UN Headquarters

18 May 2020

Remarks to the World Health Assembly

António Guterres

[English version; scroll down for bilingual as delivered and French versions]

Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, dear colleagues and friends,
 
Thank you for this opportunity to address you on the greatest challenge of our age. 
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated our global fragility.
 
Despite the enormous scientific and technological advances of recent decades, a microscopic virus has brought us to our knees.
 
We do not yet know how to eradicate, treat or vaccinate against COVID-19.
 
We have no idea when we will be able to do these things. 
 
But the fragility exposed by the virus is not limited to our health systems. It affects all areas of our world and our institutions. 
 
The fragility of coordinated global efforts is highlighted by our failed response to the climate crisis.
 
The fragility of our nuclear disarmament regime is shown by the ever-increasing risk of proliferation. 
 
The fragility of our web protocols is laid bare by constant breaches in cybersecurity, as cyber warfare is also already happening – in a lawless international environment.
 
COVID-19 must be a wake-up call.
 
It is time for an end to the hubris.
 
Our deep feelings of powerlessness must lead to greater humility.
 
Deadly global threats require a new unity and solidarity.
 
Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, dear friends,
 
We have seen some solidarity, but very little unity, in our response to COVID-19.
 
Different countries have followed different, sometimes contradictory, strategies and we are all paying a heavy price.

Many countries have ignored the recommendations of the World Health Organization.
 
As a result, the virus has spread across the world and is now moving into the global South, where its impact may be even more devastating, and we are risking further spikes and waves.
 
Since the beginning of the pandemic, the United Nations, and I personally, have advocated for a three-point response.
 
First, a large-scale, coordinated and comprehensive health response, guided by the WHO, with an emphasis on solidarity towards developing countries. We must pool our efforts to help countries at greatest risk and strengthen and expand their health systems. This must be complemented by our humanitarian response.
 
We must also invest in expanded mental health services to support the enormous increase in psychological suffering caused by this disease, from grief and depression to anxiety and fear for the future.
 
Second, we have called for policies to address the devastating social and economic dimensions of the crisis.
 
Let me be clear: there is no choice between addressing the health impact and the economic and social fallout from this pandemic. 
 
This is a false dichotomy.
 
Unless we control the spread of the virus, the economy will never recover.
 
So together with the health response, we need direct support that will keep households afloat and businesses solvent. There must be a focus on the most affected: women, older people, children, low-wage earners and other vulnerable groups.
 
I therefore urged the G20 to consider the urgent launch of a large-scale, coordinated and comprehensive stimulus package amounting to a double-digit percentage of global GDP.
 
While developed countries can do this by themselves, we must massively increase the resources available to the developing world.
 
I also called for greater support through the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank Group and other International Financial Institutions. 
 
Third, we have made clear that the recovery from the COVID-19 crisis must lead to more equal, inclusive and sustainable economies and societies that are stronger and more resilient.
 
The pandemic is a tragedy.
 
Both our response and our recovery must put human rights considerations at the centre.

But it is also an opportunity to address the climate crisis and inequality of all kinds, including the yawning gaps in our social protection systems. It is an opportunity to rebuild differently and better.
 
Instead of going back to systems that were unsustainable, we need to make a leap into a future of clean energy, inclusivity and equality, and stronger social safety nets, including universal health coverage.
 
It will require a massive multilateral effort. 
 
I hope the search for a vaccine can be a starting point.
 
The ACT Accelerator is a landmark global collaboration to speed up the development, production and equitable access to new COVID-19 diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines.
 
It is essential that these are universally available and affordable for everyone, everywhere. They are a quintessential global public good.
 
We can do it. But will we?
 
Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, dear friends,
 
I would like to close by paying tribute to the frontline health workers who are the heroes of this pandemic.
 
From nurses, doctors and midwives to technicians and administrators, millions of healthcare workers are putting themselves in harm’s way every day to protect us. We owe them our deepest appreciation and solidarity.
 
