New York

11 March 2021

Secretary-General's Briefing to the Security Council on Conflict and Food Security [bilingual, as delivered; please scroll down for all-English and all-French versions]

Madam President, Excellencies,

Thank you for this opportunity to brief you on the links between conflict and hunger – an urgent and important issue.

Today I have one simple message: if you don’t feed people, you feed conflict.

Conflict drives hunger and famine; and hunger and famine drive conflict.

When a country or region is gripped by conflict and hunger, they become mutually reinforcing. They cannot be resolved separately.

Hunger and poverty combine with inequality, climate shocks, sectarian and ethnic tensions, and grievances over land and resources, to spark and drive conflict.

At the same time, conflict forces people to leave their homes, land and jobs; disrupts agriculture and trade; reduces access to vital resources like water and electricity, and so drives hunger.

The Nobel Committee recognized this link when it awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to the World Food Programme – a powerful call to action, recognizing the importance of food security to building peace and stability.

We have made enormous inroads into hunger over recent decades, thanks to improved productivity, and reductions in global poverty.

Famine and hunger are no longer about lack of food. They are now largely man-made – and I use the term deliberately.

They are concentrated in countries affected by large-scale, protracted conflict.

And they are rising.

At the end of 2020, more than 88 million people were suffering from acute hunger due to conflict and instability - a 20 percent increase in one year.

Projections for 2021 point to a continuation of this frightening trend.

I must warn the Council that we face multiple conflict-driven famines around the world.

Climate shocks and the COVID-19 pandemic are adding fuel to the flames.

Without immediate action, millions of people will reach the brink of extreme hunger and death.

Projections show hunger crises escalating and spreading across the Sahel and the Horn of Africa, and accelerating in South Sudan, Yemen and Afghanistan. 

There are more than 30 million people in over three dozen countries, just one step away from a declaration of famine.

Women and girls face a double risk. They are more likely to be forced from their homes by conflict; and they are more vulnerable to malnutrition, particularly when pregnant or breastfeeding. Girls who are hungry are at increased risk of trafficking, forced marriage and other abuses.

Food insecurity is worsened by the reduction of humanitarian access.

I am deeply concerned about the situation in Tigray, Ethiopia, where the harvest season has been disrupted by insecurity and violence, and hundreds of thousands of people could be experiencing hunger.

Madam President,

In some countries, famine is already here.

People are dying from hunger, and suffering critical rates of malnutrition.

Parts of Yemen, South Sudan and Burkina Faso are in the grip of famine or conditions akin to famine. More than 150,000 people are at risk of starving.

In Yemen, five years of conflict have displaced 4 million people across the country. Many Yemenis are facing a death sentence as widespread hunger stalks their nation.

Around half of all children under five – 2.3 million – are projected to face acute malnutrition in 2021. Some 16 million people face food insecurity.

South Sudan is facing its highest levels of food insecurity since the country declared independence ten years ago. Sixty percent of the population are increasingly hungry.

Food prices are so high that just one plate of rice and beans costs more than 180 per cent of the average daily salary – the equivalent of about $400 here in New York.

Chronic sporadic violence, extreme weather and the economic impact of COVID-19 have pushed more than seven million people into acute food insecurity.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo experienced the world’s largest food crisis last year, with nearly 21.8 million people facing acute hunger between July and December.

The targeting of WFP vehicles in the east of the country last month, and the tragic killing of our colleague Moustapha Milambo, as well as the Italian ambassador Luca Attanasio and his security officer Vittorio Iacovacci, are the starkest possible illustration of the dark alliance between hunger and conflict.

Madam President,

This is the devastating reality in conflict zones around the world.

We have a responsibility to do everything in our power to reverse these trends, starting by preventing famine.

Last September, the Secretariat provided a White Paper outlining the risks of famine in four countries.

The situation has only grown more urgent.

Hunger and death begin long before the highest levels of food insecurity.

We must anticipate, and act now.

I have therefore decided to establish a High-Level Task Force on Preventing Famine, led by my Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Mark Lowcock.

This Task Force will include representatives from the World Food Programme and the Food and Agriculture Organization. It will bring coordinated, high-level attention to famine prevention, and mobilize support to the most affected countries.

