New York

20 May 2020

Secretary-General's remarks to the Africa Dialogue Series on COVID-19 and Silencing the Guns in Africa: Challenges and Opportunities [bilingual as delivered; scroll down for English and French]

I am pleased to be able to join you in this time of unprecedented crisis to discuss the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on peace and security in Africa.

The pandemic has exposed the fragility of our societies.

It is a global problem that demands a coordinated global response built on unity and solidarity.

As COVID-19 spreads across Africa, its governments have responded swiftly.

As of now, reported cases are lower than feared. 

Even so, much hangs in the balance. 

In recent years African governments have done much to advance the well-being of the continent’s people. 

Economic growth has been strong. 

The digital revolution has taken hold. 

A free trade area has been agreed. 

But the pandemic threatens African progress, as outlined in the policy brief that we have issued today, which sets out the challenges and offers suggestions for the way forward.

COVID-19 threatens to aggravate long-standing inequalities and heighten hunger, malnutrition and vulnerability to disease. 

Already, demand for Africa’s commodities is down and tourism and remittances are declining. 

The opening of the trade zone has been pushed back – and millions could be pushed into extreme poverty.

The virus has so far taken more than 2,500 African lives. 

Vigilance and preparedness are critical.

I commend what African countries have done already, together with the African Union. 

Most have moved rapidly to deepen regional coordination, deploy health workers, and enforce quarantines, lockdowns and border closures.

They are also drawing on the experience of HIV/AIDS and Ebola to debunk rumours and overcome mistrust of government, security forces and health workers.

I express my total solidarity with the people and governments of Africa in tackling COVID-19. 

United Nations agencies, country teams, peacekeeping operations and humanitarian workers are providing all the support we can.

United Nations solidarity flights have delivered millions of test kits, respirators and other supplies, reaching almost the entire continent.

Our $6.71 billion-dollar Global Humanitarian Response Plan aims to support the 22 African countries that are facing humanitarian needs or hosting refugee populations.

We are calling for international action to strengthen Africa’s health systems, maintain food supplies, avoid a financial crisis, support education, protect jobs, keep households and businesses afloat, and cushion the continent against lost income and export earnings. 

African countries should also have quick, equal and affordable access to any eventual vaccine and treatment, which must be considered as global public goods.

I have launched a Call for Support for the Global Collaboration to Accelerate the Development, Production and Equitable Access to new COVID-19 Tools.

I commend the swift reaction of the African Union in establishing the African Anti-COVID-19 Fund, as well as the commitment of the members of the African Union Bureau to be the first contributors to that Fund.

I also note with appreciation the outcome of the pledging conference that the European Union held earlier this month.

And I welcome the generous contributions in the search for a COVID-19 vaccine and the commitment to ensuring that it will be a global public good accessible to all.

Excellencies,

I have been calling for a global response package amounting to at least 10 per cent of the world’s Gross Domestic Product. 

For Africa, that means more than $200 billion dollars.

In this regard, the Chair of the African Union, the Chairperson of the African Union Commission and I met recently with the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

I commend the work being done by these institutions to support African countries in creating the fiscal space necessary to devote resources to the COVID-19 response.

I also continue to advocate a comprehensive debt framework -- starting with an across-the-board debt standstill for countries unable to service their debt, followed by targeted debt relief and a comprehensive approach to structural issues in the international debt architecture to prevent defaults. 

It will also be essential for African countries to sustain their efforts to silence the guns and address violent extremism.

The pandemic is affecting capacity to support peace and security efforts in Africa. 

My message to the international community is that failure to respond quickly and adequately could jeopardize progress towards Silencing the Guns by 2020 and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and Africa’s Agenda 2063.

I welcome African support for my call for a global ceasefire, and a similar appeal by the Chairperson of the African Union Commission. 

Globally, 115 governments have endorsed my call.

It has also been supported by regional organizations, religious leaders, more than 200 civil society groups and 16 armed groups.

I welcome temporary unilateral ceasefires announced by armed groups in Cameroon, South Sudan and Sudan.

Looking ahead, various political processes and elections in the coming months offer potential milestones for stability and peace.

Despite the impact of COVID-19, the African Union has demonstrated unwavering commitment for continued operations.

This includes the renewal of the AMISOM mandates and discussions about the deployment of an AU force in support of the G5 Sahel Joint Force.

I reiterate that these peace enforcement operations must receive Security Council mandates, under Chapter VII of the Charter, and predictable funding guaranteed by assessed contributions.

For our part, the UN remains engaged with the AU, providing operational and planning support and expertise in areas ranging from mine action to human rights, safety and security.

UN field presences continue to protect civilians and undertake community outreach while strictly adhering to host-countries’ COVID-19-related measures.

And we remain actively engaged with parties to peace negotiations and other stakeholders.

Women must be central to all peace processes, just as they will be central to every aspect of the COVID-19 response. 

