New York

22 September 2020

Secretary-General's address to the Opening of the General Debate of the 75th Session of the General Assembly

[Watch the video on webtv.un.org]

[Immediately below is the trilingual, as delivered. Scroll down for all-English; French and Spanish versions.]

Mr. President, Excellencies, 
 
In a world turned upside down, this General Assembly Hall is among the strangest sights of all.   
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed our annual meeting beyond recognition.  
 
But it has made it more important than ever.  
 
In January, I addressed the General Assembly and identified “four horsemen” in our midst — four threats that endanger our common future.
 
First, the highest global geo-strategic tensions in years. 
 
Second, an existential climate crisis. 
 
Third, deep and growing global mistrust. 
 
And fourth, the dark side of the digital world.
 
But a fifth horseman was lurking in the shadows. 
 
Since January, the COVID-19 pandemic has galloped across the globe – joining the four other horsemen and adding to the fury of each.  
 
And every day, the grim toll grows, families grieve, societies stagger, and the pillars of our world wobble on already shaky footings. 
 
We face simultaneously an epochal health crisis, the biggesteconomic calamity and job losses since the Great Depression, and dangerous new threats to human rights. 
 
COVID-19 has laid bare the world’s fragilities. 
  
Rising inequalities. Climate catastrophe. Widening societal divisions. Rampant corruption. 
 
The pandemic has exploited these injustices, preyed on the most vulnerable and wiped away the progress of decades.  
 
For the first time in 30 years, poverty is rising.  
 
Human development indicators are declining.  
 
We are careening off track in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.   
 
Meanwhile nuclear non-proliferation efforts are slipping away — and we are failing to act in areas of emerging danger, particularly cyberspace.  
 
People are hurting.  
 
Our planet is burning.   
 
Our world is struggling, stressed and seeking real leadership and action. 
 
Excellencies, 
 
We face a foundational moment.  
 
Those who built the United Nations 75 years ago had lived through a pandemic, a global depression, genocide and world war. 
 
They knew the cost of discord and the value of unity. 
 
They fashioned a visionary response, embodied in our founding Charter, with people at the centre. 
 
Today, we face our own 1945 moment. 
 
The pandemic is a crisis unlike any we have ever seen.  
 
But it is also the kind of crisis that we will see in different forms again and again.  
 
COVID-19 is not only a wake-up call, it is a dress rehearsal for the world of challenges to come.  
 
We must move forward with humility — recognizing that a microscopic virus has brought the world to its knees. 
  
We must be united. We have seen, when countries go in their own direction, the virus goes in every direction.  
 
We must act in solidarity. Far too little assistance has been extended to countries with the fewest capacities to face the challenge.   
 
And we must be guided by science and tethered to reality. 
 
Populism and nationalism have failed. 
 
Those approaches to contain the virus have often made things manifestly worse.  
 
Too often, there has also been a disconnect between leadership and power.  
 
We see remarkable examples of leadership; but they are not usually associated with power.  
 
And power is not always associated with the necessary leadership.  
 
In an interconnected world, it is time to recognize a simple truth: solidarity is self-interest.  
 
If we fail to grasp that fact, everyone loses.      
 
Excellencies,  
 
As the pandemic took hold, I called for a global ceasefire. 
 
Today, I appeal for a new push by the international community to make this a reality by the end of this year. 
 
We have exactly 100 days. 
 
There is only one winner of conflict during a pandemic: the virus itself. 
 
My original appeal was endorsed by 180 Member States along with religious leaders, regional partners, civil society networks and others. 
 
A number of armed movements also responded —fromCameroon to Colombia to the Philippines and beyond —even if severalof the ceasefires they announced were not sustained. 
 
Enormous obstacles stand in the way: deep mistrust, spoilers and the weight of fighting that has festered for years. 
 
But we have reasons to be hopeful.  
 
A new peace agreement in The Republic of the Sudan between the Government and armed movements marks the start of a new era, particularly for people living in Darfur, South Kordofan and the Blue Nile.  

In Afghanistan, the launch of the Afghanistan Peace Negotiations is a milestone after years of effort. How to reach a permanent and comprehensive ceasefire will be on the agenda. An inclusive peace process with women, young people and victims of conflict meaningfully represented offers the best hope for a sustainable solution.   

In several situations, we have seen new ceasefires holding better than in the past — or in their absence, a standstill in the fighting. 

In Syria, the ceasefire in Idlib is largely intact.   After more than nine years of conflict and colossal suffering, I renew my appeal for an end to hostilities across the country as we work toward convening the next round of the Constitutional Committee.  

In the Middle East -- with a period of relative calm in Gaza and annexation of parts of the occupied West Bank put aside at least for the time being -- I urge Israeli and Palestinian leaders to re-engage in meaningful negotiations that will realize a two state-solution in line with relevant UN resolutions, international law and bilateral agreements. 

In Libya, fighting has subsided but the massive buildup of mercenaries and weapons — in flagrant violation of Security Council resolutions — shows that the risk of renewed confrontation remains high. We must all work together for an effective ceasefire agreement and the resumption of intra-Libyan political talks. 

In Ukraine, the most recent ceasefire regime remains in place, but progress on the outstanding security and political issues under the Trilateral Contact Group and the Normandy Four format to implement the Minsk agreements will be critical. 

In the Central African Republic, last year’s peace deal helped deliver a significant reduction in violence. Under the auspices of our UN peacekeeping mission– and with the backing of the international community -- the national dialogue is underway to support upcoming elections and continued implementation of the peace agreement.  

And in South Sudan, we have seen a troubling spike in inter-communal violence but the ceasefire between the two main parties has mostly held, with our UN peacekeeping mission providing support for monitoring as well as implementation of the peace agreement.  

Now, even where conflict is raging, we will not give up the search for peace.  
 
In Yemen, we are fully engaged in bringing the parties together to reach an agreement on the Joint Declaration comprised of a nationwide ceasefire, economic and humanitarian confidence-building measures, and the resumption of the political process.  

Excellencies, 
 
In areas where terrorist groups are particularly active, the obstacles to peace will be much more difficult to overcome.  
  
In the Sahel and the Lake Chad region, we see the pandemic’s over-lapping health, socio-economic, political and humanitarian impacts at play.  
 
I am particularly concerned that terrorist and violent extremist groups will exploit the pandemic.

And we must not forget the dramatic humanitarian cost of war.  
 
In many places, the pandemic coupled with conflict and disruption is dealing crippling blows to food security.  
 
Millions of people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, northeast Nigeria, South Sudan as well as Yemen face the risk of famine.    
 
Now is the time for a collective new push for peace and reconciliation. 
 
And so I appeal for a stepped-up international effort — led by the Security Council — to achieve a global ceasefire by the end of this year. 
 
We have 100 days. As I said, the clock is ticking. 
 
The world needs a global ceasefire to stop all “hot” conflicts. At the same time, we must do everything to avoid a new Cold War.  
 
We are moving in a very dangerous direction. Our world cannot afford a future where the two largest economies split the globe in a Great Fracture — each with its own trade and financial rules and internet and artificial intelligence capacities. 
 
A technological and economic divide risks inevitably turning into a geo-strategic and military divide. We must avoid this at all costs. 
 
Excellencies, 
 
In the face of the all-encompassing challenge of the pandemic, the United Nations has mounted a comprehensive response. 
 
The UN system, led by the World Health Organization, has supported governments — particularly in the developing world — to save lives and contain the spread of the virus. 
 
Our global supply chains have helped to provide personal protective equipment and other medical supplies to more than 130 countries.   
 
We have extended life-saving assistance to themost vulnerable countries and people – including refugees and those internally displaced -- through a Global Humanitarian Response Plan.  
 
We have mobilized the full UN system in development emergency mode, activated our UN country teams and rapidly issued policy guidance to support governments.  
 
The “Verified” campaign is fighting misinformation online —a toxic virus shaking the democratic underpinnings in many countries. 
 
We are working to advance treatments and therapies as a global public good – and backing efforts for a people’s vaccine available and affordable everywhere. 
 
Yet some countries are reportedly making side deals exclusively for their own populations.  
 
Such “vaccinationalism” is not only unfair, it is self-defeating. 
 
None of us is safe, until all of us are safe. Everybody knows that. 
 
Likewise, economies cannot run with a runaway pandemic.  
 
Since the beginning, we have pushed for a massive rescue package worth at least 10 per cent of the global economy. 
 
Developed countries have provided enormous relief for their own societies. They can afford it.  
 
But we need to ensure that the developing world does not fall into financial ruin, escalating poverty anddebt crises. 
 
We need a collective commitment to avoid a downward spiral.  
 
One week from today, we will bring world leaders together to find solutions at a Meeting on Financing for Development in the Era of COVID-19 and Beyond.  
 
And in all we do, we are putting a special focus on women and girls. 
 
Half of humanity is bearing the brunt of the social and economic consequences of COVID-19. 

