New York

21 September 2021

Secretary-General’s Address to the General Assembly

[trilingual, as delivered]  [scroll further down for all-English and all-French versions]

Mr. President of the General Assembly, Excellencies,

I am here to sound the alarm:  The world must wake up.

We are on the edge of an abyss — and moving in the wrong direction.

Our world has never been more threatened.

Or more divided.

We face the greatest cascade of crises in our lifetimes. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has supersized glaring inequalities. 

The climate crisis is pummeling the planet.

Upheaval from Afghanistan to Ethiopia to Yemen and beyond has thwarted peace.

A surge of mistrust and misinformation is polarizing people and paralyzing societies, and human rights are under fire. 

Science is under assault.  

And economic lifelines for the most vulnerable are coming too little and too late — if they come at all.

Solidarity is missing in action — just when we need it most. 

Perhaps one image tells the tale of our times. 

The picture we have seen from some parts of the world of COVID-19 vaccines … in the garbage.  

Expired and unused.   

On the one hand, we see the vaccines developed in record time — a victory of science and human ingenuity.

On the other hand, we see that triumph undone by the tragedy of a lack of political will, selfishness and mistrust. 

A surplus in some countries.  Empty shelves in others.

A majority of the wealthier world vaccinated.  Over 90 percent of Africans still waiting for their first dose.

This is a moral indictment of the state of our world.

It is an obscenity. 

We passed the science test. 

But we are getting an F in Ethics.

Excellencies,

The climate alarm bells are also ringing at fever pitch.

The recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was a code red for humanity. 

We see the warning signs in every continent and region.

Scorching temperatures.  Shocking biodiversity loss.  Polluted air, water and natural spaces. 

And climate-related disasters at every turn.

As we saw recently, not even this city — the financial capital of the world — is immune. 

Climate scientists tell us it is not too late to keep alive the 1.5 degree goal of the Paris Climate Agreement. 

But the window is rapidly closing.

We need a 45 per cent cut in emissions by 2030.  Yet a recent UN report made clear that with present national climate commitments,  emissions will go up by 16% by 2030. 

That would condemn us to a hellscape of temperature rises of at least 2.7 degrees above pre-industrial levels – a catastrophe.

Meanwhile, the OECD just reported a gap of at least $20 billion in essential and promised climate finance to developing countries.

We are weeks away from the UN Climate Conference in Glasgow, but seemingly light years away from reaching our targets.

We must get serious.  And we must act fast. 

Excellencies,

COVID-19 and the climate crisis have exposed profound fragilities as societies and as a planet. 

Yet instead of humility in the face of these epic challenges, we see hubris. 

Instead of the path of solidarity, we are on a dead end to destruction.

At the same time, another disease is spreading in our world today:  a malady of mistrust.

When people see promises of progress denied by the realities of their harsh daily lives…

When they see their fundamental rights and freedoms curtailed…

When they see petty — as well as grand — corruption around them…

When they see billionaires joyriding to space while millions go hungry on earth…

When parents see a future for their children that looks even bleaker than the struggles of today...

And when young people see no future at all…

The people we serve and represent may lose faith not only in their governments and institutions — but in the values that have animated the work of the United Nations for over 75 years.

Peace.  Human rights.  Dignity for all.  Equality.  Justice.  Solidarity.

Like never before, core values are in the crosshairs. 

A breakdown in trust is leading to a breakdown in values. 

Promises, after all, are worthless if people do not see results in their daily lives. 

Failure to deliver creates space for some of the darkest impulses of humanity.

It provides oxygen for easy-fixes, pseudo-solutions and conspiracy theories. 

It is kindling to stoke ancient grievances.  Cultural  supremacy.  Ideological dominance.  Violent misogyny.  The targeting of the most vulnerable including refugees and migrants.   

Excellencies,

We face a moment of truth.

Now is the time to deliver. 

Now is the time to restore trust. 

Now is the time to inspire hope. 

And I do have hope. 

The problems we have created are problems we can solve.

Humanity has shown that we are capable of great things when we work together.

That is the raison d’être of our United Nations. 

But let’s be frank.  Today’s multilateral system is too limited in its instruments and capacities, in relation to what is needed for effective governance of managing global public goods.

It is too fixed on the short-term. 

We need to strengthen global governance.  We need to focus on the future.  We need to renew the social contract.  We need to ensure a United Nations fit for a new era. 

That is why I presented my report on Our Common Agenda in the way I did.

It provides a 360 degree analysis of the state of our world, with 90 specific recommendations that take on the challenges of today and strengthen multilateralism for tomorrow. 

Our Common Agenda builds on the UN Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and the Paris Climate Agreement.

It is in line with the mandate I was given by the UN75 Declaration to seek a pathway to a better world.  

But to reach that land of our promises, we must bridge Great Divides. 

Excellencies,

I see 6 Great Divides — 6 Grand Canyons — that we must bridge now.   

First, we must bridge the peace divide.  

For far too many around the world, peace and stability remain a distant dream. 

In Afghanistan, where we must boost humanitarian assistance and defend human rights, especially of women and girls.

In Ethiopia, where we call on parties to immediately cease hostilities, ensure humanitarian access and create the conditions for the start of an Ethiopian-led political dialogue.

In Myanmar, where we reaffirm unwavering support to the people in their pursuit of democracy, peace, human rights and the rule of law.

In the Sahel, where we are committed to mobilizing international assistance for regional security, development and governance.

In places such as Yemen, Libya and Syria, where we must overcome stalemates and push for peace.
 
In Israel and Palestine, where we urge leaders to resume a meaningful dialogue,  recognizing the two-State solution as the only pathway to a just and comprehensive peace.

In Haiti and so many other places left behind, where we stand in solidarity through every step out of crisis. 

Excellencies,

We are seeing an explosion in seizures of power by force. 

Military coups are back. 

And the lack of unity among the international community does not help.

Geopolitical divisions are undermining international cooperation and limiting the capacity of the Security Council to take the necessary decisions.

A sense of impunity is taking hold. 

At the same time, it will be impossible to address dramatic economic and development challenges while the world’s two largest economies are at odds with each other. 

Yet I fear our world is creeping towards two different sets of economic, trade, financial, and technology rules, two divergent approaches in the development of artificial intelligence — and ultimately the risk of two different military and geo-political strategies, and this is a recipe for trouble.  It would be far less predictable than the Cold War. 

To restore trust and inspire hope, we need cooperation.  We need dialogue.  We need understanding. 

We need to invest in prevention, peacekeeping and peacebuilding.  We need progress on nuclear disarmament and in our shared efforts to counter terrorism.

We need actions anchored in respect for human rights.  And we need a new comprehensive Agenda for Peace.

Excellencies,

Second, we must bridge the climate divide.  This requires bridging trust between North and South.

