General Assembly Adopts 63 Drafts on First Committee’s Recommendation with Nuclear Disarmament at Core of Several Recorded Votes

GA/11593
2 December 2014
Sixty-ninth session, 62nd Meeting (AM)

General Assembly Adopts 63 Drafts on First Committee’s Recommendation with Nuclear Disarmament at Core of Several Recorded Votes

The General Assembly today, closely following the recommendation of its First Committee (Disarmament and International Security), where delegates had record-breaking participation and, as in past sessions, accorded priority attention to nuclear weapons, adopted 57 resolutions and six decisions, requiring 47 recorded votes in all, including on separate provisions of texts.

Faithful to the Committee’s voting pattern, the world body adopted a raft of texts on such topics as a convention prohibiting the use of those weapons, the Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation, and establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the Middle East.  The nuclear disarmament issue remained the primary concern, as evidenced by the high number of resolutions — 21 in all — on the matter.

A draft on achieving a nuclear weapon-free world and accelerating the implementation of nuclear disarmament commitments had the Assembly call upon the nuclear-weapon States to implement those commitments in a manner that enabled the States parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) to regularly monitor progress (L.12/Rev.1).

It was adopted by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 7 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, France, India, Israel, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States), with 5 abstentions (Bhutan, China, Federated States of Micronesia, Pakistan, Palau).

Prior to passage of the draft as a whole, the Assembly considered preambular paragraph 24, which emphasized the importance of a successful 2015 NPT Review Conference, deciding to retain it by a vote of 166 in favour to 3 against (India, Israel, United States), with 3 abstentions (France, Pakistan, United Kingdom).

A separate vote was also taken on operative paragraph 9, which stressed the fundamental role of the NPT in achieving nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation and urged India, Israel and Pakistan to accede to it as non-nuclear-weapon States promptly and without conditions and to place all their nuclear facilities under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards.  That provision was retained by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 4 against (India, Israel, Pakistan, United States), with 3 abstentions (Bhutan, France, United Kingdom).

The Assembly also retained operative paragraph 11, which urged all States to work together to overcome obstacles within the international disarmament machinery and immediately implement the three specific recommendations from the 2010 Review Conference Action Plan addressed to the Conference on Disarmament, by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Russian Federation, United States), with 4 abstentions (France, India, Pakistan, United Kingdom).

Expressing concern that, notwithstanding the end of the cold war, several thousand nuclear weapons remained on high alert, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution on decreasing the operational readiness of those systems by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 4 against (France, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States), with 11 abstentions (L.22).

Prior to action on the text as a whole, the Assembly retained preambular paragraph 8 by a recorded vote of 161 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 14 abstentions.  That provision welcomed the adoption by consensus of the conclusions and recommendations for follow-up actions by the 2010 NPT Review Conference, including the commitments of the nuclear-weapon States to promptly engage and consider the interests of non-nuclear-weapon States in further reducing the operational status of nuclear weapons systems.

The Assembly urged the nuclear-weapon States to immediately stop the qualitative improvement, development, production and stockpiling of nuclear warheads and their delivery systems, by the terms of another draft resolution, adopted by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 44 against, with 17 abstentions (L.31/Rev.1).  Further to the text, the world body reiterated its call upon the nuclear-weapon States to undertake a step-by-step reduction of the nuclear threat and to carry out effective nuclear disarmament measures with a view to achieving their total elimination within a specified timeframe.

Before adoption of the text as a whole, a recorded vote was taken on operative paragraph 16, which called for the immediate commencement of negotiations in the Conference on Disarmament on a non-discriminatory, multilateral and internationally and effectively verifiable treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices. That provision was retained by a recorded vote of 175 in favour to 1 against (Pakistan), with 3 abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom).

The following texts also took recorded votes in the nuclear cluster: risk of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East (L.2/Rev.1); Nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere and adjacent areas (L.10); convention on the Prohibition of the Use of Nuclear Weapons activities (L.16); Reducing nuclear danger (L.18); Treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices (L.20); Taking forward multilateral nuclear disarmament negotiations (L.21); Follow-up to the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice on the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons (L.23); Conclusion of effective international arrangements to assure non-nuclear-weapon States against the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons (L.27); United action towards the total elimination of nuclear weapons (L.36); Follow-up to the 2013 high-level meeting of the General Assembly on nuclear disarmament (L.44); Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (L.56); and the Third Conference of States Parties and Signatories to Treaties that Establish Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones and Mongolia, 2015 (L.57).

Acting without a vote, drafts in that cluster were adopted on the Establishment of a nuclear weapon-free zone in the region of the Middle East (L.1); Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia (L.11); Missiles (L.24); Hague Code of Conduct (L.25); Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapon-free status (L.49); and the African Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone Treaty (L.60).

