Goma

04 October 2019

Note to Correspondents: Joint Press Release by the EERC, WHO, WFP, UNICEF and Save the Children - 1000 Ebola Survivors in the DRC [scroll down for French]

As the 1000th Ebola survivor returns home, United Nations agencies working to stop the current Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) today commended the strong leadership of the DRC health authorities and the tireless efforts of thousands of local health workers and partners that have led to 1000 people surviving the disease.
 
United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres handed Kavira her Ebola survivor certificate in early September. “I never thought I would make it at first but now that I am cured, I want to go back to my community and tell them to seek treatment early if they are affected because you can actually survive,” said Kavira.
 
The outbreak, declared on 1 August, 2018, started in North Kivu and has since spread to parts of Ituri and South Kivu provinces. Currently, active transmission is confined to Ituri, in several hotspots – Mambasa and Mandima – but the epidemic is evolving in an extremely complex environment, marked by poor health infrastructure, political instability, insecurity, community mistrust and resistance, and ongoing conflict involving scores of armed groups.
 
Through an integrated UN system-wide approach, the United Nations scaled-up its efforts in May in support of the DRC government-led response in the areas of public health, assistance to Ebola-affected communities, political engagement, security and strengthened financial management.
 
“Every survivor gives us reason and motivation to continue to enhance our fight against Ebola, but every survivor is also a reminder that there are lives we were not able to save”, David Gressly, Emergency Ebola Response Coordinator, said.  “We have to continue gaining access through improved security for health workers and populations alike, along with continuous efforts to engage communities to be empowered with the response. We cannot win the battle against this outbreak without the full support of the Congolese people. We have seen how the acceptance of the people of towns like Rwangoma or Mabolio have led to a rapid reduction of Ebola cases there,” he added.
 
Although this is the largest and longest running Ebola outbreak the DRC has experienced, new tools are now available to help stop the virus and save lives. A highly effective vaccine (shown to have 97.5% efficacy) has protected over 226,000 people. New treatments, that recent study results show can save over 90 percent of people who come early during their illness, improve survival rates of people infected with Ebola.
 
“We have the tools, vaccines and treatments, but we still need to find and support every person who has been in contact with someone infected with Ebola,” Dr Ibrahima Socé Fall, World Health Organization Assistant Director-General for Emergency Response, said.  WHO is the UN Agency leading the public health response. “Surviving this disease is all about trusting the responders – contact tracers, decontamination teams, burial teams, vaccinators, Ebola Treatment Centre staff – who are working tirelessly to protect people from this virus”.
 
Seven Ebola treatment centres, and numbers of transit centres have provided care for people in the many areas affected by Ebola, making it possible for those who seek treatment to survive. During this outbreak the type and level of care has been revolutionized by innovative approaches such as ALIMA’s ‘Ebola cube’, and inclusion of survivors as ‘garde-malades’ caring for others sick with Ebola. The partners managing Ebola Treatment and Transit Centres include: ALIMA, International Medical Corps and Medair among others.
 
Led by UNICEF with the support of international partners, thousands of Congolese responders and associations from the affected communities are engaging with community and religious leaders, mass media, and Ebola survivors to bring crucial knowledge of symptoms, prevention and treatment to the households and communities most at risk. Children are among the most vulnerable in the communities, as they are not only at risk of contracting the virus but are also affected if they lose their parents or schools are closed. Save the Children and other organizations are reaching out to children on how to prevent contracting Ebola, through child-friendly awareness campaigns in schools and youth groups.  An important part of this work is listening and responding to their pressing concerns, particularly in the areas where Ebola is often not perceived as a priority.
 
“When survivors tell communities the reason they are alive is because they sought treatment early, people believe them and are getting the help they need sooner. Survivors have become a crucial element in gaining the community trust and acceptance required to defeat this epidemic”, Edouard Beigbeder, UNICEF representative in the DRC, said. “At the same time, having experienced the disease, they are able to offer a level of support and compassion to patients and their family members that is especially meaningful.”
 
As part of the emergency response, the World Food Programme is providing food to Ebola survivors and people potentially carrying the virus, so they won’t have to leave their homes to buy food and can therefore easily be monitored in case they develop symptoms. WFP also provides critical logistical services and operational support to partners of the medical response teams, enabling responders to reach new or remote outbreak areas quickly. In a country facing the world’s second worst food crisis after Yemen, this support is crucial.
 
“It is surely a celebration when cured patients go home after surviving Ebola; they feel reborn. I can’t begin to explain how grateful they are for the support, even more so when they learn that food assistance will accompany them for a year to get back on their feet,” Susana Rico, WFP Emergency coordinator in Goma, said. “This celebration must also serve as our motivation to continue the fight against Ebola and save many more by encouraging communities to alert about potential cases, so that they can seek treatment in time to be saved. Those are our priorities.”
 

