ASSEMBLY BACKS EFFORT TOWARDS GLOBAL LAW AGAINST REPRODUCTIVE CLONING OF HUMAN BEINGS, STUDY GROUP TO BE ESTABLISHED

12 December 2001
GA/9998

ASSEMBLY BACKS EFFORT TOWARDS GLOBAL LAW AGAINST REPRODUCTIVE CLONING OF HUMAN BEINGS, STUDY GROUP TO BE ESTABLISHED

12/12/2001
Press ReleaseGA/9998

Fifty-sixth General Assembly

Plenary

85th Meeting (AM)

ASSEMBLY BACKS EFFORT TOWARDS GLOBAL LAW AGAINST REPRODUCTIVE

CLONING OF HUMAN BEINGS, STUDY GROUP TO BE ESTABLISHED

Other Actions Also Taken on Legal Committee Recommendations;

Work To Continue on Comprehensive Convention against Terrorism

The General Assembly this morning decided to establish an ad hoc committee to study the elaboration of an international convention against the reproductive cloning of human beings, by one of 21 decisions and resolutions adopted without a vote on the recommendations of its Sixth Committee (Legal).

By another resolution, the Assembly decided that its own Ad Hoc Committee on terrorism should continue work towards a comprehensive convention on the subject at a session to be held from 28 January to 1 February 2002.  The Ad Hoc Committee would also continue its work on a draft convention for the suppression of acts of nuclear terrorism.

By the text on the resolution relating to human cloning, the Assembly decided that formal negotiations on an international convention, proposed by France and Germany, would begin once agreement was reached on a negotiating mandate.  To that end, the ad hoc committee would meet from 25 February to 1 March, and again from 23 to 27 September, 2002.  (During a debate on the proposal in the Sixth Committee, Germany's representative had said the threat posed to human dignity by reproductive cloning was a sufficient reason in itself for the international community to strive for a legally binding instrument against it.)

On the issue of terrorism, the Sixth Committee's rapporteur, the representative of Saudi Arabia, told the Assembly the "most important achievement" of the Committee during the current session was its approval, without a vote, of a draft resolution on measures to eliminate international terrorism.  The unanimous approach indicated the international community's determination to suppress that dangerous phenomenon, "a position supported by all divine faiths", he said.

By adopting the Sixth Committee's recommendations, the General Assembly strongly condemned all acts, methods and practices of terrorism as criminal and unjustifiable, wherever and by whomsoever committed.  Reaffirming its strong condemnation of the heinous acts of terrorism against the United States on

11 September, the Assembly reiterated its call upon States not to finance, encourage, or provide training for terrorist activities.

Also this morning, the Assembly adopted and opened for signature or accession the United Nations Convention on the Assignment of Receivables in International Trade and called upon all Governments to become party to it.  The text, finalized by the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL), was annexed to one of three draft resolutions related to the report of the Commission on its session this year.  The main objective of the Convention on the Assignment of Receivables in International Trade is to increase the availability of lower-cost credit to manufacturers, retailers, wholesalers and consumers of goods and services.

It expressed appreciation to the UNCITRAL for completing and adopting the Model Law on Electronic Signatures contained in a resolution approved by it.  The Assembly recommended that all States favourably consider the Model Law, together with the Model Law on Electronic Commerce adopted by the Commission in 1996 when they enact or revise their laws relating to alternatives to paper-based forms of communication, storage or authentication of information.

The new UNCITRAL Model Law builds on the general principles expressed in the 1996 Model Law on Electronic Commerce.  The Assembly also adopted a draft decision deferring action on the enlargement of the 34-member Commission until its fifty-seventh session next year.

In another action, the Assembly took note of a significant achievement of the International Law Commission -- its completion this year, after more than four decades, of work on draft articles on State responsibility for internationally wrongful acts.  The 59 draft articles developed a clear system for regulating the obligations of States in their interactions with other States.  The Assembly commended the articles to the attention of Governments.  It also expressed appreciation for the Commission’s valuable work on the prevention aspects of international liability for transboundary harm from hazardous activities.

In a further action, the Assembly adopted a resolution welcoming the important work accomplished by the Preparatory Commission for the International Criminal Court and authorized it to meet from 8 to 19 April and 1 to 12 July 2002.  The Commission has completed six out of the eight tasks assigned to it, covering practical arrangements for the establishment and operation of the Court.  With 47 States so far ratifying the Court’s Statute, it is likely that the 60 required for it to enter into force could be achieved next year.  Consequently, the General Assembly asked the Secretary-General to make arrangements for the convening of a meeting of States Parties to be held at United Nations Headquarters upon entry into force of the Statute.

