness of Antarctica. Nor is it delivering policies to support peace, global health, the viability of our planet and other pressing needs. 

In other words, multilateralism is failing its most basic test.

The lack of a global response and vaccination programme to end the COVID-19 pandemic is a clear and tragic example. 

The longer the virus circulates among billions of unvaccinated people, the higher the risk that it will develop into more dangerous variants that could rip through vaccinated and unvaccinated populations alike, with a far higher fatality rate.

IMF recall that investing $50 billion in vaccination now could add an estimated $9 trillion to the global economy in the next four years.

We need an immediate global vaccination plan, implemented by an emergency Task Force made up of present and potential vaccine producers, the World Health Organization, ACT-Accelerator partners, and international financial institutions, to work with pharmaceutical companies to at least double vaccine production, and ensure that vaccines reach seventy percent of the world’s population in the first half of 2022.

Likewise, the recommendations of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response must be a starting point for urgent reforms to strengthen the global health architecture.

The World Health Organization must be empowered and funded adequately, so that it can play a leading role in coordinating emergency response. Global health security and preparedness must be strengthened through sustained political commitment and leadership at the highest level. Low- and middle-income countries must be able to develop and access health technologies.

Excellencies,

More broadly, we cannot afford to ignore the alarm sounded by the pandemic and by galloping climate change. We must launch a new era of bold, transformative policies across the board. 

We must take our heads out of the sand and face up to future health crises, financial shocks, and the triple planetary emergency of climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution.

We need a quantum leap to strengthen multilateralism and make it fit for purpose.

One of the central recommendations of my report on Our Common Agenda is that the world should come together to consider all these issues and more at a high-level Summit of the Future.

This summit will aim to forge a new global consensus on what our future should look like, and how we can secure it.

The summit should include a New Agenda for Peace, that takes a more comprehensive, holistic view of global security.

The New Agenda for Peace could include measures to reduce strategic risks from nuclear arms, cyberwarfare and lethal autonomous weapons; strengthen foresight of future risk and reshape responses to all forms of violence, including by criminal groups, and in the home; investing in prevention and peacebuilding by addressing the root causes of conflict; increase support for regional initiatives that can fill critical gaps in the global peace and security architecture; and put women and girls at the centre of security policy.

The Summit could also include tracks on sustainable development and climate action beyond 2030; a Global Digital Compact to guarantee that new technologies are a force for good; the peaceful and sustainable use of outer space, the management of future shocks and crises, and more.

It should take account of today’s more complex context for global governance, in which a range of State and non-State actors are participating in open, transparent systems that draw on the capacities of all relevant stakeholders.
Our goal should be a more inclusive and networked multilateralism, to navigate this complex landscape and deliver effective solutions.

To support our collective efforts, I will ask an Advisory Board led by eminent former heads of state and government to identify global public goods and potentially other areas of common interest where governance improvements are most needed, and to propose options for how this could be achieved.

The work starts now, and I hope for your future engagement.

Excellencies,

The uneven recovery from the pandemic has exposed the deficiencies in our global financial system.

In the next five years, according to the International Monetary Fund, cumulative economic growth per capita in sub-Saharan Africa is projected to be around one quarter of the rate in the rest of the world.

This is intolerable.

Meanwhile, both public and private finance for climate action have been insufficient for years, if not decades.

To tackle historic weaknesses and gaps, and integrate the global financial system with other global priorities, I propose biennial Summits at the level of Heads of States and Government, between G20 members, ECOSOC members, the heads of International Financial Institutions, and the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 

The overriding aim of these summits would be to create a more sustainable, inclusive and resilient global economy, including fairer multilateral systems to manage global trade and technological development.

Issues for immediate consideration could include innovative financing to address inequality and support sustainable development; an investment boost to finance a green and just transition from fossil fuels; and a “last mile alliance’ to reach those farthest behind, as part of efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. 

These biennial Summits would coordinate efforts to incentivize inclusive and sustainable policies, across all systems, that enable countries to offer basic services and social protection to their citizens.

They would tackle unfair and exploitative financial practices, and resolve longstanding weaknesses in the international debt architecture.

Governments should never again face a choice between serving their people or servicing their debt.

These biennial Summits would also harness global financial frameworks to move forward quickly and unequivocally on climate action and biodiversity loss.

The Paris target is still within reach, but we need faster, nimbler, more effective climate and environmental governance to limit global heating and support countries most affected.

COP26 will be a vital forum to accelerate climate action.

I intend to convene all stakeholders ahead of the first Global Stocktake of the Paris Agreement in 2023 to consider further urgent steps.

Member States are already preparing a strong post-2020 biodiversity framework, the 2021 Food Systems Summit, and the Stockholm + 50 summit on the environment next year.

I will do everything in my power to ensure that these platforms will be a fundamental reset in our relationship with [nature].

Excellencies,

All these efforts and initiatives require economic analysis based on today’s realities, rather than outdated ideas of economic success.

We must correct a major blind spot in how we measure progress and prosperity.

Gross Domestic Product, GDP, fails to account for the incalculable social and environmental damage that may be caused by the pursuit of profit.

My report calls for new metrics that value the life and wellbeing of the many over short-term profit for the few.

Likewise, access to concessional finance should be based on vulnerability to risks and shocks, not the outdated metric of GDP.

Excellencies,

The second element of my report is a new focus on the world’s young people, and future generations.

These two groups will inherit the consequences of our decisions – but are barely represented at the global table of decisions.

I therefore intend to appoint a Special Envoy for Future Generations, to give weight to the interests of those who will be born over the coming century.

And a new United Nations Youth Office will upgrade engagement with young people across all our work, so that today’s young women and men can be designers of their own future.

My report proposes measures on education, skills training and lifelong learning, including a Transforming Education Summit next year, to address the learning crisis and expand opportunities and hope for the world’s 1.8 billion young people.

But we must go further, to make full use of our unprecedented capacity to predict and model the impact of policy decisions over time. 

I therefore intend to create a Futures Lab that will work with governments, academia, civil society, the private sector and others, bringing together all our work around forecasting, megatrends and risks. 

The Futures Lab will collect and analyse data, building on existing mechanisms including the annual IMF early warning exercise, to issue regular reports on megatrends and catastrophic risks. 

To improve our preparedness for future shocks, my report recommends an Emergency Platform that would be triggered automatically in large-scale crises, bringing together leaders from Member States, the United Nations system, key country groupings, international financial institutions, regional parties, and civil society and the private sector that is required to cooperate together with research bodies and others.

I also believe we need an intergovernmental body that thinks beyond immediate geopolitical dynamics to consider the interests of our entire human family, present and future. 

My report therefore proposes that Member States consider repurposing the Trusteeship Council, to make it into a deliberative platform on behalf of succeeding generations.

I hope Member States will also consider a Declaration on Future Generations to support this work.

Unless we change course, we could bequeath to our children and their children a barely habitable world.