It starts by doing all we can now to create the conditions for success in Glasgow. 

We need more ambition from all countries in three key areas — mitigation, finance and adaptation.

More ambition on mitigation — means countries committing to carbon neutrality by mid-century —  and to concrete 2030 emissions reductions targets that will get us there, backed up with credible actions now.

More ambition on finance — means developing nations finally seeing the promised US$100 billion dollars a year for climate action, fully mobilizing the resources of both international financial institutions and the private sector too.

More ambition on adaptation — means developed countries living up to their promise of credible support to developing countries to build resilience to save lives and livelihoods.

This means 50 per cent of all climate finance provided by developed countries and multilateral development banks should be dedicated to adaptation.

The African Development Bank set the bar in 2019 by allocating half of its climate finance to adaptation.

Some donor countries have followed their lead.  All must do so.

My message to every Member State is this:  Don’t wait for others to make the first move.  Do your part.

Around the world, we see civil society — led by young people — fully mobilized to tackle the climate crisis.

The private sector is increasingly stepping up. 

Governments must also summon the full force of their fiscal policymaking powers to make the shift to green economies. 

By taxing carbon and pollution instead of people’s income to more easily make the switch to sustainable green jobs.

By ending subsidies to fossil fuels and freeing up resources to invest back into health care, education, renewable energy, sustainable food systems, and social protections for their people.

By committing to no new coal plants.  If all planned coal power plants become operational, we will not only be clearly above 1.5 degrees — we will be well above 2 degrees.
 
The Paris targets will go up in smoke.

This is a planetary emergency. 

We need coalitions of solidarity -- between countries that still depend heavily on coal, and countries that have the financial and technical resources to support their transition.
 
We have the opportunity and the obligation to act. 

Excellencies,

Third, we must bridge the gap between rich and poor, within and among countries.

That starts by ending the pandemic for everyone, everywhere. 

We urgently need a global vaccination plan to at least double vaccine production and ensure that vaccines reach seventy percent of the world’s population in the first half of 2022.

This plan could be implemented by an emergency Task Force made up of present and potential vaccine producers, the World Health Organization, ACT-Accelerator partners, and international financial institutions, working with pharmaceutical companies.

We have no time to lose.

A lopsided recovery is deepening inequalities. 

Richer countries could reach pre-pandemic growth rates by the end of this year while the impacts may last for years in low-income countries.

Is it any wonder?

Advanced economies are investing nearly 28 per cent of their Gross Domestic Product into economic recovery.

For middle-income countries, that number falls to 6.5 per cent.

And it plummets to 1.8 per cent for the least developed countries — a tiny percentage of a much smaller amount.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, the International Monetary Fund projects that cumulative economic growth per capita over the next five years will be 75 percent less than the rest of the world.

Many countries need an urgent injection of liquidity. 
 
I welcome the issuance of US $650 billion in Special Drawing Rights by the International Monetary Fund.

But these SDRs are largely going to the countries that need them least. 

Advanced economies should reallocate their surplus SDRs to countries in need. 

SDRs are not a silver bullet. 

But they provide space for sustainable recovery and growth.

I renew also my call for a reformed, and more equitable international debt architecture. 

The Debt Service Suspension Initiative must be extended to 2022 and should be available to all highly indebted vulnerable and middle-income countries that request it. 

This would be solidarity in action.

Countries shouldn’t have to choose between servicing debt and serving people.

With effective international solidarity, it would be possible at the national level to forge a new social contract that includes universal health coverage and income protection, housing and decent work, quality education for all, and an end to discrimination and violence against women and girls. 

I call on countries to reform their tax systems and finally end tax evasion, money laundering and illicit financial flows.

And as we look ahead, we need a better system of prevention and preparedness for all major global risks. We must support the recommendations of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response. 

I have put forward a number of other proposals in Our Common Agenda — including an emergency platform and a Futures Lab.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Quatrièmement, nous devons combler le fossé entre les genres.

Le COVID-19 a mis à nu et exacerbé la plus vieille injustice du monde : le déséquilibre de pouvoir entre les hommes et les femmes.

Lorsque la pandémie a frappé, les femmes représentaient la majorité des travailleurs de première ligne. Elles ont été les premières à perdre leur emploi et les premières à mettre leurs carrières en suspens pour s’occuper de leurs proches.

Les fermetures d’écoles ont touché les filles de manière disproportionnée, freinant leurs parcours et augmentant les risques d'abus, de violence et de mariage d’enfants.

Combler le fossé entre les femmes et les hommes n’est pas seulement une question de justice pour les femmes et les filles.

Cela change la donne pour l’humanité tout entière.

Les sociétés plus égalitaires sont aussi plus stables et plus pacifiques. Elles ont de meilleurs systèmes de santé et des économies plus dynamiques.

L'égalité des femmes est essentiellement une question de pouvoir. Si nous voulons résoudre les problèmes les plus difficiles de notre époque, nous devons de toute urgence transformer notre monde dominé par les hommes et changer l'équilibre du pouvoir.

Cela requiert plus de femmes dirigeantes dans les parlements, les cabinets ministériels et les conseils d’administration. Cela exige que les femmes soient pleinement représentées et puissent apporter leur pleine contribution partout.  

J’exhorte les gouvernements, les entreprises et les autres organisations à prendre des mesures audacieuses, y compris des critères de référence et des quotas, pour établir la parité hommes-femmes à tous les niveaux de la hiérarchie.

A l’Organisation des Nations Unies, nous avons atteint cela au sein de l’équipe dirigeante et parmi les responsables de bureaux de pays. Nous continuerons jusqu’à ce que nous parvenions à la parité à tous les niveaux.

Dans le même temps, nous devons nous opposer aux lois régressives qui institutionnalisent la discrimination de genre. Les droits des femmes sont des droits humains.

Les plans de relance économique devraient accorder une place centrale aux femmes, notamment par des investissements à grande échelle dans l’économie des soins.

Et nous devons adopter un plan d’urgence pour lutter contre la violence de genre dans chaque pays.

Pour atteindre les Objectifs de développement durable et bâtir un monde meilleur, nous pouvons et nous devons combler le fossé entre les femmes et les hommes.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,
 
Cinquièmement, pour redonner confiance et raviver l’espoir, nous devons réduire la fracture numérique.

La moitié de l’humanité n’a pas accès à l’Internet. Nous devons faire en sorte que tout le monde soit connecté d’ici à 2030.
 
Telle est la vision de mon Plan d’action de coopération numérique : saisir les promesses du numérique tout en se prémunissant contre ses dangers.

L’un des plus grands périls auxquels nous sommes confrontés, c’est le pouvoir croissant des plateformes numériques et l’utilisation des données à des fins néfastes.