Women are disproportionately represented in the sectors hit hardest by job losses. 
 
Women do most of the unpaid care work generated by the pandemic. 
 
And women have fewer economic resources to fall back on, because their wages are lower, and they have less access to benefits. 
 
At the same time, millions of young girls are losing their chance of an education and a future, as schools close and child marriage is on the rise.  
 
Unless we act now, gender equality could be set back by decades. 
 
We must also stamp out the horrifying increase in violence against women and girls during the pandemic, from domestic violence to sexual abuse, online harassment and femicide. 
 
This is a hidden war on women. 
 
Preventing and ending it requires the same commitment and resources that we devote to other forms of warfare. 
 
Excellences,  
  
Au-delà des mesures d’urgence, les efforts de relance d’aujourd’hui doivent jeter les bases d’un monde meilleur pour demain.   
  
Cette relance est notre chance de réinventer les économies et les sociétés.  
  
Nous avons les feuilles de route : la Charte des Nations Unies, la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme, le Programme 2030 et l’Accord de Paris.  
  
La relance doit renforcer la résilience.  
 
Au niveau national, cela exige un Nouveau contrat social.Et sur le plan international, un Nouveau pacte mondial.  
  
Ce Nouveau contrat social doit permettre de bâtir des sociétés inclusives et durables.  
  
L’inclusion implique d’investir dans la cohésion sociale et de mettre fin à toutes les formes d’exclusion, de discrimination et de racisme.  
  
Elle suppose de mettre en place une nouvelle génération de politiques de protection sociale, comprenant notamment la Couverture sanitaire universelle et la possibilité d’un Revenu minimum universel.  
  
L’inclusion consiste également à donner à toutes et à tous l’accès à l’éducation et à tirer parti des technologies numériques, les deux grands vecteurs d’autonomisation et d’égalité de notre époque.  
  
Cela requiert des systèmes fiscaux auxquels tout le monde – particuliers comme entreprises – contribue équitablement.   
  
Il s’agit de placer les droits humains au cœur de nos efforts, dans la droite ligne de l’Appel à l’action en faveur des droits humains, que j’ai lancé cette année à Genève. 
  
Cela signifie l’égalité des droits et des chances pour les femmes et les filles.  
  
La pandémie a plus que jamais révélé l’efficacité des femmes lorsqu’elles tiennent les rênes.  
  
Vingt-cinq ans après Pékin, la génération actuelle de filles doit être en mesure de réaliser ses ambitions et son potentiel illimités.  
  
Mesdames et Messieurs,  
  
Pour être véritablement durable, le Nouveau contrat social doit assurer la transition vers les énergies renouvelables et ainsi atteindre l’objectif de zéro émissions nettes d’ici à 2050.  
  
Je demande à tous les pays d’envisager d’inclure six mesures positives pour le climat dans les efforts qu’ils déploient pour sauver, reconstruire et relancer leurs économies.  
  
Premièrement, nous devons rendre les sociétés plus résilientes et rechercher une transition juste.  
   
Deuxièmement, nous avons besoin d’emplois verts et d’une croissance durable.  
  
Troisièmement, les plans de sauvetages de l’industrie, de l’aviation et du transport maritime devraient être assortis de conditions de conformité aux objectifs de l’Accord de Paris.  
  
Quatrièmement, il faut mettre un terme aux subventions aux combustibles fossiles.  
  
Cinquièmement, il est impératif de tenir compte des risques climatiques dans toutes les décisions financières et politiques.  
  
Sixièmement, il faut agir ensemble, sans laisser personne de côté.  
  
Mais pour réduire véritablement les fragilités et les risques, et pour mieux résoudre les problèmes que nous avons en commun, nous avons également besoin d’un Nouveau pacte mondial au niveau international.  
  
Ce Nouveau pacte doit permettre de garantir que les systèmes politiques et économiques mondiaux fournissent les biens publics essentiels à toutes les populations.  
  
Aujourd’hui, ce n’est pas le cas.  
  
Les structures de gouvernance et les cadres éthiques sont marqués par de profondes lacunes.  
  
Pour y remédier, nous devons veiller au partage large et équitable du pouvoir, des richesses et des opportunités.  
  
Le Nouveau pacte mondial doit reposer sur une mondialisation juste, fondée sur les droits et la dignité de chaque être humain, sur la vie en harmonie avec la nature et sur nos responsabilités envers les générations futures.  
  
Nous devons intégrer les principes du développement durable dans tous les processus décisionnels, afin d’orienter les flux de ressources vers l’économie verte, durable et équitable.  
  
Les systèmes financiers mondiaux doivent évoluer dans cette direction.  
  
Le commerce doit être libre et juste, sans subventions perverses ni barrières qui défavorisent les économies en développement.  
  
Le Nouveau pacte mondial doit aussi s’attaquer aux injustices historiques des structures de pouvoir sur la planète.  
  
Plus de soixante-dix ans après leur création, les institutions multilatérales doivent être modernisées afin de représenter plus équitablement tous les peuples du monde, plutôt que de conférer un pouvoir disproportionné à certains et de limiter l’influence des autres, surtout du monde en développement. 
 
Excelencias, 
 
No necesitamos nuevas burocracias. 
 
Necesitamos un sistema multilateral que innove constantemente, beneficie a las personas y proteja nuestro planeta. 
 
El multilateralismo del siglo XXI debe actuar en red: debe ser capaz de vincular, a través de los diferentes ámbitos sectoriales y áreas geográficas, a las instituciones globales, desde los bancos de desarrollo a las organizaciones regionales, pasando por las distintas alianzas comerciales. 
 
El multilateralismo del siglo XXI debe ser inclusivo: debe abrir la participación a un círculo mucho más amplio de actores, aprovechando las capacidades de la sociedad civil, las regiones y ciudades, las empresas, las fundaciones y las instituciones académicas y científicas. 
 
Es así como garantizaremos un multilateralismo efectivo, a la altura de los desafíos del siglo XXI. 
 
Dear friends across the world, 
 
We cannot respond to this crisis by going back to what was or withdrawing into national shells.  
 
To overcome today’s fragilities and challenges we need more international cooperation — not less; strengthened multilateral institutions — not a retreat from them; better global governance — not a chaotic free-for-all.  
 
The pandemic has upended the world, but that upheaval has created space for something new. 
 
Ideas once considered impossible are suddenly on the table.  
 
Large-scale action no longer seems so daunting; in just months, billions of people have fundamentally changed how they work, consume, move and interact. 
 
Large-scale financing has suddenly proven possible, as trillions [of dollars] have been deployed to rescue economies. 
 
In commemorating the 75thanniversary of the United Nations, the General Assembly has invited me to report on our common agenda for the future. 
 
I welcome this opportunity for a process of profound reflection involving us all.   
 
I will report back next year with analysis and recommendations on how we can reach our shared aims. 
 
Let us draw inspiration from our achievements across the history of the United Nations. 
 
Let us respond affirmatively to the movements for justice and dignity we see in the world.  
 
And let us vanquish the five horsemen and build the world we need: peaceful, inclusive and sustainable.  
The pandemic has taught us that our choices matter. 
 
As we look to the future, let us make sure we choose wisely.  
 
Thank you. 

*****
All English

Mr. President, Excellencies,
 
In a world turned upside down, this General Assembly Hall is among the strangest sights of all.   
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed our annual meeting beyond recognition. 
 
But it has made it more important than ever. 
 
In January, I addressed the General Assembly and identified “four horsemen” in our midst — four threats that endanger our common future.
 
First, the highest global geo-strategic tensions in years.
 
Second, an existential climate crisis.
 
Third, deep and growing global mistrust.
 
And fourth, the dark side of the digital world.
 
But a fifth horseman was lurking in the shadows.
 
Since January, the COVID-19 pandemic has galloped across the globe – joining the four other horsemen and adding to the fury of each.  
 
And every day, the grim toll grows, families grieve, societies stagger, and the pillars of our world wobble on already shaky footings.
 
We face simultaneously an epochal health crisis, the biggest economic calamity and job losses since the Great Depression, and dangerous new threats to human rights.
 
COVID-19 has laid bare the world’s fragilities.
 
Rising inequalities.  Climate catastrophe.  Widening societal divisions.  Rampant corruption.
 
The pandemic has exploited these injustices, preyed on the most vulnerable and wiped away the progress of decades. 
 
For the first time in 30 years, poverty is rising. 
 
Human development indicators are declining. 
 
We are careening off track in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.   
 
Meanwhile nuclear non-proliferation efforts are slipping away — and we are failing to act in areas of emerging danger, particularly cyberspace. 
 
People are hurting. 
 
Our planet is burning.   
 
Our world is struggling, stressed and seeking real leadership and action.
 
Excellencies,
 
We face a foundational moment. 
 
Those who built the United Nations 75 years ago had lived through a pandemic, a global depression, genocide and world war.
 
They knew the cost of discord and the value of unity.
 
