New York

22 February 2021

Secretary-General's Message to the Opening of the 46th Regular Session of the Human Rights Council - as delivered [scroll down for all English and French]

Distinguished President of the Human Rights Council,
Madam High Commissioner,
Excellencies,
Ladies and gentlemen,

Human rights are our bloodline; they connect us to one another, as equals.

Human rights are our lifeline; they are the pathway to resolving tensions and forging lasting peace.

And, human rights are on the frontline; they are the building blocks of a world of dignity and opportunity for all – and they are under fire every day.

The Human Rights Council is the global locus for tackling the full range of human rights challenges. 

I thank you for that vital work — and welcome the engagement of Member States and civil society.

One year ago, I came before you to launch a Call to Action for Human Rights.

We named this values-based and dignity-driven appeal “The Highest Aspiration” — drawing from the words of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights itself. 

That phrase is a reminder that securing human rights is both essential and a constant work in progress.    

Gains can be easily undone. 

Perils can strike in any instant.

Mesdames et Messieurs,
 
Peu de temps après notre rassemblement de l’année dernière, le COVID-19 a déferlé sur la planète.
 
La pandémie a mis en évidence les liens qui unissent notre grande famille humaine, mais aussi ceux qui relient les droits humains dans toute leur diversité, qu’ils soient civils, culturels, économiques, politiques ou sociaux.
 
Le COVID-19 a non seulement creusé les fossés qui nous séparent, aggravé les vulnérabilités et renforcé les inégalités, mais aussi ouvert de nouvelles lignes de faille, y compris en termes de droits humains. 
 
Les violations se multiplient pour former un cercle vicieux. 
 
Des centaines de millions de familles ont vu leur vie bouleversée par la perte d’un emploi, par l’accumulation des dettes, par l’effondrement des revenus.
 
La pandémie a affecté de manière disproportionnée les femmes, les minorités, les personnes âgées, les personnes en situation de handicap, les réfugiés, les migrants et les peuples autochtones.
 
Des années de progrès en matière d’égalité des genres ont été réduits à néant.
 
Pour la première fois depuis des décennies, l’extrême pauvreté gagne du terrain.
 
La jeunesse souffre : leur éducation a été interrompue et nombre d’entre eux n’ont qu’un accès limité aux nouvelles technologies. 
 
L’incapacité d’assurer un accès équitable aux vaccins représente une nouvelle faillite morale. 
 
À eux seuls, dix pays se sont partagés plus de trois quarts des doses de vaccin contre le COVID-19 administrées à ce jour. 
 
L'équité en matière de vaccins représente une étape décisive dans la réalisation des droits humains. Le nationalisme vaccinal nous renvoie en arrière. 
 
Les vaccins doivent être un bien public mondial, accessibles et abordables pour tous. 
 
Le virus s’attaque aussi aux droits politiques et civils et réduit davantage encore les espaces civiques d’expression.
 
Brandissant la pandémie comme prétexte, les autorités de certains pays ont pris des mesures de sécurité sévères et adopté des mesures d’urgence pour réprimer les voix dissonantes, abolir les libertés les plus fondamentales, faire taire les médias indépendants et entraver le travail des organisations non gouvernementales.
 
Des défenseurs des droits humains, des journalistes, des avocats, des militants, et même des professionnels de la santé, ont fait l’objet d’arrestations, de poursuites et de mesures d’intimidation et de surveillance pour avoir critiqué les mesures – ou le manque de mesures – prises pour faire face à la pandémie.
Les restrictions liées à la pandémie servent d’excuse pour miner les processus électoraux, affaiblir les voix des opposants et réprimer les critiques.
 
L’accès à des informations vitales a parfois été entravé, tandis que la désinformation mortelle a été amplifiée, y compris par quelques dirigeants.

Excellencies,

The COVID-19 infodemic has raised alarms more generally about the growing reach of digital platforms and the use and abuse of data.
 
A vast library of information is being assembled about each of us. Yet we don’t really have the keys to that library. 

We don’t know how this information has been collected, by whom or for what purposes.
 
That data is being used commercially — for advertising, for marketing and for beefing up corporate bottom lines.  

Behavior patterns are being commodified and sold like futures contracts.

This has created new business models and entirely new industries that have contributed to an ever-greater concentration of wealth and inequality.
 
Our data is also being used to shape and manipulate our perceptions, without our ever realizing it.  
 
Governments can exploit that data to control the behavior of their own citizens, violating human rights of individuals or groups.  
 
All of this is not science fiction or a forecast of a 22nd-century dystopia.  

It is here and now.  And it requires a serious discussion.  
 
We have developed a Roadmap for Digital Cooperation to find a way forward.
 
And, I urge all Member States to place human rights at the centre of regulatory frameworks and legislation on the development and use of digital technologies.
 