Une vaste bibliothèque d’informations est en train d’être constituée sur chacun d’entre nous. Et nous n’y avons même pas accès.

Nous ne savons pas comment ces informations ont été recueillies, par qui, ni dans quels buts.

Mais nous savons que nos données sont utilisées à des fins commerciales, pour augmenter encore les profits.

Nos comportements et habitudes deviennent des produits qui sont vendus comme des contrats à terme.

Nos données sont également utilisées pour influencer nos perceptions et nos opinions.

Les gouvernements – et d’autres entités – peuvent les exploiter pour contrôler ou manipuler le comportement des citoyens, bafouant ainsi les droits humains des individus ou groupes et sapant la démocratie.

Ce n’est pas de la science-fiction. C’est notre réalité d’aujourd’hui.

Et cela exige un débat sérieux.

Il en va de même pour d’autres dangers de l’ère numérique. 

Je suis par exemple certain que toute future confrontation majeure – et j’espère évidemment qu’une telle confrontation n’aura jamais lieu – commencera par une cyberattaque massive.

Quels cadres juridiques nous permettraient de faire face à une telle situation ?

Aujourd’hui, des armes autonomes peuvent prendre pour cible des personnes et les tuer sans intervention humaine. De telles armes devraient être interdites.

Mais il n’y a pas de consensus sur la manière de réglementer ces technologies.

Afin de rétablir la confiance et raviver l’espoir, nous devons placer les droits humains au cœur de nos efforts pour que l’avenir numérique de tous soit sûr, équitable et ouvert.

Excelencias,

En sexto lugar, y por último, tenemos que salvar la brecha entre generaciones. 
 
Los jóvenes heredarán las consecuencias de nuestras decisiones, buenas y malas.

Al mismo tiempo, se espera que nazcan 10.900 millones de personas antes de que termine el siglo.

Necesitamos sus talentos, ideas y energías.

Nuestra Agenda Común propone la celebración, el año que viene, de una Cumbre para la Transformación de la Educación con el fin de abordar la crisis del aprendizaje y ampliar las oportunidades al alcance de los 1.800 millones de jóvenes de hoy.

Los jóvenes necesitan algo más que apoyo.

Necesitan tener un asiento en la mesa.

Por ello, nombraré un Enviado Especial para las Generaciones Futuras y crearé la Oficina de la Juventud de las Naciones Unidas.

Y las contribuciones de los jóvenes serán fundamentales en la Cumbre del Futuro, tal y como queda recogido en Nuestra Agenda Común.

La juventud necesita una visión de esperanza para el futuro. 

Una investigación realizada recientemente en diez países ha demostrado que la mayoría de los jóvenes sufre altos niveles de ansiedad y angustia por el estado de nuestro planeta.

Un 60% de sus futuros votantes se sienten traicionados por sus gobiernos.

Debemos demostrar a los niños y niñas, a los y las jóvenes, que, a pesar de la gravedad de la situación, el mundo tiene un plan – y que los gobiernos están comprometidos con su aplicación.

Tenemos que actuar ahora para superar las Grandes Divisiones y salvar a la humanidad y al planeta.
 
Excellencies,

With real engagement, we can live up to the promise of a better, more peaceful world.

That is the driving force of our Common Agenda. 
 
The best way to advance the interests of one’s own citizens is by advancing the interests of our common future. 

Interdependence is the logic of the 21st century.

And it is the lodestar of the United Nations. 

This is our time. 

A moment for transformation. 

An era to re-ignite multilateralism.

An age of possibilities. 

Let us restore trust.  Let us inspire hope. 

And let us start right now. 

Thank you.

*****
Secretary-General’s address to the General Assembly  [all-English version]

Mr. President of the General Assembly, Excellencies,

I am here to sound the alarm:  The world must wake up.

We are on the edge of an abyss — and moving in the wrong direction.

Our world has never been more threatened.

Or more divided.

We face the greatest cascade of crises in our lifetimes. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has supersized glaring inequalities. 

The climate crisis is pummeling the planet.

Upheaval from Afghanistan to Ethiopia to Yemen and beyond has thwarted peace.

A surge of mistrust and misinformation is polarizing people and paralyzing societies.

Human rights are under fire. 

Science is under assault.  

And economic lifelines for the most vulnerable are coming too little and too late — if they come at all.

Solidarity is missing in action — just when we need it most. 

Perhaps one image tells the tale of our times. 

The picture we have seen from some parts of the world of COVID-19 vaccines … in the garbage.  

Expired and unused.   

On the one hand, we see the vaccines developed in record time — a victory of science and human ingenuity.

On the other hand, we see that triumph undone by the tragedy of a lack of political will, selfishness and mistrust. 

A surplus in some countries.  Empty shelves in others.

A majority of the wealthier world vaccinated.  Over 90 percent of Africans still waiting for their first dose.

This is a moral indictment of the state of our world.

It is an obscenity. 

We passed the science test. 

But we are getting an F in Ethics.

Excellencies,

The climate alarm bells are also ringing at fever pitch.

The recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was a code red for humanity. 

We see the warning signs in every continent and region.

Scorching temperatures.  Shocking biodiversity loss.  Polluted air, water and natural spaces. 

And climate-related disasters at every turn.

As we saw recently, not even this city — the financial capital of the world — is immune. 

Climate scientists tell us it’s not too late to keep alive the 1.5 degree goal of the Paris Climate Agreement. 

But the window is rapidly closing.

We need a 45 per cent cut in emissions by 2030.  Yet a recent UN report made clear that with present national climate commitments, emissions will go up by 16% by 2030. 

That would condemn us to a hellscape of temperature rises of at least 2.7 degrees above pre-industrial levels.  A catastrophe.

Meanwhile, the OECD just reported a gap of at least $20 billion in essential and promised climate finance to developing countries.

We are weeks away from the UN Climate Conference in Glasgow, but seemingly light years away from reaching our targets.

We must get serious.  And we must act fast. 

Excellencies,

COVID and the climate crisis have exposed profound fragilities as societies and as a planet. 

Yet instead of humility in the face of these epic challenges, we see hubris. 

Instead of the path of solidarity, we are on a dead end to destruction.

At the same time, another disease is spreading in our world today:  a malady of mistrust.

When people see promises of progress denied by the realities of their harsh daily lives…

When they see their fundamental rights and freedoms curtailed…

When they see petty — as well as grand — corruption around them…

When they see billionaires joyriding to space while millions go hungry on earth…

When parents see a future for their children that looks even bleaker than the struggles of today...

And when young people see no future at all…

The people we serve and represent may lose faith not only in their governments and institutions — but in the values that have animated the work of the United Nations for over 75 years.

Peace.  Human rights.  Dignity for all.  Equality.  Justice.  Solidarity.

Like never before, core values are in the crosshairs. 