Concerning other weapons of mass destruction, the Assembly adopted a draft on the implementation of the Convention on Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, by a recorded vote of 181 in favour to none against, with 1 abstention (Saudi Arabia) (L.63).  In so doing, it urged all States parties to meet in full and on time their obligations and to support the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in its implementation activities.

Prior to taking action on the draft as a whole, the Assembly retained preambular paragraph 4 by a recorded vote of 158 in favour to none against, with 9 abstentions (Bolivia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Ecuador, Iran, Nicaragua, Russian Federation, Venezuela, Syria).  That provision noted that the following actions remained to be taken in Syria: destruction of chemical weapons removed from its territory; destruction of the 12 remaining declared chemical weapons production facilities; and inspections of those sites.

A separate recorded vote was also taken on preambular paragraph 5, which urged the OPCW Technical Secretariat and the Syrian authorities to continue to cooperate through technical discussions on outstanding issues regarding Syria’s declaration. It was retained by a vote of 159 in favour to none against, with 9 abstentions (Bolivia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Ecuador, Iran, Nicaragua, Russian Federation, Syria, Venezuela).

Also requiring recorded votes in that cluster were texts on the Prohibition of the development and manufacture of new types of weapons of mass destruction and new systems of such weapons: report of the Conference on Disarmament (L.7); and Measures to uphold the authority of the 1925 Geneva Protocol (L.38). The following texts were adopted without a vote: Convention on Biological and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction (L.6); Measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction (L.17); and Preventing the acquisition by terrorists of radioactive sources (L.34/Rev.1).

Recorded votes were taken as well on drafts in the cluster on the disarmament aspects of outer space on Prevention of an arms race in outer space (L.3/Rev.1), and no first placement of weapons in outer space (L.14). Without a vote, the Assembly adopted a text on transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities (L.15).

For the cluster on conventional weapons, the Assembly adopted, by recorded votes, texts on: Implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on Their Destruction (L.5/Rev.1); Arms Trade Treaty (L.32/Rev.1).

Acting without a vote in that group, drafts were passed on: Assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them (L.4); Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed To Be Excessively Injurious or To Have Indiscriminate Effects (L.33); illicit trade in small arms and light weapons (L.35); and Information on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms (L.50).

On other disarmament measures and international security, the Assembly took recorded votes on Promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (L.39); Effects of the use of armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium (L.43); Compliance with non-proliferation, arms limitation and disarmament agreements and commitments (L.45); Women, disarmament, non-proliferation and arms control (L.47); and preventing and combating illicit brokering activities (L.48).

Without a vote, it adopted drafts on Role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (L.13); Developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security (L.26); Observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (L.41); Relationship between disarmament and development (L.42); Consolidation of peace through practical disarmament measures (L.46); United Nations Disarmament Information Programme (L.52); and Disarmament and non-proliferation education (L.53).

The Assembly, also acting without a vote, adopted texts on Regional disarmament (L.28); Confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context (L.29); Strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region (L.54); and Maintenance of international security — good-neighbourliness, stability and development in South-Eastern Europe (L.62). A text on Conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels required a recorded vote (L.30).

On the disarmament machinery, the Assembly adopted without votes drafts on Report of the Conference on Disarmament (L.8); United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific (L.9); Revitalizing the work of the Conference on Disarmament and taking forward multilateral disarmament negotiations (L.19); United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament (L.40); Report of the Disarmament Commission (L.51); United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (L.55/Rev.1); Regional confidence-building measures:  activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa (L.58); United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa (L.59); and United Nations disarmament fellowship, training and advisory services (L.61).

A recorded vote was taken on a draft decision on the Open-ended Working Group on the Fourth Special Session of the General Assembly Devoted to Disarmament (L.37).

Finally, the Assembly adopted a draft decision on its Proposed Programme of Work for 2015, as orally revised, without a vote.  It took note of the Report of the First Committee. 

Action on Texts

Committee Rapporteur SAADA DAHER HASSAN (Djibouti) introduced the reports of the First Committee.

The draft resolution entitled African Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone Treaty (document A/69/432 (L.60)) was adopted without a vote.  By so doing, the General Assembly called upon African States that had not yet done so to sign and ratify the Treaty.

Next, by a recorded vote of 174 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 1 abstention (Ukraine), the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on the Prohibition of the development and manufacture of new types of weapons of mass destruction and new systems of such weapons: report of the Conference on Disarmament (A/69/433 (L.7)).