We need a safe, equitable and open digital future that does not infringe on privacy or dignity.

Excellencies,

Our Human Rights Call to Action is a comprehensive framework to advance our most important work — from sustainable development to climate action, from protecting fundamental freedoms to gender equality, the preservation of civic space and ensuring that digital technology is a force for good.

Today, I come before you with a sense of urgency to do even more to bring our Human Rights Call to Action to life.

I want to focus on two areas where the imperative for action is great — and the scale of the challenge looms large.

First, the blight of racism, discrimination and xenophobia. 

And, second, the most pervasive human rights violation of all: gender inequality. 

These evils are fed by two of the deepest wells of injustice in our world: the legacy of centuries of colonialism; and the persistence, across the millennia, of patriarchy.

The linkages between racism and gender inequality are also unmistakable. Some of the worst impacts of both are in the overlaps and intersections of discrimination suffered by women from racial and ethnic minority groups.

Stoking the fires of racism, anti-Semitism, anti-Muslim bigotry, violence against some minority Christian communities, homophobia, xenophobia and misogyny is nothing new.

It has just become more overt, easier to achieve, and globalized.

When we allow the denigration of any of us, we set the precedent for the demonization of all of us.

Excellencies,

The rot of racism eats away at institutions, social structures and everyday life — sometimes invisibly and insidiously.

I welcome the new awakening in the global fight for racial justice, a surge of resistance against being reduced or ignored —often led by women and young people.

As they have highlighted, we have a long way to go.

I commend the Human Rights Council decision to report on systemic racism, accountability and redress, and responses to peaceful anti-racism protests — and look forward to concrete action.

We must also step up the fight against resurgent neo-Nazism, white supremacy and racially and ethnically motivated terrorism.   
 
The danger of these hate-driven movements is growing by the day. 
 
Let us call them what they are:  

White supremacy and neo-Nazi movements are more than domestic terror threats.  

They are becoming a transnational threat.
 
These and other groups have exploited the pandemic to boost their ranks through social polarization and political and cultural manipulation.   
 
Today, these extremist movements represent the number one internal security threat in several countries. 
 
Individuals and groups are engaged in a feeding frenzy of hate — fundraising, recruiting and communicating online both at home and overseas, travelling internationally to train together and network their hateful ideologies.   

Far too often, these hate groups are cheered on by people in positions of responsibility in ways that were considered unimaginable not long ago. 
 
We need global coordinated action to defeat this grave and growing danger.

Excellencies,

We must also place a special focus on safeguarding the rights of minority communities, many of whom are under threat around the world.

Minority communities are part of the richness of our cultural and social fabric. 

Just as biodiversity is fundamental to human well-being, the diversity of communities is fundamental to humanity.

Yet we see not only forms of discrimination but also policies of assimilation that seek to wipe out the cultural and religious identity of minority communities. 

When a minority community’s culture, language or faith are under attack, all of us are diminished.

When authorities cast suspicion on entire groups under the guise of security, all of us are threatened.

These measures are doomed to backfire. 

We must continue to push for policies that fully respect human rights and religious, cultural and unique human identity.

And we must simultaneously nurture the conditions for each community to feel that they are fully part of society as a whole.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants, 
 
Aucune atteinte aux droits humains n’est plus répandue que l’inégalité de genre.
 
La pandémie de COVID-19 a encore exacerbé la discrimination tenace à l’égard des femmes et des filles.
 
La crise a un visage féminin. 
 
En effet, la plupart des travailleurs en première ligne sont des femmes, dont beaucoup appartiennent à des groupes ethniques et raciaux marginalisés et se situent au bas de l’échelle économique. 
 
Le fardeau accru des soins à domicile est principalement assumé par les femmes. 
 
La violence à l’égard des femmes et des filles a explosé sous toutes ses formes, des agressions en ligne à la violence domestique, en passant par la traite, l’exploitation sexuelle et le mariage d’enfants. 
 
Les femmes sont proportionnellement plus touchées par les pertes d’emploi et ont été précipitées dans la pauvreté en plus grand nombre.
 
Cela vient aggraver une situation socioéconomique déjà fragile en raison de leurs revenus inférieurs, de l’écart salarial, de l’inégalité des chances et d’un accès réduit aux ressources et aux mesures de protection. 
 
Rien de tout cela n’est dû au hasard. 
 
Il s’agit là du résultat de générations d’exclusion.
 
Et, en définitive, d’une question de pouvoir. 
 
Un monde et une culture dominés par les hommes donneront des résultats dominés par les hommes. 
 
Dans le même temps, la réponse au COVID-19 a mis en évidence le pouvoir et l’efficacité du leadership des femmes.
 