Stimulus packages must prioritize putting cash in the hands of women and increasing social protection.

We must also empower African youth.

And the human rights of all must be respected.

Many difficult decisions will need to be taken as the pandemic unfolds, and it will be essential to retain the trust and participation of citizens throughout.

These are still early days for the pandemic in Africa, and disruption could escalate quickly.

Il faut impérativement faire preuve de solidarité mondiale avec l’Afrique – dès aujourd’hui et pour mieux se redresser.

Il est indispensable de mettre fin à la pandémie en Afrique, pour y mettre fin dans le monde entier.

Je vous encourage à tirer parti de ce Cycle de conférences pour développer une compréhension commune des enjeux auxquels le continent fait face et contribuer à jeter les bases de l’Afrique que nous voulons tous.  Je vous remercie.

----------------------

I am pleased to be able to join you in this time of unprecedented crisis to discuss the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on peace and security in Africa.

The pandemic has exposed the fragility of our societies.

It is a global problem that demands a coordinated global response built on unity and solidarity.

As COVID-19 spreads across Africa, its governments have responded swiftly.

As of now, reported cases are lower than feared. 

Even so, much hangs in the balance. 

In recent years African governments have done much to advance the well-being of the continent’s people. 

Economic growth has been strong. 

The digital revolution has taken hold. 

A free trade area has been agreed. 

But the pandemic threatens African progress, as outlined in the policy brief that we have issued today, which sets out the challenges and offers suggestions for the way forward.

COVID-19 threatens to aggravate long-standing inequalities and heighten hunger, malnutrition and vulnerability to disease. 

Already, demand for Africa’s commodities is down and tourism and remittances are declining. 

The opening of the trade zone has been pushed back – and millions could be pushed into extreme poverty.

The virus has so far taken more than 2,500 African lives. 

Vigilance and preparedness are critical.

I commend what African countries have done already, together with the African Union. 

Most have moved rapidly to deepen regional coordination, deploy health workers, and enforce quarantines, lockdowns and border closures.

They are also drawing on the experience of HIV/AIDS and Ebola to debunk rumours and overcome mistrust of government, security forces and health workers.

I express my total solidarity with the people and governments of Africa in tackling COVID-19. 

United Nations agencies, country teams, peacekeeping operations and humanitarian workers are providing all the support we can. 

United Nations solidarity flights have delivered millions of test kits, respirators and other supplies, reaching almost the entire continent.

Our $6.7 billion-dollar Global Humanitarian Response Plan aims to support the 22 African countries that are facing humanitarian needs or hosting refugee populations.

We are calling for international action to strengthen Africa’s health systems, maintain food supplies, avoid a financial crisis, support education, protect jobs, keep households and businesses afloat, and cushion the continent against lost income and export earnings. 

African countries should also have quick, equal and affordable access to any eventual vaccine and treatment, which must be considered as global public goods.

I have launched a Call for Support for the Global Collaboration to Accelerate the Development, Production and Equitable Access to new COVID-19 Tools.

I commend the swift reaction of the African Union in establishing the African Anti-COVID-19 Fund, as well as the commitment of the members of the African Union Bureau to be the first contributors to that Fund.

I also note with appreciation the outcome of the pledging conference that the European Union held earlier this month.

And I welcome the generous contributions in the search for a COVID-19 vaccine and the commitment to ensuring that it will be a global public good accessible to all.

Excellencies,

I have been calling for a global response package amounting to at least 10 per cent of the world’s Gross Domestic Product. 

For Africa, that means more than $200 billion dollars.

In this regard, the Chair of the African Union, the Chairperson of the African Union Commission and I met recently with the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

I commend the work being done by these institutions to support African countries in creating the fiscal space necessary to devote resources to the COVID-19 response.

I also continue to advocate a comprehensive debt framework -- starting with an across-the-board debt standstill for countries unable to service their debt, followed by targeted debt relief and a comprehensive approach to structural issues in the international debt architecture to prevent defaults. 

It will also be essential for African countries to sustain their efforts to silence the guns and address violent extremism.

The pandemic is affecting capacity to support peace and security efforts in Africa. 

My message to the international community is that failure to respond quickly and adequately could jeopardize progress towards Silencing the Guns by 2020 and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and Africa’s Agenda 2063.

I welcome African support for my call for a global ceasefire, and a similar appeal by the Chairperson of the African Union Commission. 

Globally, 115 governments have endorsed my call.

It has also been supported by regional organizations, religious leaders, more than 200 civil society groups and 16 armed groups.

I welcome temporary unilateral ceasefires announced by armed groups in Cameroon, South Sudan and Sudan.

Looking ahead, various political processes and elections in the coming months offer potential milestones for stability and peace.

Despite the impact of COVID-19, the African Union has demonstrated unwavering commitment for continued operations.