They fashioned a visionary response, embodied in our founding Charter, with people at the centre.
 
Today, we face our own 1945 moment.
 
The pandemic is a crisis unlike any we have ever seen. 
 
But it is also the kind of crisis that we will see in different forms again and again. 
 
COVID-19 is not only a wake-up call, it is a dress rehearsal for the world of challenges to come. 
 
We must move forward with humility — recognizing that a microscopic virus has brought the world to its knees.
 
We must be united.  We have seen, when countries go in their own direction, the virus goes in every direction. 
 
We must act in solidarity.  Far too little assistance has been extended to countries with the fewest capacities to face the challenge.  
 
And we must be guided by science and tethered to reality.
 
Populism and nationalism have failed.
 
Those approaches to contain the virus have often made things manifestly worse. 
 
Too often, there has also been a disconnect between leadership and power. 
 
We see remarkable examples of leadership; but they are not usually associated with power. 
 
And power is not always associated with the necessary leadership. 
 
In an interconnected world, it is time to recognize a simple truth: solidarity is self-interest. 
 
If we fail to grasp that fact, everyone loses.     
 
Excellencies,  
 
As the pandemic took hold, I called for a global ceasefire.
 
Today, I appeal for a new push by the international community to make this a reality by the end of this year.
 
We have exactly 100 days.
 
There is only one winner of conflict during a pandemic:  the virus itself.
 
My original appeal was endorsed by 180 Member States along with religious leaders, regional partners, civil society networks and others.
 
A number of armed movements also responded —from Cameroon to Colombia to the Philippines and beyond —even if several of the ceasefires they announced were not sustained.
 
Enormous obstacles stand in the way: deep mistrust, spoilers and the weight of fighting that has festered for years.
 
But we have reasons to be hopeful. 
 
A new peace agreement in The Republic of the Sudan between the Government and armed movements marks the start of a new era, particularly for people living in Darfur, South Kordofan and the Blue Nile. 

In Afghanistan, the launch of the Afghanistan Peace Negotiations is a milestone after years of effort.  How to reach a permanent and comprehensive ceasefire will be on the agenda.  An inclusive peace process with women, young people and victims of conflict meaningfully represented offers the best hope for a sustainable solution.  

In several situations, we have seen new ceasefires holding better than in the past — or in their absence, a standstill in the fighting.

In Syria, the ceasefire in Idlib is largely intact.    After more than nine years of conflict and colossal suffering, I renew my appeal for an end to hostilities across the country as we work toward convening the next round of the Constitutional Committee. 

In the Middle East --  with a period of relative calm in Gaza and annexation of parts of the occupied West Bank put aside at least for the time being -- I urge Israeli and Palestinian leaders to re-engage in meaningful negotiations that will realize a two state-solution in line with relevant UN resolutions, international law and bilateral agreements.

In Libya, fighting has subsided but the massive buildup of mercenaries and weapons — in flagrant violation of Security Council resolutions — shows that the risk of renewed confrontation remains high.  We must all work together for an effective ceasefire agreement and the resumption of intra-Libyan political talks.

In Ukraine, the most recent ceasefire regime remains in place, but progress on the outstanding security and political issues under the Trilateral Contact Group and the Normandy Four format to implement the Minsk agreements will be critical.

In the Central African Republic, last year’s peace deal helped deliver a significant reduction in violence.  Under the auspices of our UN peacekeeping mission– and with the backing of the international community -- the national dialogue is underway to support upcoming elections and continued implementation of the peace agreement. 

And in South Sudan, we have seen a troubling spike in inter-communal violence but the ceasefire between the two main parties has mostly held, with our UN peacekeeping mission providing support for monitoring as well as implementation of the peace agreement. 

Now, even where conflict is raging, we will not give up the search for peace. 
 
In Yemen, we are fully engaged in bringing the parties together to reach an agreement on the Joint Declaration comprised of a nationwide ceasefire, economic and humanitarian confidence-building measures, and the resumption of the political process. 

Excellencies,
 
In areas where terrorist groups are particularly active, the obstacles to peace will be much more difficult to overcome. 
 
In the Sahel and the Lake Chad region, we see the pandemic’s over-lapping health, socio-economic, political and humanitarian impacts at play. 
 
I am particularly concerned that terrorist and violent extremist groups will exploit the pandemic.

And we must not forget the dramatic humanitarian cost of war. 
 
In many places, the pandemic coupled with conflict and disruption is dealing crippling blows to food security. 
 
Millions of people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, northeast Nigeria, South Sudan as well as Yemen face the risk of famine.   
 
Now is the time for a collective new push for peace and reconciliation.
 
And so I appeal for a stepped-up international effort — led by the Security Council — to achieve a global ceasefire by the end of this year.
 
We have 100 days.  As I said, the clock is ticking.
 
The world needs a global ceasefire to stop all “hot” conflicts.  At the same time, we must do everything to avoid a new Cold War. 
 
We are moving in a very dangerous direction.  Our world cannot afford a future where the two largest economies split the globe in a Great Fracture — each with its own trade and financial rules and internet and artificial intelligence capacities.
 
A technological and economic divide risks inevitably turning into a geo-strategic and military divide.  We must avoid this at all costs.
 
Excellencies,
 
In the face of the all-encompassing challenge of the pandemic, the United Nations has mounted a comprehensive response.
 
The UN system, led by the World Health Organization, has supported governments —  particularly in the developing world — to save lives and contain the spread of the virus.
 
Our global supply chains have helped to provide personal protective equipment and other medical supplies to more than 130 countries.  
 
We have extended life-saving assistance to the most vulnerable countries and people – including refugees and those internally displaced -- through a Global Humanitarian Response Plan. 
 
We have mobilized the full UN system in development emergency mode, activated our UN country teams and rapidly issued policy guidance to support governments. 
 
The “Verified” campaign is fighting misinformation online —a toxic virus shaking the democratic underpinnings in many countries.
 
We are working to advance treatments and therapies as a global public good – and backing efforts for a people’s vaccine available and affordable everywhere.
 
Yet some countries are reportedly making side deals exclusively for their own populations. 
 
Such “vaccinationalism” is not only unfair, it is self-defeating.
 
None of us is safe, until all of us are safe. Everybody knows that.
 
Likewise, economies cannot run with a runaway pandemic. 
 
Since the beginning, we have pushed for a massive rescue package worth at least 10 per cent of the global economy.
 
Developed countries have provided enormous relief for their own societies.  They can afford it. 
 
But we need to ensure that the developing world does not fall into financial ruin, escalating poverty and debt crises.
 
We need a collective commitment to avoid a downward spiral. 
 
One week from today, we will bring world leaders together to find solutions at a Meeting on Financing for Development in the Era of COVID-19 and Beyond. 
 
And in all we do, we are putting a special focus on women and girls.
 
Half of humanity is bearing the brunt of the social and economic consequences of COVID-19.
Women are disproportionately represented in the sectors hit hardest by job losses.
 
Women do most of the unpaid care work generated by the pandemic.
 
And women have fewer economic resources to fall back on, because their wages are lower, and they have less access to benefits.
 
At the same time, millions of young girls are losing their chance of an education and a future, as schools close and child marriage is on the rise. 
 
Unless we act now, gender equality could be set back by decades.
 
We must also stamp out the horrifying increase in violence against women and girls during the pandemic, from domestic violence to sexual abuse, online harassment and femicide.
 
This is a hidden war on women.
 
Preventing and ending it requires the same commitment and resources that we devote to other forms of warfare.
 
Beyond the immediate response, recovery efforts must lead to a better future starting now.
 
Recovery is our chance to re-imagine economies and societies.
 
We have the blueprints: the United Nations Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the 2030 Agenda and Paris Agreement.
 
Recovery needs to build resilience.
 
That requires a New Social Contract at the national level and a New Global Deal at the international level.
 
A New Social Contract is about building inclusive and sustainable societies.  
 
Inclusivity means investing in social cohesion and ending all forms of exclusion, discrimination and racism.
 
It means establishing a new generation of social protection – including Universal Health Coverage and the possibility of a Universal Basic Income.
 
It means providing access to education for all and harnessing digital technology —the two great enablers and equalizers of our time.
 
It means tax systems in which everyone – individuals and corporations – pays their fair share.
 
It means ensuring the centrality of human rights in all we do — in line with my Call to Action on Human Rights launched earlier this year in Geneva.  
 
It means equal rights and opportunities for women and girls. 
 
The pandemic has demonstrated more clearly than ever the effectiveness of women’s leadership.
 
Twenty-five years since Beijing, today’s generation of girls must be able to realize their unlimited ambitions and potential.
 
Excellencies,
 
A sustainable New Social Contract means transitioning towards renewable energy to achieve net zero emissions by 2050.
 
I am asking all countries to consider six climate positive actions as they rescue, rebuild and reset their economies.
First, we need to make our societies more resilient and ensure a just transition. 
 