I have also asked Under-Secretary-General Lowcock to draw on the support of other Inter-Agency Standing Committee members and obviously including UNICEF, the World Health Organization, UNHCR, the UN Development Programme, UNFPA and UN Women.

The group will cooperate with the Non-Governmental Organizations who are our vital partners in feeding the hungry around the world.

It will also work with international financial institutions and other specialized UN agencies, including the International Fund for Agricultural Development.

I urge all Members of this Council to support the Task Force in every way possible, and to do everything in your power to take urgent action to prevent famine.

Madam President,

Our most serious concern must be the more than 34 million people who already face emergency levels of acute food insecurity.

WFP and FAO have appealed for the emergency mobilization of $5.5 billion in extraordinary resources, to avert catastrophe for these 34 million women, men, girls and boys.

These resources are needed for a comprehensive package of life-saving aid, including the distribution of food, cash and vouchers; targeted support for agriculture; and medical treatment for people already suffering from acute malnutrition.

While all countries face some economic strain as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the solution does not lie in cutting aid to starving children.

The disappointing outcome of last week’s High-Level Pledging Event on Yemen cannot become a pattern.

I ask all countries to reconsider their responsibilities and their capacities.

The relatively small amounts of money involved in humanitarian aid are an investment not only in people, but an investment in peace.

Madame la Présidente,

Les personnes souffrant de faim aiguë doivent pouvoir accéder à la nourriture et à une assistance vitale en toute sécurité, en particulier durant des conflits armés.

Conformément à la résolution 2417 de ce Conseil et sur la base du droit international humanitaire, les biens et les produits indispensables à la survie des populations civiles tels que les denrées alimentaires, les récoltes et le bétail, doivent être protégés dans les conflits.

L’accès humanitaire ne doit pas être entravé et l’utilisation de la famine comme méthode de guerre est interdite.

Malheureusement, nous ne manquons pas d’exemples récents d’utilisation de la famine comme tactique de guerre.

Le conflit en Syrie a soumis des millions de civils à de terribles conditions, ce qui dans certains cas revenait à les réduire à la famine.

En 2017, la famine a été déclarée dans certaines parties du Soudan du Sud, l’accès humanitaire ayant été systématiquement refusé à la population.

Et au Myanmar, des éléments montrent que la faim, due à la destruction des terres agricoles et des villages ainsi qu’aux restrictions de mouvement, a été utilisée contre les Rohingyas.

L’utilisation délibérée de la famine comme méthode de guerre constitue un crime de guerre.

J’exhorte les membres du Conseil à agir par tous les moyens pour que les responsables de ces actes atroces soient amenés à rendre des comptes, et à rappeler aux parties aux conflits les obligations qui leur incombent dans le cadre du droit international humanitaire.

Madam President,

Addressing hunger is a foundation for stability and peace.

We need to tackle both hunger and conflict, if we are to solve either.

Our blueprint for reducing hunger is the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and particularly SDG2 on Zero Hunger.

We need to transform our food systems to make them more inclusive, resilient and sustainable.

This will be one of the key issues of the Food Systems Summit that I will convene later this year.

At the same time, ending hunger requires us to find political solutions to conflict.

I urge all states to make ending conflict, not simply mitigating its impact, a key foreign policy priority.

I call on Council members to use your privileged position to do everything in your power to end violence, negotiate peace, and alleviate the hunger and suffering that afflict so many millions of people around the world. 

There is no place for famine and starvation in the 21st century.

Thank you.

***
All-English version

Madam President, Excellencies,

Thank you for this opportunity to brief you on the links between conflict and hunger – an urgent and important issue.

Today I have one simple message: if you don’t feed people, you feed conflict.

Conflict drives hunger and famine; and hunger and famine drive conflict.

When a country or region is gripped by conflict and hunger, they become mutually reinforcing. They cannot be resolved separately.

Hunger and poverty combine with inequality, climate shocks, sectarian and ethnic tensions, and grievances over land and resources, to spark and drive conflict.

At the same time, conflict forces people to leave their homes, land and jobs; disrupts agriculture and trade; reduces access to vital resources like water and electricity, and so drives hunger.

The Nobel Committee recognized this link when it awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to the World Food Programme – a powerful call to action, recognizing the importance of food security to building peace and stability.

We have made enormous inroads into hunger over recent decades, thanks to improved productivity, and reductions in global poverty.