This includes the renewal of the AMISOM mandates and discussions about the deployment of an AU force in support of the G5 Sahel Joint Force.

I reiterate that these peace enforcement operations must receive Security Council mandates, under Chapter VII of the Charter, and predictable funding guaranteed by assessed contributions.

For our part, the UN remains engaged with the AU, providing operational and planning support and expertise in areas ranging from mine action to human rights, safety and security.

UN field presences continue to protect civilians and undertake community outreach while strictly adhering to host-countries’ COVID-19-related measures.

And we remain actively engaged with parties to peace negotiations and other stakeholders.

Women must be central to all peace processes, just as they will be central to every aspect of the COVID-19 response. 

Stimulus packages must prioritize putting cash in the hands of women and increasing social protection. 

We must also empower African youth.  0:35

And the human rights of all must be respected.

Many difficult decisions will need to be taken as the pandemic unfolds, and it will be essential to retain the trust and participation of citizens throughout.

These are still early days for the pandemic in Africa, and disruption could escalate quickly. 

Global solidarity with Africa is an imperative – now and for recovering better.

Ending the pandemic in Africa is essential for ending it across the world.

I encourage you to use this Africa Dialogue Series to create a shared understanding of the challenges Africa faces and help to lay the foundations for the Africa we all want.

Thank you.

------------------------

Je suis heureux de pouvoir me joindre à vous en cette période de crise sans précédent pour discuter des effets de la pandémie du COVID-19 sur la paix et la sécurité en Afrique.

La pandémie a mis en évidence la fragilité de nos sociétés.

Il s’agit d’un problème mondial qui exige une réponse mondiale coordonnée et fondée sur l’unité et la solidarité.

Alors que le COVID-19 se propage en Afrique, les gouvernements du continent ont réagi rapidement.

À ce jour, le nombre de cas signalés est plus faible que ce que l’on craignait.

Malgré cela, l’enjeu reste de taille.

Ces dernières années, les gouvernements africains ont beaucoup fait pour promouvoir le bien-être des peuples du continent.

La croissance économique a été forte.

La révolution du numérique est en place.

Une zone de libre-échange a été décidée.

Mais la pandémie menace les progrès accomplis en Afrique, comme cela est indiqué dans la note de synthèse que nous avons diffusée aujourd’hui, qui rend compte des problèmes à résoudre et comporte des suggestions sur la voie à suivre.

Le COVID-19 menace d’aggraver des inégalités de longue date et d’accentuer la faim, la malnutrition et la vulnérabilité face à la maladie.

La demande de marchandises venant d’Afrique est déjà en baisse, ainsi que le tourisme et les envois de fonds.

L’ouverture de la zone de libre-échange a été reportée et des millions de personnes pourraient basculer dans l’extrême pauvreté.

Le virus a déjà fait plus de 2 500 morts en Afrique.

La vigilance et la préparation sont essentielles.

Je félicite les pays africains pour ce qu’ils ont déjà accompli, ainsi que l’Union africaine.

La plupart se sont empressés d’agir pour renforcer la coordination régionale, déployer des travailleurs sanitaires et imposer des quarantaines, des confinements et la fermeture des frontières.

Ils mettent également à profit l’expérience qu’ils ont acquise dans le cadre de la lutte contre le Sida et l’Ebola pour réfuter les rumeurs et surmonter la méfiance à l’égard des autorités, des forces de sécurité et des travailleurs sanitaires.

Je tiens à exprimer toute ma solidarité aux peuples et aux gouvernements d’Afrique dans leur lutte contre le COVID-19.

Ils ont tout le soutien des organismes des Nations Unies, des équipes de pays, des opérations de maintien de la paix et des travailleurs humanitaires.

Les vols de solidarité de l’ONU ont permis d’acheminer des millions de kits de dépistage, de masques et d’autres équipements, à travers pratiquement tout le continent.

Notre plan mondial de réponse humanitaire, doté de 6,7 milliards de dollars, vise à soutenir les 22 pays africains qui ont des besoins dans le domaine humanitaire ou qui accueillent des réfugiés.

Nous demandons une mobilisation internationale pour renforcer les systèmes sanitaires en Afrique, maintenir les chaînes d’approvisionnement alimentaire, éviter une crise financière, soutenir l’éducation, protéger les emplois, maintenir les ménages et les entreprises à flot et protéger le continent contre les pertes de revenus et de recettes d’exportation.

Les pays africains doivent bénéficier du même accès rapide, équitable et abordable à tout vaccin et traitement à venir, qui doivent être considérés comme des biens publics mondiaux.

J’ai lancé un appel en faveur d’un soutien à la collaboration mondiale pour accélérer la mise au point, la production et la diffusion équitable de nouveaux outils de lutte contre la COVID-19.