Second, we need green jobs and sustainable growth.  
 
Third, bailouts of industry, aviation and shipping should be conditional on aligning with the goals of the Paris Agreement.
 
Fourth, end fossil fuel subsidies. 
  
Fifth, take climate risks into account in all financial and policy decision-making.
 
Sixth, work together, leaving no one behind.
 
But to truly reduce fragilities and risks, and to more effectively solve shared problems, we need a corresponding New Global Deal at the international level.
 
A New Global Deal is about ensuring that the global political and economic systems deliver on critical global public goods. 
 
Today, that is simply not happening. 
 
We have huge gaps in governance structures and ethical frameworks. 
 
To close these gaps, we need to ensure that power, wealth and opportunities are broadly and fairly shared. 
 
A New Global Deal must be rooted in a fair globalization, based on the rights and dignity of every human being, on living in balance with nature, and on our responsibilities to future generations. 
 
We need to integrate the principles of sustainable development into all decision-making, to shift the flow of resources towards the green, the sustainable and the equitable.
 
Global financial systems must move in that direction.
 
Trade needs to be free and fair, without perverse subsidies and barriers that tilt the playing field against developing economies.
 
And a New Global Deal must address historical injustices in global power structures.
 
More than seven decades on, multilateral institutions need an upgrade to more equitably represent all the people of the world, rather than giving disproportionate power to some and limiting the voice of others, especially in the developing world.
 
We don’t need new bureaucracies.
 
We need a multilateral system that constantly innovates, delivers for people, and protects our planet.
 
21st century multilateralism must be networked — linking global institutions across sectors and geographies, from development banks to regional organizations and trade alliances. 
 
21st century multilateralism must be inclusive — expanding the circle of engagement, drawing on the capacities of civil society, regions and cities, businesses, foundations and academic and scientific institutions. 
 
That is how we ensure effective multilateralism that meets the test of the 21st century.
 
Dear friends across the world,
 
We cannot respond to this crisis by going back to what was or withdrawing into national shells. 
 
To overcome today’s fragilities and challenges we need more international cooperation — not less; strengthened multilateral institutions — not a retreat from them; better global governance — not a chaotic free-for-all. 
 
The pandemic has upended the world, but that upheaval has created space for something new.
 
Ideas once considered impossible are suddenly on the table. 
 
Large-scale action no longer seems so daunting; in just months, billions of people have fundamentally changed how they work, consume, move and interact.
 
Large-scale financing has suddenly proven possible, as trillions [of dollars] have been deployed to rescue economies.
 
In commemorating the 75th anniversary of the United Nations, the General Assembly has invited me to report on our common agenda for the future.
 
I welcome this opportunity for a process of profound reflection involving us all.   
 
I will report back next year with analysis and recommendations on how we can reach our shared aims.
 
Let us draw inspiration from our achievements across the history of the United Nations.
 
Let us respond affirmatively to the movements for justice and dignity we see in the world. 
 
And let us vanquish the five horsemen and build the world we need: peaceful, inclusive and sustainable. 
 
The pandemic has taught us that our choices matter.
 
As we look to the future, let us make sure we choose wisely. 
 
Thank you.
*****
All French
 
Excellences,
 
Dans le monde sens dessus dessous qui est le nôtre, la salle de l’Assemblée générale est l’un des lieux les plus étranges qu’il soit donné de voir.
 
Avec la pandémie de COVID-19, notre réunion annuelle prend place sous un jour méconnaissable.
 
Mais elle est plus importante que jamais.
 
Au mois de janvier, je me suis exprimé devant l’Assemblée générale et j’ai identifié « quatre cavaliers » des ténèbres parmi nous – quatre menaces qui hypothèquent notre avenir commun.
 
Tout d’abord, des tensions géostratégiques mondiales, qui sont les plus graves que l’on ait vues depuis des années.
 
Deuxièmement, la crise climatique, qui menace notre existence même.
 
Troisièmement, la méfiance profonde qui ne cesse partout de gagner du terrain.
 
Et quatrièmement, la face obscure du monde numérique.
 
Mais un cinquième cavalier était tapi dans l’ombre.
 
Depuis le mois de janvier, la pandémie du COVID-19 s’est propagée au grand galop dans le monde entier, rejoignant les quatre autres cavaliers et ajoutant à leur fureur.
 
Et chaque jour, le bilan sinistre s’alourdit, des familles sont endeuillées, les sociétés chancellent et les piliers sur lesquels repose notre monde, déjà fragilisés, vacillent encore un peu plus.
 
Nous devons faire face à la fois à une crise sanitaire historique, à la plus grande calamité économique et aux pertes d’emplois les plus importantes que le monde ait connu depuis la Grande Dépression, ainsi qu’à de nouvelles menaces pesant sur les droits humains.
 
Le COVID-19 a mis à nu les fragilités du monde.
 
Le creusement des inégalités. La catastrophe climatique. Les divisions de plus en plus marquées au sein de la société. La corruption rampante.
 
La pandémie a fait son lit de ces injustices, elle s’en est pris aux plus vulnérables et elle a réduit à néant les progrès accomplis au cours des dernières décennies.
 
Pour la première fois en 30 ans, la pauvreté augmente.
 
Les indicateurs de développement humain sont en berne.
 
Nous n’avons jamais dévié aussi loin des Objectifs de développement durable.
 
Pendant ce temps, les efforts de non-prolifération nucléaire s’essoufflent – et nous ne faisons rien dans les domaines qui constituent pourtant un danger potentiel, comme le cyberespace.
 
Les gens souffrent.
 
La planète est en feu.
 
Notre monde est aux abois, stressé : il se cherche de véritables leaders, prêts à l’action.
 
Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants,
 
Nous vivons des jours décisifs.
 
Celles et ceux qui ont donné naissance à l’Organisation des Nations Unies il y a 75 ans avaient survécu à une pandémie, à une dépression mondiale, à un génocide et à une guerre mondiale.
 
Ils connaissaient le prix de la discorde et la valeur de l’unité.
 
Ils ont été visionnaires dans la réponse qu’ils ont su façonner et qu’incarne notre Charte fondatrice, centrée sur l’être humain.
 
Aujourd’hui, nous affrontons un moment historique semblable à 1945.
 
La pandémie est une crise que nous n’avons jamais connue.
 
Mais c’est aussi le genre de crise que nous sommes condamnés à connaître de nouveau sous une forme ou une autre, encore et toujours.
 
Plus qu’un avertissement, le COVID-19 est une répétition générale pour tous les défis dont le monde sera le théâtre.
 
Nous devons avancer en faisant preuve d’humilité, et reconnaître qu’un virus microscopique a mis le monde à genoux.
 
Nous devons être unis. Nous avons bien vu que lorsque les pays choisissent de faire cavaliers seuls, le virus gagne du terrain.
 
Nous devons faire preuve de solidarité. L’aide qui a été proposée jusqu’ici aux pays ayant le moins de moyens pour leur permettre de faire face est totalement inadéquate.
 
Et nous devons nous fier à la science et obéir au principe de réalité.
 
Le populisme et le nationalisme ont fait la preuve de leur inefficacité.
 
Loin de permettre de contenir le virus, ces approches n’ont souvent fait qu’aggraver la situation de manière flagrante.
 
On constate par ailleurs trop souvent l’existence d’un décalage entre leadership et pouvoir.
 
Il existe des exemples remarquables de leadership ; mais souvent, ces personnes n’ont pas de pouvoir.
 
Et le pouvoir n’est pas toujours accompagné du leadership necessaire.
 
Dans un monde interconnecté, il est temps de reconnaître une vérité toute simple : la solidarité est dans l’intérêt commun.
 
Si nous refusons d’admettre cette réalité, tout le monde est perdant.
 
Excellences,
 
Lorsque la pandémie s’est installée, j’ai appelé à un cessez-le-feu mondial.
 
Aujourd’hui, j’engage la communauté internationale à redoubler d’efforts pour que ce cessez-le-feu mondial devienne une réalité d’ici à la fin de l’année.
 
Nous avons exactement 100 jours.
 
Lorsqu’un conflit fait rage en même temps qu’une pandémie, il ne peut y avoir qu’un seul vainqueur : le virus.
 
Mon appel initial a été approuvé par 180 États Membres ainsi que par des chefs religieux, des partenaires régionaux, des réseaux de la société civile et d’autres.
 
Certains mouvements armés ont aussi répondu présents – au Cameroun, en Colombie, aux Philippines et ailleurs – même si plusieurs des cessez-le-feu qu’ils avaient annoncés n’ont pas été maintenus.
 
Entre la méfiance qui s’est installée au fil des ans, les fauteurs de troubles et le poids des combats qui n’ont cessé d’envenimer la situation, les obstacles sont gigantesques.
 
Mais il y aussi des raisons d’espérer.
 