By so doing, it reaffirmed that effective measures should be taken to prevent the emergence of new types of weapons of mass destruction and called upon all States, immediately following any recommendations of the Conference on Disarmament, to give favourable consideration to those recommendations.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft decision entitled Maintenance of international security — good-neighbourliness, stability and development in South-Eastern Europe (A/69/434 (L.62)), by which it decided to include the item in the provisional agenda of its seventy-first session.

The Assembly then took action on a resolution entitled Developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security (A/69/435 (L.26)), adopting it without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly called on States to consider existing and potential threats in the field of information security, and take into account the assessments and recommendations of the Group of Governmental Experts.

The Assembly then turned to the draft resolution on the Establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the region of the Middle East (A/69/436 (L.1)), adopting it without a vote.

By its terms, the Assembly urged all parties to consider taking practical and urgent steps towards implementing the proposal to establish a nuclear-weapon-free-zone in the Middle East and invited the countries concerned to adhere to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT).  It called on countries of the region that had not yet done so to agree to place all their nuclear activities under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards.

Next, the Assembly took action on the resolution, Conclusion of effective international arrangements to assure non-nuclear-weapon States against the use or threat of use of nuclear weapon (A/69/437 (L.27)), adopting it by a recorded vote of 125 in favour to none against, with 56 abstentions.

By that text, the Assembly recognized effective measures and arrangements to assure that non-nuclear-weapon States could protect themselves against the nuclear-weapon threat and contribute positively to preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.  It appealed to all States to work actively towards a common formula that could be included in a legally binding international instrument.

Next, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on the Prevention of an arms race in outer space (A/69/438 (L.3/Rev.1)) by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions (Israel, United States).

That draft called on all States, in particular those with major space capabilities, to contribute actively to the peaceful use of outer space, prevent an arms race there and refrain from actions contrary to that objective.  The text urged States conducting activities in outer space to keep the Conference on Disarmament informed of any progress on bilateral and multilateral negotiations.

By a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 4 against (Georgia, Israel, Ukraine, United States), with 46 abstentions, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution No first placement of weapons in outer space (A/69/438 (L.14)).

By its terms, the Assembly reaffirmed the importance of preventing an arms race in outer space and urged an early start of substantive work based on the updated draft treaty submitted by China and the Russian Federation.  The text stressed that, while such an agreement had not yet concluded, other measures could contribute to ensuring that weapons were not placed in outer space.

The Assembly adopted without a vote the draft decision on the Role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (A/69/439 (L.13)), by which it decided to include that item in the provisional agenda of its seventieth session.

The representative of Greece said his delegation supported the draft resolution, “L.25”, on The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation.

The Russian Federation’s representative said his delegation wanted to join in supporting, and, if the rule permitted, co-sponsoring that text.

The Assembly then adopted without a vote a draft resolution on Assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them (A/69/440 I (L.4)).

By the terms of that text, the Assembly encouraged countries of the Sahelo-Saharan subregion to facilitate the effective functioning of national commissions to combat the illicit proliferation of small arms and light weapons.  It also called on the international community to provide technical and financial support to help combat the illicit trade of those weapons.

The Assembly then adopted the resolution on the Implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on Their Destruction (A/69/440 II (L.5/Rev.1)), by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to none against, with 17 abstentions.

By its terms, the Assembly, reaffirming its determination to put an end to the suffering and casualties caused by anti-personnel mines, invited all States that had not signed the Mine-Ban Convention to accede to it without delay.  It urged the one remaining State that had signed but not ratified the Convention to do so without delay.

The Assembly then took action on the resolution on the Nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere and adjacent areas (A/69/440 III (L.10)), adopting it by a recorded vote of 173 in favour to 4 against (France, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States), with 3 abstentions (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Palau).

By its terms, the Assembly reaffirmed the importance of nuclear weapon-free zones in strengthening the nuclear non-proliferation regime and called on all States to work together to facilitate adherence to the protocols of those Treaties by all relevant States that had not yet done so.  In that regard, it welcomed the steps taken by the United States towards the ratification of the protocols to the Treaties of Pelindaba and of Rarotonga (South Pacific Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone) and the signing by the nuclear-weapon States of the Protocol to the Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia.  The Assembly called on nuclear-weapon States to withdraw any reservations or interpretive declarations contrary to those treaties.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on the Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia (A/69/440 IV (L.11)), by which it welcomed that Treaty’s entry into force on 21 March 2009.

The Assembly then turned to the draft resolution, Towards a nuclear weapon-free world: accelerating the implementation of nuclear disarmament commitments (A/69/440 V (L.12/Rev.1)), by which it would stress the fundamental role of NPT and urge the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to fulfil its commitments under the six-party talks.  It would also call upon the nuclear-weapon States to implement their nuclear disarmament commitments in a manner that enabled the States parties to regularly monitor progress.  It would urge States to pursue multilateral negotiations without delay.