La vie des femmes est peut-être l’un des baromètres les plus précis de la santé de la société dans son ensemble. 
 
La façon dont la société traite la moitié de sa population est révélatrice de la façon dont elle traitera les autres. Nos droits sont indissociablement liés.
 
En tant que féministe, et fier de l’être, j’ai donc honoré mon engagement de faire de la parité des genres une réalité au sein de la haute direction de l’ONU. 
 
Et j’ai fait de l’égalité des genres l’une des principales priorités de l’ensemble de l’Organisation. 
 
Cette responsabilité ne relève pas d’une seule personne ou d’une seule entité. Si nous voulons être une organisation internationale inclusive, crédible et efficace, nous devons toutes et tous y contribuer.
 
Je suis déterminé à en faire beaucoup plus. 
 
Notre Appel à l’action en faveur des droits humains vise en particulier à abroger toutes les lois discriminatoires dans le monde et à assurer aux femmes l’égalité en droit en matière de participation et de représentation, dans chaque secteur et à chaque niveau, par des initiatives ambitieuses, notamment des mesures temporaires spéciales comme les quotas. 
 
La réalisation de ce droit sera bénéfique pour nous tous. 
 
Les problèmes qui ont été créés par les hommes – je dis bien par les hommes – ne pourront être réglés que par l’humanité tout entière. 
 
Mais ces solutions ne pourront être trouvées que dans le cadre d’un partage du pouvoir et de la prise des décisions et du respect du droit de chacune et de chacun d’y participer sur un pied d’égalité.

Excellencies,

Every corner of the globe is suffering from the sickness of violations of human rights. 

Of course, there are a number of extremely concerning country situations — some of them very prolonged – and this is where the Human Rights Council and its mechanisms are so vital in raising awareness, protecting people, maintaining dialogue and finding solutions. 

I thank the Human Rights Council for your recent and timely focus on a situation where the challenges that I outlined today are dramatically evident — and that is the case of Myanmar. 

We see the undermining of democracy, the use of brutal force, arbitrary arrests, repression in all its manifestations.  Restrictions of civic space.  Attacks on civil society.  Serious violations against minorities with no accountability, including what has rightly been called ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya population.  The list goes on. 

It is all coming together in a perfect storm of upheaval. 

Today, I call on the Myanmar military to stop the repression immediately.  Release the prisoners.  End the violence.  Respect human rights, and the will of the people expressed in recent elections.

Coups have no place in our modern world. 

I welcome the resolution of the Human Rights Council, pledge to implement your request, and express my full support to the people of Myanmar in their pursuit of democracy, peace, human rights and the rule of law.

Excellencies,

People around the world are relying on us to secure and protect their rights.

With the pandemic shining a spotlight on human rights, recovery gives us an opportunity to generate momentum for transformation.

Now is the time to reset.  To reshape.  To rebuild.  To recover better, guided by human rights and human dignity for all.

I am convinced it is possible – if we are determined and if we work together.

Thank you.

***

[English Version]

Distinguished President of the Human Rights Council,
Madam High Commissioner,
Excellencies,
Ladies and gentlemen,

Human rights are our bloodline; they connect us to one another, as equals.

Human rights are our lifeline; they are the pathway to resolving tensions and forging lasting peace.

Human rights are on the frontline; they are the building blocks of a world of dignity and opportunity for all – and they are under fire every day.

The Human Rights Council is the global locus for tackling the full range of human rights challenges. 

I thank you for that vital work — and welcome the engagement of Member States and civil society.

One year ago, I came before you to launch a Call to Action for Human Rights.

We named this values-based and dignity-driven appeal “The Highest Aspiration” — drawing from the words of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights itself. 

That phrase is a reminder that securing human rights is both essential and a constant work in progress.    

Gains can be easily undone. 

Perils can strike in an instant.

Soon after our gathering last year, COVID-19 hit the world without mercy.

The pandemic revealed the interconnectedness of our human family — and of the full spectrum of human rights — civil, cultural, economic, political and social.
COVID-19 has deepened pre-existing divides, vulnerabilities and inequalities, as well as opened up new fractures, including fault-lines in human rights.

We are seeing a vicious circle of violations. 

The lives of hundreds of millions of families have been turned upside down — with lost jobs, mounting debt and steep falls in income.

The disease has taken a disproportionate toll on women, minorities, persons with disabilities, older persons, refugees, migrants and indigenous peoples.

Progress on gender equality has been set back years.

Extreme poverty is rising for the first time in decades.

Young people are struggling, out of school and often with limited access to technology. 

The latest moral outrage is the failure to ensure equity in vaccination efforts. 

Just ten countries have administered more than 75 per cent of all COVID-19 vaccines.  

Vaccine equity affirms human rights.  Vaccine nationalism denies it.

