Japan

20 October 2021, Tokyo

Deputy Secretary-General's virtual lecture at Sophia University on "Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and realizing youth aspirations in a disrupted world" [as prepared for delivery]

Thank you, Professor Higashi, for the introduction.
Dear Students,
Dear Chancellor Sakuma and President Terumichi,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

It is a pleasure to be with you today.

Thank you, Chancellor Sakuma and President Terumichi, for this wonderful opportunity to connect with all of you at Sophia University.

Many of you are no doubt joining today’s conversation with an eye to your own futures.

And I can understand if – looking both around and ahead – you see many reasons for anxiety and uncertainty.

SHIRAHASE  Sawako Senior Vice-Rector

SHIRAHASE Sawako

Senior Vice-Rector

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres announced on 13 September 2021 the appointment of Sawako Shirahase of Japan as Senior Vice-Rector of the United Nations University (UNU). 

She will succeed Taikan Oki of Japan to whom the Secretary-General is grateful for his contributions to UNU’s work on water issues in connection to climate change and his initiative to engage the private sector in implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through the ‘SDG Corporate Strategy Forum’.

09 August 2021, Nagasaki, Japan

Secretary-General's Message to the Nagasaki Peace Memorial on the 76th Anniversary of the Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki

Delivered by Ms. Izumi Nakamitsu, Under-Secretary-General and United Nations High Representative for Disarmament Affairs

Excellencies,
Brave hibakusha,
Ladies and gentlemen,

It is an honour to send this message to the Nagasaki Peace Memorial, seventy-six years after an atomic bomb unleashed a catastrophe in this vibrant city.

I continue to be humbled by the selfless acts of the hibakusha. Your courage in the face of immense human tragedy is a beacon of hope for humanity.

Thank you for continuing to spread your powerful testimony.

08 October 2020, Japan

Secretary-General's video message to the Ministerial Meeting on Universal Health Coverage: "Measuring Progress, Challenges and Opportunities in the Context of COVID-19”

I send my warmest greetings to this ministerial meeting and my thanks to the co-hosts.
 
A year ago, I warned that half the world’s people were not able to access affordable, high quality healthcare.
 
Today, the COVID-19 pandemic has shown that our health systems are inadequate.
 
Weak health systems and unequal access to healthcare are major reasons why COVID-19 has killed one million people and infected more than 30 million around the world.  
 

03 September 2020, Japan

Secretary-General's video remarks to Japan Ministerial Meeting on Sustainable and Resilient Socio-Economic Systems in the Process of Recovery from COVID-19

Prime Minister Abe, Minister Koizumi, Excellencies, Ladies and gentlemen,
 
I thank the Government of Japan for convening this meeting to consider how to forge a sustainable recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, and Minister Koizumi for his hard work on climate.
 
The decisions being taken now will have consequences for decades.
 
This is why I have been urging governments to incorporate meaningful climate action in all aspects of recovery initiatives.
 
I have proposed six climate-positive actions to recover better.
 

09 August 2020, Nagasaki

Secretary-General's message to Nagasaki Peace Memorial Ceremony on the 75th Anniversary of the Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki

Delivered by Ms. Izumi Nakamitsu, Under Secretary-General and United Nations High Representative for Disarmament Affairs

Excellencies,

Brave hibakusha, Ladies and gentlemen,

It is a privilege to greet the Peace Memorial Ceremony, commemorating the seventy-fifth anniversary of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki.

This city is a true example of resilience, recovery and reconciliation. Citizens of Nagasaki are not defined by the atomic bombing, but they are dedicated to ensuring such a catastrophe never befalls another city or people. The international community remains grateful for that dedication to achieving a world free of nuclear weapons. 

06 August 2020, Hiroshima, Japan

Secretary-General's video message to event hosted by Hiroshima Prefecture: "UN75 IN Hiroshima"

I am pleased to send greetings to this dialogue on “UN75 in Hiroshima”.
 
This year marks seventy-five years since the United Nations was born from the ashes of the Second World War.
 
It also marks three quarters of a century since the atomic incineration of Hiroshima and Nagasaki heralded the advent of terrible new weapons that pose an existential threat to humanity.
 
Since 1945, one of the United Nations’ top priorities has been the elimination of nuclear weapons.
 

06 August 2020, Hiroshima

Secretary-General's Video Message to Hiroshima Peace Memorial Ceremony

I am honoured to greet the Peace Memorial Ceremony and to pay tribute to the victims of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

Seventy-five years ago, a single nuclear weapon visited unspeakable death and destruction upon this city.

The effects linger to this day.

This city and its people, however, have chosen not to be characterized by calamity, but instead by resilience, reconciliation and hope.

As unmatched advocates for nuclear disarmament, the hibakusha have turned their tragedy into a rallying voice for the safety and well-being of all humanity.

29 August 2019, Yokohama

Remarks at TICAD VII session on climate change and disaster risk reduction

Secretary-General António Guterres addresses the media at the Seventh Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD), taking place in Yokohama, Japan. UN Japan/Ichiro Mae

Excellencies,
Ladies and gentlemen,
 
I am pleased to be with you today to discuss the critical issue of reducing the risk of disasters flowing from the impacts of climate change.
 
I can think of no more appropriate place to be discussing this subject than here in Japan, where the Sendai Framework was agreed as a global blueprint for reducing risk and building resilience.
 
Little undermines development like disaster.
 
Decades of sustainable development gains can be wiped out overnight.