New York

09 March 2015

Secretary-General's Remarks to Security Council on "Cooperation between the UN and Regional and Sub-Regional Organizations (EU)" [Bilingual version -as delivered- Scroll down for all-English version]

Je suis très heureux d’accueillir S. E. Mme Frederica Mogherini, Haute Représentante de l’Union européenne pour les affaires étrangères et la politique de sécurité.

Les pères de la Charte des Nations Unies ont fait preuve d’une grande clairvoyance en imaginant une architecture de sécurité mondiale et collective faisant clairement une place aux accords régionaux.

Aujourd’hui, dans le domaine de la sécurité, l’ONU collabore de près, de diverses manières, avec différentes structures régionales.

Nous partageons le fardeau, apportons un appui, et prenons la tête des opérations si on nous le demande.

Les défis sont trop complexes pour qu’une seule organisation ou une seule nation puisse les relever seule, d’où la nécessité des partenariats et de l’innovation.

Le partenariat stratégique entre l’Union européenne et l’ONU est profondément ancré.
Nos organisations partagent les mêmes valeurs et tiennent toutes deux à ce que les problèmes de sécurité soient gérés collectivement et pacifiquement pour qu’il n’y ait pas de conflits.

En ces temps de crises multiples, il est plus nécessaire que jamais de renforcer ce partenariat pour la paix, les droits de l’homme et le développement durable.

Et il est plus nécessaire que jamais que l’Europe surmonte les frictions et difficultés internes qu’elle rencontre pour rester efficace dans les missions importantes qu’elle mène au-delà de ses frontières.

In recent years, the United Nations and the EU have made significant strides in working together for peace and security around the world.
But we still encounter difficulties in mobilizing early action before a situation visibly deteriorates.

Rapid and effective political engagement remains the single most important element for success in our preventive diplomacy efforts.

The European Union, which has helped to prevent conflict within its own borders, helps others to resolve their differences peacefully.

It is a key actor in many international negotiations – such as the P5+1 nuclear negotiations with Iran, the Middle East Peace Process, and the Belgrade-Pristina dialogue. 

EU support to UN diplomatic efforts in Libya has been invaluable.

I also appreciate the European Union’s support for mediation, and its funding for the UN Stand-by Team of Mediation Experts. 

The European Union is also one of our strongest and most reliable regional peacekeeping partners, together with the African Union.

The implementation of the EU’s 2012 Plan of Action to enhance support to UN peacekeeping has played an important role.

We look forward to working with you on a follow-on action plan for the next few years.  

The Central African Republic, Mali and Somalia are excellent examples of the comprehensive and complementary nature of the UN/EU partnership. 

In Mali, MINUSMA is working very closely with EUTM and EUCAP Sahel Mali.  We are also benefiting from the uniformed contributions of 13 European Member States.

In the Central African Republic, MINUSCA has been working effectively with EUFOR, and we are on track for a seamless handover by mid-March.

This experience shows the tremendous potential for EU operations to deploy as bridging mechanisms to UN missions.

In Somalia, building on the positive experience of the security strategy designed with AU and EU support in 2013, the Security Council has mandated another joint planning exercise to take place in 2015.

I look forward to continuing our joint efforts to assist Somalia in advancing along the path charted in Vision 2016.

The UN and EU are not acting alone in Africa.  The African Union’s partnership with both organizations and its role in addressing conflict are key components of the peace and security architecture on the continent.

Our three organizations are also playing important roles in addressing the threat of Ebola in West Africa.

The European Union, with the capabilities of its Member States, as well as the standing capacity of the EU Battlegroup, is also an indispensable partner of the UN on rapid response.

Given the magnitude of the challenges we face, it is our responsibility to continue exploring scenarios where we can put our combined efforts to use.

Both of our organizations are engaged in important reviews this year.

Our Peace Operations review is under way, and the Panel engaged in European consultations last month.

Member States are also evaluating the Organization’s peacebuilding architecture and there is a ten-year review of progress on Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security.

The European Union, in turn, will be undertaking a comprehensive security and foreign policy review of its own.

Allow me to take this opportunity to once again express my condolences to the families of the victims of recent terrorist attacks in Paris and in Copenhagen.

Terrorism requires a global and holistic response that upholds human rights and does not exacerbate the problem.

I value the UN-EU High-Level Counter-Terrorism Political Dialogue and our cooperation to prevent violent extremism through capacity-building initiatives in challenged regions and countries.

I am also grateful for the financial contributions that the European External Action Service has made to key UN counter-terrorism capacity-building initiatives.

Europe must look both outwards and inwards in order to foster global peace and security.

The UN is strongly committed to working with the European Union and all other players in helping to discourage the phenomenon of foreign terrorist fighters, who pose dangers within and beyond Europe.