Vaccines must be a global public good, accessible and affordable for all. 

The virus is also infecting political and civil rights and further shrinking civic space.

Using the pandemic as a pretext, authorities in some countries have deployed heavy-handed security responses and emergency measures to crush dissent, criminalize basic freedoms, silence independent reporting and curtail the activities of non-governmental organisations.

Human rights defenders, journalists, lawyers, political activists — and even medical professionals — are being detained, prosecuted and subjected to intimidation and surveillance for criticizing government pandemic responses — or the lack thereof.

Pandemic-related restrictions are being used to subvert electoral processes, weaken opposition voices and suppress criticism.

At times, access to life-saving COVID-19 information has been concealed— while deadly misinformation has been amplified — including by those in power. 
 
Excellencies,

The COVID-19 infodemic has raised alarms more generally about the growing reach of digital platforms and the use and abuse of data.
 
A vast library of information is being assembled about each of us.   Yet we don’t really have the keys to that library. 

We don’t know how this information has been collected, by whom or for what purposes.
 
That data is being used commercially — for advertising, for marketing and for beefing up corporate bottom lines.  

Behavior patterns are being commodified and sold like futures contracts.

This has created new business models and entirely new industries that have contributed to an ever-greater concentration of wealth and inequality.
 
Our data is also being used to shape and manipulate our perceptions, without our ever realizing it.  
 
Governments can exploit that data to control the behavior of their own citizens, violating human rights of individuals or groups.  
 
All of this is not science fiction or a forecast of a 22nd-century dystopia.  

It is here and now.  And it requires a serious discussion.  
 
We have developed a Roadmap for Digital Cooperation to find a way forward.
 
I urge all Member States to place human rights at the centre of regulatory frameworks and legislation on the development and use of digital technologies.
 
We need a safe, equitable and open digital future that does not infringe on privacy or dignity.

Excellencies,

Our Human Rights Call to Action is a comprehensive framework to advance our most important work — from sustainable development to climate action, from protecting fundamental freedoms to gender equality, the preservation of civic space and ensuring that digital technology is a force for good.

Today, I come before you with a sense of urgency to do even more to bring our Human Rights Call to Action to life.

I want to focus on two areas where the imperative for action is great — and the scale of the challenge looms large.

First, the blight of racism, discrimination and xenophobia. 

And, second, the most pervasive human rights violation of all: gender inequality. 

These evils are fed by two of the deepest wells of injustice in our world: the legacy of centuries of colonialism; and the persistence, across the millennia, of patriarchy.

The linkages between racism and gender inequality are also unmistakable. Some of the worst impacts of both are in the overlaps and intersections of discrimination suffered by women from racial and ethnic minority groups.

Stoking the fires of racism, anti-Semitism, anti-Muslim bigotry, violence against some minority Christian communities, homophobia, xenophobia and misogyny is nothing new.

It has just become more overt, easier to achieve, and globalized.

When we allow the denigration of any one of us, we set the precedent for the demonization of all of us.

Excellencies,

The rot of racism eats away at institutions, social structures and everyday life — sometimes invisibly and insidiously.

I welcome the new awakening in the global fight for racial justice, a surge of resistance against being reduced or ignored —often led by women and young people.

As they have highlighted, we have a long way to go.

I commend the Human Rights Council decision to report on systemic racism, accountability and redress, and responses to peaceful anti-racism protests — and look forward to concrete action.

We must also step up the fight against resurgent neo-Nazism, white supremacy and racially and ethnically motivated terrorism.   
 
The danger of these hate-driven movements is growing by the day. 
 
Let us call them what they are:  

White supremacy and neo-Nazi movements are more than domestic terror threats.  

They are becoming a transnational threat.
 
These and other groups have exploited the pandemic to boost their ranks through social polarization and political and cultural manipulation.   
 
Today, these extremist movements represent the number one internal security threat in several countries. 
 
Individuals and groups are engaged in a feeding frenzy of hate — fundraising, recruiting and communicating online both at home and overseas, travelling internationally to train together and network their hateful ideologies.   

Far too often, these hate groups are cheered on by people in positions of responsibility in ways that were considered unimaginable not long ago. 
 
We need global coordinated action to defeat this grave and growing danger.

Excellencies,

We must also place a special focus on safeguarding the rights of minority communities, many of whom are under threat around the world.

Minority communities are part of the richness of our cultural and social fabric. 

Just as biodiversity is fundamental to human well-being, the diversity of communities is fundamental to humanity.

Yet we see not only forms of discrimination but also policies of assimilation that seek to wipe out the cultural and religious identity of minority communities. 

When a minority community’s culture, language or faith are under attack, all of us are diminished.

When authorities cast suspicion on entire groups under the guise of security, all of us are threatened.