Famine and hunger are no longer about lack of food. They are now largely man-made – and I use the term deliberately.

They are concentrated in countries affected by large-scale, protracted conflict.

And they are rising.

At the end of 2020, more than 88 million people were suffering from acute hunger due to conflict and instability - a 20 percent increase in one year.

Projections for 2021 point to a continuation of this frightening trend.

I must warn the Council that we face multiple conflict-driven famines around the world.

Climate shocks and the COVID-19 pandemic are adding fuel to the flames.

Without immediate action, millions of people will reach the brink of extreme hunger and death.

Projections show hunger crises escalating and spreading across the Sahel and the Horn of Africa, and accelerating in South Sudan, Yemen and Afghanistan. 

There are more than 30 million people in over three dozen countries, just one step away from a declaration of famine.

Women and girls face a double risk. They are more likely to be forced from their homes by conflict; and they are more vulnerable to malnutrition, particularly when pregnant or breastfeeding. Girls who are hungry are at increased risk of trafficking, forced marriage and other abuses.

Food insecurity is worsened by the reduction of humanitarian access.

I am deeply concerned about the situation in Tigray, Ethiopia, where the harvest season has been disrupted by insecurity and violence, and hundreds of thousands of people could be experiencing hunger.

Madam President,

In some countries, famine is already here.

People are dying from hunger, and suffering critical rates of malnutrition.

Parts of Yemen, South Sudan and Burkina Faso are in the grip of famine or conditions akin to famine. More than 150,000 people are at risk of starving.

In Yemen, five years of conflict have displaced 4 million people across the country. Many Yemenis are facing a death sentence as widespread hunger stalks their nation.

Around half of all children under five – 2.3 million – are projected to face acute malnutrition in 2021. Some 16 million people face food insecurity.

South Sudan is facing its highest levels of food insecurity since the country declared independence ten years ago. Sixty percent of the population are increasingly hungry.

Food prices are so high that just one plate of rice and beans costs more than 180 per cent of the average daily salary – the equivalent of about $400 here in New York.

Chronic sporadic violence, extreme weather and the economic impact of COVID-19 have pushed more than seven million people into acute food insecurity.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo experienced the world’s largest food crisis last year, with nearly 21.8 million people facing acute hunger between July and December.

The targeting of WFP vehicles in the east of the country last month, and the tragic killing of our colleague Moustapha Milambo, as well as the Italian ambassador Luca Attanasio and his security officer Vittorio Iacovacci, are the starkest possible illustration of the dark alliance between hunger and conflict.

Madam President,

This is the devastating reality in conflict zones around the world.

We have a responsibility to do everything in our power to reverse these trends, starting by preventing famine.

Last September, the Secretariat provided a White Paper outlining the risks of famine in four countries.

The situation has only grown more urgent.

Hunger and death begin long before the highest levels of food insecurity.

We must anticipate, and act now.

I have therefore decided to establish a High-Level Task Force on Preventing Famine, led by my Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Mark Lowcock.

This Task Force will include representatives from the World Food Programme and the Food and Agriculture Organization. It will bring coordinated, high-level attention to famine prevention, and mobilize support to the most affected countries.

I have also asked Under-Secretary-General Lowcock to draw on the support of other Inter-Agency Standing Committee members and obviously including UNICEF, the World Health Organization, UNHCR, the UN Development Programme, UNFPA and UN Women.

The group will cooperate with the Non-Governmental Organizations who are our vital partners in feeding the hungry around the world.

It will also work with international financial institutions and other specialized UN agencies, including the International Fund for Agricultural Development.

I urge all Members of this Council to support the Task Force in every way possible, and to do everything in your power to take urgent action to prevent famine.

Madam President,

Our most serious concern must be the more than 34 million people who already face emergency levels of acute food insecurity.

WFP and FAO have appealed for the emergency mobilization of $5.5 billion in extraordinary resources, to avert catastrophe for these 34 million women, men, girls and boys.

These resources are needed for a comprehensive package of life-saving aid, including the distribution of food, cash and vouchers; targeted support for agriculture; and medical treatment for people already suffering from acute malnutrition.

While all countries face some economic strain as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the solution does not lie in cutting aid to starving children.

The disappointing outcome of last week’s High-Level Pledging Event on Yemen cannot become a pattern.