The entire United Nations family stands with thousands of our colleagues at the World Health Organization who are working around the world to support Member States in saving lives and protecting the vulnerable, with guidance, training and essential testing, treatment and protective equipment. We thank you for your service.
 
I saw the courage and determination of WHO personnel working to end the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo last year. It is partly or largely thanks to their efforts, in very difficult and dangerous conditions, that new infections have been contained and we are counting down to the end of the Ebola outbreak.
 
The WHO is irreplaceable. It needs enhanced resources, particularly to provide support to developing countries, which must be our greatest concern.
 
We are as strong as the weakest health systems.
 
Protecting the developing world is not a matter of charity or generosity but a question of enlightened self-interest. The global North cannot defeat COVID-19 unless the global South defeats it at the same time.
As I said last month, “Once we have finally turned the page on this epidemic, there must be a time to look back fully to understand how such a disease emerged and spread its devastation so quickly across the globe, and how all those involved reacted to the crisis. The lessons learned will be essential to effectively address similar challenges, as they may arise in the future.
 
“But now is not that time. Now is the time for unity, for the international community to work together in solidarity to stop this virus and its shattering consequences.”  
 
We cannot contemplate a future of fear and insecurity.
 
Either we get through this pandemic together, or we fail.
 
Either we stand together, or we fall apart.
 
Thank you.

**************************************************************************************************************

[Bilingual as delivered version]

Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, dear colleagues and friends,

Thank you for this opportunity to address you on the greatest challenge of our age. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated our global fragility.

Despite the enormous scientific and technological advances of recent decades, a microscopic virus has brought us to our knees.

We do not yet know how to eradicate, treat or vaccinate against COVID-19.

And we have no clear idea when we will be able to do these things. 

But the fragility exposed by the virus is not limited to our health systems. It affects all areas of our world and our institutions. 

The fragility of coordinated global efforts is highlighted by our failed response to the climate crisis.

The fragility of our nuclear disarmament regime is shown by the ever-increasing risk of proliferation. 

The fragility of our web protocols is laid bare by constant breaches in cybersecurity, as cyber warfare is also already happening – in a lawless international environment.
COVID-19 must be a wake-up call.

It is time for an end to this hubris.

Our deep feelings of powerlessness must lead to greater humility.

Deadly global threats require a new unity and solidarity.

Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs, chers amis,

Nous avons vu des expressions de solidarité, mais très peu d’unité dans notre réponse face au COVID-19.

Les pays ont suivi des stratégies différentes, parfois contradictoires, et nous en payons tous le prix fort.

De nombreux pays ont ignoré les recommandations de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé.

En conséquence, le virus s’est répandu dans le monde entier et se dirige maintenant vers les pays du Sud, où il pourrait avoir des effets encore plus dévastateurs ; et nous risquons de nouveaux pics et de nouvelles vagues.

Depuis le début de la pandémie, les Nations Unies et moi-même avons plaidé en faveur d’une réponse en trois points.

Premièrement, une intervention sanitaire complète, coordonnée et à grande échelle, guidée par l’OMS, et mettant l’accent sur la solidarité avec les pays en développement. Nous devons unir nos efforts pour aider les pays les plus vulnérables et renforcer et étendre leurs systèmes de santé. Des mesures humanitaires doivent compléter ce dispositif.

Nous devons également investir dans l’extension des services de santé mentale, afin de faire face à l’immense souffrance psychologique causée par cette maladie, qu’il s’agisse du deuil, de la dépression, de l’anxiété ou de la peur de l’avenir.

Deuxièmement, nous avons appelé à la mise en place de mesures pour faire face aux terribles conséquences économiques et sociales de la crise.

Permettez-moi d’être clair : nous ne devons pas choisir entre la réponse aux conséquences sanitaires ou aux retombées économiques et sociales de cette pandémie.
Il s’agit d’une fausse dichotomie.

Si nous ne contrôlons pas la propagation du virus, l’économie ne s’en remettra jamais.