The Assembly first acted on the text’s preambular paragraph 24, by which it would emphasize the importance of a successful 2015 Review Conference, retaining the provision by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 3 against (India, Israel, United States), with 3 abstentions (France, Pakistan, United Kingdom).

Operative paragraph 9, which would have the Assembly stress the fundamental role of NPT in achieving nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation and urge India, Israel and Pakistan to promptly accede to the Treaty as non-nuclear-weapon States and place all their nuclear facilities under IAEA safeguards, was retained by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 4 against (India, Israel, Pakistan, United States), with 3 abstentions (Bhutan, France, United Kingdom).

Operative paragraph 11, which would have the Assembly urge all States to work together to overcome obstacles within the international disarmament machinery and immediately implement the three specific recommendations from the 2010 Review Conference Action Plan addressed to the Conference on Disarmament, was retained by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Russian Federation, United States), with 4 abstentions (France, India, Pakistan, United Kingdom).

The Assembly then took action on the draft as a whole, adopting it by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 7 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, France, India, Israel, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States), with 5 abstentions (Bhutan, China, Federated States of Micronesia, Pakistan, Palau).

Acting without a vote, it adopted the draft resolution on Transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities (A/69/440 VI (L.15)).

By its terms, the Assembly encouraged Member States to continue to review and implement the proposed transparency and confidence-building measures contained in the report in a manner consistent with the national interests of Member States.

Also acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution on Measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction (A/69/440 VII (L.17)) by which it urged all Member States to take and strengthen national measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction.

The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution on Reducing nuclear danger (A/69/440 VIII (L.18)) by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 48 against, with 10 abstentions (Argentina, Armenia, Belarus, China, Georgia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia, Uzbekistan).

By its terms, the Assembly, bearing in mind that the use of nuclear weapons posed the most serious threat to mankind and convinced that the proliferation of nuclear weapons in all its aspects would seriously enhance the danger of nuclear war, requested the five nuclear-weapon States to take measures towards the implementation of a review of nuclear doctrines and steps to reduce the risks of the use of nuclear weapons.

The Assembly then turned to the draft resolution on Taking forward multilateral nuclear disarmament negotiations (A/69/440 IX (L.21)), adopting it by a recorded vote of 154 in favour to 5 against (France, Israel, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States), with 20 abstentions.

By its terms, the Assembly called on Member States, international organizations and civil society to continue to enrich discussions on how to take forward multilateral nuclear disarmament negations in the relevant United Nations bodies.

Next, the Assembly took up the draft resolution entitled, Decreasing the operational readiness of nuclear weapons systems (A/69/440 X (L.22)), by which it would express concern that, notwithstanding the end of the cold war, several thousand nuclear weapons remained on high alert.  The draft would call for practical steps to decrease the operational status of nuclear weapons systems, with a view to ensuring that all nuclear weapons were removed from high-alert status.

Before taking action on that text as a whole, the Assembly voted on preambular paragraph 8, which would have it welcome the adoption by consensus of the conclusions and recommendations for follow-up actions by the 2010 NPT Review Conference, including the commitments of the nuclear-weapon States to promptly engage and consider the interests of non-nuclear-weapon States in further reducing the operational status of nuclear weapons systems.

That provision was retained by a recorded vote of 161 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 14 abstentions.

The Assembly then adopted that draft as a whole by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 4 against (France, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States), with 11 abstentions.

Next, the Assembly took action on a resolution entitled Follow-up to the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice on the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons (A/69/440 XI (L.23)), by which it would underline the court’s unanimous conclusion that there existed an obligation to bring about nuclear disarmament under strict and effective international control.  It would call on all States to immediately commence multilateral negotiations on a nuclear weapons convention prohibiting the development, production, testing, deployment, stockpiling, transfer, threat or use of those weapons and providing for their elimination.

That text was adopted by a recorded vote of 134 in favour to 23 against, with 23 abstentions.

The Assembly next took up a resolution on The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (A/69/440 XII (L.25)), approving it by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 1 against (Iran), with 17 abstentions.

By that text, the Assembly expressed concern about the increasing regional and global security challenges posed by the proliferation of ballistic missiles, and called upon States that had not yet done so to subscribe to the Code of Conduct.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution on Regional disarmament (A/69/440 XIII (L.28)), by which it stressed that sustained effort within the Conference on Disarmament was needed to make progress on the entire range of disarmament issues, and called upon States to conclude agreements, wherever possible, for nuclear non-proliferation, disarmament and confidence-building measures at the regional and subregional levels.