I ask all countries to reconsider their responsibilities and their capacities.

The relatively small amounts of money involved in humanitarian aid are an investment not only in people, but an investment in peace.

Madam President,

People facing acute hunger must be able to access food and life-saving assistance in safety, particularly during armed conflict.

In accordance with resolution 2417 of this Council, and underpinned by international humanitarian law, goods and supplies that are essential to civilians’ survival – including food, crops and livestock – must be protected in conflict.

Humanitarian access must be unimpeded, and the starvation of civilians as a method of war is prohibited.

Sadly, we have many recent examples of the use of starvation as a war tactic.

The conflict in Syria subjected millions of civilians to extreme conditions, in some cases amounting to starvation.

Famine was declared in some areas of South Sudan in 2017, when people were systematically denied access to humanitarian assistance.

And in Myanmar, there is evidence that starvation, through the destruction of farmland and villages together with restrictions on movement, was used against the Rohingya.

The intentional use of the starvation of civilians as a method of waging war is a war crime.

I urge members of this Council to take maximum action to seek accountability for these atrocious acts, and to remind parties to conflict of their obligations under international humanitarian law.

Madam President,

Addressing hunger is a foundation for stability and peace.

We need to tackle both hunger and conflict, if we are to solve either.

Our blueprint for reducing hunger is the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and particularly SDG2 on Zero Hunger.

We need to transform our food systems to make them more inclusive, resilient and sustainable.

This will be one of the key issues of the Food Systems Summit that I will convene later this year.

At the same time, ending hunger requires us to find political solutions to conflict.

I urge all states to make ending conflict, not simply mitigating its impact, a key foreign policy priority.

I call on Council members to use your privileged position to do everything in your power to end violence, negotiate peace, and alleviate the hunger and suffering that afflict so many millions of people around the world. 

There is no place for famine and starvation in the 21st century.

Thank you.

***
All-French version

Madame la Présidente, Excellences,

Je vous remercie de l’occasion qui m’est donnée de m’adresser à vous au sujet des liens entre les conflits et la faim, une question pressante et importante.

Aujourd’hui, le message que je tiens à faire passer est simple : si vous ne nourrissez pas les gens, vous nourrissez les conflits.

Les conflits entraînent la faim et la famine ; la faim et la famine conduisent à des conflits.

Les conflits et la faim, lorsqu’ils frappent un pays ou une région, se renforcent mutuellement et ne peuvent être éliminés séparément.

La faim et la pauvreté, associés aux inégalités, aux chocs climatiques, aux tensions confessionnelles et ethniques et aux griefs concernant les terres et les ressources, déclenchent des conflits.

Dans le même temps, les conflits amènent des personnes à quitter leur foyer, leur terre et leur emploi, bouleversent les activités agricoles et les échanges commerciaux et limitent l’accès aux ressources vitales telles que l’eau et l’électricité et entraîne la faim.

Le Comité Nobel a reconnu cette corrélation lorsqu’il a décerné le prix Nobel de la paix au Programme alimentaire mondial : ce puissant appel à l’action fait comprendre que la sécurité alimentaire est essentielle pour instaurer la paix et la stabilité.

Ces dernières décennies, l’amélioration de la productivité et le recul de la pauvreté dans le monde nous ont permis de faire d’énormes progrès en matière de lutte contre la faim.

La famine et la faim ne sont plus une question de manque de nourriture. Elles sont aujourd’hui en grande partie produites par l’homme – et j’emploie ce terme à dessein.

Elles frappent surtout des pays touchés par des conflits prolongés et de grande envergure.

Et la situation empire.

Fin 2020, plus de 88 millions de personnes souffraient cruellement de la faim en raison des conflits et de l’instabilité – ce chiffre a augmenté de 20 % en l’espace d’un an.

D’après les prévisions pour 2021, cette situation effrayante devrait perdurer.

Je dois alerter le Conseil : nous devons faire face à de multiples famines entraînées par des conflits dans le monde entier.

Les chocs climatiques et la pandémie de maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) attisent le feu.

En l’absence de mesures immédiates, des millions de personnes risquent de basculer dans la faim extrême et de perdre la vie.

D’après les estimations, les crises alimentaires s’accentuent et se propagent dans l’ensemble du Sahel et de la Corne de l’Afrique, et s’installent de plus en plus rapidement au Soudan du Sud, au Yémen et en Afghanistan.