A breakdown in trust is leading to a breakdown in values. 

Promises, after all, are worthless if people do not see results in their daily lives. 

Failure to deliver creates space for some of the darkest impulses of humanity.

It provides oxygen for easy fixes, pseudo-solutions and conspiracy theories. 

It is kindling to stoke ancient grievances.  Cultural supremacy.  Ideological dominance.  Violent misogyny.  The targeting of the most vulnerable including refugees and migrants.   

Excellencies,

We face a moment of truth.

Now is the time to deliver. 

Now is the time to restore trust. 

Now is the time to inspire hope. 

And I do have hope. 

The problems we have created are problems we can solve.

Humanity has shown that we are capable of great things when we work together.
That is the raison d’être of our United Nations. 

But let’s be frank.  Today’s multilateral system is too limited in its instruments and capacities, in relation to what is needed for effective governance of managing global public goods.

It is too fixed on the short-term. 

We need to strengthen global governance.  We need to focus on the future.  We need to renew the social contract.  We need to ensure a United Nations fit for a new era. 

That is why I presented my report on Our Common Agenda in the way I did.

It provides a 360 degree analysis of the state of our world, with 90 specific recommendations that take on the challenges of today and strengthen multilateralism for tomorrow. 

Our Common Agenda builds on the UN Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and the Paris Climate Agreement.

It is in line with the mandate I was given by the UN75 Declaration to seek a pathway to a better world.  

But to reach that land of our promises, we must bridge Great Divides. 

Excellencies,

I see 6 Great Divides — 6 Grand Canyons — that we must bridge now.   

First, we must bridge the peace divide.  

For far too many around the world, peace and stability remain a distant dream. 

In Afghanistan, where we must boost humanitarian assistance and defend human rights, especially of women and girls.

In Ethiopia, where we call on parties to immediately cease hostilities, ensure humanitarian access and create the conditions for the start of an Ethiopian-led political dialogue.

In Myanmar, where we reaffirm unwavering support to the people in their pursuit of democracy, peace, human rights and the rule of law.

In the Sahel, where we are committed to mobilizing international assistance for regional security, development and governance.

In places such as Yemen, Libya and Syria, where we must overcome stalemates and push for peace.
 
In Israel and Palestine, where we urge leaders to resume a meaningful dialogue,  recognizing the two-State solution as the only pathway to a just and comprehensive peace.

In Haiti and so many other places left behind, where we stand in solidarity through every step out of crisis. 

Excellencies,

We are seeing an explosion in seizures of power by force. 

Military coups are back. 

The lack of unity among the international community does not help.

Geopolitical divisions are undermining international cooperation and limiting the capacity of the Security Council to take the necessary decisions.

A sense of impunity is taking hold. 

At the same time, it will be impossible to address dramatic economic and development challenges while the world’s two largest economies are at odds with each other. 

Yet I fear our world is creeping towards two different sets of economic, trade, financial, and technology rules, two divergent approaches in the development of artificial intelligence — and ultimately the risk of two different military and geo-political strategies.

This is a recipe for trouble.  It would be far less predictable than the Cold War. 

To restore trust and inspire hope, we need cooperation.  We need dialogue.  We need understanding. 

We need to invest in prevention, peacekeeping and peacebuilding.  We need progress on nuclear disarmament and in our shared efforts to counter terrorism.

We need actions anchored in respect for human rights.  And we need a new comprehensive Agenda for Peace.

Excellencies,

Second, we must bridge the climate divide.  This requires bridging trust between North and South.

It starts by doing all we can now to create the conditions for success in Glasgow. 

We need more ambition from all countries in three key areas — mitigation, finance and adaptation.

More ambition on mitigation — means countries committing to carbon neutrality by mid-century —  and to concrete 2030 emissions reductions targets that will get us there, backed up with credible actions now.

More ambition on finance — means developing nations finally seeing the promised $100 billion dollars a year for climate action, fully mobilizing the resources of both international financial institutions and the private sector, too.

More ambition on adaptation — means developed countries living up to their promise of credible support to developing countries to build resilience to save lives and livelihoods.

This means 50 per cent of all climate finance provided by developed countries and multilateral development banks should be dedicated to adaptation.

The African Development Bank set the bar in 2019 by allocating half of its climate finance to adaptation.

Some donor countries have followed their lead.  All must do so.

My message to every Member State is this:  Don’t wait for others to make the first move.  Do your part.

Around the world, we see civil society — led by young people — fully mobilized to tackle the climate crisis.

The private sector is increasingly stepping up. 

Governments must also summon the full force of their fiscal policymaking powers to make the shift to green economies. 

By taxing carbon and pollution instead of people’s income to more easily make the switch to sustainable green jobs.

By ending subsidies to fossil fuels and freeing up resources to invest back into health care, education, renewable energy, sustainable food systems, and social protections for their people.

By committing to no new coal plants.  If all planned coal power plants become operational, we will not only be clearly above 1.5 degrees — we will be well above 2 degrees.
 
The Paris targets will go up in smoke.

This is a planetary emergency. 

We need coalitions of solidarity -- between countries that still depend heavily on coal, and countries that have the financial and technical resources to support their transition.
 
We have the opportunity and the obligation to act. 

Excellencies,

Third, we must bridge the gap between rich and poor, within and among countries.

That starts by ending the pandemic for everyone, everywhere. 

We urgently need a global vaccination plan to at least double vaccine production and ensure that vaccines reach seventy percent of the world’s population in the first half of 2022.

This plan could be implemented by an emergency Task Force made up of present and potential vaccine producers, the World Health Organization, ACT-Accelerator partners, and international financial institutions, working with pharmaceutical companies.

We have no time to lose.

A lopsided recovery is deepening inequalities. 

Richer countries could reach pre-pandemic growth rates by the end of this year while the impacts may last for years in low-income countries.

Is it any wonder?

Advanced economies are investing nearly 28 per cent of their Gross Domestic Product into economic recovery.

For middle-income countries, that number falls to 6.5 per cent.

And it plummets to 1.8 per cent for the least developed countries — a tiny percentage of a much smaller amount.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, the International Monetary Fund projects that cumulative economic growth per capita over the next five years will be 75 percent less than the rest of the world.

Many countries need an urgent injection of liquidity. 
 
I welcome the issuance of $650 billion in Special Drawing Rights by the International Monetary Fund.

But these SDRs are largely going to the countries that need them least. 

Advanced economies should reallocate their surplus SDRs to countries in need. 

SDRs are not a silver bullet. 

But they provide space for sustainable recovery and growth.

I renew also my call for a reformed and more equitable international debt architecture. 

The Debt Service Suspension Initiative must be extended to 2022 and should be available to all highly indebted vulnerable and middle-income countries that request it. 