You may have heard of the seven-generation principle, under which some indigenous communities make decisions based on the generations from their great-grandparents to their great-grandchildren. We have a lot to learn from them.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

En troisième lieu, je recommande dans mon rapport des mesures visant à rétablir la confiance et la cohésion sociale grâce à un nouveau contrat social ancré dans les droits humains.

Pour une grande part, le malaise mondial actuel prend racine dans la pauvreté persistante, la faim, le manque d’accès aux soins de santé, à l’éducation et à la sécurité de revenu ainsi que dans la hausse des inégalités et des injustices.

La majorité des membres de notre famille humaine – 55 %, soit 4 milliards de personnes – vivent au bord de la misère, privés de toute protection sociale.

Depuis le début de la pandémie, la fortune cumulée des dix hommes les plus riches du monde a progressé de 500 milliards de dollars. Dans le même temps, nous affrontons la pire crise de l’emploi que nous ayons traversée depuis la Grande Dépression avec plusieurs centaines de millions de personnes sans emploi ou en situation de sous-emploi dans le monde, surtout dans les pays en développement. Et comme toujours, les femmes sont démesurément touchées.

La réparation du tissu social passe par la mise en œuvre, aux niveaux national et mondial, de nouvelles initiatives qui permettent d’accélérer les progrès vers la réalisation du Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030, le tout ancré dans les droits humains et la dignité de chacune et de chacun.

Nous devons tirer pleinement parti de la célébration du soixante-quinzième anniversaire de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme.

La coopération mondiale ne peut se construire que sur la solidarité au sein même des pays.

C’est pourquoi je propose dans mon rapport une série de mesures visant à renouveler le contrat social entre l’État et les citoyens, ainsi qu’entre les citoyens eux-mêmes.

Nous devons tirer sans tarder les enseignements de la pandémie de COVID-19 et nous employer à mettre en place une couverture sanitaire universelle et à offrir à toutes et à tous, partout, une éducation, un logement, un travail décent et une protection de leur revenu.

Ces mesures sont non seulement possibles, elles sont indispensables à la construction de sociétés pacifiques, sûres, résilientes et fondées sur les droits humains et la dignité de toutes et de tous.

Pour ancrer ces efforts à l’échelle mondiale, je propose l’organisation d’un Sommet Social Mondial en 2025.

Un tel sommet pourrait constituer une nouvelle forme de délibération internationale qui déboucherait sur des mesures décisives à l’échelle mondiale afin de coordonner les efforts par-delà les frontières et d’être à la hauteur des valeurs qui fondent le contrat social.

Les conclusions du sommet pourraient porter sur des questions telles que la protection sociale universelle, la couverture sanitaire universelle, le logement convenable, l’éducation pour tous et le travail décent, dans le cadre d’une économie mondiale plus équitable et plus solidaire, pour que ce soit possible partout.

Une telle initiative donnerait une forte impulsion à la réalisation du Programme 2030 et des Objectifs de Développement Durable.

Le nouveau contrat social doit être fondé sur l’universalité des droits et des opportunités.

Dans toutes les sociétés et tous les secteurs, les femmes et les filles se heurtent aux discriminations et sont désavantagées. En moyenne, elles ne disposent que de 75 % des droits reconnus aux hommes et sont systématiquement exclues des mêmes opportunités et de la protection sociale.

Cela freine non seulement les femmes et les filles, mais l'humanité tout entière.

Je propose donc des mesures transformatrices pour renforcer l'égalité des genres, allant de l'abrogation des lois discriminatoires à l'investissement dans l'économie des soins, en passant par l'adoption de plans d'intervention d'urgence pour mettre fin aux violences fondées sur le genre.  

Garantir l’égalité des droits et des chances pour les femmes et les filles représente la mesure la plus efficace que nous puissions prendre pour créer des communautés et des sociétés plus stables, plus pacifiques, plus résilientes et plus prospères.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,
Pour rétablir la cohésion sociale, nous devons également nous attaquer à la crise de confiance qui s’est installée entre les citoyens et les institutions qui les représentent et les gouvernent.

Les théories du complot, la mésinformation, la désinformation et les mensonges prospèrent dans notre écosystème d’information défaillant.

La guerre menée contre la science tue. Il faut y mettre fin.

J’invite instamment les États Membres, les média et les organismes de réglementation à rechercher ensemble de nouveaux moyens de promouvoir l’intégrité dans le discours public, afin de se retrouver autour d’un consensus empiriquement fondé sur les faits, la science et la connaissance.

J’invite également tous les pays à mener des consultations nationales inclusives afin que leurs citoyens puissent contribuer aux décisions qui engagent leur avenir.

Le temps est venu de renouveler notre réflexion sur les droits humains au sens large, y compris leur application aux grandes questions de demain et à la vie en ligne. Je demande que l’accès à Internet soit considéré comme un droit humain fondamental et que des mesures soient prises pour que chacune et chacun y ait accès d’ici à 2030.

J’exhorte également tous les pays à prendre des mesures pour garantir une justice axée sur les droits de la personne, lutter contre la corruption, réformer le système fiscal international et mettre en place une nouvelle structure commune dédiée à l’intégrité financière et à la lutte contre les flux financiers illicites.

Il s’agit de moyens essentiels pour rétablir la confiance des citoyens.

Excellencies,

Fourth and finally, the United Nations itself must adapt to support the vision of Our Common Agenda.

The United Nations is the only institution with universal convening power. Our Common Agenda must therefore include upgrading the United Nations.

We need a UN 2.0 that can offer more relevant, systemwide, multilateral and multi-stakeholder solutions to the challenges of the 21st century.

This transformation will be based on a quintet of cross-cutting issues: data; digital innovation; strategic foresight; behavioral science; and performance and results orientation.

I will seek to reestablish the Secretary-General's Scientific Advisory Board, to strengthen the role of the United Nations as a source of reliable data and evidence.

And I will broaden participation through an annual meeting with regional organizations, and a new Advisory Group on Local and Regional Governments, as well as systematic engagement with cities, civil society, parliaments and the private sector.
 
All United Nations entities will be asked to establish a dedicated focal point for civil society, to create greater space for civil society to contribute at the country and global levels, and within all United Nations networks and processes.

The Futures Lab, a repurposed Trusteeship Council, and my new envoy for Future Generations will together ensure that the United Nations takes far better account of the intergenerational impact of our work.

Our finances should be put on a firmer footing, and I invite Member States to consider my proposals in this regard.

As regards any decisions by Member States to adapt the intergovernmental organs to the needs and realities of today, including reforming the Security Council, revitalizing the work of the General Assembly and strengthening ECOSOC, I stand ready to provide the necessary support.

Excellencies,

Global governance may sound lofty or abstract. It is not.

These decisions have life-or-death consequences for you and your citizens, from the quality of the air we breathe to the chance to earn a living wage and the risk of catching a deadly disease.