The Assembly then took action on a draft resolution entitled, Confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context (A/69/440 XIV (L.29)), adopting it without vote.  By the text, the Assembly urged States to comply strictly with all bilateral, regional and international agreements, including arms control and disarmament agreements.

The Assembly next took action on a draft resolution on Conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels (A/69/440 XV (L.30)), by which it would decide to give urgent consideration to the issues involved in conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels.

Prior to action on that text as a whole, the Assembly retained operative paragraph 2 by a recorded vote of 148 in favour to 2 against (India, Ireland), with 32 abstentions.  That provision would request that the Conference on Disarmament consider the formulation of principles that could serve as a framework for regional agreements on conventional arms control.

That text as a whole was then adopted by a recorded vote of 181 in favour to 1 against (India), with 2 abstentions (Bhutan, Russian Federation).

Next, the Assembly took action on a resolution on Nuclear disarmament (A/69/440 XVI (L.31/Rev.1)), by which it would urge the nuclear-weapon States to immediately stop the qualitative improvement, development, production and stockpiling of nuclear warheads and their delivery systems.  It would also urge those States to de-alert and immediately deactivate their nuclear weapons as an interim measure, and to take other steps to further reduce the operational status of those weapons systems.

Prior to action on that text as a whole, the Assembly retained operative paragraph 16 by a recorded vote of 175 in favour to 1 against (Pakistan), with 3 abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom).  That provision would call for the immediate commencement of negotiations in the Conference on Disarmament on a non-discriminatory, multilateral and internationally and effectively verifiable treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices.  The text was then adopted as a whole by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 44 against, with 17 abstentions.

It next turned to a draft resolution on The Arms Trade Treaty (A/69/440 XVII (L.32/Rev.1)), by which it would welcome the ratifications of the Treaty.

Prior to action on that text as a whole, the Assembly retained operative paragraph 3, by which it would call upon States that had not yet done so to sign and ratify the Treaty, by a recorded vote of 153 in favour to 1 against (Iran), with 27 abstentions.  The text was then adopted as a whole by a recorded vote of 154 in favour to none against, with 29 abstentions.

It next adopted, without a vote, the resolution Preventing the acquisition by terrorists of radioactive sources (A/69/440 XVIII (L.34/Rev.1)).

Deeply concerned by the potential threat to human health and the environment that would result from the use of such devices by terrorists, the Assembly urged States to enhance their national protective measures in that regard and to follow the guidelines of the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources.

Also acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution entitled, The illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects (A/69/440 XIX (L.35)), by which it encouraged States to build national capacity for effective implementation of the Programme of Action, to make increasing use of their national reports for communicating assistance needs, and implement the International Tracing Instrument.

The Assembly then turned to the draft resolution on United action towards the total elimination of nuclear weapons (A/69/440 XX (L.36)), by which it would reaffirm the vital importance of the NPT and call on nuclear-weapon States to undertake further efforts to reduce and ultimately eliminate all types of nuclear weapons.  It would urge all States that had not yet done so to sign and ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), and would recognize the legitimate interests of non-nuclear-weapon States in receiving negative security assurances.  It would also urge the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea not to conduct any further nuclear tests, and stress the importance of the IAEA comprehensive safeguards agreements.

The Assembly first retained operative paragraph 3, on the vital importance of the universality of the NPT, calling on all States not party to it to accede as non-nuclear-weapon States, by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 3 against (Democratic people’s Republic of Korea, India, Israel), with 5 abstentions (Bhutan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Uganda, Zimbabwe).

Next, the Assembly retained operative paragraph 11 by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 2 against (China, Pakistan), with 5 abstentions (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, India, Israel, Russian Federation, Zimbabwe), thereby reiterating its call for the immediate start of negotiations in the Conference on Disarmament on a treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons.

Operative paragraph 17 was retained by a recorded vote of 159 in favour to none against, with 18 abstentions.  It would have the Assembly reaffirm its support for establishing a zone free of nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction in the Middle East.

Operative paragraph 20 was also retained, by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to none against, with 5 abstentions (Argentina, Brazil, India, Israel, Pakistan), which stressed the importance of the universalization of the IAEA safeguard agreements and their implementation.

The text as a whole was then adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 1 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), with 14 abstentions.

Next, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution on Measures to uphold the authority of the 1925 Geneva Protocol (A/69/440 XXI (L.38)), by a recorded vote of 181 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions (Israel, United States).

By its terms, the Assembly renewed its previous call to all States to strictly observe the principles and objectives of the Protocol for the Prohibition of the Use in War of Asphyxiating, Poisonous or Other Gases, and of Bacteriological Methods of Warfare.