—ENDS —

 
* For interviews and further information please contact:
 
Gaëlle Sundelin / Vincenzo Pugliese, EERC/Public Information Officers
gaelle.sundelin@un.org /pugliesev@un.org
+243 997 068 658 / +243 997 068 784
 
Margaret Harris, WHO/Communications Officer
harrism@who.int
+ 243 846 902 970
+ 41 79 290 66 88
 
Helen Vesperini, WFP/Kinshasa
helen.vesperini@wfp.org
+243 821 223 325
 
Gerald Bourke, WFP/Johannesburg
Gerald.bourke@wfp.org
+27 82 908 1417
 
Brittany Heyer, Save the Children/Information & Communications Coordinator
Brittany.heyer@savethechildren.org
+243 082 830 0612
 
Jean-Jacques Simon, UNICEF/Head of Communications
jsimon@unicef.org
+243 826 541 004
 
* Link to photos (please credit: UNEERO/Martine Perret):
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/5libr2o6hln5xmk/AAB16OTX34JY4y5wsFR4FJ3ca?dl=0
 
* Link to WFP videos:
https://spaces.hightail.com/receive/BG5OaeyOTS

***
 
Note aux Correspondants
 
COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE CONJOINT DE L'EERC, DE L'OMS, DU PAM ET DE L'UNICEF
 
1000 VAINQUEURS D'EBOLA EN RDC

 
Alors que le 1000e vainqueur du virus Ebola rentre chez lui, les agences des Nations Unies qui luttent contre l'épidémie actuelle d'Ebola en République démocratique du Congo (RDC) ont salué aujourd'hui le fort leadership des autorités sanitaires de la RDC et les efforts inlassables de milliers d'agents de santé et de partenaires locaux. Ceux-ci ont permis à 1000 personnes de survivre à la maladie.
 
Le Secrétaire général des Nations Unies Antonio Guterres a remis à Kavira son certificat de survivante d'Ebola dans les mots: «Je n'avais jamais pensé y arriver au début, mais maintenant que je suis guérie, je souhaite retourner dans ma communauté et leur dire de se faire soigner rapidement s'ils sont touchés. On peut réellement survivre », a déclaré Kavira en quittant un centre de traitement du virus Ebola au début de septembre.
 
L'épidémie, déclarée le 1er août 2018, a débuté dans le Nord-Kivu et s'est depuis étendue dans les provinces de l'Ituri et du Sud-Kivu. Actuellement, la transmission active d’Ebola est confinée à l’Ituri, dans plusieurs points chauds –  Mambasa et Mandima – mais l’épidémie évolue dans un environnement extrêmement complexe, caractérisé par de faibles infrastructures de santé, l’instabilité politique, l’insécurité, la méfiance et la résistance des communautés et les conflits en cours impliquant de nombreux groupes armés.
 
Grâce à une approche intégrée à l'échelle du système, les Nations Unies ont intensifié leurs efforts en mai pour soutenir l'action menée par le gouvernement congolais dans les domaines de la santé publique, de l'assistance aux communautés affectées par le virus Ebola, de l'engagement politique, de la sécurité et du renforcement de la gestion financière.
 
«Chaque vainqueur nous donne une raison et une motivation supplémentaire pour continuer à renforcer notre combat contre Ebola, mais chaque vainqueur nous rappelle également qu'il y a des vies que nous n'avons pas pu sauver,» a déclaré David Gressly, coordinateur de la réponse d'urgence à Ebola. «Nous devons continuer à renforcer la sécurité pour assurer que les équipes de santé et les populations puissent circuler librement. Nous devons redoubler d’efforts pour donner aux communautés les moyens de faire partie intégrante de la riposte. Nous ne pouvons gagner la bataille contre cette épidémie sans le soutien total du peuple congolais. Nous avons vu comment l’acceptation de la population de villes comme Rwangoma ou Mabolio a entraîné une réduction rapide du nombre de cas d’Ebola dans cette région », a-t-il ajouté.
 
Bien qu'il s'agisse de l'épidémie d'Ebola la plus longue et la plus meurtrière que la RDC ait connue, de nouveaux outils sont maintenant disponibles pour aider à stopper le virus et sauver des vies. Un vaccin, dont l'efficacité a été établie à 97,5%, a protégé plus de 226 000 personnes. De nouveaux traitements, qui, d'après les résultats d'études récentes, peuvent sauver plus de 90% des personnes qui arrivent tôt pendant leur maladie, améliorent le taux de survie des personnes infectées par le virus Ebola.
 
«Nous avons les outils, les vaccins et les traitements, mais il nous faut continuer à trouver et à soutenir toutes les personnes qui ont été en contact avec une personne infectée par le virus Ebola», a déclaré le Dr Ibrahima Socé Fall, Directeur général adjoint de l'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé pour les interventions d'urgence.  L’OMS est l'agence des Nations Unies chargée de répondre à l’urgence de santé publique.
 