Multilateral action led by the United Nations has achieved an enormous amount over the past 76 years, from preventing a third world war to eradicating smallpox and mending the hole in the ozone layer. 

My report must be a starting point for ideas and initiatives that build on these achievements and take them further.

Some of my proposals can be taken forward by the United Nations system. Others will require broader discussion, and decisions by Member States.

I urge you all to act on your joint responsibility to ensure we achieve the breakthrough we need.

The United Nations is an intergovernmental organization. Member States will always be central to our collective ability to meet global challenges, with unique responsibilities in the multilateral system.

But solutions to today’s challenges also depend on action from civil society, the private sector and others, particularly young people, who must be accountable for their commitments and have a meaningful role in deliberations.

I look forward to hearing from you and your national leaders on these proposals, during the General Debate and thereafter.

Excellencies,

I am an engineer. I believe in the infinite capacity of the human mind to solve problems.

When we work together, there is no limit to what we can achieve.

My report on Our Common Agenda is a starting point. A starting point for our joint efforts to improve global governance together, on foundations of trust, solidarity and human rights, to fulfil the hopes and expectations of the people we serve. 

Thank you.

***** 
All English:

Mr. President of the General Assembly, Excellencies, Ladies and gentlemen,

On almost every front, our world is under enormous stress.

We are not at ease with each other, or our planet.

Covid-19 is a wake-up call – and we are oversleeping.

The pandemic has demonstrated our collective failure to come together and make joint decisions for the common good, even in the face of an immediate, life-threatening global emergency.

This paralysis extends far beyond COVID-19.  From the climate crisis to our suicidal war on nature and the collapse of biodiversity, our global response has been too little, too late. 

Unchecked inequality is undermining social cohesion, creating fragilities that affect us all. Technology is moving ahead without guard rails to protect us from its unforeseen consequences.

Global decision-making is fixed on immediate gain, ignoring the long-term consequences of decisions — or indecision. 

Multilateral institutions have proven too weak and fragmented for today’s global challenges and risks.

As a result, we risk a future of serious instability and climate chaos. 

Last year, in the Leaders’ Declaration marking the 75th Anniversary of the United Nations, you charged me with providing recommendations to advance Our Common Agenda, to address these challenges for global governance.

Today, after an in-depth process of consultation and reflection, I am presenting my response.

Excellencies,
In preparing this report, we built on a year-long global listening exercise.  We engaged Member States, thought leaders, young people, civil society, the United Nations system and its many partners. 

One message rang throughout our consultations: our world needs more, and better, multilateralism, based on deeper solidarity, to deal with the crises we face, and to reverse today’s dangerous trends.

There was broad recognition that we are at a pivotal moment.

Business as usual could result in breakdown of the global order, into a world of perpetual crisis and winner-takes-all.

Or we could decide to change course, heralding a breakthrough to a greener, better, safer future for all. 

This report represents my vision, informed by your contributions, for a path towards the breakthrough scenario. 

Our Common Agenda is above all an agenda of action, designed to strengthen and accelerate multilateral cooperation – particularly around the 2030 Agenda – and make a tangible difference to people’s lives.

And it is an agenda driven by solidarity – the principle of working together, recognizing that we are bound to each other and that no community or country, however powerful, can solve its challenges alone.

Excellencies,
I will set out my vision for Our Common Agenda under four broad headings: strengthening global governance; focusing on the future; renewing the social contract; and ensuring a United Nations fit for a new era. 

First, the international community is manifestly failing to protect our most precious global commons: the oceans, the atmosphere, outer space, and the pristine wilderness of Antarctica. Nor is it delivering policies to support peace, global health, the viability of our planet and other pressing needs. 

In other words, multilateralism is failing its most basic test.

The lack of a global response and vaccination programme to end the COVID-19 pandemic is a clear and tragic example. 

The longer the virus circulates among billions of unvaccinated people, the higher the risk that it will develop into more dangerous variants that could rip through vaccinated and unvaccinated populations alike, with a far higher fatality rate.

IMF recall that investing $50 billion in vaccination now could add an estimated $9 trillion to the global economy in the next four years.

We need an immediate global vaccination plan, implemented by an emergency Task Force made up of present and potential vaccine producers, the World Health Organization, ACT-Accelerator partners, and international financial institutions, to work with pharmaceutical companies to at least double vaccine production, and ensure that vaccines reach seventy percent of the world’s population in the first half of 2022.

Likewise, the recommendations of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response must be a starting point for urgent reforms to strengthen the global health architecture.

The World Health Organization must be empowered and funded adequately, so that it can play a leading role in coordinating emergency response. Global health security and preparedness must be strengthened through sustained political commitment and leadership at the highest level. Low- and middle-income countries must be able to develop and access health technologies.

Excellencies,
More broadly, we cannot afford to ignore the alarm sounded by the pandemic and by galloping climate change. We must launch a new era of bold, transformative policies across the board. 

We must take our heads out of the sand and face up to future health crises, financial shocks, and the triple planetary emergency of climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution.

We need a quantum leap to strengthen multilateralism and make it fit for purpose.

One of the central recommendations of my report on Our Common Agenda is that the world should come together to consider all these issues and more at a high-level Summit of the Future.

This summit will aim to forge a new global consensus on what our future should look like, and how we can secure it.

The summit should include a New Agenda for Peace, that takes a more comprehensive, holistic view of global security.

The New Agenda for Peace could include measures to reduce strategic risks from nuclear arms, cyberwarfare and lethal autonomous weapons; strengthen foresight of future risk and reshape responses to all forms of violence, including by criminal groups, and in the home; investing in prevention and peacebuilding by addressing the root causes of conflict; increase support for regional initiatives that can fill critical gaps in the global peace and security architecture; and put women and girls at the centre of security policy.

The Summit could also include tracks on sustainable development and climate action beyond 2030; a Global Digital Compact to guarantee that new technologies are a force for good; the peaceful and sustainable use of outer space, the management of future shocks and crises, and more.

It should take account of today’s more complex context for global governance, in which a range of State and non-State actors are participating in open, transparent systems that draw on the capacities of all relevant stakeholders.

Our goal should be a more inclusive and networked multilateralism, to navigate this complex landscape and deliver effective solutions.

To support our collective efforts, I will ask an Advisory Board led by eminent former heads of state and government to identify global public goods and potentially other areas of common interest where governance improvements are most needed, and to propose options for how this could be achieved.

The work starts now, and I hope for your future engagement.

Excellencies,
The uneven recovery from the pandemic has exposed the deficiencies in our global financial system.

In the next five years, according to the International Monetary Fund, cumulative economic growth per capita in sub-Saharan Africa is projected to be around one quarter of the rate in the rest of the world.

This is intolerable.

Meanwhile, both public and private finance for climate action have been insufficient for years, if not decades.