This would be solidarity in action.

Countries shouldn’t have to choose between servicing debt and serving people.

With effective international solidarity, it would be possible at the national level to forge a new social contract that includes universal health coverage and income protection, housing and decent work, quality education for all, and an end to discrimination and violence against women and girls. 

I call on countries to reform their tax systems and finally end tax evasion, money laundering and illicit financial flows.

And as we look ahead, we need a better system of prevention and preparedness for all major global risks.  We must support the recommendations of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response. 

I have put forward a number of other proposals in Our Common Agenda — including an emergency platform and a Futures Lab.

Excellencies,

Fourth, we must bridge the gender divide. 

COVID-19 exposed and amplified the world’s most enduring injustice: the power imbalance between men and women.

When the pandemic hit, women were the majority of frontline workers, first to lose their jobs, and first to put their careers on hold to care for those close to them.

Girls were disproportionately hit by school closures that limit their development and increase the risk of abuse, violence and child marriage. 

Bridging the gender divide is not only a matter of justice for women and girls.

It’s a game-changer for humanity.

Societies with more equal representation are more stable and peaceful. They have better health systems and more vibrant economies.

Women’s equality is essentially a question of power. We must urgently transform our male-dominated world and shift the balance of power, to solve the most challenging problems of our age.

That means more women leaders in parliaments, cabinets and board rooms. It means women fully represented and making their full contribution, everywhere. 

I urge governments, corporations and other institutions to take bold steps, including benchmarks and quotas, to create gender parity from the leadership down.

At the United Nations, we have achieved this among the Senior Management and our country team leaders. We will keep going until we have parity at every level.

At the same time, we need to push back against regressive laws that institutionalize gender discrimination. Women’s rights are human rights.    

Economic recovery plans should focus on women, including through large-scale investments in the care economy.

And we need an emergency plan to fight gender-based violence in every country.

To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and build a better world, we can and we must bridge the gender divide. 

Excellencies,

Fifth, restoring trust and inspiring hope means bridging the digital divide.

Half of humanity has no access to the internet.  We must connect everyone by 2030. 
 
This is the vision of my Roadmap for Digital Co-operation — to embrace the promise of digital technology while protecting people from its perils. 

One of the greatest perils we face is the growing reach of digital platforms and the use and abuse of data.

A vast library of information is being assembled about each of us. Yet we don’t even have the keys to that library.

We don’t know how this information has been collected, by whom or for what purposes.

But we do know our data is being used commercially — to boost corporate profits.

Our behavior patterns are being commodified and sold like futures contracts.

Our data is also being used to influence our perceptions and opinions.

Governments and others can exploit it to control or manipulate people’s behaviour, violating human rights of individuals or groups, and undermining democracy.

This is not science fiction.  This is today’s reality. 

And it requires a serious discussion.

So, too, do other dangers in the digital frontier. 

I am certain, for example, that any future major confrontation — and heaven forbid it should ever happen — will start with a massive cyberattack.

Where are the legal frameworks to address this?

Autonomous weapons can today choose targets and kill people without human interference.  They should be banned. 

But there is no consensus on how to regulate those technologies.  

To restore trust and inspire hope, we need to place human rights at the centre of our efforts to ensure a safe, equitable and open digital future for all.

Excellencies,

Sixth, and finally, we need to bridge the divide among generations. 
 
Young people will inherit the consequences of our decisions — good and bad. 
 
At the same time, we expect 10.9 billion people to be born by century’s end. 
 
We need their talents, ideas and energies. 
  
Our Common Agenda proposes a Transforming Education Summit next year to address the learning crisis and expand opportunities for today’s 1.8 billion young people.
 
But young people need more than support. 
 
They need a seat at the table. 
 
For this, I will appoint a Special Envoy for Future Generations and create the United Nations Youth Office. 
 
And the contributions of young people will be central to the Summit of the Future, as set out in Our Common Agenda.

Young people need a vision of hope for the future. 

Recent research showed the majority of young people across ten countries are suffering from high levels of anxiety and distress over the state of our planet.

Some 60 percent of your future voters feel betrayed by their governments.
We must prove to children and young people that despite the seriousness of the situation, the world has a plan — and governments are committed to implementing it.

We need to act now to bridge the Great Divides and save humanity and the planet.

Excellencies,

With real engagement, we can live up to the promise of a better, more peaceful world.

That is the driving force of our Common Agenda. 
 
The best way to advance the interests of one’s own citizens is by advancing the interests of our common future. 

Interdependence is the logic of the 21st century.

And it is the lodestar of the United Nations. 

This is our time. 

A moment for transformation. 

An era to re-ignite multilateralism.

An age of possibilities. 

Let us restore trust.  Let us inspire hope. 

And let us start right now. 

Thank you.

*****
Discours à l’Assemblée générale - Traduction – Seul le prononcé fait foi

Monsieur le Président, Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Je suis ici pour tirer la sonnette d’alarme : le monde doit se réveiller.

Nous sommes au bord du précipice – et nous continuons de nous en approcher.

Jamais notre monde n’a été aussi menacé.

Ou plus divisé.

Nous faisons face à la plus grande avalanche de crises de notre existence.

La pandémie de COVID-19 a amplifié des inégalités déjà flagrantes.

La crise climatique s’abat sur la planète.

De l’Afghanistan à l’Éthiopie en passant par le Yémen et ailleurs, les bouleversements font échec à la paix.

Un embrasement de méfiance et de désinformation polarise les gens et paralyse les sociétés.

Les droits humains sont mis à mal.

La science est vilipendée.

Et l’aide économique destinée aux plus vulnérables, à supposer qu’elle leur parvienne, est insuffisante et arrive trop tard.

La solidarité est portée disparue – au moment même où nous en avons le plus besoin.

Une image résume peut-être ce que nous vivons.

Celle qui nous vient de certains coins du monde, où l’on voit des vaccins contre le COVID-19 ... jetés à la poubelle.

Périmés et inutilisés.

D’un côté, les vaccins sont mis au point en un temps record – une victoire de la science et de l’ingéniosité humaine.

De l’autre, ce triomphe est réduit à néant par le manque tragique de volonté politique, l’égoïsme et la méfiance.

L’abondance pour certains pays. Des étagères vides pour d’autres.

La plupart des habitants des pays riches sont vaccinés. Plus de 90 % des Africains attendent toujours leur première dose.

Nous sommes moralement coupables de l’état du monde dans lequel nous vivons.

La situation est indécente.

Nous avons réussi l’épreuve de sciences.

Mais nous avons un zéro pointé en éthique.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

La sonnette d’alarme climatique est également assourdissante.

Le récent rapport du Groupe d’experts intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat est un code rouge pour l’humanité.

Nous voyons les signes d’avertissement sur chaque continent et dans chaque région.