Ainsi, parallèlement aux mesures sanitaires, nous avons besoin d’un appui direct pour aider les ménages et les entreprises à se maintenir à flot. Il faut porter une attention toute particulière aux plus touchés : les femmes, les personnes âgées, les enfants, les bas salaires et les autres groupes vulnérables.

C’est pourquoi j’ai exhorté le G20 à envisager de toute urgence un plan de relance coordonné, complet et à grande échelle, représentant au moins 10% du produit intérieur brut mondial.

Si les pays développés ont les moyens d’y parvenir par eux-mêmes, nous devons voir une augmentation massive des ressources disponibles pour les pays en développement.

J’ai également demandé le renforcement de l’appui apporté via le Fonds monétaire international, le Groupe de la Banque mondiale et d’autres institutions financières internationales.

Troisièmement, il est clair que la reconstruction après la crise du COVID-19 doit aboutir à des économies plus égalitaires, plus inclusives et plus durables et à des sociétés plus fortes et plus résilientes.

Cette pandémie est une tragédie.

Notre réponse à cette tragédie et notre reconstruction doivent placer les droits humains au centre.

Mais nous devons aussi saisir cette occasion pour faire face à la crise climatique et pour lutter contre toutes les inégalités, et notamment les lacunes béantes de nos systèmes de protection sociale. Il s’agit d’une opportunité pour reconstruire autrement et mieux.

Au lieu de revenir à des systèmes qui n’étaient plus durables, nous devons faire un bond vers un avenir qui fait place aux énergies propres, à l’inclusion et à l’égalité, au renforcement des filets de sécurité sociale, y compris à travers une couverture médicale universelle.

Il faudra un grand effort multilatéral.

J’espère que la recherche d’un vaccin pourra en être le point de départ.

L’initiative « ACT Accelerator » est une collaboration mondiale historique visant à accélérer la recherche, la production et l’égalité d’accès aux solutions diagnostiques et thérapeutiques et aux vaccins pour le COVID-19.

Il est essentiel que toute personne, où qu’elle se trouve, ait accès – physiquement et financièrement – à ces solutions, qui constituent un bien public mondial par excellence.

Nous pouvons le faire. Mais, le ferons-nous ?

Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, dear friends,

I would like to close by paying tribute to the frontline health workers who are the heroes of this pandemic.

From nurses, doctors and midwives to technicians and administrators, millions of healthcare workers are putting themselves in harm’s way every day to protect us. We owe them our deepest appreciation and solidarity.

The entire United Nations family stands with the thousands of our colleagues at the World Health Organization who are working around the world to support Member States in saving lives and protecting the vulnerable, with guidance, training and essential testing, treatment and protective equipment. We thank you for your service.

I saw the courage and determination of WHO personnel working to end the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo when I visited last year. It is partly or largely thanks to their efforts, in very difficult and dangerous conditions, that new infections have been contained and we are counting down to the end of the Ebola outbreak.

The WHO is irreplaceable. It needs enhanced resources, particularly to provide support to developing countries, which must be our greatest concern.

We are as strong as the weakest health systems.

Protecting the developing world is not a matter of charity or generosity but a question of enlightened self-interest. The global North cannot defeat COVID-19 unless the global South defeats it at the same time.

As I said last month, “Once we have finally turned the page on this epidemic, there must be a time to look back fully to understand how such a disease emerged and spread its devastation so quickly across the globe, and how all those involved reacted to the crisis. The lessons learned will be essential to effectively address similar challenges, as they may arise in the future. 

“But now is not that time. Now is the time for unity, for the international community to work together in solidarity to stop this virus and its shattering consequences.”

We cannot contemplate a future of fear and insecurity.

Either we get through this pandemic together, or we fail.

Either we stand together, or we fall apart.

Thank you.
 
****************************************************************************************************************************

[French version]

 Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs, chers collègues et amis,
 
Je vous remercie de me donner l’occasion de vous parler du plus grand défi de notre époque.

