New York

21 September 2020

Secretary-General's remarks at General Assembly Ceremony marking the 75th Anniversary of the United Nations [Bilingual as delivered, scroll down for all-English and all-French versions]

[Watch the video on webtv.un.org]

The ideals of the United Nations – peace, justice, equality and dignity — are beacons to a better world.  
 
But the Organization we celebrate today emerged only after immense suffering. 
 
It took two world wars, millions of deaths and the horrors of the Holocaust for world leaders to commit to international cooperation and the rule of law.  
 
That commitment produced results.
 
A Third World War – which so many had feared — has been avoided. 
 
Never in modern history have we gone so many years without a military confrontation between the major powers. 
 
This is a great achievement of which Member States can be proud – and which we must all strive to preserve.
 
Down the decades, there have been other historic accomplishments, including:
 

  • Peace treaties and peacekeeping 
  • Decolonization 
  • Human rights standards – and mechanisms to uphold them 
  • The triumph over apartheid 
  • Life-saving humanitarian aid for millions of victims of conflict and disaster 
  • The eradication of diseases 
  • The steady reduction of hunger 
  • The progressive development of international law 
  • Landmark pacts to protect the environment and our planet 

Most recently, unanimous support for the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change provided an inspiring vision for the 21st century.
 
Yet there is still so much to be done.
 
Of the 850 delegates to the San Francisco Conference, just 8 were women.
 
Twenty-five years since the Beijing Platform for Action, gender inequality remains the greatest single challenge to human rights around the world.
 
Climate calamity looms.
 
Biodiversity is collapsing.
 
Poverty is again rising.
 
Hatred is spreading. 
 
Geopolitical tensions are escalating.
 
Nuclear weapons remain on hair-trigger alert.
 
Transformative technologies have opened up new opportunities but also exposed new threats.
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the world’s fragilities.
 
We can only address them together.
 
Today we have a surplus of multilateral challenges and a deficit of multilateral solutions.
 
I welcome the General Assembly’s 75th anniversary declaration and commitment to reinvigorate multilateralism.
 
You have invited me to assess how to advance our common agenda, and I will report back with analysis and recommendations.
 
This will be an important and inclusive process of profound reflection. 
 
Already we know that we need more — and more effective — multilateralism, with vision, ambition and impact.
 
National sovereignty —a pillar of the United Nations  — goes hand-in-hand with enhanced international cooperation based on common values and shared responsibilities in pursuit of progress for all.
 
No one wants a world government – but we must work together to improve world governance.

In an interconnected world, we need a networked multilateralism, in which the United Nations family, international financial institutions, regional organizations, trading blocs and others work together more closely and more effectively. 

We also need as the President said, an inclusive multilateralism, drawing on civil society, cities, businesses, local authorities and more and more on young people. 

Le Secrétariat a célébré cet anniversaire en menant une consultation à l’échelle planétaire. Plus d’un million de personnes à travers le monde, et notamment un grand nombre de jeunes, ont fait entendre leurs voix.
 
Les participants ont fait part de leurs craintes et de leurs espoirs pour l’avenir.
 
Ils estiment que la coopération internationale est indispensable pour faire face aux réalités de notre époque.
 
Ils ont relevé que la pandémie du COVID-19 rendait cette solidarité plus urgente encore. Et ils ont souligné que le monde avait besoin de systèmes de santé et de services de base universels.
 
Les gens craignent la crise climatique, la pauvreté, les inégalités, la corruption et la discrimination systémique fondée sur la couleur de peau ou le genre.
 
Ils voient l’ONU comme un instrument pour bâtir un monde meilleur.
 
Et ils comptent sur nous pour être à la hauteur des épreuves d’aujourd’hui.
 
Cette responsabilité revient au premier chef aux États Membres.
 
Ce sont les États Membres qui ont fondé l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Ils ont le devoir de s’y investir pleinement, de nourrir l’Organisation et de lui fournir les moyens dont elle a besoin pour avoir un impact véritable.
 
Nous le devons à « nous, les peuples ».
 
Nous le devons aux soldats de la paix, aux diplomates, au personnel humanitaire et à celles et ceux qui ont sacrifié leur vie pour faire progresser nos valeurs communes.
 
Je veux saluer tous les membres du personnel, passés et présents, pour leur dévouement à faire vivre les idéaux de l’ONU.
 
Les fondateurs de notre Organisation se sont mis à l’ouvrage alors que le conflit faisait rage.
 
Aujourd’hui, c’est à nous qu’il appartient de se frayer un chemin hors du danger.
 
Pour reprendre les termes de notre Charte, c’est à nous, Nations Unies, « d’associer nos efforts pour réaliser ces desseins ».
 
Je vous remercie.

*****
[all-English version]

The ideals of the United Nations – peace, justice, equality and dignity — are beacons to a better world.  
 
