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NGO/932
19 May 2022
5th & 6th Meetings (AM & PM)

Continuing Session, Non-Governmental Organizations Committee Recommends 34 Entities for Consultative Status, Defers Action on 96 Others

The Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations continued its 2022 session today, recommending 34 organizations for special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council and deferring action on 96 others.

It also took note of the request by Goal to withdraw its consultative status.

The 19-member Committee considers applications for consultative status and requests for reclassification submitted by non-governmental organizations (NGOs).  Once an application has been reviewed and approved by the Committee it is considered recommended for consultative status.  Organizations which were granted general and special status can attend meetings of the Council and issue statements, while those with general status can also speak during meetings and propose agenda items.  Organizations with roster status can only attend meetings.

Action on several applications was postponed because Committee members requested further information from the candidates about, among other items, details of their organizations’ activities, partners, expenditures and sources of funding.

The Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations will meet again at 10 a.m. on Friday, 20 May, to continue its session.

Special Consultative Status

The Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations recommended that the Economic and Social Council grant special consultative status to the following entities:

Fundación para el Desarrollo de Políticas Sustentables (Argentina);

Generations For Peace (Jordan);

Jaaniv Foundation (India);

Janmitra Nyas (India);

Le conseil promotionnel pour l'action des jeunes en Afrique (Congo);

Mulabi Association Latin American Work Group for Sexual Rights Civil Association (Costa Rica);

News Network (Bangladesh);

Nikan Mammut Charity Foundation (Iran);

Parker Peace Foundation (Ghana);

Peaceland Foundation (China);

Protection for Legal & Human Rights Foundation (Bangladesh);

Public Organization "Institute for the Study of Dependencies, Drug Policy Issues and Monitoring the Drug Situation" (Ukraine);

Réveil communautaire d'assistance aux victims (Burundi);

SFLC.in- Software Freedom Law Center (India);

Social Services Trust (India);

The Emmanuel Ivorgba Foundation (Nigeria);

Agence Mondiale pour la Bonne Gouvernance (France);

Association Sphere (Switzerland);

Bell Global Justice Institute (United States);

Congregation Pirchei Shoshanim, a New Jersey Nonprofit Corporation (United States);

For All Moonkind, Inc. (United States);

Foreningen Tryggere Ruspolitikk (Norway);

Global Rights for Women (United States);

Hope Worldwide Pakistan (New Zealand);

Human Rights for Kids (United States);

Humanitarian Tracker (United States);

Instituto RIA (Mexico);

Inštitut za raziskave in razvoj "Utrip" (Slovenia);

Islamic Medical Association of North America Inc. (United States);

Organisation Suisse d'aide aux réfugiés (Switzerland);

Peace Direct (United Kingdom);

People for Equality and Relief in Lanka Inc. (United States);

Rise International Inc. (United States); and

Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, Inc. (United States).

The Committee postponed action on the application of the following 96 organizations:

Forum for Development and Human Rights Dialogue (Egypt) — as Pakistan’s representative requested audited financial statements for 2021;

Fundación Género con Clase (Venezuela) — as the representative of the United States requested details on the sources of in-kind goods and services, and their fair market value;

Fundación Venezolana por el Derecho a la Vivienda (Venezuela) — as the representative of the United States requested information on the right to housing guarantee;

General Union of Arab Experts (Morocco) — as China’s representative asked the organization why it closed its application in 2018;

Global Energy Interconnection Development and Cooperation Organization (China) — as the representative of the United States requested a list of its business members who pay member fees;

Global Village Forum Chakwal c/o Shaheen Degree College Chappar Bazar Chakwal (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative requested details on the roles and contributions of its organizational members;

Gramin Vikas Vigyan Samiti (India) — as Pakistan’s representative requested details on its projects aimed at achieving Sustainable Development Goal 16 (peace, justice, strong institutions);

Gulshan-e-John (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative requested the locations of its eight offices outside the country and asked about the work being carried out by them;