To tackle historic weaknesses and gaps, and integrate the global financial system with other global priorities, I propose biennial Summits at the level of Heads of States and Government, between G20 members, ECOSOC members, the heads of International Financial Institutions, and the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 

The overriding aim of these summits would be to create a more sustainable, inclusive and resilient global economy, including fairer multilateral systems to manage global trade and technological development.

Issues for immediate consideration could include innovative financing to address inequality and support sustainable development; an investment boost to finance a green and just transition from fossil fuels; and a “last mile alliance’ to reach those farthest behind, as part of efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. 

These biennial Summits would coordinate efforts to incentivize inclusive and sustainable policies, across all systems, that enable countries to offer basic services and social protection to their citizens.

They would tackle unfair and exploitative financial practices, and resolve longstanding weaknesses in the international debt architecture.

Governments should never again face a choice between serving their people or servicing their debt.

These biennial Summits would also harness global financial frameworks to move forward quickly and unequivocally on climate action and biodiversity loss.

The Paris target is still within reach, but we need faster, nimbler, more effective climate and environmental governance to limit global heating and support countries most affected.

COP26 will be a vital forum to accelerate climate action.

I intend to convene all stakeholders ahead of the first Global Stocktake of the Paris Agreement in 2023 to consider further urgent steps.

Member States are already preparing a strong post-2020 biodiversity framework, the 2021 Food Systems Summit, and the Stockholm + 50 summit on the environment next year.

I will do everything in my power to ensure that these platforms will be a fundamental reset in our relationship with [nature].

Excellencies,
All these efforts and initiatives require economic analysis based on today’s realities, rather than outdated ideas of economic success.

We must correct a major blind spot in how we measure progress and prosperity.

Gross Domestic Product, GDP, fails to account for the incalculable social and environmental damage that may be caused by the pursuit of profit.

My report calls for new metrics that value the life and wellbeing of the many over short-term profit for the few.

Likewise, access to concessional finance should be based on vulnerability to risks and shocks, not the outdated metric of GDP.

Excellencies,
The second element of my report is a new focus on the world’s young people, and future generations.

These two groups will inherit the consequences of our decisions – but are barely represented at the global table of decisions.

I therefore intend to appoint a Special Envoy for Future Generations, to give weight to the interests of those who will be born over the coming century.

And a new United Nations Youth Office will upgrade engagement with young people across all our work, so that today’s young women and men can be designers of their own future.

My report proposes measures on education, skills training and lifelong learning, including a Transforming Education Summit next year, to address the learning crisis and expand opportunities and hope for the world’s 1.8 billion young people.

But we must go further, to make full use of our unprecedented capacity to predict and model the impact of policy decisions over time. 

I therefore intend to create a Futures Lab that will work with governments, academia, civil society, the private sector and others, bringing together all our work around forecasting, megatrends and risks. 

The Futures Lab will collect and analyse data, building on existing mechanisms including the annual IMF early warning exercise, to issue regular reports on megatrends and catastrophic risks. 

To improve our preparedness for future shocks, my report recommends an Emergency Platform that would be triggered automatically in large-scale crises, bringing together leaders from Member States, the United Nations system, key country groupings, international financial institutions, regional parties, and civil society and the private sector that is required to cooperate together with research bodies and others.

I also believe we need an intergovernmental body that thinks beyond immediate geopolitical dynamics to consider the interests of our entire human family, present and future. 

My report therefore proposes that Member States consider repurposing the Trusteeship Council, to make it into a deliberative platform on behalf of succeeding generations.

I hope Member States will also consider a Declaration on Future Generations to support this work.

Unless we change course, we could bequeath to our children and their children a barely habitable world.

You may have heard of the seven-generation principle, under which some indigenous communities make decisions based on the generations from their great-grandparents to their great-grandchildren. We have a lot to learn from them.

Excellencies,
Third, my report recommends measures to rebuild trust and social cohesion through a renewed social contract, anchored in human rights.

Much of our global unease is rooted in persistent poverty, hunger, lack of access to health care, education and income security, and growing inequalities and injustices.

Most members of our human family – 55 percent, or 4 billion people – are one step away from destitution, with no social protection whatsoever.

The world’s ten richest men saw their combined wealth increase by half a trillion dollars since the pandemic began. Meanwhile, we face the worst jobs crisis since the Great Depression, with hundreds of millions of people out of work or underemployed. As always, women are disproportionately hit.

Repairing the social fabric requires new initiatives at the national and global level to accelerate progress on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, anchored in human rights and dignity for all.   

We must take full advantage of the Commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Global cooperation can only be built on solidarity within countries.  

My report therefore proposes a series of measures to renew the social contract between Governments and people, and between people.

We must take immediate lessons from COVID-19 through efforts to provide universal health coverage, education, housing, decent work and income protection for everyone, everywhere.

This is not only possible; it is an essential part of building peaceful, secure, resilient societies based on human rights and dignity for all.  

To anchor these efforts at the global scale, I propose a World Social Summit in 2025.

This could be a new form of global deliberation that would take decisive steps on a global scale to coordinate efforts across borders and live up to the values that underpin the social contract.

The summit outcome could cover issues including universal social protection, universal health coverage, adequate housing, education for all and decent work, in the context of a fairer and more equitable global economy.  

It would give a strong push to the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals.

A new social contract must be based on rights and opportunities for all.

In every society and sector, women and girls suffer from discrimination and disadvantage. On average, they have just 75 percent of the rights of men, and are systematically excluded from opportunities and social protection.

This holds back not only women and girls, but humanity as a whole.

My report therefore proposes transformative measures to strengthen gender equality, from repealing discriminatory laws to investing in the care economy, and enacting emergency response plans to end gender-based violence.  

Ensuring equal rights and opportunities for women and girls is the single most effective measure we can take to create more stable, peaceful, resilient and prosperous communities and societies.

Excellencies,
To rebuild social cohesion, we must also tackle the crisis of trust between people and the institutions that represent and govern them.

Conspiracy theories, misinformation, disinformation and lies are thriving in our broken information ecosystem.

The war on science is killing people. It must end. 

I urge Member States, media outlets and regulatory bodies to join forces to explore new ways to promote integrity in public discourse – an empirically backed consensus around facts, science and knowledge.

I also invite all countries to conduct inclusive national listening exercises, so their citizens can contribute to decisions that affect their future.

It is time to reinvigorate our thinking around human rights more broadly, including their application to frontier issues and our online lives. I call for access to the Internet as a basic human right, and for steps to achieve this for everyone by 2030.

And I urge all governments to take steps to ensure people-centred justice, address corruption, reform the international tax system, and establish a new joint structure on financial integrity and illicit financial flows.

These are all critical ways to rebuild trust and public confidence. 

Excellencies,
Fourth and finally, the United Nations itself must adapt to support the vision of Our Common Agenda.

The United Nations is the only institution with universal convening power. Our Common Agenda must therefore include upgrading the United Nations.

We need a UN 2.0 that can offer more relevant, systemwide, multilateral and multi-stakeholder solutions to the challenges of the 21st century.