Plus de 30 millions de personnes dans plus d’une trentaine de pays sont au bord de la famine.

Les femmes et les filles doivent faire face à un double danger: elles risquent davantage d’avoir à quitter leur foyer en raison du conflit et elles sont plus vulnérables à la malnutrition, notamment lorsqu’elles sont enceintes ou allaitent. Lorsqu’elles souffrent de la faim, les filles risquent davantage d’être victimes de la traite, de mariage forcé ou d’autres atteintes.

L’insécurité alimentaire est aggravée par la restriction de l’accès humanitaire.

Je suis profondément préoccupé par la situation au Tigré (Éthiopie), où la saison des récoltes a été perturbée par l’insécurité et la violence et où des centaines de milliers de personnes pourraient souffrir de la faim.

Madame la Présidente,

Dans certains pays, la famine est déjà là.

Des gens meurent de faim et souffrent massivement de malnutrition.

Au Yémen, au Soudan du Sud et au Burkina Faso, des régions sont en proie à la famine ou dans une situation proche de la famine. Plus de 150 000 personnes risquent de mourir de faim.

Au Yémen, cinq années de conflit ont entraîné le déplacement de 4 millions de personnes dans tout le pays. Un grand nombre de Yéménites sont en danger de mort à mesure que la faim se généralise dans tout le pays.

On estime qu’en 2021, la malnutrition aiguë devrait toucher la moitié des enfants de moins de cinq ans (2,3 millions). Environ 16 millions de personnes connaissent l’insécurité alimentaire.

Depuis que le Soudan du Sud a déclaré son indépendance il y a 10 ans, l’insécurité alimentaire n’a jamais atteint un niveau aussi élevé qu’aujourd’hui. Soixante pour cent de la population souffre de plus en plus de la faim.

Les prix des denrées alimentaires sont si élevés qu’une seule assiette de riz et de haricots coûte plus de 180 % du salaire journalier moyen, ce qui correspond à environ 400 dollars ici à New York.

Les violences sporadiques persistantes, les phénomènes météorologiques extrêmes et les répercussions économiques de la COVID-19 ont plongé plus de sept millions de personnes dans une insécurité alimentaire sévère.

L’an dernier, la République démocratique du Congo a connu la plus grande crise alimentaire au monde : près de 21,8 millions de personnes ont souffert de faim aiguë entre juillet et décembre.

Les véhicules du Programme alimentaire mondial pris pour cible dans l’est du pays le mois dernier et le meurtre tragique de notre collègue Moustapha Milambo, ainsi que de l'ambassadeur italien Luca Attanasio et de son officier de sécurité Vittorio Iacovacci, illustrent de la manière la plus brutale qui soit les sombres conséquences de l’association de la faim et des conflits.

Madame la Présidente,

Telle est l’effroyable réalité dans les zones de conflit, partout dans le monde.

Il nous incombe de faire tout ce que nous pouvons pour inverser le cours des choses, tout d’abord en prévenant la famine.

En septembre dernier, le Secrétariat a établi un livre blanc qui présente les risques de famine dans quatre pays.

L’urgence de la situation n’a fait que croître.

Les gens souffrent de la faim et perdent la vie bien avant que l’insécurité alimentaire ne soit au plus haut niveau.

Il nous faut prendre les devants et agir maintenant.

J’ai donc décidé de créer un groupe spécial de haut niveau sur la prévention de la famine, qui sera dirigé par le Secrétaire général adjoint aux affaires humanitaires et Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence, Mark Lowcock.

Ce groupe sera composé de représentants du Programme alimentaire mondiale et de l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture. Il contribuera à ce que la question de la prévention de la famine soit examinée de manière concertée à un haut niveau et à ce qu’une aide soit fournie aux pays les plus touchés.

J’ai en outre demandé à M. Lowcock de s’appuyer autant que nécessaire sur d’autres membres du Comité permanent interorganisations, qui inclut évidemment l’UNICEF, l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé, le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement, le Fonds des Nations Unies pour la population et ONU-Femmes.

Le groupe coopèrera avec les organisations non gouvernementales, des partenaires qui contribuent de manière essentielle à nos côtés à soulager la faim dans le monde.