Human Rights Protection Group and MFP Federation (India) — as India’s representative requested details on its involvement in a United Nations event;

Human Welfare Charitable Trust (India) — as India’s representative asked for clarification on the number of members;

Humanitarian Aid International (India) — as Pakistan’s representative requested details on its advocacy work outside the country;

Incentive Care Foundation (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative requested details on its social activities;

Instance démocratique pour la citoyenneté et les droits de l'homme (Morocco) — as China’s representative requested information about its non-profit status, noting that it also derives income from the sale of goods and services;

Institute for Integrated Rural Development (India) — as Pakistan’s representative requested information on its organizational members, and whether they are based outside the country;

Institute of Peace and Diplomatic Studies (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative noted that the organization has no members yet does have a membership fee, and requested clarification on this matter;

International Non-Olympic Committee (India) — as Pakistan’s representative requested details on its organizational members and the activities carried out in 100 countries;

Kafka Welfare Organization (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative requested audited financial statements for 2020 and 2021;

Kolkata Society for Cultural Heritage (India) — as Pakistan’s representative asked about the independence of the organization;

Lahore Educational and Welfare Society (Pakistan) — as India’s representative asked about measures for school security;

Mentor Amiable Professional Society (Pakistan) — as India’s representative sought details about its meetings at the United Nations and about its contributions to those discussions;

Mukti (India) — as Pakistan’s representative asked whether the organization has any employees;

Mumbai Smiles Foundation (India) — as Pakistan’s representative asked how the organization is able to operate without any individual or organizational members;

ONG L'Ange Gardien (Benin) — as the Russian Federation’s representative asked about the various types of members;

Organisation Tamaynut (Morocco) — as China’s representative requested a list of its cultural activities and asked about the nature of its partnerships with Government entities;

Organization of female conscience renewal (Morocco) — as India’s representative asked how it maintains its independence when most of its funding is from Government sources.  He also requested a list of projects undertaken and outcomes achieved;

Pak Special Persons Welfare Society (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative requested clarity on whether the membership fees are remitted from outside the country and from whom;

Pakistan Press Foundation (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative asked about efforts to procure local funding;

Piramal Swasthya Management and Research Institute (India) — as Pakistan’s representative asked about water-related projects and the regions in which they are carried out;

Populous Education Foundation (India) — as Pakistan’s representative asked whether it is an international organization;

Pouya Institute for Communications and Social Development (Iran) — as the representative of the United States asked for detailed information on the research it intends to conduct;

Prayas Juvenile Aid Centre (India) — as Pakistan’s representative asked about the juvenile justice projects undertaken over the last two years;

Public Association "Regional Consumer Protection Society" (PA "Regional Consumer Protection Society") (Belarus) — as Estonia’s representative requested full financial reports from 2019 and 2020, especially as related to question 16, the collection of membership fees;

Research Society of International Law (Pakistan) — as India’s representative asked the organization to clarify its response to question 15 on its application, related to its members and membership framework;

Shenzhen Foundation for International Exchange and Cooperation (China) — as the representative of the United States sought an update on its projects carried out in 2021 and a detailed update on those planned for the remainder of 2022;

Silk Road Chamber of International Commerce (China) — as the representative of the United States requested an update on the organization’s planned projects for 2022, as well as on its income and expenditures;

Somali Green Crescent Society (Somalia) — as the representative of the United States asked whether the organization has a relationship with Somalia’s Government, whether it received any money from that Government in the last five years or whether it plans to receive any such funds;

Syrian Youth Council (Syria) — as the representative of the United States asked why its total expenditure exceeds its total income;

The New Woman Foundation (Egypt) — as Pakistan’s representative asked about its projects for independent trade unions, their outcomes and costs incurred;

The Voice Society (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative requested clarity on the criteria used for taking up legal aid cases;

Transnational Anti-Organized Crime Intelligence Group Inc. (Philippines) — as Cuba’s representative requested a project breakdown;