Next, the Assembly adopted the resolution on Promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (A/69/440 XXII (L.39)) by a recorded vote of 131 in favour to 5 against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Palau, United Kingdom, United States), with 49 abstentions.  By its terms, the Assembly expressed concern about the continuous erosion of multilateralism in the field of arms regulation, and urged the participation of all interested States in such negotiations, and renew and fulfil their individual and collective commitments to multilateral cooperation.

The Assembly then adopted without a vote a draft resolution on Observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (A/69/440 XXIII (L.41)), by which it called upon States to adopt unilateral, bilateral, regional and multilateral measures to contribute to ensuring the application of scientific and technological progress.

The Assembly also adopted without a vote the draft resolution on the Relationship between disarmament and development (A/69/440 XXIV (L.42), by which it urged the international community to devote part of the resources made available by the implementation of disarmament and arms limitation agreements to economic and social development, with a view towards reducing the ever-widening gap between developed and developing countries.

Action was then taken on the draft resolution on the Effects of the use of armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium (A/69/440 XXV (L.43)), which it adopted by a recorded vote of 150 in favour to 4 against (France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 27 abstentions.

That draft would encourage Member States to provide assistance to countries affected by the use of arms and ammunitions containing depleted uranium, in particular, by identifying and managing contaminated sites and material.

The Assembly next adopted the draft resolution on the Follow-up to the 2013 high-level meeting of the General Assembly on nuclear disarmament (A/69/440 XXVI (L.44)), by a recorded vote of 139 in favour to 24 against, with 19 abstentions.

By its terms, the Assembly called for urgent compliance with the legal obligations and commitments undertaken on nuclear disarmament.  It endorsed a comprehensive convention on nuclear weapons and called for the urgent commencement of negotiations in the Conference on Disarmament for that purpose.

The draft resolution on Compliance with non-proliferation, arms limitation and disarmament agreements and commitments (A/69/440 XXVII (L.45)) was adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 1 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), with 10 abstentions (Belarus, Cuba, Ecuador, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Syria).

By so doing, the Assembly called on concerned States to encourage compliance by all States with their respective non-proliferation, arms limitation and disarmament agreements and hold those not in compliance accountable in a manner consistent with the Charter of the United Nations.

The Assembly then adopted without a vote the draft resolution on Consolidation of peace through practical disarmament measures (A/69/440 XXVIII (L.46)), by which it emphasized the importance of including in United Nations-mandated peacekeeping missions practical disarmament measures aimed at addressing the illicit trafficking of small arms and light weapons.  That text also encouraged Member States in a position to do so to financially contribute to the United Nations Trust Facility Supporting Cooperation on Arms Regulation.

The Assembly then turned to the draft resolution on Women, disarmament, non-proliferation and arms control (A/69/440 XXIX (L.47)), by which it would, among other things, urge Member States to support and strengthen the effective participation of women in disarmament-related organisations at the local, national, subregional and regional levels.

Prior to action on that text as a whole, the Assembly retained preambular paragraph 8 by a recorded vote of 154 in favour to none against, with 25 abstentions.

That text as a whole was then adopted by a recorded vote of 183 in favour to none against, with no abstentions.

The Assembly then took action on the draft resolution on Preventing and combating illicit brokering activities (A/69/440 XXX (L.48)), by which it would call upon Member States to establish appropriate national laws and/or measures to prevent and combat the illicit brokering of conventional arms and materials, equipment and technology that could contribute to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery, in a manner consistent with international law.

Prior to action on the resolution as a whole, the Assembly retained preambular paragraph 8 by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to none against, with 8 abstentions (Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, India, Iran, Nicaragua, Sri Lanka, Syria).  That provision would have the Assembly recognize the importance of Arms Trade Treaty States parties to take measures, pursuant to their national laws, to regulate brokering in their jurisdiction, in accordance with article 10 of the Treaty, which would enter into force on 24 December 2014.

The Assembly then adopted “L.48” as a whole by a recorded vote of 180 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Iran).

The Assembly then adopted without a vote a draft entitled Mongolia’s international security and nuclear weapon-free status (A/69/440 XXXI (L.49)), by which it welcomed the declaration of Mongolia’s nuclear weapon-free status as a concrete contribution to nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, and the enhancement of confidence and predictability in the region.

Also acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution entitled Information on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms (A/69/440 XXXII (L.50)), by which it encouraged States to adopt and apply such measures in the conventional weapons field.