Températures caniculaires. Perte de biodiversité épouvantable. Pollution de l’air, de l’eau et des espaces naturels.

Et à chaque instant des catastrophes liées au climat.

Comme nous l’avons vu récemment, même la ville où nous sommes – la capitale financière du monde – n’est pas à l’abri.

Les climatologues nous disent qu’il n’est pas trop tard pour respecter l’objectif de 1,5 degré fixé dans l’Accord de Paris sur le climat.

Mais la fenêtre pour le faire se ferme rapidement.

Nous devons réduire nos émissions de 45 % d’ici à 2030. Pourtant, un récent rapport de l’ONU a clairement montré que, compte tenu des engagements nationaux en matière de climat, d’ici à 2030, les émissions augmenteront de 16 %.

Cela nous condamnerait à une situation infernale où la température augmenterait d’au moins 2,7 degrés par rapport aux niveaux préindustriels. Une catastrophe.

Dans le même temps, l’OCDE vient de signaler un déficit d’au moins 20 milliards de dollars dans le financement essentiel de l’action climatique promis aux pays en développement.

Nous sommes à quelques semaines de la Conférence des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques qui se tiendra à Glasgow, mais nous sommes à des années-lumière de nos objectifs.

Nous devons nous y mettre sérieusement. Et vite.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Le COVID-19 et la crise climatique ont mis en évidence de profondes fragilités, dans nos sociétés et pour notre planète.

Pourtant, ces défis formidables ne suscitent pas l’humilité, mais l’arrogance.

Au lieu de suivre la voie de la solidarité, nous sommes dans une impasse qui mène à la destruction.

Dans le même temps, une autre maladie se propage aujourd’hui dans le monde : le fléau de la méfiance.

Quand les gens voient les promesses de progrès anéanties par les réalités d’un quotidien éprouvant...

Quand ils voient leurs droits fondamentaux et leurs libertés restreints...

Quand ils voient autour d’eux la petite – et la grande – corruption...

Quand ils voient des milliardaires se balader dans l’espace alors que des millions de personnes sur terre ont faim...

Quand les parents voient pour leurs enfants des lendemains plus sombres encore que l’adversité à laquelle ils sont confrontés aujourd’hui...

Et quand les jeunes ne voient aucun lendemain...

Les personnes pour lesquelles nous œuvrons et que nous représentons pourraient perdre la foi non seulement dans leurs gouvernements et leurs institutions, mais aussi dans les valeurs qui animent le travail de l’ONU depuis plus de 75 ans.

Paix. Droits humains. Dignité de toutes et tous. Égalité. Justice. Solidarité.

Jamais auparavant les valeurs fondamentales n’ont été aussi menacées.

Une rupture de la confiance entraîne une rupture des valeurs.

À quoi bon des promesses si les gens ne voient pas de résultats dans leur vie quotidienne.

Quand le résultat n’est pas au rendez-vous, place est faite à certaines des pulsions les plus sinistres de l’humanité.

Cela alimente les solutions faciles, les pseudo-solutions et les théories du complot.

Cela attise les griefs anciens. La suprématie culturelle. La domination idéologique. La misogynie violente. La mise en joue des personnes les plus vulnérables, notamment les réfugiés et les migrants.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

L’heure de vérité a sonné.

Le moment est venu d’agir.

Le moment est venu de redonner confiance.

Le moment est venu de raviver l’espoir.

Et de l’espoir, j’en ai !

Les problèmes que nous avons créés sont des problèmes que nous pouvons résoudre.

L’humanité a montré que rien ne l’arrêtait quand tout le monde travaillait main dans la main.

C’est la raison d’être des Nations Unies.

Mais soyons francs. Le système multilatéral actuel a ses limites : ses instruments et ses capacités ne suffisent pas pour assurer l’efficacité de la gouvernance des biens publics mondiaux.

Ce système est trop axé sur le court terme.

Nous devons renforcer la gouvernance mondiale. Nous devons nous concentrer sur l’avenir. Nous devons renouveler le contrat social. Nous devons adapter l’ONU à une nouvelle ère.

C’est pourquoi j’ai présenté comme je l’ai fait mon rapport sur Notre Programme commun.

Ce programme offre une analyse à 360 degrés de l’état de notre monde, accompagnée de 90 recommandations concrètes visant à relever les défis d’aujourd’hui et à renforcer le multilatéralisme de demain.

Notre Programme commun s’appuie sur la Charte des Nations Unies, la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme, le Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030 et l’Accord de Paris sur le climat.

Il s’inscrit dans le droit fil du mandat qui m’a été confié dans la Déclaration faite à l’occasion de la célébration du soixante-quinzième anniversaire de l’ONU : chercher une voie vers un monde meilleur.

Mais pour atteindre cette terre de promesses, nous devons combler de grands fossés.

Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Pour moi, il y a 6 grands fossés – 6 Grands canyons – que nous devons combler maintenant.

Premièrement, nous devons combler le fossé qui nous sépare de la paix.

Pour bien trop de personnes, partout dans le monde, la paix et la stabilité restent un rêve lointain.

En Afghanistan, où nous devons redonner de l’élan à l’aide humanitaire et défendre les droits humains, en particulier ceux des femmes et des filles.

En Éthiopie, où nous demandons à toutes les parties de cesser immédiatement les hostilités, de garantir l’accès humanitaire et de créer les conditions nécessaires à l’ouverture d’un dialogue politique conduit par les Éthiopiennes et les Éthiopiens.

Au Myanmar, où nous réaffirmons notre soutien indéfectible au peuple, qui aspire à la démocratie, à la paix, aux droits humains et à l’état de droit.

Au Sahel, où nous nous sommes engagés à mobiliser l’aide internationale en faveur de la sécurité, du développement et de la gouvernance de la région.

Ailleurs encore, comme au Yémen, en Libye et en Syrie, où nous devons sortir de l’impasse et tout faire pour que la paix soit instaurée.
 
En Israël et en Palestine, où nous exhortons les dirigeants à reprendre un dialogue constructif et à reconnaître que la solution des deux États est la seule voie pouvant conduire à une paix juste et globale.

En Haïti et dans tant d’autres pays laissés pour compte, où nous sommes solidaires à chaque mesure prise pour sortir de la crise.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Nous assistons à une flambée des prises de pouvoir par la force.

Les coups d’État militaires reprennent.

Et la désunion de la communauté internationale n’aide pas.

Les clivages géopolitiques sapent la coopération internationale et empêchent le Conseil de sécurité de prendre les décisions qui s’imposent.

Un sentiment d’impunité s’installe.

Et pourtant, il sera impossible de relever les prodigieux défis de l’économie et du développement tant que les deux plus grandes économies du monde seront en désaccord l’une avec l’autre.