An ad hoc body is to be established to consider the Secretary-General’s recommendations on measures to strengthen and enhance the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel, by the terms of another Sixth Committee recommendation adopted by the General Assembly.  The ad hoc committee will meet from 1 to 5 April 2002, and again from 7 to 11 October within the framework of a working group of the Sixth Committee.  The General Assembly called upon all States to become parties to the Convention.

                                    (page 1b follows)

By a text on the Convention on jurisdictional immunities of States and their property adopted by the Assembly this morning, the Ad Hoc Committee on the topic would meet from 4 to 15 February 2002 and report later in the year to the General Assembly at its fifty-seventh session.

The Assembly adopted two draft resolutions on the work of its Special Committee on the Charter, one of which asked it to give priority to the implementation of the provisions of the United Nations dealing with assistance to third States affected by the imposition of United Nations sanctions.  By the other text, the Assembly again renewed its invitation to the Security Council to establish mechanisms for consulting with those States on solutions to their problems.

The Assembly approved guidelines and recommendations on the administration of the United Nations Programme of Assistance in the Teaching, Study, Dissemination and Wider Appreciation of International Law, including provisions for the award of international law fellowships and travel grants for the year 2002 and 2003.

In other actions this morning, the Assembly asked the United States, as the host country, to continue to take all measures necessary to prevent any interference with the functioning of diplomatic missions.

The Assembly granted requests from the following organizations to participate in its sessions and work as observers:  the International Development Law Institute; the International Hydrographic Organization; and the 16-member Community of Sahelo-Saharan States.  It deferred action until next year on similar requests by the Inter-Parliamentary Union, the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance, and Partners in Population and Development.

Explaining his position on the establishment of the International Criminal Court, the representative of the United States said his country's objections to it were well-known. Those included the Court's jurisdiction over nationals of non-parties, inclusion of the crime of aggression in the Court's Statute, and possibly politically motivated prosecutions.

The observer of the International Hydrographic Organization said the inter-governmental and technical body was open to everyone.  Its work, which was aimed at achieving adequate global hydrographic data coverage, contributed significantly to making navigation safe and protecting the marine environment.

The Assembly meets again at 10 a.m. tomorrow, Thursday, 13 December, to take up the report of the Economic and Social Council.

Background

The General Assembly met this morning to consider the reports of its Sixth Committee (Legal) containing recommendations on a number of issues such as draft articles on State Responsibility, scope of legal protection of United Nations and Associated Personnel, the establishment of an international criminal court and an international convention against the reproductive cloning of human beings.

Sixth Committee reports

By a draft resolution on United Nations Programme of Assistance in the Teaching, Study, Dissemination and Wider Appreciation of International Law (document A/56/586), the General Assembly would, inter alia, approve the guidelines and recommendations contained in a report of the Secretary-General.  The report includes provisions for the award of international law fellowships and travel grants for the year 2002 and 2003.  The Assembly would ask the Secretary-General to consider the possibility of admitting candidates from countries willing to bear the entire cost of participation in the programme.  The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 13 November.

By a draft text on the Convention on jurisdictional immunities of States and their property (document A/56/587 and Corr.1), the General Assembly would decide that its Ad Hoc Committee on the topic established by resolution 55/150 of 12 December 2000 shall meet from 4 to 15 February 2002.  The Secretary-General would be asked to make available to the Committee relevant comments and reports on the Convention submitted respectively by States and by open-ended working groups of the Sixth Committee.  The Ad Hoc Committee would be asked to report at the Assembly’s fifty-seventh session next year.  The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 1 November.

The Sixth Committee’s report on the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (document A/56/588 and Corr.1) contains three draft resolutions and a draft decision.

Draft resolution I

Under the terms of draft resolution I -- Report of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) on the work of its thirty-fourth session -- the General Assembly would note with satisfaction the adoption by the Commission of its draft Convention on the Assignment of Receivables in International Trade, and of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law Model Law on Electronic Signatures.  It would call upon the Secretariat to ensure wide dissemination of the Legislative Guide on Privately Financed Infrastructure Projects.

The General Assembly would also request the Secretary-General to adjust the terms of reference of the UNCITRAL Trust Fund for Symposia to make it possible for the resources in the Trust Fund to be also used for the financing of training and technical assistance activities undertaken by the Secretariat.  It would reaffirm the Commission’s mandate to coordinate legal activities in the field of international trade law and to stress the importance of bringing into effect the conventions emanating from the Commission's work.