These measures are doomed to backfire. 

We must continue to push for policies that fully respect human rights and religious, cultural and unique human identity.

And we must simultaneously nurture the conditions for each community to feel that they are fully part of society as a whole.

Excellencies,

No human rights scourge is more prevalent than gender inequality.

The COVID-19 pandemic has further exacerbated entrenched  discrimination against women and girls.

The crisis has a woman’s face. 

Most essential frontline workers are women — many from racially and ethnically marginalized groups and at the bottom of the economic ladder.

Most of the increased burden of care in the home is taken on by women.

Violence against women and girls in all forms has skyrocketed, from online abuse to domestic violence, trafficking, sexual exploitation and child marriage.

Women have suffered higher job losses and been pushed into poverty in greater numbers.

This is on top of already fragile socio-economic conditions due to lower incomes, the wage gap, and a lifetime of less access to opportunities, resources and protections. 
 
None of this happened by accident.

It is the result of generations of exclusion. 

It comes down to a question of power.

A male-dominated world and a male-dominated culture will yield male-dominated results. 

At the same time, the COVID-19 response has highlighted the power and effectiveness of women’s leadership.

The lives of women are perhaps one of the most accurate barometers of the health of society as a whole.

How a society treats half its own population is a significant indicator of how it will treat others.  Our rights are inextricably bound.

This is why, as a proud feminist, I have delivered on my commitment to make gender parity a reality in the leadership of the UN.

And I have made gender equality a leading priority for the Organization as a whole.

This is not just the responsibility of any individual or agency.  If we are to be an inclusive, credible, and effective international Organization, it is the work of everyone.

I am committed to doing much more. 

Our Call to Action on Human Rights has a specific emphasis on repealing all discriminatory laws globally.

And on achieving women’s equal right to participation and representation, in every sector and at every level through ambitious actions, including temporary special measures such as quotas.

Realizing this right will benefit all of us.

The opportunity of man-made problems – and I choose these words deliberately – is that they have human-led solutions.

But these solutions can only be found through shared leadership and decision-making and the right to equal participation.

Excellencies,

Every corner of the globe is suffering from the sickness of violations of human rights. 

Of course there are a number of extremely concerning country situations — some of them very prolonged – and this is where the Human Rights Council and its mechanisms are so vital in raising awareness, protecting people, maintaining dialogue and finding solutions. 

I thank the Human Rights Council for your recent and timely focus on a situation where the challenges that I outlined today are dramatically evident — and that is the case of Myanmar. 

We see the undermining of democracy, the use of brutal force, arbitrary arrests, repression in all its manifestations.  Restrictions of civic space.  Attacks on civil society.  Serious violations against minorities with no accountability, including what has rightly been called ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya population.  The list goes on. 

It is all coming together in a perfect storm of upheaval. 

Today, I call on the Myanmar military to stop the repression immediately.  Release the prisoners.  End the violence.  Respect human rights, and the will of the people expressed in recent elections.

Coups have no place in our modern world. 

I welcome the resolution of the Human Rights Council, pledge to implement your request, and express my full support to the people of Myanmar in their pursuit of democracy, peace, human rights and the rule of law.

Excellencies,

People around the world are relying on us to secure and protect their rights.

With the pandemic shining a spotlight on human rights, recovery gives us an opportunity to generate momentum for transformation.

Now is the time to reset.  To reshape.  To rebuild.  To recover better, guided by human rights and human dignity for all.

I am convinced it is possible – if we are determined and if we work together.

Thank you.

***
[French Translation]

Madame la Présidente du Conseil des droits de l’homme,
Madame la Haute-Commissaire,
Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,
Mesdames et Messieurs,

Les droits humains font partie de notre héritage commun ; ils nous unissent les uns aux autres, d’égal à égal.

Les droits humains sont notre bouée de sauvetage ; ils constituent la clé pour mettre fin aux tensions et bâtir une paix durable.

Et les droits humains sont notre première ligne de défense, la pierre angulaire d’un monde offrant dignité et possibilités pour toutes et tous – et il ne se passe pas un jour sans qu’ils soient attaqués.

Le Conseil des droits de l’homme occupe une place centrale dans les efforts déployés à travers le monde pour régler les nombreuses questions ayant trait aux droits humains.

Je vous remercie pour le travail essentiel accompli et je salue l’engagement des États Membres et de la société civile.

Il y a un an, je me suis adressé à vous pour lancer un appel à l’action en faveur des droits humains.

C’est en nous inspirant des termes employés dans la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme que nous avons baptisé cet appel, fondé sur des valeurs et axé sur la dignité, « La plus haute aspiration ».

Cette expression vise à rappeler que garantir les droits humains est une tâche essentielle qui exige une vigilance constante.

