Kofi Annan

22 September 2003, New York

Secretary-General's remarks at Conference on "Fighting Terrorism for Humanity: A Conference on the Roots of Evil"

Mr. Prime Minister, Mr. President, Professor Wiesel, Excellencies and friends:

Let me congratulate you, Mr. Prime Minister, and you, Elie, for organizing this unique conference on a subject of fundamental importance. Terrorism has threatened Member States of the United Nations for many years, and the Organization remains active against it on many fronts. Recently, the United Nations itself has been the target of a vicious and heartless terrorist attack, in which many irreplaceable colleagues and friends were killed. I am deeply saddened by their loss. They were some of our best.

22 September 2003, New York

Press Encounter by the Secretary-General on arrival at UN Headquarters

SG: Good morning ladies and gentlemen.

Q: Sir, can you comment on the Baghdad bombing, yet another bombing in Baghdad for the UN?

SG: Obviously I am shocked and distressed by this latest attack on our premises in Baghdad. I send my sympathy and condolences to the family of the dead police and also our staff who were injured. And of course the rest have been sent home. We are assessing the situation to determine what happened, who did it, and taking further measures to protect our installations.

20 September 2003, New York

Statement on Iraq Attributable to the Spokesman for the Secretary-General

The Secretary-General strongly condemns today's assassination attempt on Dr. Akila al-Hashimi, a member of the Iraqi Governing Council. The Secretary-General reiterates that the early establishment of a broad-based and representative government in Iraq, to which sovereignty can be transferred, requires an inclusive political process. Violence such as the murderous attack on Dr. al-Hashimi only retards that process and that goal.

The Secretary-General remains greatly concerned about the security situation in Iraq.

19 September 2003, New York

Secretary-General Honours Colleagues Killed in the Bombing of the United Nations Mission in Baghdad

Let me start by thanking the families and friends who made the journey to be with us today, and by sending my prayers to those who could not be here. Spouses, mothers, fathers, children, siblings and others who have lost their loved ones -- our hearts go out to all of you.

I probably speak for most of us in saying that the past month has been among the longest and blackest in our lifetimes.

19 September 2003, New York

Secretary-General's remarks on introducing Gilberto Gil at a concert to mark the International Day of Peace and to honour colleagues kiled in the bombing of the UN Mission in Baghdad

Dear friends,

Good evening and thank you very much for coming. This has been a deeply emotional day for the United Nations family.

We have gathered to grieve and pay tribute to beloved friends and colleagues whom we lost in Baghdad one month ago. That we have also come together to celebrate the International Day of Peace lends special significance to this tribute. If there is one thing that unites all of us here, and evokes the spirit of our fallen colleagues, it is our commitment to peace and human dignity.

19 September 2003, New York

Secretary-General's remarks to the Memorial Ceremony in honour of colleagues killed in the bombing of the UN Mission in Baghdad

Dear friends,

Let me start by thanking the families and friends who made the journey to be with us today, and by sending my prayers to those who could not be here. Spouses, mothers, fathers, children, siblings and others who have lost their loved ones -- our hearts go out to all of you.

I probably speak for most of us in saying that the past month has been among the longest and blackest in our lifetimes.

19 September 2003, Stockholm, Sweden

Secretary-General's message at the Memorial Ceremony for Ms. Anna Lindh [delivered by Mr. Hans Corell, Under-Secretary-General for Legal Affairs]

You have gathered today to honour one of Sweden's greatest and most beloved daughters. For the United Nations, Anna Lindh was in many ways also a family member. The senseless and incomprehensible act that took her life a week ago was met with an outpouring of grief and disbelief in the whole international community. Today, the entire UN family stands with you -- with Anna's husband, children, friends and loved ones, and with all the people and Government of Sweden.

19 September 2003, New York

Secretary-General's remarks at the ringing of the Peace Bell

Good morning, dear colleagues and friends, and thank you all for coming this morning. I am also glad that some of our Messengers for Peace, as well as 400 young children from 40 countries, are here to support us today.

This year, the International Day of Peace, and the Peace Bell we will ring to mark it, take on added poignancy and purpose. A month ago, almost to the hour, an act of unspeakable brutality struck our friends and colleagues in Baghdad.

15 September 2003, New York

Secretary-General's remarks at the Holy Family Church

I am grateful to the Parish of the Holy Family Church for organizing this service, as it does every year. This year, we welcome the occasion more than ever. Our United Nations family joins your family at a time when we badly need the solace of prayer.

We need the comfort of sharing our grief with friends. We need the strength that comes from uniting around our faith. We need the hope that is inscribed in the windows of this church.

15 September 2003, New York

Secretary-General's remarks at lecture on "Islam and the West" by Professor Seyyed Hossein Nasr [as delivered]

Good afternoon, colleagues and friends.

This afternoon, I am really honoured that Professor Seyyed Hossein Nasr has accepted my invitation to give this lecture.

He is a great Islamic scholar who has lived and taught for many years in the West.

That very fact illustrates a problem about the title of his lecture –which, I must admit, was suggested by me and not by him.

When we talk about “Islam and the West”, it sounds as if these were two opposites. Yet

Islam is a universal religion, with adherents in almost every part of the world, whereas