The Sixth Committee adopted the draft resolution without a vote on 19 November.

Draft resolution II

Under the terms of the second draft resolution (II) -- Model Law on Electronic Signatures of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law -- the General Assembly would express its appreciation to the Commission for completing and adopting the text and for preparing the Guide to Enactment of the Model Law.  It would, inter alia, recommend that all States consider favourably the Model Law, together with the UNCITRAL Model Law on Electronic Commerce, when they enact or revise their laws relating to alternatives to paper-based forms of communication, storage or authentication of information.

The UNCITRAL Model Law on Electronic Signatures builds on the general principles expressed in the UNCITRAL Law on Electronic Commerce adopted in 1996, and provides more detailed rules to determine the legal effectiveness of electronic signatures.  It also provides certainty that using electronic signature techniques produces the same legal effect as a hand-written signature.  In addition, the Model Law establishes basic rules of conduct for the various parties involved in an electronic signature process, that is, the signatory, the relying party, and the certification services provider that may intervene in the process.      

The Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on

19 November.

Draft resolution III

By the operative paragraphs of draft resolution III, United Nations Convention on the Assignment of Receivables in International Trade, the General Assembly would, after expressing appreciation to UNCITRAL for preparing the instrument, adopt and open it for signature or accession.  It would call upon all Governments to consider becoming party to it.  The Convention is annexed to the draft resolution.  The Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 19 November.

The main objective of the Convention on the Assignment of Receivables in international trade is to increase the availability of lower-cost credit to manufacturers, retailers, wholesalers and consumers of goods and services.  According to the UNCITRAL Secretariat, the Convention achieves that by reducing the risks associated with a wide range of financing transactions, such as factoring, forfeiting, asset-based lending, refinancing and project financing, and by setting aside legal obstacles to such transactions prevailing in national laws.

Draft decision

By the draft decision on the Enlargement of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law, the General Assembly would defer consideration of and a decision on the subject to its fifty-seventh session in 2002.  The Committee approved the draft decision without a vote on 21 November.

The Sixth Committee's report on the International Law Commission on the work of its fifty-third session (document A/56/589 and Corr.1) contains two draft resolutions.

Draft resolution I

Under draft resolution I -- Report of the International Law Commission on the work of its fifty-third session -- the General Assembly would express appreciation for the work accomplished at that session, particularly the completion of the final draft articles on "Responsibility of States for internationally wrongful acts".  It would also express appreciation for the valuable work done on the question of prevention on the topic of "International liability for injurious consequences arising out of acts not prohibited by international law (prevention of transboundary harm from hazardous activities)".

The Assembly would ask the Commission to resume (at the Commission’s fifty-fourth session) its consideration of the liability aspects of the topic, taking into account the interrelationship between prevention and liability, as well as developments in international law on the topic and comments by Governments.  The Commission would also be asked to begin work on “Responsibility of international organizations” and to consider the remaining topics to be included in its long-term work programme. 

By other provisions of the text, the Assembly would reiterate its invitation to governments to respond to the questionnaire and requests for materials on "Unilateral acts of States", circulated by the Secretariat, and to submit the most relevant national legislation, decisions of domestic courts and State practice relevant to "Diplomatic protection".  It would furthermore decide that the next session of the Commission shall be held in Geneva from 29 April to 7 June and from 22 July to 16 August 2002.  The Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 19 November.

Draft resolution II

By the provisions of draft resolution II on Responsibility of States for internationally wrongful acts, the General Assembly would welcome the Commission's completion of work on the topic and its adoption of draft articles and a detailed commentary on it.  The Assembly would take note of the articles on the Responsibility of States for internationally wrongful acts and commend them to the attention of Governments without prejudice to the question of their future adoption or other appropriate action.  The 59 articles are annexed to the draft resolution.  The Assembly would decide to include in the provisional agenda of its fifty-seventh session an item on the subject.  The Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 19 November.

A draft resolution on the Report of the Committee on Relations with the Host Country (document A/56/590 and Corr.1) would have the General Assembly endorse the Committee's recommendations and conclusions contained in paragraph 37 of its report (document A/56/26).  The Assembly would express the view that the maintenance of appropriate conditions for the normal work of the delegations and the missions accredited to the United Nations and the observance of their privileges and immunities was in the interest of the United Nations and all Member States.