The Assembly then adopted, also without a vote, a draft entitled Disarmament and non-proliferation education (A/69/440 XXXIII (L.53)), by which it reiterated the request to the Secretary-General to utilize electronic means to the fullest extent possible in the dissemination of disarmament information, and maintain the website on disarmament education.

Taking up the resolution on the Third Conference of States Parties and Signatories to Treaties that Establish Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones and Mongolia, 2015 (A/69/440 XXXIV (L.57)), the Assembly adopted it as a whole by a recorded vote of 176 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States).  By its terms, the Assembly would urge the State parties and signatories to treaties that have established nuclear weapon-free zones to develop activities of cooperation and coordination in order to promote their common objectives in the framework of the Third Conference.

The Assembly next took up a draft resolution entitled Implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction (A/69/440 XXXV (L.63)), by which it would urge all States parties to the Convention to meet in full and on time their obligations and to support the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in its implementation activities.

Prior to taking action on the draft as a whole, the Assembly retained preambular paragraph 4 by a recorded vote of 163 in favour to none against, with 12 abstentions.  That provision would have the Assembly note that the following actions remained to be taken: destruction of chemical weapons removed from the territory of Syria; destruction of the 12 remaining declared chemical weapons production facilities; and inspections of the remaining declared sites.

A further separate recorded vote was taken on preambular paragraph 5, which would urge the Technical Secretariat of the OPCW and the Syrian authorities to continue to cooperate through technical discussions on outstanding issues regarding Syria’s declaration.  That provision was retained by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to none against, with 12 abstentions.  The Assembly then adopted that text as a whole by a recorded vote of 181 in favour to none against, with 1 abstention (Saudi Arabia).

Next, the Assembly adopted a draft decision on the Treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices (Draft I (L.20)), by a recorded vote of 177 in favour to 1 against (Pakistan), with 5 abstentions (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Syria).

The Assembly adopted the draft decision on Missiles (Draft II (L.24)) without a vote.

It then turned to the draft decision entitled Open-ended Working Group on the Fourth Special Session of the General Assembly Devoted to Disarmament (Draft III (L.37)), adopting it by a recorded vote of 175 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States).

Egypt’s representative said his delegation had voted in favour of “L.63” despite some important language missing from the text.  On the chemical weapons resolution, he said Egypt strongly supported the Convention’s principles, as well as the creation of a nuclear weapon-free zone in the Middle East.  He regretted the lack of progress in establishing such a zone, with only one State blocking progress.

The representative of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea explained his delegation’s vote on “L.27”, saying that threats and blackmail had triggered a nuclear arms race.  The issue of nuclear disarmament had been put aside, but, at the same time, disarming States without considering their security concerns was not a notion supported by his delegation, which had voted against the text.

The Assembly then adopted without a vote the resolution on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific (A/69/441 I (L.9)), by which it appealed to Member States, in particular those within the Asia-Pacific region, as well as international governmental and non-governmental organizations, to make voluntary contributions to strengthen the Regional Centre’s programme of activities and the implementation thereof.

Next, the Assembly took up the resolution on Convention on the Prohibition of the Use of Nuclear Weapons activities (A/69/441 II (L.16)), by which the Assembly would reiterate its request to the Conference on Disarmament to commence negotiations in order to reach agreement on an international convention prohibiting the use or threat of nuclear weapons under any circumstances.  Further, it would request the Conference on Disarmament to report on the results of those negotiations.  It adopted that text by a recorded vote of 125 in favour to 50 against, with 7 abstentions (Armenia, Belarus, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia, Uzbekistan).

The Assembly next took up a draft resolution on United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament (A/69/441 III (L.40)), adopting it without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly recognized that changes had taken place in the world which created new opportunities and posed new challenges for the pursuit of disarmament.  It appealed to Member States to make voluntary contributions to the regional centres in their respective regions.

Next, the Assembly took action on a resolution entitled United Nations Disarmament Information Programme (A/69/441 IV (L.52)), adopting it without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly recommended that the Programme continue to inform, educate and generate public understanding of the importance of multilateral action in a factual, balanced and objective manner.  Those efforts should focus on the continued publication of the United Nations Disarmament Yearbook and other publications, updating the disarmament website, and other measures.

Next, the Assembly adopted, also without a vote, a draft resolution entitled United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (A/69/441 V (L.55/Rev.1)), which would invite all States of the region to continue to take part in the Centre’s activities and encourage it to further develop activities in all countries of the region.

Then, also without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft entitled Regional confidence-building measures:  activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa (A/69/441 VI (L.58)), which expressed concern over the negative impact of poaching and illegal wildlife trafficking on the ecosystem, human development and regional security, and called upon Member States to take action to counter that phenomenon.