United Global Organization of Development (Pakistan) — as India’s representative asked about the number of beneficiaries and funding source of its vocational training centre for rural women, and requested a list of projects undertaken in 2021;

Welfare Association Jared (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative requested details on its advocacy efforts;

West Papua Interest Association (Indonesia) — as China’s representative asked for details on the dates, locations, beneficiaries and participants in its training activities;

World Historic and Cultural Canal Cities Cooperation Organization (China) — as the representative of the United States asked for detailed information about the group’s autonomy and about related decisions made by China’s Government;

Y4D Foundation (India) — as Pakistan’s representative requested project documents for a project listed under question 5 on the application, along with the expenditures incurred on that project;

Young League Pakistan (Pakistan) — as Pakistan’s representative requested that the organization submit audited financial statements;

de Centre Idriss El Fakhouri des Etudes et de Recherches en Sciences Juridiques Oujda (Morocco) — as the Russian Federation’s representative asked about its selection and application criteria for its leaders;

vishwa manavadhikar parishad (India) — as Pakistan’s representative requested projects to provide free education and medical assistance to handicapped people;

ARCS Arci Culture Solidali APS (Italy) — as Turkey’s representative asked about the mechanisms in place to ensure the organization’s independence, and about the reporting it must carry out on the public funds it receives;

Arab-European Center of Human Rights and International Law (Norway) — as Bahrain’s representative asked about its education and training sessions, as well as about annual conference, including dates, locations, participants, partners and sponsors;

Arabian Rights Watch Association (United States) — as China’s representative asked about a relationship with certain Iraqi development organizations;

Asociatia Romanian Women’s Lobby (Romania) — as Turkey’s representative requested information about its initiatives related to the effects of migration on transnational families and their outcomes;

Association of Lawyers of Russia (Russian Federation) — as the representative of the United States asked about its $2.6 million funding from the Government;

Association of Non-for-Profit Organizations to Facilitate the Drug Prevention and Socially Dangerous Behaviour “National Anti-Drug Union” (Russian Federation) — as the representative of the United States asked whether its addiction treatments, rehabilitation and resocialization programmes adhere to international best practices, and if so, requested the entity to indicate the authorities of those best practices;

Autonomous Non-Profit Organization of promotion the development of international relations in the framework of the BRICS group “International Alliance of BRICS Strategic Projects" (Russian Federation) — as Estonia’s representative asked about its financial arrears for 2019 and 2020;

Autonomous Nonprofit Organization "International Centre Save the Children from Cybercrimes" (Russian Federation) — as Estonia’s representative is interested in how the group will be managed with such a small budget and requested that it provide a list of its sponsors, donors or other funding sources;

Autonomous non-profit organization humanitarian programs organization “Russian Humanitarian Mission” (Russian Federation) — as the representative of the United States asked the group to describe how much humanitarian support it provided to the Palestinian people between 2016 and 2019;

Brussels International Center for Research and Human Rights (Belgium) — as the Russian Federation’s representative requested the organization to provide a list of all countries in which it works;

Center for Military Human Rights Korea (Republic of Korea) — as the Russian Federation’s representative asked the organization to explain its election process in more depth;

Centre international pour la paix et les droits de l'homme (Switzerland) — as China’s representative requested it provide details about the conferences it attended;

Citizens’ Alliance for North Korean Human Rights (Republic of Korea) — as China’s representative asked whether the foreign Government funding is dedicated to specific projects;

Committee for Justice (Switzerland) — as China’s representative asked about its relationship with donors in relation to decision-making;

Congres mondial Amazigh (France) — as Libya’s representative, noting that the organization is working in the Nafusa and Zuwārah mountains, requested a list of local partners, as well as the procedures followed in relation to the upcoming issuance of work permits in Libya;

Coppieters Foundation (Belgium) — as Turkey’s representative sought clarification about the organization’s election campaign spending;

Database Center for North Korean Human Rights (Republic of Korea) — as China’s representative asked how it maintains its independence;