Hélas, je crains fort que notre monde ne s’achemine vers deux ensembles de règles économiques, commerciales, financières et technologiques bien distincts, deux conceptions opposées du développement de l’intelligence artificielle – et finalement deux stratégies militaires et géopolitiques différentes.

Ce serait la garantie de problèmes à venir. Bien moins prévisibles que la guerre froide.

Pour redonner confiance et raviver l’espoir, nous avons besoin de coopération. Nous avons besoin de dialogue. Nous devons nous entendre.

Nous devons investir dans la prévention des conflits et le maintien et la consolidation de la paix. Nous devons faire avancer le désarmement nucléaire et l’action que nous menons ensemble contre le terrorisme.

Nous devons agir dans le profond respect des droits humains. Et nous devons nous munir d’un nouvel Agenda pour la paix.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Deuxièmement, nous devons combler le fossé climatique. Pour ce faire, il faut rétablir la confiance entre Nord et Sud.

Et cela commence en faisant tout ce que nous pouvons dès maintenant pour assurer le succès de la Conférence de Glasgow.

Il faut que tous les pays se montrent plus ambitieux dans trois grands domaines d’action : l’atténuation, le financement et l’adaptation.

Plus d’ambition en matière d’atténuation, cela veut dire que les pays s’engagent à atteindre la neutralité carbone d’ici le milieu du siècle et à se fixer des objectifs concrets de réduction des émissions pour 2030 qui nous permettent d’y parvenir, et qui s’appuient sur des mesures réalisables dans l’immédiat.

Plus d’ambition en matière de financement – cela veut dire que les pays en développement reçoivent les 100 milliards de dollars par an qui leur ont été promis pour l’action climatique, en mobilisant pleinement les ressources des institutions financières internationales et aussi celles du secteur privé.

Plus d’ambition en matière d’adaptation – cela veut dire que les pays développés tiennent la promesse qu’ils ont faite d’apporter un soutien crédible aux pays en développement afin de renforcer la résilience et de sauver des vies et des moyens de subsistance.

Cela veut dire que 50 % de tous les financements climatiques fournis par les pays développés et les banques multilatérales de développement devraient être consacrés à l’adaptation.

La Banque africaine de développement a montré la voie en 2019 en allouant la moitié de ses financements climatiques à l’adaptation.

Certains pays donateurs ont suivi son exemple. Il faut que tous en fassent autant.

Le message que j’adresse à chaque État Membre est le suivant : n’attendez pas que d’autres fassent le premier pas. Faites votre part.

Partout dans le monde, nous constatons que la société civile – menée par les jeunes – est pleinement mobilisée pour faire face à la crise climatique.

Le secteur privé s’engage de plus en plus.

Il faut que les gouvernements aussi mobilisent tous leurs pouvoirs en matière de politique financière pour faire la transition vers l’économie verte.

En imposant les émissions de carbone et la pollution plutôt que le revenu des ménages, afin de faciliter le passage à des emplois verts durables.

En arrêtant de subventionner les combustibles fossiles et en dégageant des ressources à réinvestir dans la santé, l’éducation, les énergies renouvelables, les systèmes alimentaires durables et la protection sociale.

En s’engageant à ne pas construire de nouvelles centrales à charbon. Si toutes celles qu’il est prévu d’ouvrir entrent en service, non seulement nous dépasserons nettement 1,5 degré, mais nous serons bien au-dessus de 2 degrés.

Les objectifs de Paris partiront en fumée.

Nous sommes face à une urgence planétaire.

Nous avons besoin de coalitions de solidarité – entre les pays qui sont encore fortement tributaires du charbon et ceux qui ont les moyens financiers et techniques de financer leur transition.

Nous pouvons et nous devons agir.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Troisièmement, nous devons combler le fossé entre riches et pauvres, dans les pays et d’un pays à l’autre.

Cela commence par mettre fin à la pandémie, partout et pour tout le monde.

Nous avons besoin de toute urgence d’un plan de vaccination mondial permettant de faire au moins doubler la production et d’acheminer des vaccins à 70 % de la population au premier semestre 2022.

Ce plan pourrait être exécuté par une équipe spéciale d’urgence composée de producteurs actuels et potentiels de vaccins, de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé, de partenaires du dispositif Accélérateur ACT et des institutions financières internationales, en collaboration avec les sociétés pharmaceutiques.

Nous n’avons pas de temps à perdre.

Une reprise asymétrique creuse les inégalités.

Les pays riches pourraient retrouver les taux de croissance d’avant la pandémie d’ici la fin de l’année, tandis que les retombées de la crise sanitaire pourraient se faire sentir pendant des années dans les pays à faible revenu.

Est-ce bien étonnant ?

Les économies avancées investissent près de 28 % de leur produit intérieur brut dans la reprise économique.

Pour les pays à revenu intermédiaire, ce chiffre tombe à 6,5 %.

Et il chute à 1,8 % pour les pays les moins avancés – un pourcentage infime d’un montant très inférieur.

En Afrique subsaharienne, le Fonds monétaire international prévoit que la croissance économique cumulée par habitant pour les cinq prochaines années devrait être égale au quart de ce qu’elle est dans le reste du monde.

De nombreux pays ont besoin d’injections d’urgence de liquidités.
 
Je me réjouis que le Fonds monétaire international ait émis 650 milliards de dollars de Droits de tirage spéciaux.

Mais ces droits vont en grande partie aux pays qui en ont le moins besoin.

Les économies avancées devraient réaffecter l’excédent de leurs DTS aux pays qui en ont vraiment besoin.

Les DTS ne sont pas la panacée.

Mais ils permettent une reprise et une croissance durables.

Je renouvelle aussi mon appel en faveur d’une réforme de l’architecture de la dette internationale, qui doit être plus équitable.

L’Initiative de suspension du service de la dette doit être prolongée jusqu’en 2022 et devrait être accessible à tous les pays vulnérables et à tous les pays à revenu intermédiaire très endettés qui le demandent.

C’est ça, la solidarité en action.

Les États ne devraient pas avoir à choisir entre assurer le service de la dette et être au service de la population.

Une véritable solidarité internationale permettrait d’établir à l’échelle nationale un nouveau contrat social prévoyant une couverture sanitaire universelle et la protection du revenu, d’offrir à toutes et à tous un logement, un travail décent et une éducation de qualité pour toutes et tous et d’éliminer la discrimination et la violence contre les femmes et les filles.

J’engage les pays à procéder à des réformes fiscales et à mettre enfin un terme à la fraude fiscale, au blanchiment d’argent et aux flux financiers illicites.

Et pour l’avenir, face aux grands risques mondiaux, nous devons nous doter d’un meilleur système de prévention et de préparation ; nous devons suivre les recommandations du Groupe indépendant sur la préparation et la riposte à la pandémie.

