Kofi Annan

21 September 2006, New York

The Secretary-General's remarks at Peace Bell Ceremony on the International Day of Peace

Good Morning.

My dear friends and Peace Messengers,

It is a pleasure to welcome so many of you here for this annual ceremony. Let me offer a special welcome to the messengers of peace and the many children who are joining us today.

For the fortunate among us, peace is a day-to-day reality. Our streets are safe; our children go to school. Where the fabric of society is strong, the precious gifts of peace can almost go unremarked and being taken for granted.

20 September 2006, New York

Secretary-General's remarks at dinner hosted by H.E. General Pervez Musharraf and H.E. Mr. Romano Prodi

Thank you very much, Mr. President [Musharraf] for those kind words. Let me also thank both you and Prime Minister Prodi for your initiative in holding this dinner, and for inviting me to join you. I'm very sorry that I won't be able to join you for dinner but I'm glad to have the chance to say a few words on this very important topic.

20 September 2006, New York

Statement attributable to the Spokesman for the Secretary-General on Thailand

The Secretary-General is following with concern developments in Thailand after the overthrow of the elected Government there. He appeals for a prompt return to civilian, democratic rule and the holding of new elections as quickly as possible.

The Secretary-General pays tribute to the progress the people of Thailand have made in recent years, under the leadership of King Bhumibol Adulyade, in establishing and strengthening democratic institutions. He expresses his profound hope that those efforts will resume very soon.

20 September 2006, New York

Secretary-General's remarks to the ministerial meeting of the Security Council on cooperation between the United Nations and Regional Organizations

Madame President,Distinguished Foreign Ministers, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen,

I pay tribute to the delegation of Greece, and in particular to you, Madam Foreign Minister, for convening this meeting on cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations. The fact that the Security Council has met twice on this issue in as many years shows the importance that you rightly attach to it.

20 September 2006, New York

Secretary-General's message on the launching of the Third Joint Ministerial Statement of Support for the CTBT [delivered by Mr. Nobuaki Tanaka, Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs]

I welcome the launching of the Third Joint Ministerial Statement of support for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty on this, the 10th anniversary of the treaty's opening for signature.

Each additional signature of this treaty will bring the world closer to achieving its longstanding goal of outlawing all nuclear tests, thereby advancing both nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament. Far-reaching verification provisions under the Treaty will contribute to ensuring full compliance with the test ban.

19 September 2006, General Assembly

10 years after – a farewell statement to the General Assembly

Madam President,

Excellencies,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

When I first spoke to you from this podium, in 1997, it seemed to me that humanity faced three great challenges.

One was to ensure that globalization would benefit the human race as a whole, not only its more fortunate members.

Another was to heal the disorder of the post-cold-war world, replacing it with a genuinely new world order of peace and freedom, as envisaged in our Charter.

19 September 2006, New York

Secretary-General's statement to High-Level segment launch of the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy [delivered by Mark Malloch Brown, Deputy Secretary-General]

Madam President,

Excellencies,

The General Assembly has set out its vision for defeating terrorism around the world. It is a vision for a comprehensive, coordinated and consistent response, at the national, regional and international levels. It stems from a fundamental conviction we all share: that terrorism in all its forms, committed by whomever, wherever and for whatever purposes, is unacceptable and can never be justified. And it unites us behind a common strategic framework that sets out concrete measures to address terrorism in all its aspects.

19 September 2006, New York

Secretary-General's remarks at official launch of UNITAID, the International Drug Purchase Facility

I am delighted that you have gathered here today for the official launch of this life-saving initiative. Let me thank the Governments who have worked together to make it happen.

UNITAID is deeply encouraging news in the world of financing for development. This international facility for the purchase of drugs is a shining example of an innovative source of funding that can help us reach the Millennium Development Goals.

19 September 2006, New York

Secretary-General's toast at luncheon in honour of heads of state and government attending the 61st General Assembly

Excellencies,

Ladies and gentlemen,

I'm honoured to welcome you to the United Nations for this General Debate.

First, let me say a warm thank you to President Bush and the people of our host country for their hospitality. Let me also, through you, Mr. President, thank the American people for being such gracious hosts to the United Nations for all of the 10 years I have served as Secretary-General.

Ladies and gentlemen, this is the last time I have the pleasure and a privilege of receiving all of you here.

19 September 2006, New York

Secretary-General's address to the General Assembly

Madam President,

Excellencies,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

When I first spoke to you from this podium, in 1997, it seemed to me that humanity faced three great challenges.

One was to ensure that globalization would benefit the human race as a whole, not only its more fortunate members.

Another was to heal the disorder of the post-cold-war world, replacing it with a genuinely new world order of peace and freedom, as envisaged in our Charter.