But the Organization we celebrate today emerged only after immense suffering. 
 
It took two world wars, millions of deaths and the horrors of the Holocaust for world leaders to commit to international cooperation and the rule of law.  
 
That commitment produced results.
 
A Third World War – which so many had feared — has been avoided. 
 
Never in modern history have we gone so many years without a military confrontation between the major powers. 
 
This is a major achievement of which Member States can be proud – and which we must all strive to preserve.
 
Down the decades, there have been other historic accomplishments, including:
 

  • Peace treaties and peacekeeping

 

  • Decolonization

 

  • Human rights standards – and mechanisms to uphold them

 

  • The triumph over apartheid

 

  • Life-saving humanitarian aid for millions of victims of conflict and disaster

 

  • The eradication of diseases

 

  • The steady reduction of hunger

 

  • The progressive development of international law

 

  • Landmark agreements to protect the environment and our planet

 
Most recently, unanimous agreement on the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change provide an inspiring vision for the 21st century.
 
Yet there is still so much to be done.
 
Of the 850 delegates to the San Francisco Conference, just 8 were women.
 
Twenty-five years since the Beijing Platform for Action, gender inequality remains the greatest single challenge to human rights around the world.
 
Climate calamity looms.
 
Biodiversity is collapsing.
 
Poverty is again rising.
 
Hatred is spreading. 
 
Geopolitical tensions are escalating.
 
Nuclear weapons remain on hair-trigger alert.
 
Transformative technologies have opened up new opportunities but also exposed new threats.
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the world’s fragilities.
 
We can only address them together.
 
Today we have a surplus of multilateral challenges and a deficit of multilateral solutions.
 
I welcome the General Assembly’s 75th anniversary declaration and commitment to reinvigorate multilateralism.
 
You have invited me to assess how to advance our common agenda, and I will report back with analysis and recommendations.
 
This will be an important and inclusive process of profound reflection. 
 
Already we know that we need more — and more effective — multilateralism, with vision, ambition and impact.
 
National sovereignty —a pillar of the United Nations — goes hand-in-hand with enhanced international cooperation based on common values and shared responsibilities in pursuit of progress for all.
 
No one wants a world government – but we must work together to improve world governance.

In an interconnected world, we need a networked multilateralism, in which the United Nations family, international financial institutions, regional organizations, trading blocs and others work together more closely and more effectively. 

We also need as the President said, an inclusive multilateralism, drawing on civil society, cities, businesses, local authorities and more and more on young people. 

The Secretariat marked this anniversary with a global conversation that reached more than a million people around the world, with a special focus on the voices of youth.
 
They shared their fears and hopes for the future.
 
They said international cooperation is vital to deal with today’s challenges.
 
They highlighted that Covid-19 has made such solidarity more urgent.  And they stressed that the world needs health systems and basic services for all.
 
People are fearful about the climate crisis, poverty, inequality, corruption and systemic racial and gender discrimination.
 
They see the United Nations as a vehicle to make the world a better place.
 
And they count on us to meet today’s tests.
 
That responsibility lies above all with Member States.
 
Member States established the United Nations and have a duty to embrace it, nourish it and provide it with the tools to make a difference. 
 
We owe this to “we the peoples”.
 
We owe it to the peacekeepers, diplomats, humanitarian personnel, and others who sacrificed their lives advancing common values.
 
I salute all staff, past and present, for their dedication in bringing the ideals of the United Nation to life.
 
Our Organization’s founders began their work during the heat of conflict.
 
Now it falls to us to chart our way out of danger.
 
In the words of our Charter, let us “combine our efforts to achieve these aims” as United Nations.
 
Thank you.

*****
[all-French version]

Les idéaux de l’Organisation des Nations Unies – la paix, la justice, l’égalité et la dignité – sont les piliers d’un monde meilleur.
 
Mais l’Organisation dont nous célébrons aujourd’hui l’anniversaire n’a vu le jour qu’après d’immenses souffrances.
 
Il a fallu deux guerres mondiales, des millions de morts et les horreurs de l’Holocauste pour que les dirigeants du monde s’engagent enfin pour la coopération internationale et l’état de droit.
 
Cet engagement a produit des résultats.
 
Une troisième guerre mondiale – que tant redoutaient – a été évitée.
 
Jamais, dans l’histoire moderne, n’avons-nous traversé autant d’années sans confrontations militaires entre grandes puissances.
 
C’est un accomplissement majeur dont les États Membres peuvent tirer fierté – et que nous devons tous nous efforcer de préserver.
 
Au fil des ans, il y a eu d’autres avancées historiques, notamment :
 

  • les traités de paix et le maintien de la paix ;

 

  • la décolonisation ;

 

  • les normes en matière de droits humains et les mécanismes garantissant leur respect ;

 

  • le triomphe sur l’apartheid ;

 

  • une aide humanitaire vitale dispensée à des millions de victimes de conflits et de catastrophes ;

 

  • l’éradication de maladies ;

 

  • la réduction continue de la faim ;

 

  • le développement progressif du droit international ;

 

  • des pacts déterminants pour la protection de l’environnement et de notre planète.