Je salue la réaction rapide de l’Union africaine, qui a créé le Fonds africain anti-COVID-19, ainsi que l’engagement pris par les membres du Bureau de l’Union africaine d’être les premiers contributeurs à ce Fonds.

Je note également avec satisfaction les résultats de la conférence d’annonce de contributions que l’Union européenne a organisée au début du mois.

Je me félicite enfin des contributions généreuses qui ont été faites en faveur de la recherche pour la mise au point d’un vaccin contre la COVID-19 et de l’engagement qui a été pris pour que ce vaccin soit un bien public mondial accessible à tous et à toutes.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

J’ai demandé un plan de relance mondiale qui représente au moins 10 % du produit intérieur brut mondial.

Pour l’Afrique, cela correspondrait à plus de 200 milliards de dollars.

À cet égard, le Président de l’Union africaine, le Président de la Commission de l’Union africaine et moi-même avons récemment rencontré les dirigeants du Fonds monétaire international et de la Banque mondiale.

Je salue le travail accompli par ces institutions pour aider les pays africains à s’assurer la marge de manœuvre nécessaire, sur le plan financier, pour consacrer des ressources à la lutte contre la COVID-19.

Je continue également de plaider en faveur d’un cadre global de la dette, à commencer par un moratoire généralisé de la dette des pays qui ne peuvent pas en assurer le service, suivi d’un allègement ciblé et d’une réponse globale aux problèmes structurels liés à l’architecture internationale de la dette, afin de prévenir tout défaut de paiement.

Il sera également essentiel que les pays africains poursuivent leur action pour faire taire les armes et faire face à l’extrémisme violent.

La pandémie affecte la capacité à soutenir les efforts de paix et de sécurité en Afrique.

Mon message à la communauté internationale est que sans une réponse rapide et adéquate, les progrès accomplis pour Faire taire les armes d’ici 2020 et réaliser les Objectifs de développement durable ainsi que l’Agenda 2063 pour l’Afrique pourraient être compromis.

Je salue le soutien de l’Afrique à mon appel en faveur d’un cessez-le-feu mondial, et de l’appel similaire lancé par le Président de la Commission de l’Union africaine.

Cet appel est endossé par 115 gouvernements du monde entier.

Il est également soutenu par des organisations régionales, des chefs religieux, plus de 200 groupes issus de la société civile et 16 groupes armés.

Je me félicite des cessez-le-feu unilatéraux temporaires annoncés par des groupes armés au Cameroun, au Soudan et au Soudan du Sud.

Les processus politiques et les élections qui doivent se tenir dans les prochains mois constituent une occasion de franchir d’importantes étapes sur le plan de la stabilité et de la paix.

Malgré l’impact du COVID-19, l’Union africaine a fait preuve d’un engagement sans faille pour la poursuite des opérations.

Elle a notamment renouvelé les mandats de l’AMISOM et tenu des discussions sur le déploiement d’une force de l’Union africaine chargée d’appuyer la Force conjointe du G5 Sahel.

Je réitère mon appel pour que ces opérations d’imposition de la paix reçoivent des mandats du Conseil de sécurité, en vertu du Chapitre VII de la Charte, et bénéficient d’un financement prévisible garanti par les contributions statutaires.

Pour sa part, l’ONU reste engagée aux côtés de l’Union africaine, à qui elle fournit un appui opérationnel et en matière de planification, ainsi qu’une expertise dans des domaines allant de la lutte anti-mines aux droits humains, à la sûreté et à la sécurité.

Sur le terrain, le personnel de l’ONU continue de protéger les civils et de mener des actions de proximité tout en respectant strictement les mesures adoptées par les pays hôtes pour lutter contre le COVID-19.

Nous restons aussi activement engagés avec les parties aux négociations de paix et les autres acteurs.

Les femmes doivent être au cœur de tous les processus de paix, tout comme elles seront au cœur de chaque aspect de la réponse au COVID-19.

Les plans de relance doivent en priorité mettre de l’argent à leur disposition et renforcer leur protection sociale.

Nous devons également donner aux jeunes Africains les moyens d’agir.

Enfin, les droits humains de chacun doivent être respectés.

Au fur et à mesure que la pandémie progresse, il faudra prendre des décisions difficiles, et il est essentiel de conserver la confiance et d’assurer la participation des citoyens tout au long du processus.

La pandémie en Afrique n’en est qu’à ses débuts, et les perturbations pourraient s’intensifier rapidement.

Il faut impérativement faire preuve de solidarité mondiale avec l’Afrique – dès aujourd’hui et pour mieux se redresser.

Il est indispensable de mettre fin à la pandémie en Afrique, pour y mettre fin dans le monde entier.

Je vous encourage à tirer parti de ce Cycle de conférences pour développer une compréhension commune des enjeux auxquels le continent fait face et contribuer à jeter les bases de l’Afrique que nous voulons tous.

Je vous remercie.