This transformation will be based on a quintet of cross-cutting issues: data; digital innovation; strategic foresight; behavioral science; and performance and results orientation.

I will seek to reestablish the Secretary-General's Scientific Advisory Board, to strengthen the role of the United Nations as a source of reliable data and evidence.

And I will broaden participation through an annual meeting with regional organizations, and a new Advisory Group on Local and Regional Governments, as well as systematic engagement with cities, civil society, parliaments and the private sector. 

All United Nations entities will be asked to establish a dedicated focal point for civil society, to create greater space for civil society to contribute at the country and global levels, and within all United Nations networks and processes.

The Futures Lab, a repurposed Trusteeship Council, and my new envoy for Future Generations will together ensure that the United Nations takes far better account of the intergenerational impact of our work.

Our finances should be put on a firmer footing, and I invite Member States to consider my proposals in this regard.

As regards any decisions by Member States to adapt the intergovernmental organs to the needs and realities of today, including reforming the Security Council, revitalizing the work of the General Assembly and strengthening ECOSOC, I stand ready to provide the necessary support.

Excellencies,
Global governance may sound lofty or abstract. It is not.

These decisions have life-or-death consequences for you and your citizens, from the quality of the air we breathe to the chance to earn a living wage and the risk of catching a deadly disease.

Multilateral action led by the United Nations has achieved an enormous amount over the past 76 years, from preventing a third world war to eradicating smallpox and mending the hole in the ozone layer. 

My report must be a starting point for ideas and initiatives that build on these achievements and take them further.

Some of my proposals can be taken forward by the United Nations system. Others will require broader discussion, and decisions by Member States.

I urge you all to act on your joint responsibility to ensure we achieve the breakthrough we need.

The United Nations is an intergovernmental organization. Member States will always be central to our collective ability to meet global challenges, with unique responsibilities in the multilateral system.

But solutions to today’s challenges also depend on action from civil society, the private sector and others, particularly young people, who must be accountable for their commitments and have a meaningful role in deliberations.

I look forward to hearing from you and your national leaders on these proposals, during the General Debate and thereafter.

Excellencies,
I am an engineer. I believe in the infinite capacity of the human mind to solve problems.

When we work together, there is no limit to what we can achieve.

My report on Our Common Agenda is a starting point. A starting point for our joint efforts to improve global governance together, on foundations of trust, solidarity and human rights, to fulfil the hopes and expectations of the people we serve. 

Thank you.

---
All French:

Monsieur le Président de l’Assemblée générale, Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants, Mesdames et Messieurs,

Sur presque tous les fronts, le monde subit d’énormes pressions.
        
Nous ne sommes pas en paix, ni les uns avec les autres, ni avec notre planète.
        
Le Covid-19 est un signal d’alarme – et nous continuons à ne pas l’entendre.
        
La pandémie a démontré notre incapacité collective à nous rassembler et à prendre ensemble les décisions indispensables au bien commun, alors même que nous sommes face à une situation d’urgence qui menace la vie de toutes et tous sur la planète.
        
Cette paralysie ne se limite pas au COVID-19. Crise climatique, guerre suicidaire contre la nature, effondrement de la biodiversité : le monde agit trop peu et trop tard.
        
Des inégalités hors de contrôle sapent la cohésion sociale et créent des fragilités qui touchent chacune et chacun d’entre nous. La technologie se développe à grand pas sans garde-fou pour nous protéger de ses conséquences imprévisibles.
        
Les instances de décision mondiales font la part belle aux gains à court terme, sans se soucier des conséquences à long terme de ce qu’elles décident ou ne décident pas.
        
Les institutions multilatérales se révèlent trop faibles et trop fragmentées pour faire face aux défis et aux risques du monde d’aujourd’hui.
        
À l’avenir, ce qui nous attend, c’est donc une grave instabilité et le chaos climatique.
        
L’année dernière, dans la déclaration que vous avez faite à l’occasion de la célébration du soixante-quinzième anniversaire de l’Organisation, vous m’avez demandé de vous présenter des recommandations pour faire progresser Notre Programme commun et relever les défis pesant sur la gouvernance mondiale.
        
Aujourd’hui, après des consultations et une réflexion approfondies, je viens vous présenter mes propositions.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,
        
Pour établir ce rapport, nous nous sommes mis à l’écoute de la planète pendant un an. Nous avons consulté les États Membres, des penseurs, des leaders d’opinion, la société civile et le système des Nations Unies et ses nombreux partenaires.
        
Un même message s’est fait entendre partout : notre monde a besoin d'un multilatéralisme plus important et plus efficace, fondé sur une plus grande solidarité, pour faire face aux crises auxquelles nous sommes confrontés et inverser les tendances dangereuses d’aujourd’hui.
        
Le constat est unanime : nous sommes à un tournant.
        
Si nous poursuivons dans la même voie, nous pourrions voir l’ordre mondial s’effondrer, des crises sans fin se succéder et voir naître un monde qui ne fait de place qu’aux gagnants.
        
Ou bien, nous pouvons choisir de changer de cap et, par un sursaut salutaire, nous engager vers un avenir meilleur, plus vert et plus sûr pour l’ensemble de l’humanité.
        
Le rapport, nourri par vos contributions, présente ma vision pour opérer ce sursaut.
        
Notre Programme commun est avant tout un programme d’action visant à renforcer et à accélérer la coopération multilatérale – en particulier en ce qui a trait au Programme 2030 – et à améliorer concrètement la vie des gens.
        
Il est fondé sur le principe de solidarité – invitant à travailler ensemble, sur la base du constat que nous sommes liés les uns aux autres et qu’aucune société ou aucun pays, aussi puissant soit-il, ne peut résoudre seul ses problèmes.

J’ai articulé notre Programme commun et la vision qui l’anime autour de quatre grands axes : renforcer la gouvernance mondiale ; privilégier l’avenir ; renouveler le contrat social ; adapter l’ONU à une nouvelle ère.

Tout d’abord, la communauté internationale est manifestement incapable de protéger les biens communs mondiaux les plus précieux, à savoir les océans, l’atmosphère, l’espace extra-atmosphérique et les terres encore vierges de l’Antarctique. Les politiques qu’elle adopte ne favorisent pas la paix, la santé mondiale et la viabilité de notre planète et ne répondent pas aux besoins urgents.

En d’autres termes, le multilatéralisme est en échec.
         
L’absence d’action mondiale et d’un plan de vaccination planétaire pour mettre fin à la pandémie de COVID-19 en est l’exemple le plus flagrant et le plus tragique.
        
Plus le virus circule parmi les milliards de personnes qui ne sont pas vaccinées, plus le risque est grand qu’il mute et donne naissance à des variants plus dangereux encore qui pourraient ravager les populations, qu’elles soient vaccinées ou non, et causer davantage de morts.
        