 
Dernièrement, le soutien unanime pour les Objectifs de développement durable et l’Accord de Paris sur les changements climatiques ont fixé un cadre ambitieux pour le XXIe siècle.
 
Pourtant, il reste encore tant à accomplir.
 
Il n’y avait que 8 femmes parmi les 850 représentants présents à la Conférence de San Francisco.
 
Vingt-cinq ans après le Programme d’action de Beijing, l’inégalité entre les genres demeure le plus grand défi au monde pour les droits humains.
 
Des calamités climatiques se profilent à l’horizon.
 
La biodiversité s’effondre.
 
La pauvreté s’accroît à nouveau.
 
La haine se répand.
 
Les tensions géopolitiques se durcissent.
 
Les armes nucléaires restent en état d’alerte instantanée.
 
Des technologies porteuses de changements ont ouvert de nouvelles possibilités mais également créé des menaces nouvelles.
 
La pandémie de COVID-19 a mis à nu les fragilités du monde.
 
Ce n’est qu’en nous unissant que nous pourrons faire face à ces réalités.
 
Aujourd’hui, nous avons trop de problèmes multilatéraux et pas assez de solutions multilatérales.
 
Je salue la déclaration convenue par l’Assemblée générale à l’occasion du 75e anniversaire de l’Organisation ainsi que l’engagement de l’Assemblée à revigorer le multilatéralisme.
 
Vous m’avez invité à étudier les moyens de faire progresser notre programme commun, et je donnerai suite à votre demande en vous communiquant une analyse et des recommandations.
 
Il s’agira d’un processus de profonde réflexion, qui sera déterminant et que je veux inclusif.
 
D’ores et déjà, nous savons que nous avons besoin d’un multilatéralisme plus fort et plus efficace, qui allie vision, ambition et impact.
 
La souveraineté nationale – un principe fondamental des Nations Unies – va de pair avec une coopération internationale renforcée, reposant sur des valeurs communes et des responsabilités partagées dans la poursuite du progrès pour tous et toutes.
 
Personne ne souhaite de gouvernement mondial – mais nous devons œuvrer de concert pour améliorer la gouvernance mondiale.
 
Dans un monde interconnecté, nous avons besoin d’un multilatéralisme en réseau, dans lequel la famille des Nations Unies, les institutions financières internationales, les organisations régionales, les blocs commerciaux et d’autres collaborent plus étroitement et plus efficacement.
 
Nous avons également besoin, comme l’a dit le Président, d’un multilatéralisme qui soit inclusif et s’appuie sur la société civile, les villes, les entreprises, les collectivités et, de plus en plus, sur la jeunesse.
 
Le Secrétariat a célébré cet anniversaire en menant une consultation à l’échelle planétaire. Plus d’un million de personnes à travers le monde, et notamment un grand nombre de jeunes, ont fait entendre leurs voix.
 
Les participants ont fait part de leurs craintes et de leurs espoirs pour l’avenir.
 
Ils estiment que la coopération internationale est indispensable pour faire face aux réalités de notre époque.
 
Ils ont relevé que la pandémie du COVID-19 rendait cette solidarité plus urgente encore. Et ils ont souligné que le monde avait besoin de systèmes de santé et de services de base universels.
 
Les gens craignent la crise climatique, la pauvreté, les inégalités, la corruption et la discrimination systémique fondée sur la couleur de peau ou le genre.
 
Ils voient l’ONU comme un instrument pour bâtir un monde meilleur.
 
Et ils comptent sur nous pour être à la hauteur des épreuves d’aujourd’hui.
 
Cette responsabilité revient au premier chef aux États Membres.
 
Ce sont les États Membres qui ont fondé l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Ils ont le devoir de s’y investir pleinement, de nourrir l’Organisation et de lui fournir les moyens dont elle a besoin pour avoir un impact véritable.
 
Nous le devons à « nous, les peuples ».
 
Nous le devons aux soldats de la paix, aux diplomates, au personnel humanitaire et à celles et ceux qui ont sacrifié leur vie pour faire progresser nos valeurs communes.
 
Je salue tous les membres du personnel, passés et présents, pour leur dévouement à faire vivre les idéaux de l’ONU.
 
Les fondateurs de notre Organisation se sont mis à l’ouvrage alors que le conflit faisait rage.
 
Aujourd’hui, c’est à nous qu’il appartient de se frayer un chemin hors du danger.
 
Pour reprendre les termes de notre Charte, c’est à nous, Nations Unies, « d’associer nos efforts pour réaliser ces desseins ».
 
Je vous remercie.