«Survivre à cette maladie consiste à faire confiance aux équipes de la riposte - traceurs de contacts, équipes de décontamination, équipes des enterrements, vaccinateurs, personnel du centre de traitement Ebola - qui travaillent sans relâche pour protéger les personnes contre ce virus».
 
Sept centres de traitement Ebola et plusieurs centres de transit ont pris en charge des personnes dans les nombreuses régions touchées par Ebola, permettant ainsi à ceux qui se font traiter de survivre. Au cours de cette épidémie, le type et le niveau de soins ont été révolutionnés par des approches novatrices telles que le «cube Ebola» d’ALIMA et par l’inclusion des vainqueurs en tant que «gardes malades» s’occupant d’autres personnes infectées. Les partenaires qui gèrent les centres de traitement et de transit Ebola sont notamment: ALIMA, International Medical Corps et Medair entre autres.
 
Sous la direction de l'UNICEF, avec le soutien de partenaires internationaux, des milliers d'intervenants et d'associations congolais, issus des communautés touchées, s'engagent auprès des dirigeants communautaires et religieux, des médias et des vainqueurs d'Ebola pour apporter des connaissances essentielles sur les symptômes, la prévention et la décontamination des ménages et sur les communautés à risque. Les enfants sont parmi les plus
vulnérables parmi les communautés car non seulement ils risquent de contracter le virus, mais ils sont également affectés s'ils perdent leurs parents ou si les écoles sont fermées. Save the Children et d'autres organisations sensibilisent les enfants à la prévention sur le virus Ebola par le biais de campagnes de sensibilisation adaptées aux enfants dans les écoles et les groupes de jeunes. Une part importante de ce travail consiste à écouter et à répondre à leurs préoccupations pressantes, en particulier dans les zones où Ebola n’est souvent pas perçu comme étant une priorité.
 
«Lorsque les vainqueurs disent aux communautés qu’ils sont en vie aujourd’hui parce qu’ils ont été pris en charge à temps, les gens les croient et recherchent l'aide dont ils ont besoin plus tôt. Les survivants sont devenus un élément crucial pour gagner la confiance de la communauté et l'acceptation nécessaire pour vaincre cette épidémie », a déclaré Edouard Beigbeder, représentant de l'UNICEF en RDC. «En même temps, après avoir connu la maladie, ils peuvent offrir aux patients et aux membres de leur famille un niveau de soutien et de compassion particulièrement significatif.»
 
Dans le cadre de la réponse d'urgence, le Programme Alimentaire Mondial fournit de la nourriture aux survivants d'Ebola et aux personnes potentiellement porteuses du virus. Ainsi, ils n'ont pas à quitter leur foyer pour acheter de la nourriture et peuvent donc facilement être surveillés s'ils développent des symptômes. Le PAM fournit également des services logistiques essentiels et un appui opérationnel aux partenaires des équipes d’intervention médicale, ce qui permet aux intervenants d’atteindre rapidement les zones d’épidémie nouvelles ou éloignées. Dans un pays qui subit la deuxième plus grave crise alimentaire après le Yémen, ce soutien est essentiel.
 
«C’est évidemment une fête lorsque des patients guéris rentrent chez eux après avoir survécu à Ebola; ils se sentent renaître. Je ne saurais comment décrire leur gratitude envers cette aide, d’autant plus lorsqu’ils apprennent que l’aide alimentaire les accompagnera un an pour se remettre sur pied », a déclaré Susana Rico, coordinatrice des interventions d’urgence du PAM à Goma. «Cette célébration doit également nous motiver à poursuivre la lutte contre le virus Ebola et à  sauver de nombreuses autres vies en encourageant les communautés à alerter sur les cas potentiels pour qu'elles puissent se faire soigner à temps. Ce sont nos priorités. "
 

- FIN -
 

* Pour des interviews et des informations complémentaires, veuillez contacter:
 
Gaëlle Sundelin / Vincenzo Pugliese, EERC/Public Information Officers
gaelle.sundelin@un.org /pugliesev@un.org
+243 997 068 658 / +243 997 068 784
 
Margaret Harris, WHO/Communications Officer
harrism@who.int
+ 243 846 902 970
+ 41 79 290 66 88
 
Helen Vesperini, WFP/Kinshasa
helen.vesperini@wfp.org
+243 821 223 325
 
Gerald Bourke, WFP/Johannesburg
Gerald.bourke@wfp.org
+27 82 908 1417
 
Brittany Heyer, Save theChildren/Information& Communications Coordinator
Brittany.heyer@savethechildren.org
+243 082 830 0612
 
Jean-Jacques Simon, UNICEF/Head of Communications
jsimon@unicef.org
+243 826 541 004
 
* Lien vers les photos (crédit: UNEERO / Martine Perret):
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/5libr2o6hln5xmk/AAB16OTX34JY4y5wsFR4FJ3ca?dl=0
 
* Lien vers les videos WFP :
https://spaces.hightail.com/receive/BG5OaeyOTS