La pandémie du COVID-19 a exposé notre fragilité collective.
 
Malgré les grands progrès scientifiques et technologiques de ces dernières années, il a suffi d’un virus microscopique pour nous mettre à genoux.
 
Nous ne savons pas encore comment l’éradiquer, le traiter ou le prévenir.

Nous ne savons même pas quand nous y parviendrons.
 
Toutefois, la fragilité exposée par le virus ne se limite pas à nos systèmes de santé. Elle touche tous les domaines de notre monde et de nos institutions.
 
Fragiles, les initiatives mondiales concertées, comme le montre l’échec de notre action face à la crise climatique.
 
Fragile, notre régime de désarmement nucléaire, comme l’atteste le risque toujours plus grand de prolifération.
 
Fragiles, nos protocoles Internet, mis à nu par les atteintes répétées contre notre cybersécurité, car la guerre de l’information est déjà là, dans un environnement international sans loi.
 
Le COVID-19 doit être un signal d’alarme.
 
Il est temps de mettre un terme à l’arrogance.
 
Le profond sentiment d’impuissance que nous ressentons doit nous inciter à plus d’humilité.

Devant ces menaces mondiales, mortelles, nous devons trouver une nouvelle unité, une nouvelle solidarité.
 
Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs, chers amis,
 
Nous avons vu des expressions de solidarité, mais très peu d’unité dans notre réponse face au COVID-19.
 
Les pays ont suivi des stratégies différentes, parfois contradictoires, et nous en payons tous le prix fort.
 
De nombreux pays ont ignoré les recommandations de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé.
 
En conséquence, le virus s’est répandu dans le monde entier et se dirige maintenant vers les pays du Sud, où il pourrait avoir des effets encore plus dévastateurs ; et nous risquons de nouveaux pics et de nouvelles vagues.
 
Depuis le début de la pandémie, les Nations Unies et moi-même avons plaidé en faveur d’une réponse en trois points.
 
Premièrement, une intervention sanitaire complète, coordonnée et à grande échelle, guidée par l’OMS, et mettant l’accent sur la solidarité avec les pays en développement. Nous devons unir nos efforts pour aider les pays les plus vulnérables et renforcer et étendre leurs systèmes de santé. Des mesures humanitaires doivent venir compléter ce dispositif.
 
Nous devons également investir dans l’extension des services de santé mentale, afin de faire face à l’immense souffrance psychologique causée par cette maladie, qu’il s’agisse du deuil, de la dépression, de l’anxiété ou de la peur de l’avenir.
 
Deuxièmement, nous avons appelé à la mise en place de mesures pour faire face aux terribles conséquences économiques et sociales de la crise.
 
Permettez-moi d’être clair : nous ne devons pas choisir entre la réponse aux conséquences sanitaires ou aux retombées économiques et sociales de cette pandémie.
 
Il s’agit d’une fausse dichotomie.
 
Si nous ne contrôlons pas la propagation du virus, l’économie ne s’en remettra jamais.
 
Ainsi, parallèlement aux mesures sanitaires, nous avons besoin d’un appui direct pour aider les ménages et les entreprises à se maintenir à flot. Il faut porter une attention toute particulière aux plus touchés : les femmes, les personnes âgées, les enfants, les bas salaires et les autres groupes vulnérables.
 
C’est pourquoi j’ai exhorté le G20 à envisager de toute urgence un plan de relance coordonné, complet et à grande échelle, représentant au moins 10% du produit intérieur brut mondial.

Si les pays développés ont les moyens d’y parvenir par eux-mêmes, nous devons voir une augmentation massive des ressources disponibles pour les pays en développement.
 
J’ai également demandé un renforcement de l’appui apporté via le Fonds monétaire international, le Groupe de la Banque mondiale et d’autres institutions financières internationales.
 