The Assembly would request the host country (the United States) to continue to take all measures necessary to prevent any interference with the functioning of missions.  The host country would also be asked to continue to take steps to resolve parking problems of missions in a fair, balanced and non-discriminatory way and to respond to the growing needs of the diplomatic community.  The Assembly would express its appreciation for the efforts made by the host country, and hope that the issues raised at meetings of the Committee on Relations with the Host Country would continue to be resolved in a spirit of cooperation and in accordance with international law.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 13 November.

A draft text on the Establishment of the International Criminal Court (document A/56/591) would have the General Assembly call upon all States to ratify or accede to the Court’s Statute and would welcome the important work accomplished by the Preparatory Commission for the Court on completing many parts of its mandate.

The Secretary-General would be asked to reconvene the Preparatory Commission from 8 to 19 April and from 1 to 12 July 2002 to continue its work.  The Secretary-General would also be asked to undertake the preparations necessary to convene the meeting of the Assembly of States Parties to the Court’s Statute to be held at United Nations Headquarters upon the entry into force of the Statute which would require ratification by 60 States.  (So far, 47 States have done so).  The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 19 November.

The report of the Sixth Committee on the work of the Special Committee on the Charter and on the Strengthening of the Role of the Organization (document A/56/A/56/592) contains two draft resolutions.

Draft resolution I

By draft resolution I, entitled Report of the Special Committee on the Charter of the United Nations and on Strengthening the role of the Organization, the General Assembly would decide that the Special Committee hold its next session from 18 to 28 March 2002, to continue its consideration of all proposals on the question of the maintenance of international peace and security in all its aspects to strengthen the role of the United Nations.

The Special Committee would also be asked to continue to consider, on a priority basis, implementation of provisions of the United Nations Charter on assistance to third States affected by the application of sanctions, under Chapter VII of the Charter.  It would be expected to do so by, among other things, commencing substantive debate on all of the related reports of the Secretary-General.

The Assembly would also ask the Special Committee to continue its work on the peaceful settlement of disputes between States, as well as proposals concerning the Trusteeship Council.  Furthermore, it would be asked to consider, on a priority basis, ways and means of improving its working methods and enhancing its efficiency.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 8 November.

Draft resolution II

By draft resolution II on Implementation of the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations related to assistance to third States affected by the application of sanctions, the General Assembly would, inter alia, renew its invitation to the Security Council to consider establishing further mechanisms or procedures for consulting with those States as early as possible on solutions to their problems as provided for under article 50 of the Charter.

It would welcome measures taken by the Security Council to improve the effectiveness of United Nations sanctions.  The Assembly would recommend that the Council continue its efforts to further enhance the effectiveness and transparency of its sanctions committees, streamlining their working procedures and facilitating access to them.

The Assembly would also invite the Security Council, its sanctions committees and the Secretariat to ensure, among other things, the mitigation of unintended impact of sanctions.  The Assembly would request the Secretary-General to ensure that the Secretariat develop the capacity, modalities, technical procedures and guidelines to coordinate information about international assistance to those third States.  In addition, the Secretariat would continue to develop a possible methodology for assessing adverse consequences of sanctions on such States.

The Assembly would welcome the report of the Secretary-General containing a summary of the deliberations and main findings of the ad hoc expert group on the question which met in 1998, and would ask the Secretary-General to expedite the preparation of a report to the Assembly containing his views on the meeting.  Furthermore, it would decide to consider, within the Sixth Committee, or a working group of the Committee, at its fifty-seventh session, further progress in the elaboration of effective measures to implement the Charter provisions on assistance to third States affected by sanctions.  

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 9 November.

By a draft resolution on Measures to eliminate international terrorism (document A/56/593), the General Assembly would, among other things, strongly condemn all acts, methods and practices of terrorism as criminal and unjustifiable, wherever and by whomsoever committed.  It would urge States that had not yet done so to consider, as a matter of priority, becoming parties to relevant conventions and protocols on terrorism.  The Assembly’s Ad Hoc Committee on terrorism (established by resolution 51/210 of 17 December 1996) would meet from 28 January to 1 February 2002 to continue its work on a draft comprehensive convention on international terrorism.

The Ad Hoc Committee would also consider the remaining issues involved in the draft international convention for the suppression of acts of nuclear terrorism.  Work on those draft instruments would, if necessary, be continued within the framework of a working group of the Sixth Committee during the fifty-seventh session of the General Assembly in 2002.