Les progrès peuvent être vite effacés.

Le malheur peut frapper à tout instant.

Mesdames et Messieurs,

Peu de temps après notre rassemblement de l’année dernière, le COVID-19 a déferlé sur la planète.

La pandémie a mis en évidence les liens qui unissent notre grande famille humaine, mais aussi ceux qui relient les droits humains dans toute leur diversité, qu’ils soient civils, culturels, économiques, politiques ou sociaux.

Le COVID-19 a non seulement creusé les fossés qui nous séparent, aggravé les vulnérabilités et renforcé les inégalités, mais aussi ouvert de nouvelles lignes de faille, y compris en termes de droits humains.

Les violations se multiplient pour former un cercle vicieux.

Des centaines de millions de familles ont vu leur vie bouleversée par la perte d’un emploi, par l’accumulation des dettes, par l’effondrement des revenus.

La pandémie a affecté de manière disproportionnée les femmes, les minorités, les personnes âgées, les personnes en situation de handicap, les réfugiés, les migrants et les peuples autochtones.

Des années de progrès en matière d’égalité des genres ont été réduits à néant.

Pour la première fois depuis des décennies, l’extrême pauvreté gagne du terrain.

La jeunesse souffre : leur éducation a été interrompue et nombre d’entre eux n’ont qu’un accès limité aux nouvelles technologies.

L’incapacité d’assurer un accès équitable aux vaccins représente une nouvelle faillite morale.

À eux seuls, dix pays se sont partagés plus de trois-quarts des doses de vaccin contre le COVID-19 administrées à ce jour.

L'équité en matière de vaccins représente une étape décisive dans la réalisation des droits humains. Le nationalisme vaccinal nous renvoie en arrière.

Les vaccins doivent être un bien public mondial, accessibles et abordables pour tous.

Le virus s’attaque aussi aux droits politiques et civils et réduit davantage encore les espaces civiques d’expression.

Brandissant la pandémie comme prétexte, les autorités de certains pays ont pris des mesures de sécurité sévères et adopté des mesures d’urgence pour réprimer les voix dissonantes, abolir les libertés les plus fondamentales, faire taire les médias indépendants et entraver le travail des organisations non gouvernementales.

Des défenseurs des droits humains, des journalistes, des avocats, des militants, et même des professionnels de la santé, ont fait l’objet d’arrestations, de poursuites et de mesures d’intimidation et de surveillance pour avoir critiqué les mesures – ou le manque de mesures – prises pour faire face à la pandémie.

Les restrictions liées à la pandémie servent d’excuse pour miner les processus électoraux, affaiblir les voix des opposants et réprimer les critiques.

L’accès à des informations vitales a parfois été entravé, tandis que la désinformation mortelle a été amplifiée, y compris par quelques dirigeants.

Plus généralement, l’infodémie de COVID-19 a suscité des inquiétudes liées au pouvoir de diffusion croissant des plateformes numériques et à l’utilisation abusive des données.

En ce moment même, une vaste bibliothèque d’informations est constituée sur chacun et chacune d’entre nous. Pourtant, nous n’en possédons pas réellement les clés.

Nous ne savons pas comment ces informations ont été recueillies, par qui, ni à quelles fins.
 
Ces données sont utilisées à des fins commerciales, notamment de publicité et de marketing, et servent à augmenter les revenus de ces entreprises.

Nos comportements et habitudes deviennent des marchandises qui sont commercialisées comme des contrats à terme.

Tout cela a abouti à l’apparition de modèles commerciaux inédits et d’industries entièrement nouvelles, qui ont contribué à une concentration toujours plus grande des richesses et à un accroissement des inégalités.
 
Nos données sont également utilisées pour façonner et manipuler nos perceptions, sans que nous ne nous en rendions compte.
 
Les gouvernements peuvent exploiter ces données pour contrôler le comportement de leurs propres citoyens, bafouant ainsi les droits humains de certaines personnes ou certains groupes.
 
Tout cela n’est ni de la science-fiction, ni une anticipation dystopique de ce qui pourrait survenir au XXIIe siècle.

Cela se passe ici et maintenant. Et cela exige un débat sérieux.
 
Nous avons élaboré un Feuille de route de coopération numérique afin de trouver la voie à suivre.
 
Et je demande instamment aux États Membres de mettre les droits humains au centre des cadres réglementaires et de la législation sur le développement et l’utilisation des technologies numériques.
 
Le monde a besoin d’un avenir numérique sûr, équitable et ouvert afin de veiller à ce qu’il ne soit pas porté atteinte à la vie privée ou à la dignité.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Notre appel à l’action en faveur des droits humains est un cadre complet visant à faire progresser nos travaux les plus importants – du développement durable à l’action climatique, en passant par la protection des libertés fondamentales, l’égalité des genres, la préservation de l’espace civique ou les activités visant à mettre la technologie numérique au service du bien.