Un nouvel accord de paix a été conclu en République du Soudan entre le Gouvernement et les mouvements armés, inaugurant le début d’une nouvelle ère, en particulier pour les populations du Darfour, du Kordofan méridional et du Nil-Bleu.

En Afghanistan, après des années d’efforts, le lancement des Négociations de paix intra-afghanes a marqué une étape importante. Le chemin pour instaurer un cessez-le-feu permanent et généralisé sera à l’ordre du jour. C’est dans un processus de paix inclusif, dans lequel les femmes, les jeunes et les victimes du conflit seraient réellement représentés, que réside le meilleur espoir d’une solution durable. 

Dans plusieurs situations, on constate que les nouveaux cessez-le-feu tiennent mieux que par le passé – ou qu’il y a, en l’absence de cessez-le-feu, un arrêt des combats.

En Syrie, le cessez-le-feu à Edleb est en grande partie respecté. Après plus de neuf ans d’un conflit ayant engendré des souffrances colossales, je renouvelle mon appel en faveur de la fin des hostilités dans tout le pays tandis que nous travaillons à la convocation du prochain cycle de réunions de la Commission constitutionnelle.

Au Moyen-Orient – tandis que Gaza connaît une période de calme relatif et que l’idée d’annexer certaines parties de la Cisjordanie occupée a été mise de côté, du moins temporairement – j’exhorte les dirigeants israéliens et palestiniens à reprendre des négociations porteuses pour parvenir à une solution à deux États, conformément aux résolutions pertinentes des organes de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, au droit international et aux accords bilatéraux.

En Libye, les hostilités sont retombées, mais le grand nombre de mercenaires et l’accumulation massive d’armes – en violation flagrante des résolutions du Conseil de sécurité – montrent que le risque d’une nouvelle confrontation reste élevé. Nous devons tous œuvrer ensemble à la conclusion d’un accord de cessez-le-feu efficace et à la reprise des pourparlers politiques intra-libyens.

En Ukraine, le régime de cessez-le-feu instauré récemment demeure en place, mais il sera essentiel d’accomplir des progrès sur les questions restées en suspens sur le plan politique et en ce qui concerne la sécurité dans le cadre du Groupe de contact trilatéral et du format Normandie pour mettre en œuvre les accords de Minsk.

En République centrafricaine, l’accord de paix conclu l’année dernière a permis de réduire considérablement la violence. Sous les auspices de la mission de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies – et avec le soutien de la communauté internationale – le dialogue national se poursuit pour permettre le bon déroulement des prochaines élections et l’application de l’accord de paix.

Et au Soudan du Sud, nous avons constaté une montée inquiétante de la violence intercommunautaire, mais le cessez-le-feu entre les deux parties principales a été dans l’ensemble respecté, avec l’aide de la mission de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies qui ont appuyé sa surveillance et soutenu l’application de l’accord de paix. 

Même lorsqu’un conflit fait rage, nous n’abandonnons pas notre quête de la paix.
 
Au Yémen, nous sommes résolus à amener les parties à se mettre d’accord sur une déclaration conjointe prévoyant un cessez-le-feu national, des mesures de confiance sur les plans économique et humanitaire et la reprise du processus politique. 

Excellences,
 
Dans les régions où les groupes terroristes sont particulièrement actifs, les obstacles empêchant la réalisation de la paix seront beaucoup plus difficiles à surmonter.
 
La région du Sahel et du lac Tchad subit de plein fouet les effets démultiplicateurs de la pandémie sur les plans sanitaire, socioéconomique, politique et humanitaire.
 
Je crains aussi que les groupes terroristes et extrémistes violents cherchent à exploiter la pandémie.
 
Et nous ne devons pas oublier le coût tragique de la guerre sur le plan humanitaire.
 
Dans de nombreux endroits, la pandémie, qui vient s’ajouter à des conflits et à des perturbations, porte un coup fatal à la sécurité alimentaire.
 
Des millions de personnes en République démocratique du Congo, dans le nord-est du Nigéria, au Soudan du Sud ainsi qu’au Yémen sont menacées par la famine.
 
L’heure est venue de donner ensemble une nouvelle impulsion à la paix et à la réconciliation.
 
J’appelle donc la communauté internationale a redoubler d’efforts – sous la conduite du Conseil de sécurité – pour parvenir à un cessez-le-feu mondial d’ici à la fin de l’année.
 
Nous avons 100 jours. Comme je l’ai dit, le temps presse.
 
Un cessez-le-feu mondial s’impose pour éteindre les « conflits chauds. Mais nous devons aussi faire tout ce qui est en notre pouvoir pour éviter une nouvelle guerre froide.
 
Nous prenons une direction très dangereuse. Notre monde ne supportera pas un avenir dans lequel les deux plus grandes économies diviseraient la planète de part et d’autre d’une Grande Fracture, chacune bardée de ses propres règles commerciales et financières, de son propre Internet et de ses propres capacités en matière d’intelligence artificielle.
 
Une fracture technologique et économique risque inévitablement de se muer en fracture géostratégique et militaire. C’est ce que nous devons éviter à tout prix.
 
Excellences,
 
Face au défi posé par la pandémie sur tous les fronts, les Nations Unies ont orchestré une riposte globale.
 
Sous la conduite de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé, le système des Nations Unies a aidé les États – et en particulier les pays en développement – à sauver des vies et à contenir la propagation du virus.
 
Nos chaînes d’approvisionnement mondiales ont permis de fournir des équipements de protection individuelle et d’autres fournitures médicales à plus de 130 pays.
 
Grâce au Plan de réponse humanitaire global, nous avons apporté une aide salvatrice aux pays et populations les plus vulnérables, et notamment aux réfugiés et aux personnes déplacées.
 
Nous avons mobilisé l’ensemble du système des Nations Unies en mode « urgence développement », activé nos équipes de pays des Nations Unies et publié rapidement des orientations générales pour aider les gouvernements.
 
La campagne « Verified » permet de lutter contre la désinformation en ligne, un virus toxique ébranlant les fondements démocratiques de nombreux pays.
 
Nous nous efforçons d’obtenir des progrès en ce qui concerne les traitements et les thérapies, compris comme un bien public mondial, et nous appuyons les efforts engagés pour développer un vaccin du peuple, qui soit abordable et accessible partout.
 
Pourtant, il semblerait que certains pays cherchent à conclure de leur côté des marchés qui ne bénéficieraient qu’à leur propre population.
 
Le « vaccinationalisme » n’est pas qu’injuste, il est aussi voué à l’échec.
 
Car personne ne peut se sentir en sécurité si nous ne le sommes pas toutes et tous. Nous le savons tous.
 
De même, les économies ne peuvent tourner normalement si une pandémie se déchaîne.
 
Depuis le début, nous demandons un plan de sauvetage massif représentant au moins 10 % de l’économie mondiale.
 
Les pays développés n’ont pas hésité à voler au secours de leurs propres sociétés en y injectant d’énormes montants. Ils en ont les moyens.
 
Mais nous devons veiller à ce que le monde en développement ne s’embourbe pas dans la ruine financière, l’escalade de la pauvreté et les crises de la dette.
 
Pour éviter une spirale fatale, il faut une mobilisation collective.
 
Dans une semaine, nous réunirons les dirigeantes et dirigeants du monde entier pour trouver des solutions lors d’une réunion sur le financement du développement à l’ère de du COVID-19 et après.
 
Et dans tout ce que nous faisons, nous accordons une attention particulière aux femmes et aux filles.
 
C’est cette moitié de l’humanité qui subit le plus durement les conséquences sociales et économiques du COVID-19.
 
Les femmes sont représentées de manière disproportionnée dans les secteurs les plus gravement touchés par les pertes d’emploi.
 
Ce sont elles qui assument la plupart des tâches non rémunérées associées à la pandémie.
 
Et elles ont moins de ressources économiques sur lesquelles elles peuvent compter pour retomber sur leurs pieds, car leurs salaires sont plus bas et elles n’ont pas autant accès aux prestations.
 
Dans le même temps, des millions de jeunes filles voient leurs chances de recevoir une éducation et leurs rêves d’avenir s’envoler, puisque leurs écoles ferment leurs portes et que les mariages d’enfants sont de plus en plus nombreux.
 
Si nous n’agissons pas maintenant, l’égalité des genres pourrait accuser un recul de plusieurs décennies.
 
Nous devons également parvenir à juguler l’effroyable augmentation de la violence contre les femmes et les filles à laquelle nous assistons depuis le début de la pandémie, tant pour ce qui est de la violence domestique qu’en ce qui concerne les atteintes sexuelles, le harcèlement en ligne ou les féminicides.
 
C’est une guerre larvée contre les femmes qui se joue.
 
Pour l’empêcher et y porter un coup d’arrêt, il faut faire preuve de la même volonté que pour les autres formes de guerre, et consentir autant de ressources au combat.
 
Excellences, 
 
Au-delà des mesures d’urgence, les efforts de relance d’aujourd’hui doivent jeter les bases d’un monde meilleur pour demain.  
 