Reaffirming its strong condemnation of the heinous acts of terrorism on 11 September that caused enormous loss of human life, destruction and damage to New York, the host city of the United Nations, and Washington, D.C. and in Pennsylvania, the General Assembly would reiterate its call upon States not to finance, encourage, or provide training for, or otherwise support, terrorist activities.

The Assembly would also reiterate its call upon all States to adopt further measures to prevent terrorism and to strengthen international cooperation in combating it and, to that end, to consider in particular the implementation of the measures set out in paragraphs 3 (a) to (f) of resolution 51/210.  (Those deal with consultations by relevant security officials; acceleration of research and development on detection of explosives and other harmful substances; and steps to counter the financing of terrorists and terrorist organizations).

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 21 November.

By a draft resolution on the Scope of legal protection under the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel contained in document A/56/594 and Corr.1, the General Assembly would establish an ad hoc committee to consider recommendations of the Secretary-General (document A/56/637) on measures to strengthen and enhance the protective legal regime for such personnel.  The ad hoc committee would meet from 1 to 5 April 2002, with its work continuing from 7 to 11 October within the framework of the working group of the Sixth Committee during the Assembly's fifty-seventh session.

The Assembly would express its deep concern about the increasing dangers and security risks faced by United Nations and associated personnel, in particular locally recruited personnel, at the field level, and would call upon all States to consider the fullest possible protection for their security.  States would also be asked to become parties to the Convention and to respect fully their obligations under relevant international instruments.  By other provisions, the Assembly would recommend that the Secretary-General continue to seek the inclusion of relevant provisions of the Convention in the status-of-forces or status-of-mission agreements concluded by the United Nations.  The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 19 November.

By the terms of a draft decision on Observer status for the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance in the General Assembly (document A/56/595 and Corr.1), the Assembly would, on the recommendation of the Sixth Committee, decide to defer further consideration of and a decision on the Institute's request for observer status to its fifty-seventh session next year.  The Committee approved the draft decision without a vote on 29 October. 

By a draft resolution on Observer status for the International Development Law Institute in the General Assembly (document A/56/596), the Assembly would decide to invite the organization to participate in its sessions and work as an observer.  The Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 13 November.

By a draft resolution on Observer status for the International Hydrographic Organization in the General Assembly (document A/56/597 and Corr.1) the Assembly would decide to invite the Monaco-based organization to participate in its sessions and work as an observer.  The Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 12 October.

By draft resolution on the Community of Sahelo-Saharan Statesin the General Assembly) (document A/56/598 and Corr.1), the Assembly would decide to invite the intergovernmental organization to participate in its sessions and work as an observer.  The Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 26 October.

By a draft resolution on International convention against the reproductive cloning of human beings (document A/56/599) (A/C.6/56/L.19), the General Assembly would establish an ad hoc committee, open to all Member States, to consider the elaboration of the instrument.  It would invite interested specialized agencies of the United Nations system to participate as observers.  The ad hoc committee would meet twice in 2002 to consider the elaboration of a mandate for the negotiation of the international convention -- from 25 February to 1 March and from 23 to 27 September -- within the framework of a working group of the Sixth Committee during the fifty-seventh session of the General Assembly.

Upon the adoption of the mandate, the General Assembly would recommend the reconvening of the ad hoc committee for negotiations on the international convention to begin.  The issue would be on the provisional agenda of the Assembly's fifty-seventh session.

The Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote on 19 November.

By a draft decision on Observer status for Partners in Population and Development (document A/56/600), the General Assembly would decide to defer consideration of and a decision on, the organization’s request for observer status to its fifty-seventh session.

By a draft decision on Observer status for the Inter-Parliamentary Union in the General Assembly (document A/56/646), the Assembly would decide to defer consideration of and a decision on the request for observer status for the organization to its fifty-seventh session in 2002.

Statements

Action on Sixth Committee recommendations

MAHMOUD MOHMED AL-NAMAN (Saudi Arabia), rapporteur of the Sixth Committee, introduced the Committee's reports.

In summary, he said the Committee’s most important achievement during the current session had been the approval, without a vote, of the draft resolution on measures to eliminate international terrorism.  The unanimous approach indicated the international community’s determination to suppress that dangerous phenomenon in all its forms and shapes, a position supported by all divine faiths.  The Committee’s common approach endorsed the Assembly’s declaration on the subject.

Adoption of the draft Convention on receivables in international trade and electronic signatures was another achievement.

He said that as a member of the delegation of Saudi Arabia representing the Asian Group, it had been a privilege to be chosen for the Committee’s Bureau.  The confidence shown by that action, as well as the cooperation of Committee members, had been encouraging.  His country’s contribution to the Assembly’s Committees reflected its sincere desire to share positions and views with the world community, in building a mechanism to realize the aims of the Charter.