Le Fonds monétaire international nous rappelle qu’investir 50 milliards de dollars dans la vaccination dès aujourd’hui permettrait à l’économie mondiale d’engranger quelque 9 000 milliards de dollars au cours des quatre prochaines années.
        
Il nous faut établir sans plus tarder un plan de vaccination mondial, qui serait mis en œuvre par une équipe spéciale d’urgence associant les producteurs de vaccins, l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé, les acteurs d’Accélérateur ACT et les institutions financières internationales. Cette équipe s’emploierait, en collaboration avec les entreprises pharmaceutiques, à faire doubler la production de vaccins, au minimum, et à faire en sorte que 70 % de la population mondiale soit vaccinée au cours du premier semestre 2022.
        
Par ailleurs, les recommandations du Groupe indépendant sur la préparation et la riposte à la pandémie constituent un bon point de départ pour des réformes susceptibles de renforcer rapidement l’architecture sanitaire mondiale.
        
Il faut donner à l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé des moyens d’agir et lui assurer les financements dont elle a besoin pour qu’elle puisse jouer un rôle de de premier plan dans la coordination de l’action d’urgence. La sécurité sanitaire mondiale et la préparation doivent être renforcées grâce à une volonté politique sans faille et à un véritable leadership aux plus hauts niveaux. Les pays à bas revenu et à revenu intermédiaire doivent avoir accès aux technologies de santé et pouvoir les développer.
         
De façon générale, nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre d’ignorer l’avertissement que nous lancent la pandémie et le changement climatique en pleine accélération. Nous devons entrer dans une nouvelle ère et adopter des politiques audacieuses et porteuses de transformations dans tous les domaines.
        
Nous devons sortir la tête du sable et faire face aux crises sanitaires à venir, aux chocs financiers et à cette triple urgence planétaire que sont le changement climatique, la perte de biodiversité et la pollution.
        
Ce n’est que par un saut qualitatif que nous pourrons renforcer le multilatéralisme et l’adapter à nos objectifs.
        
L’une des principales recommandations de mon rapport, c’est que le monde se réunisse pour examiner toutes ces questions et bien d’autres encore lors d’un Sommet de Haut Niveau sur le Futur.
        
Ce sommet viserait à forger un nouveau consensus mondial sur ce à quoi notre avenir devrait ressembler et sur les moyens que nous pourrions déployer pour le faire advenir.
        
Il pourrait également être l’occasion d’adopter un Nouvel Agenda pour la paix, basé sur une vision plus globale et complète de la sécurité mondiale.
        
Ce nouvel agenda pour la paix pourrait prévoir des mesures visant plusieurs objectifs : réduire les risques stratégiques posés par les armes nucléaires, la cyberguerre et les armes létales autonomes ; renforcer l’analyse prospective des nouveaux risques et remodeler nos interventions face à toutes les formes de violence, y compris la violence des groupes criminels et la violence domestique ; investir dans la prévention et la consolidation de la paix en s’attaquant aux causes profondes des conflits ; appuyer davantage les initiatives régionales qui peuvent combler certaines des grandes lacunes de l’architecture mondiale de paix et de sécurité ; placer les femmes et les filles au cœur des politiques de sécurité.
        
Le Sommet pourrait également être l’occasion d’explorer des pistes sur d’autres sujets : le développement durable et l’action climatique au-delà de 2030 ; un Pacte numérique mondial permettant de garantir que les nouvelles technologies soient au service du bien ; l’utilisation pacifique et durable de l’espace extra-atmosphérique ; ou encore la gestion des chocs et des crises à venir.
        
Le Sommet devrait tenir compte de la réalité et de la complexité de la gouvernance mondiale actuelle, dans laquelle divers acteurs étatiques et non étatiques participent à des systèmes ouverts et transparents qui font appel aux capacités de toutes les parties prenantes compétentes.
        
Notre but doit être d’établir un multilatéralisme plus inclusif et en réseau, qui nous permette d’évoluer dans un monde complexe et d’apporter des solutions qui marchent.
        
À l’appui de notre action collective, j’entends demander à un Conseil consultatif dirigé par d’anciens chefs d’État et de gouvernement respectés de dresser la liste des biens publics mondiaux et des autres domaines d’intérêt commun qui pourraient grandement bénéficier d’une amélioration de la gouvernance et de proposer des solutions sur la manière d’y parvenir.
        
Nos travaux commencent dès maintenant et je compte sur votre participation active.
         
Les soubresauts du relèvement post-pandémique font apparaître les faiblesses du système financier mondial.
        
Selon le Fonds monétaire international, dans les cinq prochaines années, la croissance économique cumulée par habitant en Afrique subsaharienne devrait être égale à peu près au quart de ce qu’elle est dans le reste du monde.

C’est inacceptable.
        
Par ailleurs, les financements publics et privés en faveur de l’action climatique ont été insuffisants pendant des années, voire des décennies.
        
Pour remédier aux faiblesses et aux lacunes anciennes et permettre au système financier international de prendre en compte d’autres priorités mondiales, je propose d’organiser tous les deux ans, au niveau des chefs d’État et de gouvernement, un Sommet entre les membres du G20 et du Conseil économique et social, les chefs des institutions financières internationales et le Secrétaire général de l’ONU.
        
Il aurait pour objet d’œuvrer à la mise en place d’une économie mondiale plus durable, plus inclusive et plus résiliente, ainsi qu’à la constitution de systèmes multilatéraux plus équitables aptes à gérer le commerce mondial et le développement des technologies.
        
On y examinerait diverses questions pressantes : le financement innovant comme moyen de remédier aux inégalités et d’appuyer le développement durable ; la possibilité d’un coup de pouce à l’investissement pour financer une transition verte et juste et l’abandon des combustibles fossiles ; la mise sur pied d’une « alliance de la dernière ligne droite » visant les grands oubliés des efforts déployés pour atteindre les Objectifs de développement durable.
        
Ces sommets biennaux permettraient de coordonner les initiatives visant à encourager des politiques inclusives et durables qui permettent aux pays d’offrir des services de base et une protection sociale à leurs citoyens.

Ils permettraient de s'attaquer aux pratiques financières injustes et prédatrices et de remédier aux faiblesses de longue date de l'architecture internationale de la dette.
        
Les États ne devraient plus jamais avoir à choisir entre servir leur population et assurer le service de la dette.
        
Ces sommets biennaux seraient également l’occasion de mobiliser rapidement les cadres de financement internationaux en faveur de l’action climatique et de la lutte contre la perte de biodiversité.
        
L’objectif de Paris est encore à notre portée, mais il nous faut mettre sur pied une gouvernance climatique et environnementale plus rapide, plus souple et plus efficace pour limiter le réchauffement de la planète et aider les pays les plus touchés.
        
La vingt-sixième session de la Conférence des Parties sera essentielle pour accélérer l’action climatique.
        
J’ai l’intention de réunir toutes les parties prenantes avant le premier bilan mondial de l’Accord de Paris qui doit se tenir en 2023 afin d’examiner les mesures urgentes à prendre dans ce domaine.
        