Cette relance est notre chance de réinventer les économies et les sociétés. 
 
Nous avons les feuilles de route : la Charte des Nations Unies, la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme, le Programme 2030 et l’Accord de Paris. 
 
La relance doit renforcer la résilience. 
Au niveau national, cela exige un Nouveau contrat social. Et sur le plan international, un Nouveau pacte mondial. 
 
Ce Nouveau contrat social doit permettre de bâtir des sociétés inclusives et durables. 
 
L’inclusion implique d’investir dans la cohésion sociale et de mettre fin à toutes les formes d’exclusion, de discrimination et de racisme. 
 
Elle suppose de mettre en place une nouvelle génération de politiques de protection sociale, comprenant notamment la Couverture sanitaire universelle et la possibilité d’un Revenu minimum universel. 
 
L’inclusion consiste également à donner à toutes et à tous l’accès à l’éducation et à tirer parti des technologies numériques, les deux grands vecteurs d’autonomisation et d’égalité de notre époque. 
 
Cela requiert des systèmes fiscaux auxquels tout le monde – particuliers comme entreprises – contribue équitablement.  
 
Il s’agit de placer les droits humains au cœur de nos efforts, dans la droite ligne de l’Appel à l’action en faveur des droits humains, que j’ai lancé cette année à Genève. 
 
Cela signifie l’égalité des droits et des chances pour les femmes et les filles. 
 
La pandémie a plus que jamais révélé l’efficacité des femmes lorsqu’elles tiennent les rênes. 
 
Vingt-cinq ans après Pékin, la génération actuelle de filles doit être en mesure de réaliser ses ambitions et son potentiel illimités. 
 
Mesdames et Messieurs, 
 
Pour être véritablement durable, le Nouveau contrat social doit assurer la transition vers les énergies renouvelables et ainsi atteindre l’objectif de zéro émissions nettes d’ici à 2050. 
 
Je demande à tous les pays d’envisager d’inclure six mesures positives pour le climat dans les efforts qu’ils déploient pour sauver, reconstruire et relancer leurs économies. 
 
Premièrement, nous devons rendre les sociétés plus résilientes et rechercher une transition juste. 
  
Deuxièmement, nous avons besoin d’emplois verts et d’une croissance durable. 
 
Troisièmement, les plans de sauvetages de l’industrie, de l’aviation et du transport maritime devraient être assortis de conditions de conformité aux objectifs de l’Accord de Paris. 
 
Quatrièmement, il faut mettre un terme aux subventions aux combustibles fossiles. 
 
Cinquièmement, il est impératif de tenir compte des risques climatiques dans toutes les décisions financières et politiques. 
 
Sixièmement, il faut agir ensemble, sans laisser personne de côté. 
 
Mais pour réduire véritablement les fragilités et les risques, et pour mieux résoudre les problèmes que nous avons en commun, nous avons également besoin d’un Nouveau pacte mondial au niveau international. 
 
Ce Nouveau pacte doit permettre de garantir que les systèmes politiques et économiques mondiaux fournissent les biens publics essentiels à toutes les populations. 
 
Aujourd’hui, ce n’est pas le cas. 
 
Les structures de gouvernance et les cadres éthiques sont marqués par de profondes lacunes. 
 
Pour y remédier, nous devons veiller au partage large et équitable du pouvoir, des richesses et des opportunités. 
 
Le Nouveau pacte mondial doit reposer sur une mondialisation juste, fondée sur les droits et la dignité de chaque être humain, sur la vie en harmonie avec la nature et sur nos responsabilités envers les générations futures. 
 
Nous devons intégrer les principes du développement durable dans tous les processus décisionnels, afin d’orienter les flux de ressources vers l’économie verte, durable et équitable. 
 
Les systèmes financiers mondiaux doivent évoluer dans cette direction. 
 
Le commerce doit être libre et juste, sans subventions perverses ni barrières qui défavorisent les économies en développement. 
 
Le Nouveau pacte mondial doit aussi s’attaquer aux injustices historiques des structures de pouvoir sur la planète. 
 
Plus de soixante-dix ans après leur création, les institutions multilatérales doivent être modernisées afin de représenter plus équitablement tous les peuples du monde, plutôt que de conférer un pouvoir disproportionné à certains et de limiter l’influence des autres, surtout du monde en développement.
 
Nous n’avons pas besoin de nouvelles bureaucraties.
 
Nous avons besoin d’un système multilatéral qui innove en permanence, qui bénéficie aux peuples et qui protège notre planète.
 
Le multilatéralisme du XXIe siècle doit se structurer en réseau : il doit relier entre elles les institutions mondiales, telles que les banques de développement, les organisations régionales et les alliances commerciales, à travers les secteurs et les zones géographiques.
 
Le multilatéralisme du XXIe siècle doit être inclusif : il doit ouvrir la participation à un cercle bien plus vaste d’acteurs, en faisant appel aux capacités de la société civile, des régions et des villes, des entreprises, des fondations et des institutions universitaires et scientifiques.
 
C’est ainsi que nous garantirons un multilatéralisme efficace qui soit à la hauteur des épreuves du XXIe siècle.
 
Chers amis du monde entier,
 
Nous ne pouvons pas sortir de cette crise en revenant au statu quo ante ou en nous repliant dans nos coquilles nationales.
 
Pour venir à bout des fragilités et des problèmes actuels, il nous faut plus de coopération internationale, et non pas moins ; des institutions multilatérales renforcées, et non pas désertées ; une meilleure gouvernance mondiale, et non pas une mêlée chaotique.
 
La pandémie a bouleversé le monde, mais ce chamboulement a dégagé un espace pour quelque chose de nouveau.
 
Des idées autrefois jugées impossibles sont soudain envisagées.
 
Les actions de grande envergure ne semblent plus aussi intimidantes ; en quelques mois seulement, des milliards de personnes ont fondamentalement modifié leur façon de travailler, de consommer, de se déplacer et d’interagir.
 
Tout d’un coup, il s’est avéré possible d’assurer des financements à grande échelle, des milliers de milliards de dollars ayant été mobilisés pour sauver les économies.
 
Pour le soixante-quinzième anniversaire de l’ONU, l’Assemblée générale m’a invité à faire le point sur nos priorités communes pour l’avenir.
 
Je me félicite de cette occasion qui m’est donnée de mener une réflexion en profondeur dans laquelle nous sommes tous impliqués.
 
Je présenterai l’année prochaine une analyse assortie de recommandations sur les moyens d’atteindre nos objectifs communs.
 
Inspirons-nous des succès qui ont jalonné l’histoire de l’ONU.
 
Répondons positivement aux mouvements pour la justice et la dignité que nous voyons à travers le monde.
 
Enfin, triomphons des cinq cavaliers et faisons advenir le monde dont nous avons besoin : un monde pacifique, inclusif et durable.
 
Si nous avons appris une chose grâce à la pandémie, c’est que nos choix comptent.
 
Au nom de l’avenir, il est impératif que nous fassions les bons choix.
 
Je vous remercie.

*****
All Spanish

Excelencias:
        En un mundo que parece vuelto del revés, este Salón de la Asamblea General es uno de los lugares más extraños de todos.

        La pandemia de COVID-19 ha cambiado nuestra reunión anual hasta hacerla irreconocible.

        Sin embargo, también ha hecho que sea más importante que nunca.

        En enero me dirigí a la Asamblea General y señalé a “cuatro jinetes” entre nosotros, cuatro amenazas que ponen en peligro nuestro futuro común.

        En primer lugar, las tensiones geoestratégicas globales más intensas que hayamos presenciado en años.

        En segundo lugar, una crisis climática existencial.

        En tercer lugar, una profunda y creciente desconfianza mundial.

        Y en cuarto lugar, el lado oscuro del mundo digital.

        Pero había un quinto jinete al acecho en las tinieblas.

        Desde enero, la pandemia de COVID-19 ha galopado por todo el mundo, uniéndose a los otros cuatro jinetes y aumentando la furia de cada uno de ellos.

        Y cada día que pasa, el trágico balance de víctimas aumenta, las familias lloran, las sociedades se tambalean y los pilares de nuestro mundo retiemblan en sus ya endebles cimientos.

        Nos enfrentamos simultáneamente a una crisis sanitaria que hace época, a la mayor calamidad económica y pérdida de empleo desde la Gran Depresión y a nuevas y peligrosas amenazas para los derechos humanos.

        La COVID-19 ha puesto en evidencia las fragilidades del mundo.

        Desigualdades en aumento. Catástrofe climática. Divisiones sociales cada vez más profundas. Corrupción desenfrenada.

        La pandemia se ha aprovechado de estas injusticias, se ha cebado en los más vulnerables y ha hecho desvanecerse de un soplo el progreso de décadas.

        Por primera vez en 30 años, la pobreza está aumentando.

        Los indicadores de desarrollo humano van a la baja.