J’ai fait de nombreuses autres propositions dans Notre Programme commun, parmi lesquelles une plateforme d’urgence et un laboratoire pour l’avenir.

Quatrièmement, nous devons combler le fossé entre les genres.

Le COVID-19 a mis à nu et exacerbé la plus vieille injustice du monde : le déséquilibre de pouvoir entre les hommes et les femmes.

Lorsque la pandémie a frappé, les femmes représentaient la majorité des travailleurs de première ligne. Elles ont été les premières à perdre leur emploi et les premières à mettre leurs carrières en suspens pour s’occuper de leurs proches.

Les fermetures d’écoles ont touché les filles de manière disproportionnée, freinant leurs parcours et augmentant les risques d'abus, de violence et de mariage d’enfants.

Combler le fossé entre les femmes et les hommes n’est pas seulement une question de justice pour les femmes et les filles.

Cela change la donne pour l’humanité tout entière.

Les sociétés plus égalitaires sont aussi plus stables et plus pacifiques. Elles ont de meilleurs systèmes de santé et des économies plus dynamiques.

L'égalité des femmes est essentiellement une question de pouvoir. Si nous voulons résoudre les problèmes les plus difficiles de notre époque, nous devons de toute urgence transformer notre monde dominé par les hommes et changer l'équilibre du pouvoir.

Cela requiert plus de femmes dirigeantes dans les parlements, les cabinets ministériels et les conseils d’administration. Cela exige que les femmes soient pleinement représentées et puissent apporter leur pleine contribution partout.  

J’exhorte les gouvernements, les entreprises et les autres organisations à prendre des mesures audacieuses, y compris des critères de référence et des quotas, pour établir la parité hommes-femmes à tous les niveaux de la hiérarchie.

A l’Organisation des Nations Unies, nous avons atteint cela au sein de l’équipe dirigeante et parmi les responsables de bureaux de pays. Nous continuerons jusqu’à ce que nous parvenions à la parité à tous les niveaux.

Dans le même temps, nous devons nous opposer aux lois régressives qui institutionnalisent la discrimination de genre. Les droits des femmes sont des droits humains.

Les plans de relance économique devraient accorder une place centrale aux femmes, notamment par des investissements à grande échelle dans l’économie des soins.

Et nous devons adopter un plan d’urgence pour lutter contre la violence de genre dans chaque pays.

Pour atteindre les Objectifs de développement durable et bâtir un monde meilleur, nous pouvons et nous devons combler le fossé entre les femmes et les hommes.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,
 
Cinquièmement, pour redonner confiance et raviver l’espoir, nous devons réduire la fracture numérique.

La moitié de l’humanité n’a pas accès à l’Internet. Nous devons faire en sorte que tout le monde soit connecté d’ici à 2030.
 
Telle est la vision de mon Plan d’action de coopération numérique : saisir les promesses du numérique tout en se prémunissant contre ses dangers.

L’un des plus grands périls auxquels nous sommes confrontés, c’est le pouvoir croissant des plateformes numériques et l’utilisation des données à des fins néfastes.

Une vaste bibliothèque d’informations est en train d’être constituée sur chacun d’entre nous. Et nous n’y avons même pas accès.

Nous ne savons pas comment ces informations ont été recueillies, par qui, ni dans quels buts.

Mais nous savons que nos données sont utilisées à des fins commerciales, pour augmenter encore les profits.

Nos comportements et habitudes deviennent des produits qui sont vendus comme des contrats à terme.

Nos données sont également utilisées pour influencer nos perceptions et nos opinions.

Les gouvernements – et d’autres entités – peuvent les exploiter pour contrôler ou manipuler le comportement des citoyens, bafouant ainsi les droits humains des individus ou groupes et sapant la démocratie.

Ce n’est pas de la science-fiction. C’est notre réalité d’aujourd’hui.

Et cela exige un débat sérieux.

Il en va de même pour d’autres dangers de l’ère numérique. 

Je suis par exemple certain que toute future confrontation majeure – et j’espère évidemment qu’une telle confrontation n’aura jamais lieu – commencera par une cyberattaque massive.

Quels cadres juridiques nous permettraient de faire face à une telle situation ?

Aujourd’hui, des armes autonomes peuvent prendre pour cible des personnes et les tuer sans intervention humaine. De telles armes devraient être interdites.

Mais il n’y a pas de consensus sur la manière de réglementer ces technologies.

Afin de rétablir la confiance et raviver l’espoir, nous devons placer les droits humains au cœur de nos efforts pour que l’avenir numérique de tous soit sûr, équitable et ouvert.

Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Sixièmement, enfin, nous devons combler le fossé entre les générations.

Les jeunes devront vivre avec les conséquences de nos décisions – bonnes et mauvaises.

Dans le même temps, à la fin du siècle, il devrait y avoir 10,9 milliards de personnes sur la planète.

Nous avons besoin de leurs talents, de leurs idées et de leur énergie.

Notre Programme commun propose qu’un sommet sur la Transformation de l’éducation soit organisé l’an prochain pour faire face à la crise de l’enseignement et offrir davantage de possibilités aux 1,8 milliard de personnes que compte la jeunesse d’aujourd’hui.

Mais les jeunes ont besoin de plus.

Ils doivent être assis à la table de négociations.

Je compte nommer un Envoyé spécial pour les générations futures et créer un bureau des Nations Unies pour la jeunesse.

Et les contributions des jeunes seront essentielles pour le Sommet sur le futur proposé dans Notre Programme commun.

Les jeunes ont besoin d’un projet porteur d’espoir pour l’avenir.

Des études récentes menées dans une dizaine de pays ont montré que l’état de notre planète plongeait la plupart des jeunes dans une angoisse et une détresse profondes.

Environ 60 % de votre futur électorat se sent trahi par son gouvernement.

Nous devons prouver aux enfants et aux jeunes que, malgré la gravité de la situation, le monde a un plan – et que les gouvernements s’engagent à le concrétiser.

Nous devons agir maintenant combler ces grands fossés et sauver l’humanité et la planète.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Si la mobilisation est réelle, nous pourrons tenir notre promesse d’un monde meilleur, plus pacifique.

C’est la force motrice de Notre Programme commun.

Le meilleur moyen pour un gouvernement de défendre les intérêts de ses propres citoyens, c’est de défendre notre avenir commun.

L’interdépendance est la logique du XXIe siècle.

C’est l’idée qui guide l’Organisation des Nations Unies.

L’heure est venue d’agir.

C’est une ère de transformation qui s’ouvre.

L’ère du renouveau du multilatéralisme.

Une ère de possibilités.

Ensemble, nous devons redonner confiance. Nous devons raviver l’espoir.

Sans plus attendre.

Je vous remercie.