Troisièmement, il est clair que la reconstruction après la crise du COVID-19 doit aboutir à des économies plus égalitaires, plus inclusives et plus durables et à des sociétés plus fortes et plus résilientes.
 
Cette pandémie est une tragédie.
 
Notre réponse à cette tragédie et notre reconstruction doivent placer les droits humains au centre.
 
Mais nous devons aussi saisir cette occasion pour faire face à la crise climatique et pour lutter contre toutes les inégalités, et notamment les lacunes béantes de nos systèmes de protection sociale. Il s’agit d’une opportunité pour reconstruire autrement et mieux.
 
Au lieu de revenir à des systèmes qui n’étaient pas durables, nous devons faire un bond vers un avenir qui fait place aux énergies propres, à l’inclusion et à l’égalité, au renforcement des filets de sécurité sociale, y compris à travers une couverture médicale universelle.
 
Il faudra un effort multilatéral énorme.
 
J’espère que la recherche d’un vaccin pourra en être le point de départ.
 
L’initiative « ACT Accelerator » est une collaboration mondiale historique visant à accélérer la recherche, la production et l’égalité d’accès aux solutions diagnostiques et thérapeutiques et aux vaccins pour le COVID-19.
 
Il est essentiel que toute personne, où qu’elle se trouve, ait accès – physiquement et financièrement- à ces solutions, qui constituent un bien public mondial par excellence.
 
Nous pouvons le faire. Mais, le ferons-nous ?
 
Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs, chers amis,
 
Pour terminer, je souhaite rendre hommage au personnel de santé en première ligne, qui sont les héros de cette pandémie.
 
Infirmières et infirmiers, médecins, sages-femmes, techniciennes et techniciens, administratrices et administrateurs : ils sont des millions à mettre leur santé en péril chaque jour pour nous protéger. Nous leur devons notre plus profonde reconnaissance et notre soutien.
 
Tous les membres de la famille des Nations Unies sont solidaires de nos milliers de collègues de l’OMS qui travaillent dans le monde entier pour aider les États Membres à sauver des vies et à protéger les personnes vulnérables, en fournissant des conseils, des formations et des tests, des traitements et des équipements de protection. Nous vous remercions de votre dévouement.
 
J’ai pu constater le courage et la détermination du personnel de l’OMS qui a travaillé sans relâche pour mettre fin à l’épidémie d’Ebola en République démocratique du Congo l’année dernière.

C’est en grande partie grâce à leurs efforts, dans des conditions très difficiles et dangereuses, que les nouvelles infections ont été endiguées et que nous entrevoyons la fin de l’épidémie d’Ebola.
 
L’OMS est irremplaçable. Elle a besoin de ressources accrues, notamment pour apporter un soutien aux pays en développement, qui doivent être notre plus grande préoccupation.
 
L’humanité ne saurait être plus forte que son système de santé le plus faible.
 
Protéger les pays en développement n’est pas une question de charité ou de générosité, mais une question d’intérêt commun éclairé. Les pays du Nord ne pourront venir à bout du COVID-19 que si les pays du Sud le neutralisent en même temps.
 
Comme je l’ai dit le mois dernier, « lorsque nous aurons clos le chapitre de cette épidémie, il faudra nous accorder un temps de rétrospection pour comprendre comment une telle maladie est apparue et a fait de tels ravages, si rapidement, à travers le monde, et comment tous les acteurs ont réagi face à la crise. Les enseignements que nous en tirerons seront essentiels pour nous permettre de bien relever les défis similaires qui pourraient se présenter à l’avenir.
 
Mais nous n’en sommes pas là. Pour l’instant, nous devons être unis, faire en sorte que la communauté internationale collabore dans la solidarité pour éliminer ce virus et ses conséquences dévastatrices. »
 
Nous ne pouvons pas envisager un avenir fait de peur et d’insécurité.
 
Ou bien nous traverserons cette pandémie ensemble, ou bien nous échouerons.
 
C’est dans l’unité que réside notre survie.
 
Je vous remercie.