        Estamos desviándonos a toda velocidad de la senda de alcanzar los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible.

        Entretanto, los esfuerzos de no proliferación de las armas nucleares van decayendo, y no estamos actuando en esferas de peligro emergente, en particular en el ciberespacio.

        La gente está sufriendo.

        Nuestro planeta se está quemando.

        Nuestro mundo está luchando, estresado y sediento de liderazgo y acción verdaderos.

Excelencias:

        Afrontamos un momento fundamental.

        Quienes construyeron las Naciones Unidas hace 75 años habían vivido una pandemia, una depresión a nivel planetario, un genocidio y una guerra mundial.

        Conocían el costo de la discordia y el valor de la unidad.

        Crearon una respuesta visionaria, encarnada en nuestra Carta fundacional, cuyo centro eran las personas.

        Hoy estamos frente a nuestro propio 1945.

        La pandemia es una crisis como ninguna otra que hayamos visto.

        Pero también es el tipo de crisis que veremos producirse en diferentes formas una y otra vez.

        La COVID-19 no es solo una llamada de advertencia: es un ensayo general para el mundo de desafíos que está por venir.

        Debemos avanzar con humildad, reconociendo que un virus microscópico ha puesto de rodillas al mundo.

        Debemos estar unidos. Como hemos visto, cuando cada país va en su propia dirección, el virus va en todas las direcciones.

        Debemos actuar en solidaridad. Se ha prestado muy poca asistencia a los países con menor capacidad para hacer frente al desafío.

        Y debemos guiarnos por la ciencia y aferrarnos a la realidad.

        El populismo y el nacionalismo han fracasado; usados como enfoques para contener el virus, muchas veces han llevado a un empeoramiento palpable.

        Con demasiada frecuencia, también ha habido una desconexión entre liderazgo y poder.

        Vemos ejemplos notables de liderazgo, pero no suelen estar asociados con el poder.

        Y el poder no siempre lleva asociado el liderazgo necesario.

        En un mundo interconectado, es hora de reconocer una sencilla verdad: la solidaridad es el interés propio.

        Si no logramos comprender ese hecho, todo el mundo saldrá perdiendo.
 
Excelencias:

        Cuando la pandemia se fue afianzando, pedí un alto el fuego global.

        Hoy hago un llamamiento a un nuevo esfuerzo de la comunidad internacional para que el alto el fuego se haga realidad antes de que termine el año.

        Tenemos exactamente 100 días.

        Durante una pandemia, los conflictos solo tienen un vencedor: el propio virus.

        Mi llamamiento inicial fue respaldado por 180 Estados Miembros, junto con líderes religiosos, asociados regionales, redes de la sociedad civil y otras instancias.

        También respondieron varios movimientos armados, desde el Camerún hasta Colombia, pasando por Filipinas y más lugares, incluso si en varios casos el alto el fuego que anunciaron no llegó a cumplirse.

        Enormes obstáculos se interponen en el camino: una profunda desconfianza, la presencia de elementos perturbadores y el peso de muchos años de enconada lucha.

        Pese a ello, tenemos motivos de esperanza.

      • Un nuevo acuerdo de paz en la República del Sudán entre el Gobierno y los movimientos armados marca el comienzo de una nueva era, en particular para quienes viven en Darfur, Kordofán del Sur y el Nilo Azul.

      • En el Afganistán, el inicio de las Negociaciones de Paz del Afganistán supone un hito tras años de esfuerzo. El modo de alcanzar un alto el fuego permanente y completo estará en la agenda de las negociaciones. Un proceso de paz inclusivo, en que las mujeres, la juventud y las víctimas del conflicto estén representadas de manera significativa, ofrece la mayor esperanza de una solución sostenible.

        En varios casos hemos visto nuevas situaciones de alto el fuego que se mantienen mejor que en el pasado, o, en su ausencia, una estancación de los combates.

      • En Siria, el alto el fuego en Idlib permanece en gran parte intacto. Después de más de nueve años de conflicto y de sufrimiento colosal, renuevo mi llamamiento para que cesen las hostilidades en todo el país mientras trabajamos para celebrar la próxima ronda del Comité Constitucional.

      • En Oriente Medio, en un período de relativa calma en Gaza y en que la anexión de partes de la Ribera Occidental ocupada se ha dejado de lado al menos por el momento, insto a los dirigentes israelíes y palestinos a que vuelvan a entablar negociaciones significativas que permitan alcanzar una solución biestatal de conformidad con las resoluciones pertinentes de las Naciones Unidas, el derecho internacional y los acuerdos bilaterales.

      • En Libia, los combates han disminuido, pero la acumulación masiva de mercenarios y armas, en flagrante violación de las resoluciones del Consejo de Seguridad, demuestra que el riesgo de que se reanude la confrontación sigue siendo alto. Debemos trabajar todos juntos para lograr un acuerdo de alto el fuego efectivo y la reanudación de las conversaciones políticas en Libia.

      • En Ucrania, el régimen de alto del fuego más reciente sigue en vigor, pero será primordial avanzar en las cuestiones políticas y de seguridad pendientes en el marco del Grupo de Contacto Trilateral y el formato de los Cuatro de Normandía para aplicar los acuerdos de Minsk.

      • En la República Centroafricana, el trato de paz del año pasado contribuyó a reducir considerablemente la violencia. Bajo los auspicios de nuestra misión de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas, y con el respaldo de la comunidad internacional, se está llevando a cabo el diálogo nacional para apoyar las próximas elecciones y la aplicación continuada del acuerdo de paz.

      • Y en Sudán del Sur hemos visto un preocupante aumento de la violencia intercomunitaria, pero el alto el fuego entre las dos partes del conflicto se ha mantenido en su mayor parte, con el apoyo que ha prestado nuestra misión de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas a las labores de vigilancia y la aplicación del acuerdo de paz.

        Ahora, incluso allí donde haya un conflicto encarnizado, no abandonaremos la búsqueda de la paz.

      • En el Yemen, estamos plenamente resueltos a acercar a las partes para alcanzar un acuerdo sobre la Declaración Conjunta que comprenda un alto el fuego en todo el país, la adopción de medidas económicas y humanitarias de fomento de la confianza y la reanudación del proceso político.

Excelencias:
        En las zonas en que los grupos terroristas son especialmente activos, los obstáculos a la paz serán mucho más difíciles de superar.

        En la región del Sahel y del lago Chad, vemos cómo se superponen las repercusiones sanitarias, socioeconómicas, políticas y humanitarias de la pandemia.

        Me preocupa en especial que los grupos terroristas y extremistas violentos saquen partido de la pandemia.

        Además, no debemos olvidar el dramático costo humanitario de la guerra.

        En muchos lugares, la pandemia, aparejada con los conflictos y las disrupciones, está asestando golpes demoledores a la seguridad alimentaria.

        Millones de personas en el nordeste de Nigeria, la República Democrática del Congo, Sudán del Sur y el Yemen corren el riesgo de sufrir hambrunas.

        Ahora es el momento de lograr un nuevo impulso colectivo para la paz y la reconciliación.

        En estas condiciones, hago un llamamiento a un esfuerzo internacional redoblado, liderado por el Consejo de Seguridad, para lograr un alto el fuego mundial antes de fin de año.

        Tenemos 100 días y como he dicho, el tiempo apremia.

        El mundo necesita un alto el fuego global para detener todos los conflictos “calientes”. Al mismo tiempo, debemos hacer todo lo posible por evitar una nueva Guerra Fría.

        Estamos yendo en una dirección muy peligrosa. Nuestro mundo no puede permitirse un futuro en que las dos mayores economías creen una Gran Grieta que divida el globo, cada una con sus propias reglas comerciales y financieras y sus propias capacidades de Internet e inteligencia artificial.

        Una brecha tecnológica y económica corre el riesgo de convertirse inevitablemente en una brecha geoestratégica y militar. Debemos evitar esto a toda costa.

Excelencias:

        Ante el reto global de la pandemia, las Naciones Unidas han organizado una respuesta integral.

        El sistema de las Naciones Unidas, dirigido por la Organización Mundial de la Salud, ha ayudado a los gobiernos, especialmente en el mundo en desarrollo, a salvar vidas y contener la propagación del virus.

        Nuestras cadenas mundiales de suministro han ayudado a proporcionar equipo de protección personal y otros suministros médicos a más de 130 países.

        Hemos prestado asistencia vital a los países y personas más vulnerables, incluidos refugiados y desplazados internos, a través de un Plan Mundial de Respuesta Humanitaria.

        Hemos movilizado a todo el sistema de las Naciones Unidas en modo de emergencia para el desarrollo, hemos activado nuestros equipos de las Naciones Unidas en los países y hemos publicado rápidamente orientaciones de política para apoyar a los gobiernos.

        La campaña “Verified” está luchando contra la desinformación en línea, un virus tóxico que sacude los fundamentos democráticos de muchos países.