Il œuvrera également en collaboration avec les institutions financières internationales et d’autres institutions spécialisées des Nations Unies, dont le Fonds international de développement agricole.

J’invite instamment tous les membres du Conseil à soutenir par tous les moyens ce groupe spécial et à mettre tout en œuvre pour prendre des mesures urgentes de prévention de la famine.

Madame la Présidente,

Nous devons nous préoccuper avant tout de cette population de plus de 34 millions de personnes déjà aux prises avec une insécurité alimentaire qui a atteint un niveau critique.

Le Programme alimentaire mondial et l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture ont lancé un appel à la mobilisation urgente de 5,5 milliards de dollars de ressources extraordinaires afin que ces 34 millions de femmes, d’hommes, de filles et de garçons échappent à une catastrophe.

Ces ressources sont nécessaires à un ensemble de mesures visant à fournir une aide vitale, qui comprend la distribution de nourriture, d’argent en espèces et de bons d’alimentation, l’aide adaptée à l’agriculture et les soins médicaux à ceux qui souffrent déjà de malnutrition aigüe.

Certes, tous les pays rencontrent des difficultés économiques résultant de la pandémie de COVID-19 mais supprimer l’aide aux enfants qui meurent de faim n’est pas la solution.

La manifestation de haut niveau pour les annonces de contributions relatives à la crise humanitaire au Yémen n’a pas répondu à nos attentes, il ne faudrait pas que cela se reproduise.

Je demande à tous les pays de réfléchir à nouveau aux responsabilités et aux capacités qui sont les leurs.

Les sommes relativement modestes qui vont à l’aide humanitaire permettent d’investir non seulement dans la population mais aussi dans la paix.

Madame la Présidente,

Les personnes souffrant de faim aiguë doivent pouvoir accéder à la nourriture et à une assistance vitale en toute sécurité, en particulier durant des conflits armés.

Conformément à la résolution 2417 de ce Conseil et sur la base du droit international humanitaire, les biens et les produits indispensables à la survie des populations civiles tels que les denrées alimentaires, les récoltes et le bétail, doivent être protégés dans les conflits.

L’accès humanitaire ne doit pas être entravé et l’utilisation de la famine comme méthode de guerre est interdite.

Malheureusement, nous ne manquons pas d’exemples récents d’utilisation de la famine comme tactique de guerre.

Le conflit en Syrie a soumis des millions de civils à de terribles conditions, ce qui dans certains cas revenait à les réduire à la famine.

En 2017, la famine a été déclarée dans certaines parties du Soudan du Sud, l’accès humanitaire ayant été systématiquement refusé à la population.

Et au Myanmar, des éléments montrent que la faim, due à la destruction des terres agricoles et des villages ainsi qu’aux restrictions de mouvement, a été utilisée contre les Rohingyas.

L’utilisation délibérée de la famine comme méthode de guerre constitue un crime de guerre.

J’exhorte les membres du Conseil à agir par tous les moyens pour que les responsables de ces actes atroces soient amenés à rendre des comptes, et à rappeler aux parties aux conflits les obligations qui leur incombent dans le cadre du droit international humanitaire.

Madame la Présidente,

Remédier à la faim permet de jeter les bases de la stabilité et de la paix.

Il faut nous attaquer en même temps à la faim et aux conflits si nous voulons régler l’un ou l’autre problème.

Notre plan pour la réduction de la faim est le Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030, et en particulier l’objectif 2 : Faim zéro.

Nous devons transformer nos systèmes alimentaires pour qu’ils profitent à tous et pour les rendre plus résilients et durables.

Cette question sera au cœur du Sommet des Nations Unies sur les systèmes alimentaires, que je convoquerai l’année prochaine.

Dans le même temps, pour éliminer la faim nous devons trouver des solutions politiques aux conflits.

J’invite instamment tous les États à faire en sorte que la cessation des conflits, et non pas simplement l’atténuation de leurs effets, soit une priorité majeure de leur politique étrangère.

Je demande aux membres du Conseil d’user de leur position privilégiée pour agir autant qu’ils le pourront en vue de mettre fin à la violence, de négocier la paix et de soulager la faim et les souffrances qui touchent des millions et des millions de personnes dans le monde.

La famine et la privation de nourriture n’ont pas lieu d’être au XXIe siècle.

Je vous remercie.