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NGO/915
24 May 2021
9th Meeting (PM)

Continuing 2021 Session, Non-Governmental Organizations Committee Recommends 12 Entities for Special Consultative Status, Defers Action on 35 Others

Continuing its 2021 regular session, the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations today recommended 12 organizations for special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council and deferred action on the status of 35 others.

The 19-member Committee considers applications for consultative status and requests for reclassification submitted by non-governmental organizations (NGOs).  Once an application has been reviewed and approved by the Committee, it is considered recommended for consultative status.  Organizations which were granted general and special status can attend meetings of the Council and issue statements, while those with general status can also speak during meetings and propose agenda items.  Organizations with roster status can only attend meetings.

Action on several applications was postponed because Committee members requested further information from the candidates about, among other items, details of their respective organizations’ activities, partners, expenditures and sources of funding.  It also held an interactive segment, hearing presentations by three representatives of non-governmental organizations.

The Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations will meet again at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, 25 May, to continue its session.

Special Consultative Status

The Committee recommended that the Economic and Social Council grant special consultative status to the following organizations:

Hazrat-e Fatemeh Zahra Charity Institute (Iran);

Institutia Privata Centrul National de Studii si Informare pentru Problemele Femeii “Parteneriat pentru Dezvoltare” (Republic of Moldova);

League of Arab People Organization (Egypt);

Ligue Mauritanienne pour l’appui aux initiatives associatives (Mauritania);

Organisation EL INSANIYA (Mauritania);

Raad Al-Ghadir Charity Institute (Iran);

Republican Social Information Center “Istiqbolli Avlod” (Uzbekistan);

SOS Urgence (Mauritania);

Shaik Taher Azzawi Charity Organization (Libya);

Shuhada Organization SO (Afghanistan);

West Africa Coalition for Indigenous People’s Rights (WACIPR) (Nigeria); and

World Organization for Human Rights (Iraq).

The Committee postponed action on the applications of the following organizations:

Institute for Integrated Rural Development (India) — as the representative of Pakistan asked about COVID-19-related initiatives, outcomes and expenditures incurred;

Institute of Peace and Diplomatic Studies (IPD) (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on projects and expenditures;

International Anti Terrorism Movement (India) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked for details on its 2019 summit;

Hazrat-e Fatemeh Zahra Charity Institute (Iran) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on 2018-2020 activities and outcomes of initiatives related to the Sustainable Development Goals;

International Union for Sustainable Development (Egypt) — as the representative of India asked for details on its source of funding and on projects;

Justice Centre Hong Kong Limited (China) — as the representative of Cuba asked for further information on 2020 activities and plans for 2021;

Kurdistan Institute for Human Rights (Iraq) — as the representative of India asked for details on its financial statement and projects in 2020;

Le conseil promotionnel pour l’action des jeunes en Afrique (Congo) — as the representative of India requested more information on projects involving youth and the environment;

Mentor Amiable Professional Society (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on sources of financing in 2020;

Mulabi Association Latin American Work Group for Sexual Rights Civil Association (Costa Rica) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked for a list of the 300 partners it has in Latin America;

New Barrackpore Samaj Bandhu Welfare Organization (India) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on tree planting activities since 2018;

Onelife Initiative for Human Development (Nigeria) — as the representative of Nicaragua requested the current number of volunteers;

Organisation Tamaynut (Morocco) — as the representative of India asked for details on lobbying projects;

Organization of female conscience renewal (Morocco) — as the representative of China asked for updated information on an international symposium on women’s rights and the outcome;

Pak Special Persons Welfare Society (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for financial details for 2020;

Pakistan International Human Rights Organization (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked about the specific rights it focused on in projects in 2020;

Pakistan Press Foundation (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on efforts to promote media accountability from 2018 to 2020;

Palestinian Working Woman Society for Development (Al-Mar’a Al-Amelah Al-Felstinia Lel-Tanmia) (State of Palestine) — as the representative of Israel asked for details about why its previous application had been closed;

Public Organization “Institute for the Study of Dependencies, Drug Policy Issues and Monitoring the Drug Situation” (Ukraine) — as the representative of the Russian Federation asked for details on its partnership with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and on any joint projects;

Réveil communautaire d’assistance aux victims (Burundi) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on financial information and whether it worked exclusively in Burundi;

Safe Care Trust International (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details and outcomes of campaigns from 2018 to 2020;

Southeast Asia Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Expression Caucus (ASC), Inc. (Philippines) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked for details of activities for 2021 and 2022;

Society for Cognition of Science and Art for Quality Welfare, Sustenance, Livelihood and Economic Development of the Poor (SCOSAQ) (India) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on its research for the last five years;

The New Woman Foundation (Egypt) — as the representative of Cuba asked how it is financing itself and the origins of its income in 2020;