Les États Membres élaborent déjà un solide cadre mondial de la biodiversité pour l’après‑2020 et se préparent pour le Sommet sur les systèmes alimentaires de 2021 et la réunion internationale « Stockholm+50 » sur l’environnement qui se tiendra l’année prochaine. Je ferai tout ce qui est en mon pouvoir pour que ces rendez-vous soient l’occasion de redéfinir la relation de l’humanité avec la nature.
         
Toutes ces actions et initiatives nécessitent une analyse économique qui soit fondée sur les réalités d’aujourd’hui et non sur une conception datée de la réussite économique.
        
Il nous faut combler un vide manifeste dans la façon dont nous mesurons la prospérité et le progrès.
        
Le produit intérieur brut – PIB – ne comptabilise pas les dommages sociaux et environnementaux considérables que la recherche du profit peut provoquer.
        
Dans le rapport, je préconise l’adoption de nouveaux indicateurs qui valorisent la vie et le bien-être du plus grand nombre et non le profit à court terme de quelques-uns.
        
De même, l’accès aux aides concessionnelles devrait être basé sur des indices de vulnérabilité aux risques et aux chocs et non sur le PIB, indicateur obsolète.
         
Le deuxième axe de mon rapport porte sur les jeunes et les générations futures.
        
Alors même que ce sont eux qui devront supporter les conséquences de nos décisions, ces deux groupes sont à peine représentés dans les instances de décision mondiales.
        
J’ai donc l’intention de nommer un ou une Envoyé(e) spécial(e) pour les générations futures afin d’accorder toute l’importance qui convient aux intérêts de celles et ceux qui naîtront au cours du siècle à venir.
        
La création d’un nouveau bureau des Nations Unies pour la jeunesse permettra de renforcer la participation des jeunes à toutes les activités de l’Organisation afin que les jeunes femmes et les jeunes hommes d’aujourd’hui puissent être les inventeurs de leur propre avenir.
        
Dans mon rapport, je propose des mesures dans les domaines de l’éducation, de la formation professionnelle et de l’apprentissage tout au long de la vie, notamment la tenue l’année prochaine d’un sommet sur la transformation de l’éducation destiné à résoudre la crise de l’apprentissage et à élargir les chances et les espoirs du 1,8 milliard de jeunes que compte la planète.
        
Mais nous ne devons pas nous arrêter là. Il nous faut exploiter pleinement la capacité sans précédent que nous avons de prédire et de modéliser l’incidence dans le temps des grandes décisions que nous prenons.
        
Aussi ai-je l’intention de mettre sur pied un Laboratoire sur le Futur qui travaillera avec les pouvoirs publics, les milieux universitaires, la société civile, le secteur privé et d’autres acteurs, et concentrera tous nos travaux sur la prospective, les grandes tendances et les risques.
        
Le Laboratoire collectera et analysera des données, en s'appuyant sur les mécanismes existants, notamment l'exercice annuel d'alerte précoce du Fonds Monétaire International, afin de publier des rapports réguliers sur les grandes tendances et les risques de catastrophe. 
        
Pour améliorer notre préparation aux chocs futurs, je préconise dans mon rapport la mise en place d’une plateforme d’urgence qui serait activée automatiquement en cas de crise de grande ampleur et qui réunirait notamment les responsables des États Membres, du système des Nations Unies, des principaux groupes de pays, des institutions financières internationales, des acteurs régionaux, de la société civile, du secteur privé et d’organismes de recherche.
        
Je crois également que nous avons besoin d’un organe intergouvernemental qui se projette au-delà des enjeux géopolitiques du moment pour prendre en compte les intérêts de toute notre famille humaine, présente comme future.
        
Aussi, je propose dans mon rapport que les États Membres envisagent de redéfinir la mission du Conseil de tutelle et transforme cet organe en plateforme de délibération agissant au nom des générations qui viennent.
        
J’ai l’espoir que les États Membres envisageront d’adopter une Déclaration sur les générations futures pour soutenir ce travail.
        
Si nous ne changeons pas de cap, nous risquons de léguer à nos enfants et aux enfants de nos enfants un monde à peine habitable.
        
Sans doute avez-vous déjà entendu parler du principe des sept générations, suivi par certaines communautés autochtones. Selon ce principe, les décisions doivent tenir compte de sept générations, des arrière-grands-parents aux arrière-petits-enfants. Il y a là un riche enseignement.

En troisième lieu, je recommande dans mon rapport des mesures visant à rétablir la confiance et la cohésion sociale grâce à un nouveau contrat social ancré dans les droits humains.

Pour une grande part, le malaise mondial actuel prend racine dans la pauvreté persistante, la faim, le manque d’accès aux soins de santé, à l’éducation et à la sécurité de revenu ainsi que dans la hausse des inégalités et des injustices.

La majorité des membres de notre famille humaine – 55 %, soit 4 milliards de personnes – vivent au bord de la misère, privés de toute protection sociale.

Depuis le début de la pandémie, la fortune cumulée des dix hommes les plus riches du monde a progressé de 500 milliards de dollars. Dans le même temps, nous affrontons la pire crise de l’emploi que nous ayons traversée depuis la Grande Dépression avec plusieurs centaines de millions de personnes sans emploi ou en situation de sous-emploi dans le monde, surtout dans les pays en développement. Et comme toujours, les femmes sont démesurément touchées.

La réparation du tissu social passe par la mise en œuvre, aux niveaux national et mondial, de nouvelles initiatives qui permettent d’accélérer les progrès vers la réalisation du Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030, le tout ancré dans les droits humains et la dignité de chacune et de chacun.

Nous devons tirer pleinement parti de la célébration du soixante-quinzième anniversaire de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme.

La coopération mondiale ne peut se construire que sur la solidarité au sein même des pays.

C’est pourquoi je propose dans mon rapport une série de mesures visant à renouveler le contrat social entre l’État et les citoyens, ainsi qu’entre les citoyens eux-mêmes.
Nous devons tirer sans tarder les enseignements de la pandémie de COVID-19 et nous employer à mettre en place une couverture sanitaire universelle et à offrir à toutes et à tous, partout, une éducation, un logement, un travail décent et une protection de leur revenu.

Ces mesures sont non seulement possibles, elles sont indispensables à la construction de sociétés pacifiques, sûres, résilientes et fondées sur les droits humains et la dignité de toutes et de tous.

Pour ancrer ces efforts à l’échelle mondiale, je propose l’organisation d’un Sommet Social Mondial en 2025.

Un tel sommet pourrait constituer une nouvelle forme de délibération internationale qui déboucherait sur des mesures décisives à l’échelle mondiale afin de coordonner les efforts par-delà les frontières et d’être à la hauteur des valeurs qui fondent le contrat social.