De Regenboog Groep (Netherlands) — as the Russian Federation’s representative asked about the distribution of its grants;

Earth Focus Foundation (Switzerland) — as China’s representative, citing an article on the organization’s website, requested that it use the correct terminology, “Taiwan, province of China”;

Eiropas demokrātijas attīstības centrs (Latvia) — as Estonia’s representative asked the group to explain whether it is an international or regional organization, to provide a list of its activities aimed at promoting democracy and whether it cooperates with any State institutions in Latvia or within the European Union;

Eri-Platform (Belgium) — as China’s representative requested its 2021 financial statement;

Ethiopian Genocide Committee 1935-1941, Inc. (United States) — as Turkey’s representative requested information on how the organization takes decisions, as well as on the functions of its administrative bodies and the election/nomination process for its executive bodies;

European network on cultural management and policy (Belgium) — as China’s representative requested a list of the organization’s associated members and supporting members;

Global Action for Trans* Equality Inc. (United States) — as the Russian Federation’s representative requested a full list of its partner organizations;

Global Alumni Alliance (Russian Federation) — as Estonia’s representative asked the organization to explain who is a member and whether there are members from the Russian Federation, among other questions;

Global Detention Project (Switzerland) — as China’s representative asked for information on its members;

Global Minorities Alliance (United Kingdom) — as Turkey’s representative asked how the organization carries out it activities, given its budget;

Global Network of Women Peacebuilders, Inc. (United States) — as Pakistan’s representative requested further information about its projects in Afghanistan, notably related to expenses and outcomes achieved;

Health and Environment Justice Support e.V. (Germany) — as the Russian Federation’s representative asked how members participate in decision-making if they do not have the right to vote;

Institute for Development of Freedom of Information (Georgia) — as the Russian Federation’s representative asked whether it cooperates on a financial level with a certain organization;

InterPride (United States) — as the Russian Federation’s representative, noting that the organization’s income is twice that of its expenses, asked how it uses its surplus income;

International Association for the Development of the Abaza-Abkhaz Ethnos "Alashara" (Russian Federation) — as the representative of the United States requested the names and nationalities of those on its executive bodies and for an explanation of how they are nominated, and Estonia’s representative made a point about using United Nations terminology, notably in relation to Abkhazia, Georgia, and the Russian Federation’s representative said the organization’s name is not aligned with the Committee’s view regarding the republic of Abkhazia nor the Russian Federation’s acknowledgement of Abkhazia as a sovereign nation;

International Association of Genocide Scholars, Inc., The (Australia) — as India’s representative asked for a list of activities for 2022 and audited statement for 2021;

International Funders for Indigenous Peoples Inc. (United States) — as the Russian Federation’s representative requested detailed information about the organization’s financing sources;

International Network of Civil Liberties Organizations (Switzerland) — as the Russian Federation’s representative requested further clarification around its organizational members;

International Society of Criminology (United States) — as China’s representative asked for another update about its workshop, specifically whether it is supported by any Government;

International Youth Federation (United Kingdom) — as Pakistan’s representative asked about its member organizations and about any related project details;

Inti Raymi Fund, Inc. (United States) — as the Russian Federation’s representative requested further information about its activities in the Russian Federation, the amount of money spent on those projects and about its partner organizations in the country;

Khmers Kampuchea-Krom Federation (United States) — as Cuba’s representative asked about the countries in which it operates, as well as a list of activities over the last two years and its funding for them, and the representative of the United States said members of this community have experienced harassment and attacks;

Mangfoldhuset (Norway) — as Turkey’s representative requested information on the scope of funding objectives and outcomes of its projects carried out since 2019;

NAUH (Now Action & Unity for Human rights) (Republic of Korea) — as the Russian Federation’s representative requested financial reports from 2018-2021;

Natan - International Humanitarian Aid (R.A.) (Israel) — as Pakistan’s representative requested details on projects to help victims of national disasters, including the countries in which the projects are carried out and the funding sources for them;