Aujourd’hui, je me présente devant vous avec le sentiment qu’il est urgent de redoubler d’efforts pour donner vie à cet appel à l’action.

Je souhaiterais me concentrer sur deux domaines dans lesquels il est impératif d’agir et sur lesquels l’ampleur du défi est importante.

Tout d’abord, le fléau du racisme, de la discrimination et de la xénophobie.

Ensuite, l’atteinte aux droits humains la plus répandue de toutes : l’inégalité de genre.

Ces maux sont alimentés par deux des injustices les plus profondes de notre histoire : l’héritage de siècles de colonialisme et la persistance du patriarcat à travers les millénaires.

La volonté de jeter de l’huile sur le feu du racisme, de l’antisémitisme, du sectarisme antimusulman, de la violence contre certaines communautés minoritaires chrétiennes, de l’homophobie, de la xénophobie et de la misogynie n’est pas nouvelle.

Ce qui l’est, c’est la possibilité de se livrer à de tels actes de façon plus visible, plus facile et plus généralisée.

Lorsque nous permettons qu’une personne soit dénigrée, nous créons un précédent qui peut aboutir à la diabolisation de chacun et chacune d’entre nous.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Le racisme gangrène les institutions, les structures sociales et notre quotidien – parfois de manière invisible et insidieuse.

Je me félicite du nouvel élan qui anime la lutte mondiale pour la justice raciale, un élan de résistance contre le dénigrement ou l’ignorance – souvent insufflé par les femmes et les jeunes.

Comme ces derniers l’ont souligné, nous avons encore beaucoup à faire.

Je salue la décision qu’a prise le Conseil des droits de l’homme de faire rapport sur le racisme systémique, l’application du principe de responsabilité, les mécanismes de réparation et les interventions menées face aux manifestations pacifiques contre le racisme – et espère vivement que des mesures concrètes seront prises à cet égard.

Nous devons également intensifier la lutte contre la résurgence du néonazisme, de la suprématie blanche et du terrorisme à motivation raciale et ethnique.

La menace que représentent ces mouvements de haine grandit de jour en jour.

Soyons francs :

Les mouvements de suprémacistes blancs et les mouvements néonazis sont plus qu’une menace terroriste intérieure.

Ils sont en train de devenir une menace transnationale.

Comme d’autres, ces groupes ont tiré parti de la pandémie, ainsi que de la polarisation sociale et de la manipulation politique et culturelle pour grossir leurs rangs.

Aujourd’hui, ces mouvements extrémistes représentent la plus grande menace pour la sécurité intérieure de plusieurs pays.

Seules ou en groupes, certaines personnes se livrent à une surenchère de la haine : elles collectent des fonds, recrutent et communiquent en ligne, tant dans leur pays qu’à l’étranger, et voyagent dans le monde entier pour s’entraîner ensemble et mettre en réseau leurs idéologies haineuses.

Bien trop souvent, ces groupes haineux sont encouragés par des personnes occupant des postes à responsabilité, ce qui semblait encore inimaginable il n’y a pas si longtemps.

Ce n’est que par une action concertée à l’échelle mondiale que nous pourrons mettre fin à cette menace sérieuse et croissante.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Il nous faut également nous attacher à sauvegarder les droits des personnes issues de minorités, dont beaucoup sont menacées partout dans le monde.

Ces personnes contribuent à la richesse de notre tissu culturel et social.

Tout comme la biodiversité est essentielle au bien-être humain, la diversité des populations est fondamentale pour l’humanité.

Pourtant, nous avons affaire non seulement à des formes de discrimination, mais aussi à des politiques d’assimilation qui cherchent à annihiler l’identité culturelle et religieuse des personnes issues de minorités.

Lorsque la culture, la langue ou la foi d’une minorité est attaquée, nous sommes tous perdants.

Lorsque les autorités jettent la suspicion sur des groupes entiers sous prétexte de garantir la sécurité, nous sommes tous menacés.

Ces mesures sont vouées à se retourner contre nous.

Nous devons continuer de plaider en faveur de politiques qui respectent pleinement les droits humains et l’identité religieuse, culturelle et humaine.

Et nous devons en même temps créer les conditions permettant à chaque communauté de se sentir pleinement intégrée à la société dans son ensemble.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Aucune atteinte aux droits humains n’est plus répandue que l’inégalité de genre.

La pandémie de COVID-19 a encore exacerbé la discrimination tenace à l’égard des femmes et des filles.

La crise a un visage féminin.

En effet, la plupart des travailleurs en première ligne sont des femmes, dont beaucoup appartiennent à des groupes ethniques et raciaux marginalisés et se situent au bas de l’échelle économique.