The Assembly then proceeded to adopt, without a vote, the following texts:

-- a draft resolution on United Nations Programme of Assistance in the Teaching, Study, Dissemination and Wider Appreciation of International Law contained in document A/56/586, and

-- a draft text on the Convention on jurisdictional immunities of States and their property contained in document A/56/587 and Corr.1.

The Assembly then took up the report on the work of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (document A/56/588 and Corr.1) which contains three draft resolutions and a draft decision.  It adopted all the texts without a vote.  Draft resolution I dealt with the Commission's report; Draft resolution II covered the Model Law on Electronic Signatures of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law; and Draft resolution III was on the United Nations Convention on the Assignment of Receivables in International Trade.

The Assembly, by the draft decision, deferred action on the enlargement of the 34-member United Nations Commission on International Trade Law until its next session in 2002.

The Assembly next considered the Sixth Committee's report on the work of the International Law Commission (A/56/589 and Corr.1) which contains two draft resolutions.  It adopted Draft resolution I on the Commission's report on the work of its fifty-third session, without a vote.  It similarly adopted Draft resolution II on Responsibility of States for internationally wrongful acts.

The Assembly went on to adopt a draft resolution on the report of the Committee on Relations with the Host Country contained in document A/56/590 and Corr.1.

Establishment of International Criminal Court

WILLIAM HYBL (United States), speaking before action on the draft resolution on the Establishment of the International Criminal Court contained in document A/56/591, said his country would not participate in it.  He said the United States had well-known objections about the Court, including the Court’s purported ability to exercise jurisdiction over nationals of non-parties; the inclusion of the crime of aggression within the Statute of the Court; and the possibility of politically motivated prosecutions.  The United States believed, therefore, that it would be inappropriate to join consensus on the resolution.

The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution on the Establishment of the International Criminal Court, without a vote.

The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, two draft resolutions on the work of its Special Committee on the Charter of the United Nations and on the Strengthening of the Role of the Organization (document A/56/A/56/592).  Draft resolution I was on the Special Committee's report, while draft resolution II dealt with the implementation of the provisions of the United Nations Charter related to assistance to third States affected by the application of sanctions.

The Assembly next adopted the following texts without a vote:

-- a draft resolution on measures to eliminate international terrorism contained in document A/56/593);

-- a draft resolution on the scope of legal protection under the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel contained in document A/56/594 and Corr.1;

-- a draft decision deferring, on the recommendation of the Sixth Committee, action on a request for observer status by the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance in the General Assembly contained in document A/56/595 and Corr.1;

 -- a draft resolution granting observer status for the International Development Law Institute in the General Assembly contained in document A/56/596;

-- a draft resolution also granting observer status for the International Hydrographic Organization in the General Assembly contained in document A/56/597 and Corr.1;

Capt. DAVID MACFARLAND, Observer of the International Hydrographic Organization, speaking after the action, said the organization was grateful to the Assembly for endorsing the recommendation of the Sixth Committee.  He said his organization was an intergovernmental, consultative and technical body governed by a convention which was registered at the United Nations on 22 September 1970.  It had 70 member States.  Its objectives included coordinating the activities of national hydrographic offices and encouraging the greatest possible uniformity in nautical charts.  All the main maritime States were members.

He said the body was fully committed to implementing United Nations resolutions related to the Law of the Sea Convention.  Its work, which was aimed at achieving adequate global hydrographic data coverage, contributed significantly to the safety of navigation and to the protection of the marine environment. Membership of the organization was opened to all countries; it cooperated with the United Nations and its specialized agencies and actively participated in their meetings.

The Assembly next adopted the following texts:

--a draft resolution granting observer status for the Community of Sahelo-Saharan States in the General Assembly contained in document A/56/598 and Corr.1;

--a draft resolution on International convention against the reproductive cloning of human beings contained in document A/56/599;

--a draft decision deferring action on a request for observer status for Partners in Population and Development in the General Assembly contained in document A/56/600.

--a draft decision deferring action on a request for observer status for the Inter–Parliamentary Union in the General Assembly contained in document A/56/646.

     Regarding the last draft decision, the Acting President of the Assembly, Murari Raj Sharma (Nepal), explained, in clarifications, that the agenda item should read “Cooperation between the United Nations and Regional and Other Organizations”.

The meeting was adjourned.

* *** *

For information media. Not an official record.