The Assembly next adopted without a vote the draft resolution entitled United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa (A/69/441 VII (L.59)).  By that text, the Assembly would urge all States, the African Union States in particular, international governmental and non-governmental organizations to make voluntary contributions to the Centre.

The Assembly then adopted the draft on United Nations disarmament fellowship, training and advisory services (A/69/441 VIII (L.61)) without a vote. By its terms, the Assembly expressed its appreciation to the IAEA; the OPCW; the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO); the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe; the Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Use Goods and Technologies; the Asser Institute; and the Monterey Institute of International Studies for organizing specific study programmes in the field of disarmament.

The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution on the Report of the Conference on Disarmament (A/69/442 I (L.8)), without a vote.  By so doing, it reaffirmed the role of the Conference as the sole multilateral disarmament negotiating forum of the international community and called upon it to intensify consultations and explore possibilities for overcoming its ongoing deadlock.

Also acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution entitled Report of the Disarmament Commission (A/69/442 II (L.51)), by which it emphasized the need for a focused and results-oriented discussion on the agenda, and intensified consultations, with a view to reaching an agreement.

It next considered the draft resolution on the risk of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East (A/69/443 (L.2/Rev.1)), by which the Assembly, recalling that Israel remained the only State in the Middle East that had not yet become party to NPT, would call on it to accede to that Treaty without further delay, and not develop, produce, test or acquire nuclear weapons, to renounce their possession and place all unsafeguarded nuclear facilities under full IAEA control.

Before taking action on that draft as a whole, the Assembly took a recorded vote on preambular paragraph 5, by which it would recall the decision on principles and objectives for nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament adopted by the 1995 NPT Review and Extension Conference, which, among other things, called on all States not yet party to the Treaty to accede to it at the earliest date, particularly those States that operated unsafeguarded nuclear facilities.

That paragraph was retained today by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 2 against (India, Israel), with 5 abstentions (Belgium, Bhutan, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Hungary, Pakistan).

The Assembly next took a recorded vote on preambular paragraph 6, by which it would recognize that, in the Final Document of the 2000 NPT Review, the Conference had undertaken to make determined efforts towards the achievement of the goal of universality of the Treaty and called on States that had not done so to accede to it and accept IAEA safeguards. That provision was retained by a recorded vote of 174 in favour to 2 against (India, Israel), with 5 abstentions (Belgium, Bhutan, Hungary, Mauritius, Pakistan).

That text was then adopted as a whole by a recorded vote of 161 in favour to 5 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Palau, United States), with 18 abstentions.

On a point of order, the representative of Saudi Arabia said his delegation had meant to vote in favour of “L.63”, rather than abstain.

The Assembly next proceeded to take action on a draft resolution sponsored by France on Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed To Be Excessively Injurious or To Have Indiscriminate Effects (A/69/444 (L.33)), adopting it without a vote.

By that text, the Assembly called upon all States to become parties to the Convention and emphasize the importance of the universalization of the Protocol on Explosive Remnants of War.  It would also welcome the commitment by States parties to continue contributing to the further development of international humanitarian law, regarding the development and use of new weapons.

Also acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a resolution entitled Strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region (A/69/445 (L.54)), by which it recognized that eliminating economic and social disparities, as well as respect and greater understanding among cultures in the area, would contribute to enhancing peace, security and cooperation among the region’s States.

Then the Assembly took up the draft resolution entitled Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (A/69/446 (L.56)), which urged all States not to carry out nuclear-weapon test explosions or any other nuclear explosions.

Prior to action on that text as a whole, the Assembly voted to retain preambular paragraph 6 by 177 in favour to none against, with 5 abstentions (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, India, Israel, Mauritius, Pakistan).  That provision urged all States that had not yet signed the CTBT to do so and to ratify it as soon as possible.

The resolution was then adopted as a whole by a recorded vote of 179 in favour to 1 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), with 3 abstentions (India, Mauritius, Syria).

The Assembly then adopted without a vote the draft resolution, introduced by Hungary, on the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction (A/69/447 (L.6)).

By the terms of that text, the Assembly encouraged States parties to provide, at least biannually, appropriate information on their implementation of article X of the Convention and offer assistance or training in support of the measures of States parties needed to ensure their compliance with the Convention.

Next, the Assembly adopted the draft decision on Revitalizing the work of the Conference on Disarmament and taking forward multilateral disarmament negotiations (A/69/448 (L.19)), also without a vote, thus deciding to include that item in the provisional agenda of its seventieth session.

Also without a vote, the Assembly a draft decision, as orally revised, entitled Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (A/69/449).

Before concluding the meeting, the Assembly took note of the report of the First Committee entitled Programme planning (A/69/450).

For information media. Not an official record.