        Estamos trabajando para promover tratamientos y terapias como bien público mundial, y respaldando los esfuerzos por obtener una vacuna popular disponible y asequible en todas partes.
        Sin embargo, se informa de que algunos países están haciendo arreglos paralelos para beneficio exclusivo de sus propias poblaciones.

        Ese “vacunacionalismo” es no solo injusto, sino contraproducente.

        Ninguno de nosotros estará a salvo hasta que estemos a salvo todos. Todos lo sabemos.

        Análogamente, las economías no pueden funcionar con una pandemia galopante.

        Desde el principio, hemos impulsado un paquete de rescate masivo por valor de al menos el 10 % de la economía mundial.

        Los países desarrollados han brindado un enorme alivio a sus propias sociedades: es un lujo a su alcance.

        Pero tenemos que asegurarnos de que el mundo en desarrollo no caiga en la ruina financiera, la escalada de la pobreza y las crisis de la deuda.

        Necesitamos un compromiso colectivo para evitar una espiral descendente.

        Dentro de una semana, reuniremos a los líderes mundiales para encontrar soluciones en una Reunión sobre la Financiación para el Desarrollo en la Era de la COVID-19 y Después.

        Y en todo lo que hacemos, nos centramos especialmente en las mujeres y las niñas.

        Media humanidad está soportando las peores consecuencias sociales y económicas de la COVID-19.

        Las mujeres están representadas desproporcionadamente en los sectores más afectados por la pérdida de empleos.

        Son también quienes realizan la mayor parte del trabajo de cuidado no remunerado generado por la pandemia.

        Y son además quienes tienen menos recursos económicos a los que recurrir, porque sus salarios son más bajos y tienen menos acceso a beneficios.

        Al mismo tiempo, millones de niñas están perdiendo la oportunidad de recibir una educación y tener un futuro, por el cierre de las escuelas y el alza del matrimonio infantil.

        A menos que actuemos ahora, la igualdad de género podría retroceder décadas.

        También debemos erradicar el espantoso aumento de la violencia contra las mujeres y las niñas durante la pandemia, desde la violencia doméstica hasta el abuso sexual, el acoso en línea y el femicidio.

        Esta es una guerra oculta contra las mujeres.

        Prevenirla y ponerle fin requiere el mismo compromiso y los mismos recursos que dedicamos a otras formas de guerra.

Excelencias:

        Más allá de la respuesta inmediata, los esfuerzos de recuperación deben conducir a un futuro mejor que comienza ahora.

        La recuperación es nuestra oportunidad de reimaginar las economías y las sociedades.

        Tenemos con qué guiarnos: la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos, la Agenda 2030 y el Acuerdo de París.

        La recuperación debe crear resiliencia.

        Ello requiere un Nuevo Contrato Social a nivel nacional y un Nuevo Acuerdo Mundial a nivel internacional.

        Un Nuevo Contrato Social entraña construir sociedades inclusivas y sostenibles.

        La inclusividad implica invertir en la cohesión social y poner fin a todas las formas de exclusión, discriminación y racismo.

        Implica establecer una nueva generación de protección social, con Cobertura Sanitaria Universal y la posibilidad de un Ingreso Básico Universal.

        Implica brindar acceso a la educación para todos y aprovechar la tecnología digital, los dos grandes facilitadores e igualadores de nuestro tiempo.

        Implica regímenes tributarios en los que todas las personas y todas las empresas paguen la contribución que les corresponde.

        Implica asegurar la centralidad de los derechos humanos en lo que hacemos, de acuerdo con el Llamamiento a la Acción sobre Derechos Humanos que formulé a principios de este año en Ginebra.

        Implica igualdad de derechos y oportunidades para las mujeres y las niñas.

        La pandemia ha demostrado más claramente que nunca la eficacia del liderazgo de las mujeres.

        Veinticinco años después de Beijing, la generación de niñas de hoy debe poder realizar sus ambiciones y potencial ilimitados.

Excelencias:

        Un Nuevo Contrato Social sostenible implica efectuar la transición hacia la energía renovable a fin de lograr emisiones netas cero para 2050.

        Pido a todos los países que consideren la posibilidad de adoptar seis medidas favorables al clima al rescatar, reconstruir y reajustar sus economías.

        En primer lugar, debemos aumentar la resiliencia de las sociedades y asegurar una transición justa.

        En segundo lugar, necesitamos empleos verdes y un crecimiento sostenible.

        En tercer lugar, los rescates de la industria, la aviación y el transporte marítimo deben condicionarse a que estén alineados con los objetivos del Acuerdo de París.

        En cuarto lugar, hay que dejar de subsidiar los combustibles fósiles.

        En quinto lugar, han de tenerse en cuenta los riesgos climáticos de todas las decisiones financieras y políticas.

        En sexto lugar, tenemos que trabajar juntos, sin dejar a nadie atrás.

        Pero para reducir verdaderamente las fragilidades y los riesgos, y para resolver más eficazmente los problemas comunes, necesitamos un Nuevo Acuerdo Mundial a nivel internacional.

        Ese Nuevo Acuerdo Mundial implica asegurar que los sistemas políticos y económicos mundiales provean los bienes públicos mundiales críticos, algo que hoy no ocurre.

        Tenemos enormes brechas en las estructuras de gobernanza y los marcos éticos.

        Para cerrar esas brechas, debemos asegurarnos de que el poder, la riqueza y las oportunidades se compartan de manera amplia y justa.

        Ese Nuevo Acuerdo Mundial debe arraigarse en una globalización justa, basada en los derechos y la dignidad de cada ser humano, en una vida en equilibrio con la naturaleza y en nuestras responsabilidades para con las generaciones futuras.

        Hemos de integrar los principios del desarrollo sostenible en todas las decisiones, para cambiar los flujos de recursos hacia lo verde, lo sostenible y lo equitativo.

        Los sistemas financieros mundiales deben moverse en esa dirección.

        El comercio debe ser libre y justo, sin barreras ni subsidios perversos que inclinen las condiciones en contra de las economías en desarrollo.

        Y ese Nuevo Acuerdo Mundial debe remediar las injusticias históricas de las estructuras de poder mundiales.

        Más de siete decenios después, es preciso mejorar las instituciones multilaterales para representar más equitativamente a todos los pueblos del mundo, en lugar de dar un poder desproporcionado a algunos y limitar la voz de otros, sobre todo del mundo en vías de desarrollo.

            Excelencias,

No necesitamos nuevas burocracias.

Necesitamos un sistema multilateral que innove constantemente, beneficie a las personas y proteja nuestro planeta.

El multilateralismo del siglo XXI debe actuar en red: debe ser capaz de vincular, a través de los diferentes ámbitos sectoriales y áreas geográficas, a las instituciones globales, desde los bancos de desarrollo a las organizaciones regionales, pasando por las distintas alianzas comerciales.

El multilateralismo del siglo XXI debe ser inclusivo: debe abrir la participación a un círculo mucho más amplio de actores, aprovechando las capacidades de la sociedad civil, las regiones y ciudades, las empresas, las fundaciones y las instituciones académicas y científicas.

Es así como garantizaremos un multilateralismo efectivo, a la altura de los desafíos del siglo XXI.

Amigos de todo el mundo:

        No podemos responder a esta crisis volviendo a lo de antes o refugiándonos en nuestra caparazón nacional.

        Para superar las fragilidades y los desafíos actuales necesitamos más cooperación internacional, no menos; fortalecer las instituciones multilaterales, no abandonarlas; una mejor gobernanza global, no una caótica ley de la selva.

        La pandemia ha trastornado el mundo, pero ese trastorno ha creado espacio para algo nuevo.

        De repente, se están debatiendo ideas que antes se consideraban imposibles.

        La acción a gran escala ya no parece una tarea tan abrumadora; en apenas meses, miles de millones de personas han cambiado fundamentalmente su forma de trabajar, consumir, moverse e interactuar.

        Repentinamente, la financiación a gran escala ha demostrado ser posible, pues se han desplegado billones de dólares para rescatar las economías.

        Al conmemorar el 75º aniversario de las Naciones Unidas, la Asamblea General me ha invitado a informar sobre nuestra agenda común para el futuro.

        Acojo con beneplácito esta oportunidad de iniciar un proceso colectivo de profunda reflexión.

        El año que viene presentaré análisis y recomendaciones sobre cómo podemos alcanzar nuestros objetivos comunes.

        Inspirémonos en los logros que hemos obtenido a lo largo de la historia de las Naciones Unidas.

        Respondamos afirmativamente a los movimientos en pro de la justicia y la dignidad que vemos en el mundo.

        Y derrotemos a los cinco jinetes y construyamos el mundo que necesitamos: un mundo pacífico, inclusivo y sostenible.

        La pandemia nos ha enseñado que nuestras elecciones importan.

        De cara al futuro, asegurémonos de elegir sabiamente.

        Muchas gracias.