We must also collectively work towards a peaceful, political resolution to the conflict in eastern Ukraine, which not only threatens the country, but the broader European region and even international peace and security.

While we all recognize that much remains to be done, our joint work over the past years has developed a solid foundation on which to build and deliver results for the people we serve.

Thank you. Merci.

*****
All English version

It is a pleasure for me to welcome Her Excellency Ms. Federica Mogherini, High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice-President of the European Commission. 

The framers of the Charter of the United Nations showed great vision in foreseeing a global, collective security architecture with a clear role for regional arrangements.

In today’s security landscape, the United Nations is working closely with regional actors in a variety of ways.

We share burdens, provide support and take the lead when requested.

The challenges we face are too complex for any one organization or nation to address alone – hence the need for partnership and innovation. 

The strategic partnership between the European Union and the United Nations runs deep. 

Both organizations share common values and are committed to the peaceful collective management of security challenges to avoid conflict.

At a time when we face multiple crises, strengthening this partnership for peace, human rights and sustainable development is more necessary than ever.

So too is the need for Europe to transcend whatever internal frictions and struggles it encounters so it may maintain its effectiveness in its important engagements beyond its borders.

In recent years, the United Nations and the EU have made significant strides in working together for peace and security around the world.

But we still encounter difficulties in mobilizing early action before a situation visibly deteriorates.

Rapid and effective political engagement remains the single most important element for success in our preventive diplomacy efforts.

The European Union, which has helped to prevent conflict within its own borders, helps others to resolve their differences peacefully.

It is a key actor in many international negotiations – such as the P5+1 nuclear negotiations with Iran, the Middle East Peace Process, and the Belgrade-Pristina dialogue. 

EU support to UN diplomatic efforts in Libya has been invaluable.

I also appreciate the European Union’s support for mediation, and its funding for the UN Stand-by Team of Mediation Experts. 

The European Union is also one of our strongest and most reliable regional peacekeeping partners, together with the African Union.

The implementation of the EU’s 2012 Plan of Action to enhance support to UN peacekeeping has played an important role.

We look forward to working with you on a follow-on action plan for the next few years.  

The Central African Republic, Mali and Somalia are excellent examples of the comprehensive and complementary nature of the UN/EU partnership. 

In Mali, MINUSMA is working very closely with EUTM and EUCAP Sahel Mali.  We are also benefiting from the uniformed contributions of 13 European Member States.

In the Central African Republic, MINUSCA has been working effectively with EUFOR, and we are on track for a seamless handover by mid-March.

This experience shows the tremendous potential for EU operations to deploy as bridging mechanisms to UN missions.

In Somalia, building on the positive experience of the security strategy designed with AU and EU support in 2013, the Security Council has mandated another joint planning exercise to take place in 2015.

I look forward to continuing our joint efforts to assist Somalia in advancing along the path charted in Vision 2016.

The UN and EU are not acting alone in Africa.  The African Union’s partnership with both organizations and its role in addressing conflict are key components of the peace and security architecture on the continent.

Our three organizations are also playing important roles in addressing the threat of Ebola in West Africa.

The European Union, with the capabilities of its Member States, as well as the standing capacity of the EU Battlegroup, is also an indispensable partner of the UN on rapid response.

Given the magnitude of the challenges we face, it is our responsibility to continue exploring scenarios where we can put our combined efforts to use.

Both of our organizations are engaged in important reviews this year.

Our Peace Operations review is under way, and the Panel engaged in European consultations last month.

Member States are also evaluating the Organization’s peacebuilding architecture and there is a ten-year review of progress on Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security.

The European Union, in turn, will be undertaking a comprehensive security and foreign policy review of its own.

Allow me to take this opportunity to once again express my condolences to the families of the victims of recent terrorist attacks in Paris and in Copenhagen.

Terrorism requires a global and holistic response that upholds human rights and does not exacerbate the problem.

I value the UN-EU High-Level Counter-Terrorism Political Dialogue and our cooperation to prevent violent extremism through capacity-building initiatives in challenged regions and countries.

I am also grateful for the financial contributions that the European External Action Service has made to key UN counter-terrorism capacity-building initiatives.

Europe must look both outwards and inwards in order to foster global peace and security.

The UN is strongly committed to working with the European Union and all other players in helping to discourage the phenomenon of foreign terrorist fighters, who pose dangers within and beyond Europe.

We must also collectively work towards a peaceful, political resolution to the conflict in eastern Ukraine, which not only threatens the country, but the broader European region and even international peace and security.

While we all recognize that much remains to be done, our joint work over the past years has developed a solid foundation on which to build and deliver results for the people we serve.

Thank you.