Les conclusions du sommet pourraient porter sur des questions telles que la protection sociale universelle, la couverture sanitaire universelle, le logement convenable, l’éducation pour tous et le travail décent, dans le cadre d’une économie mondiale plus équitable et plus solidaire, pour que ce soit possible partout.

Une telle initiative donnerait une forte impulsion à la réalisation du Programme 2030 et des Objectifs de Développement Durable.

Le nouveau contrat social doit être fondé sur l’universalité des droits et des opportunités.

Dans toutes les sociétés et tous les secteurs, les femmes et les filles se heurtent aux discriminations et sont désavantagées. En moyenne, elles ne disposent que de 75 % des droits reconnus aux hommes et sont systématiquement exclues des mêmes opportunités et de la protection sociale.

Cela freine non seulement les femmes et les filles, mais l'humanité tout entière.

Je propose donc des mesures transformatrices pour renforcer l'égalité des genres, allant de l'abrogation des lois discriminatoires à l'investissement dans l'économie des soins, en passant par l'adoption de plans d'intervention d'urgence pour mettre fin aux violences fondées sur le genre.  

Garantir l’égalité des droits et des chances pour les femmes et les filles représente la mesure la plus efficace que nous puissions prendre pour créer des communautés et des sociétés plus stables, plus pacifiques, plus résilientes et plus prospères.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Pour rétablir la cohésion sociale, nous devons également nous attaquer à la crise de confiance qui s’est installée entre les citoyens et les institutions qui les représentent et les gouvernent.

Les théories du complot, la mésinformation, la désinformation et les mensonges prospèrent dans notre écosystème d’information défaillant.

La guerre menée contre la science tue. Il faut y mettre fin.

J’invite instamment les États Membres, les média et les organismes de réglementation à rechercher ensemble de nouveaux moyens de promouvoir l’intégrité dans le discours public, afin de se retrouver autour d’un consensus empiriquement fondé sur les faits, la science et la connaissance.

J’invite également tous les pays à mener des consultations nationales inclusives afin que leurs citoyens puissent contribuer aux décisions qui engagent leur avenir.

Le temps est venu de renouveler notre réflexion sur les droits humains au sens large, y compris leur application aux grandes questions de demain et à la vie en ligne. Je demande que l’accès à Internet soit considéré comme un droit humain fondamental et que des mesures soient prises pour que chacune et chacun y ait accès d’ici à 2030.

J’exhorte également tous les pays à prendre des mesures pour garantir une justice axée sur les droits de la personne, lutter contre la corruption, réformer le système fiscal international et mettre en place une nouvelle structure commune dédiée à l’intégrité financière et à la lutte contre les flux financiers illicites.
Il s’agit de moyens essentiels pour rétablir la confiance des citoyens.
      
En quatrième et dernier lieu, l’Organisation des Nations Unies elle-même doit s’adapter pour favoriser la réalisation de la vision esquissée dans Notre programme commun.
        
L’Organisation est la seule institution à pouvoir réunir tous les États de la planète. Notre programme commun prévoit donc de moderniser l’ONU.
        
Nous avons besoin d’une « ONU 2.0 » qui soit capable d’offrir à l’échelle du système des solutions multilatérales et multipartites adaptées aux problèmes du XXIe siècle.
        
Cette transformation reposera sur cinq domaines d’action transversaux : données, innovation, prospective stratégique, sciences comportementales et analyse des performances et des résultats.
        
J’entends rétablir à mes côtés le Conseil scientifique consultatif afin de renforcer le rôle du système des Nations Unies comme source de données fiables.
        
Je compte également élargir la participation en organisant chaque année une réunion avec les organisations régionales et en mettant en place un nouveau groupe consultatif pour les autorités locales et régionales, mais aussi en instituant une collaboration systématique avec les villes, la société civile, les parlements et le secteur privé.
        
Toutes les entités des Nations Unies seront priées de désigner un(e) interlocuteur(trice) de la société civile, qui sera chargé(e) de faire en sorte que la société civile puisse contribuer davantage à leurs activités, aux niveaux national et mondial, et participer à leurs réseaux et procédures.
        
Ensemble, le Laboratoire pour le Futur, le conseil de tutelle revisité et mon ou ma nouvel(le) Envoyé(e) pour les générations futures permettront à l’Organisation des Nations Unies de bien mieux tenir compte des répercussions intergénérationnelles de ses activités.
        
Il faut doter l’Organisation d’une meilleure assise financière. J’invite les États Membres à examiner mes propositions à ce sujet.
        
Je me tiens prêt à apporter le soutien nécessaire à toute décision que prendraient les États Membres pour adapter les organes intergouvernementaux aux besoins et aux réalités d’aujourd’hui, notamment la réforme du Conseil de sécurité, la revitalisation des travaux de l’Assemblée générale et le renforcement du Conseil économique et social.
         
La gouvernance mondiale peut nous paraître comme trop théorique ou abstraite. Il n’en est rien.
        
Les décisions que nous prenons ont des conséquences vitales pour vous et vos concitoyens, qu’il s’agisse de la qualité de l’air que l’on respire, de la possibilité de gagner un salaire décent ou encore du risque de contracter une maladie mortelle.
        
Le multilatéralisme sous l’égide de l’Organisation des Nations Unies a permis d’accomplir de grandes choses au cours des 76 dernières années : conjurer le spectre de la troisième guerre mondiale, éradiquer la variole, combler le trou dans la couche d’ozone.
        
Mon rapport se veut le point de départ d’idées et d’initiatives qui s’inscrivent dans la continuité de ces réalisations et en assurent le prolongement.
        
Certaines de mes propositions pourront être mises en œuvre par le système des Nations Unies. D’autres nécessiteront un débat plus large et devront faire l’objet d’une décision des États Membres.
        
Je vous invite tous à assumer votre responsabilité commune afin que nous réalisions la percée dont nous avons besoin.
        
L’ONU est une organisation intergouvernementale. Les États Membres seront toujours au cœur de notre capacité collective de relever les défis mondiaux, assumant des responsabilités uniques dans le système multilatéral.
        
Mais les solutions aux problèmes d’aujourd’hui dépendent également de l’action de la société civile, du secteur privé et d’autres acteurs, en particulier des jeunes, qui doivent rendre compte du respect de leurs engagements et prendre une part véritable aux délibérations.
        
J’attends avec intérêt de prendre connaissance de votre avis et de celui de vos dirigeants sur ces propositions au cours du débat général et par la suite.
         
Je suis ingénieur de formation. Autrement dit, je crois en l’infinie capacité de l’esprit humain à résoudre les problèmes.
        
Quand nous unissons nos forces, rien ne peut nous arrêter.
        
Mon rapport sur Notre programme commun est le point de départ des efforts conjoints que nous devons mener pour améliorer ensemble la gouvernance mondiale, en la fondant sur la confiance, la solidarité et les droits humains, en vue de répondre aux espoirs et aux attentes des peuples que nous servons.
        
Je vous remercie.