National Committee on BRICS Research (Russian Federation) — as the representative of the United States asked about the nature of its cooperation, notably in the economic and humanitarian spheres;

Nobel Women’s Initiative (Canada) — as Bahrain’s representative requested the organization to elaborate on what it means by “some work” with women human rights defenders in the Middle East, per its 13 July 2021 response;

Peace Without Limits (PWL) International Organization, Inc. (Switzerland) — as Turkey’s representative asked about the aim, scope, funding, participants and outcomes of its projects;

PeaceCorea (Republic of Korea) — as China’s representative asked about its registration in China;

Razom Inc. (United States) — as the Russian Federation’s representative asked for a list of projects carried out in 2020 and 2021, their costs and sources of financing; and

Regional Public Organization for the Protection of Citizens' Rights "Zolochevsky Team" (Russian Federation) — as Estonia’s representative requested an updated financial overview that includes membership fees and other income in 2020, and the representative of the United States, referring to the group’s advocacy activities, asked specifically about public hearings and legislative initiatives.

Interactive Discussion

A speaker from Nithyananda Dhyanapeetam of Columbus said that since 2007, the volunteer-run organization has served everyone, irrespective of age, sex, ethnicity, religion, economic or any other status.  Participants and donors are mainly from the north-east region of the United States and from Canada.  Since 2007, more than 24,000 meals were freely distributed to anyone visiting the complex, contributing to the goals of zero poverty and hunger.  It also offered 100 yoga and meditation sessions at the largest women’s prison in Ohio, aimed at achieving good health and well-being.  It organizes classes on the ancient scriptures, online and in person, and provides 250 life skills classes for children.

The representative of the United States said the organization had previously been asked about its current relationship with Swami Nithyananda, who has faced charges in India of kidnapping and other abuse, to which the speaker replied that Nithyananda Dhyanapeetam of Columbus is a Hindu religious organization, registered as a 501 (c) and is independent.  It has no legal relationship with any other entity.  Swami Nithyananda is the spiritual head of Hinduism; he is not a director, officer or volunteer of the organization, and hence, not involved in any of its operations or decision-making.  He is only a spiritual guide, and the organization is aligned with his spiritual teachings.  He said the kidnapping charge relates to a 2019 case in Gujarat, where the alleged victims — who are adults — provided their oral and written confirmation to police that no such crime had taken place and stated the same in an affidavit notarized by the Indian High Commission.

The representative of the United States asked the organization to provide documentation about when and how these ties were severed from the spiritual leader, if there is no affiliation with him.

The speaker from the Brussels International Center for Research and Human Rights said the organization is a think tank that promotes the Sustainable Development Goals, notably through high-level dialogues with ambassadors and other stakeholders.  Its recent work includes events to promote Sustainable Development Goal 16, aimed at mitigating the crises in Afghanistan and Yemen.  It also launched a podcast, and among others, welcomed an official from the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in Afghanistan.  It also increased its focus on fulfilling Goal 3 to improve Africa’s health sovereignty.  On Goal 5, it will continue to advance the women, peace and security agenda, following a flagship event “extremely important to prioritize in the near future” given the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on women and girls.

The Russian Federation’s representative said the website page could not be opened and asked for the new website address if the current one is no longer operating, to which the speaker replied that the website listed on the application has not changed.  The Russian Federation’s representative, noting that the link still does not open, asked more broadly how the organization carries out its projects, to which the speaker replied that the majority of its expenses are for staff and personnel; projects have low budget implications, especially as many of them are organized online.  The Russian Federation’s representative requested more detail about projects in countries where it has a physical presence, and if it can provide financial reporting.

Estonia’s representative said the organization’s website does indeed open.

The speaker from the organization added that in Afghanistan, researchers are on the ground to understand the drivers of conflict and promote goals around women’s empowerment.  The costs of that research are around €1,000-2,000.  In turn, that work has directed events organized on the crisis.

For information media. Not an official record.