Le fardeau accru des soins à domicile est principalement assumé par les femmes.

La violence à l’égard des femmes et des filles a explosé sous toutes ses formes, des agressions en ligne à la violence domestique, en passant par la traite, l’exploitation sexuelle et le mariage d’enfants.

Les femmes sont proportionnellement plus touchées par les pertes d’emploi et ont été précipitées dans la pauvreté en plus grand nombre.

Cela vient aggraver une situation socioéconomique déjà fragile en raison de leurs revenus inférieurs, de l’écart salarial, de l’inégalité des chances et d’un accès réduit aux ressources et aux mesures de protection.
 
Rien de tout cela n’est dû au hasard.

Il s’agit là du résultat de générations d’exclusion.

Et, en définitive, d’une question de pouvoir.

Un monde et une culture dominés par les hommes donneront des résultats dominés par les hommes.

Dans le même temps, la réponse au COVID-19 a mis en évidence le pouvoir et l’efficacité du leadership des femmes.

La vie des femmes est peut-être l’un des baromètres les plus précis de la santé de la société dans son ensemble.

La façon dont la société traite la moitié de sa population est révélatrice de la façon dont elle traitera les autres. Nos droits sont indissociablement liés.

En tant que féministe, et fier de l’être, j’ai donc honoré mon engagement de faire de la parité des genres une réalité au sein de la direction de l’ONU.

Et j’ai fait de l’égalité des genres l’une des principales priorités de l’ensemble de l’Organisation.

Cette responsabilité ne relève pas d’une seule personne ou d’une seule entité. Si nous voulons être une organisation internationale inclusive, crédible et efficace, nous devons toutes et tous y contribuer.

Je suis déterminé à en faire beaucoup plus.

Notre Appel à l’action en faveur des droits humains vise en particulier à abroger toutes les lois discriminatoires dans le monde et à assurer aux femmes l’égalité en droit en matière de participation et de représentation, dans chaque secteur et à chaque niveau, par des initiatives ambitieuses, notamment des mesures temporaires spéciales comme les quotas.

La réalisation de ce droit sera bénéfique pour nous tous.

Les problèmes qui ont été créés par les hommes – je dis bien par les hommes – ne pourront être réglés que par l’humanité tout entière.

Mais ces solutions ne pourront être trouvées que dans le cadre d’un partage du pouvoir et de la prise des décisions et du respect du droit de chacune et de chacun d’y participer sur un pied d’égalité.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Les quatre coins du globe sont touchés par des violations des droits humains.

Bien sûr, la situation de certains pays, qui dure parfois depuis longtemps, est extrêmement préoccupante et le Conseil des droits de l’homme et ses mécanismes ont un rôle essentiel à jouer pour ce qui est de sensibiliser et de protéger la population, de maintenir le dialogue et de trouver des solutions.

Je remercie le Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’attention qu’il a récemment accordée à la situation au Myanmar, où les problèmes que j’ai décrits aujourd’hui sont flagrants.

Je remercie le Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’attention accordée aux situations où les défis que j’ai évoqués aujourd’hui sont dramatiquement évidents – et c’est le cas du Myanmar.

Nous assistons à l’affaiblissement de la démocratie, à l’utilisation de la force brutale, à des arrestations arbitraires, à la répression dans toutes ses manifestations, à la restriction de l’espace civique, à des attaques contre la société civile, à des violations graves commises contre des personnes issues de minorités sans que les responsables n’aient à rendre de comptes, notamment à ce qui a été appelé à juste titre un nettoyage ethnique de la population Rohingya, et la liste est encore longue.

Tout cela se conjugue dans une réelle période de troubles.

Aujourd'hui, j'appelle l'armée birmane à arrêter immédiatement la répression. Libérer les prisonniers. Mettre fin à la violence. Respecter les droits humains et la volonté du peuple exprimée lors des récentes élections.

Les coups d'État n'ont pas leur place dans notre monde moderne.

Je salue la résolution adoptée par le Conseil des droits de l’homme, m’engage à donner suite à votre demande et exprime tout mon soutien au peuple du Myanmar dans sa quête de démocratie et de paix et dans son action en faveur du respect des droits humains et de l’état de droit.

Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,

Les populations du monde entier comptent sur nous pour garantir et protéger leurs droits.

Alors que la pandémie met les droits humains sous les projecteurs, le relèvement est l’occasion de créer un élan de transformation.

Le moment est venu de remettre les pendules à zéro. De refaçonner. De reconstruire. De mieux redresser, dans le respect des droits humains et de la dignité de toutes et tous.

C’est par notre détermination et notre collaboration que nous pourrons y parvenir : j’en suis convaincu.

Je vous remercie.