The Union of Non-governmental Associations “The International Non-governmental Organization ‘The World Union of Cossack Atamans’” (Kazakhstan) — as the representative of the Russian Federation asked for details on expenditures on salaries;

The Voice Society (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for financial details;

The YP Foundation (India) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on programmes and outcomes for 2020 and 2021;

Transnational Anti-Organized Crime Intelligence Group Inc. (TAOC-IG) (Philippines) — as the representative of the Russian Federation asked for a list of countries in which its teams are working;

United National Organization of Human Rights (Egypt) — as the representative of India asked for details on its participation in United Nations meetings;

United World Against Diabetes (India) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on psychosocial support provided in the last three years;

Welfare Association Jared (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for financial details;

West Papua Interest Association (Indonesia) — as the representative of India asked for details on its budget;

Women For a Change, Cameroon (Cameroon) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked for details on projects;

Y4D Foundation (India) — as the representative of Pakistan requested details on youth-related projects in 2019 and 2020; and

General Union of Arab Experts (Morocco) — as the representative of Bahrain asked how its work contributes to the work of the United Nations.

Interactive Discussion

During a question-and-answer session, NGO representatives faced questions from Committee members.

The representative of Asociacion Civil Grupo SURES (Venezuela) said her organization’s work focuses on education, research and the defence of human rights among vulnerable groups.  Initiatives include research on mobility and migration and the provision of training and workshops.  In response to the Committee’s previous questions, she said the organization attended the Human Rights Council session in 2020 as an observer, to, among other things, exchange informally with other civil society groups.

The representative of the United States requested clarification of activities at the Human Rights Council in terms of the other organizations it engaged with.

The representative of Cuba asked how the group plans its agenda and research priorities.  He also asked for details about elements of research.

The group’s representative said participation at the Human Rights Council stemmed from an invitation from a civil society organization.  It engaged with a non-governmental organization focusing on law and with the Democratic International Federation of Women.  Turning to details on research, she said a consultative team, including experts on human rights, provides input at three meetings during the year to decide on an annual plan of action.  Research includes independent studies, data collection and analysis, particularly in the area of human mobility.

The representative of the United States asked for details on legislative activities and its current or past work with Parliament.

The organization’s representative said all legislative projects have a space for civil society consultations.  Her organization has participated in and contributed to discussions on human trafficking and has also created a protocol for granting travel permits for children.

The representative of United States asked for details on the organization’s human rights training efforts.

The Committee deferred action on the application of the organization, pending a written response to the final question.

The representative of The American India Foundation (United States) said the organization is among the largest philanthropic groups related to India in the United States.  This secular apolitical organization partners with the public and private sector.  Providing examples of education, health and livelihood projects, he also said a fellowship programme sends young professionals in the United States to work in India for 10 months.  Given the current grim situation related to COVID-19 in India, the organization also provided contributions to the health sector.  All of its work is aligned with the Sustainable Development Goals, and it partners with several United Nations agencies.

The representative of China asked whether it carried out activities or projects outside the United States and India.

The organization’s representative said all activities are focused on India.  As such, all projects operated only in India.

The representative of Pakistan asked for details on funding sources.

The representative of China requested details on its participation in United Nations events.

The organization’s representative said the primary source of funding comes from members of the diaspora in the United States as well as businesses.  It participates in United Nations events related to youth, persons with disabilities and education.

The representative of Pakistan requested a break down of all sources of funding in writing.

The Committee deferred action on the application of this organization, pending a written response.

The representative of the World Fund for Development and Planning (WFDP) (Kenya) said his non-profit organization focuses on doing business in Africa.  Projects cover sustainable issues, from water treatment to education.  Attention is also needed on renewable energy and health care, the latter of which is a big problem.  Funded by members, both individuals and companies, the organization focuses on project financing in helping companies to help Governments.

The representative of United States requested further information on its activities on children’s health.

The organization’s representative said there are no current projects focused exclusively on children’s health, but some efforts include providing clean water, which has benefits for all.  Providing another example, he said a project in Sudan is working on building a robust health-care system over the next two years.

The representative of the United States asked for details on current projects.

The organization’s representative outlined ongoing activities, including water treatment initiatives in Chad and Kenya, an education programme in Kenya to provide more schools, and energy projects in Sudan.  In addition, alternative medicine initiatives are also under way in Ethiopia, with a project planned in Madagascar.  The organization tries to arrange funding for these and other projects.

The representative of the United States asked for confirmation of the 12 private sector organizations mentioned in its application and if they are tied to any Governments.

The organization’s representative said these partners do not have ties to Governments.  The organization brings the seed capital to do research and data collection, as needed.  The countries have all the assets to support themselves, he said.

The Committee then postponed action on the application of this organization, pending a written response.

For information media. Not an official record.