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GA/12306
21 December 2020
Seventy-fifth Session, 48th Meeting (PM)

Taking Up Second Committee Reports, General Assembly Adopts 36 Resolutions, including Text Calling for Building Back Better in Wake of Pandemic

As the COVID‑19 pandemic ravages economies and threatens to reverse hard-won development gains, the General Assembly today adopted 36 resolutions and two decisions of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial), urging the global community to “build back better” in tackling the biggest challenge it has faced since the Second World War.

By a resolution on “International trade and development”, adopted by recorded vote of 175 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions (Haiti, Sudan), the Assembly emphasized the urgent need to combat protectionism in all its forms and rectify any trade-distorting measures inconsistent with World Trade Organization (WTO) rules.

Underscoring COVID‑19 disruptions, the Assembly called on Member States to reaffirm the critical importance of global supply chains in ensuring the flow of vital medical and food supplies as well as other essential goods across air, land and sea borders.  It also encouraged cooperation to ease cross-border travel of individuals for essential purposes without undermining efforts to prevent spread of the coronavirus.

Adopting another resolution on “External debt sustainability and development”, the Assembly stressed the need to continue assisting developing countries in reducing the risk of relapsing into another crisis.  It recognized steps the Group of 20 has taken, including the extraordinary leaders’ summit hosted by Saudi Arabia on COVID‑19, to provide a time-bound suspension of debt service payments for the poorest countries.

By adopting a resolution on “Promoting investments for sustainable development”, the organ expressed concern that many least developed countries and small island developing States continue to be side-lined by foreign direct investment that could help diversify their economies, noting the gap in access to capital for micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises.

Further macroeconomic resolutions focused on the international financial system, assets return, investments for sustainable development and financing for development.

Addressing texts on sustainable development, the Assembly adopted a resolution on “Protection of global climate for present and future generations of humankind” by a recorded vote of 102 in favour to 54 against, with 2 abstentions (Madagascar, Turkey).  The text urged Member States to adopt a climate-responsive approach to COVID‑19 recovery by aligning investments with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on climate change in creating low‑emission, climate-resilient and sustainable economies.

Further, expressing concern that nationally determined contributions presented thus far by parties to the Paris Agreement are insufficient, it stated that action is needed to hold the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.

Adopting another resolution on “Disaster risk reduction”, the Assembly urged States to conduct inclusive and multi-hazard disaster risk assessments that consider climate change projections.  The Assembly also emphasized the need for action to enhance efforts to build resilience through the sustainable management of ecosystems and to build resilience to reduce the impacts and costs of natural hazards.

Other texts on sustainable development addressed the 2030 Agenda, small island developing States, desertification, biological diversity, harmony with nature, sustainable energy access and sand as well as dust storms.

Turning to globalization and interdependence, the Assembly adopted a text titled “Towards a New International Economic Order”, by which it called on States and international institutions to increase financial liquidity in tackling the COVID‑19 crisis.  Further, it emphasized the need to boost access to concessional finance, calling on donors to fulfil their development assistance commitments.

Addressing Groups of countries in special situations, the Assembly adopted a resolution on “Follow-up to the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries”.  By the text, it expressed deep concern at the recent devastating impacts of COVID‑19 on least developed countries, inviting development partners, international organizations and other stakeholders to support them in recovering.

By other terms, the organ noted that exports of goods and services of least developed countries declined by 1.6 per cent in 2019 compared with 2018, expressing concern that the share of goods and services exports, which stood at 0.91 per cent in 2019, remains far below the target of 2 per cent of global exports called for in the Istanbul Programme of Action.

Taking up poverty eradication, the Assembly adopted a resolution on “Eradication of poverty and other development issues:  eradicating rural poverty to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” in a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 49 against, with 2 abstentions (Tonga, Turkey).

By the text, the Assembly expressed deep concern that progress in reducing poverty remains uneven, with 1.46 billion people still living in multidimensional poverty.  Further, it emphasized that 2 billion people globally, primarily in rural areas in developing countries, have no access to formal financial services.

The organ adopted a further text on “Quadrennial comprehensive policy review of operational activities for development of the United Nations system”, in a recorded vote of 167 in favour to none against, with 1 abstention (Russian Federation).  By that text, the Assembly expressed concern over the rise in global poverty, requesting the United Nations development system to strengthen actions to accelerate progress on its eradication.

Adopting a related resolution on “Agriculture development, food security and nutrition”, the Assembly urged Member States to speed up collective actions addressing the impacts of COVID‑19 on those needs.  Actions should focus on sustainable agriculture and food systems, access to safe drinking water and sanitation, measures to ensure adequate nutrition, healthy diets and prevention of novel diseases.

It further emphasized that sustainable agricultural production, food security, food safety and nutrition are key elements for eradicating poverty in all forms, calling for greater efforts to sustainably enhance agricultural production capacities, productivity and food security in developing countries.

The Assembly also took up a report on “Programme planning”, which regarded working arrangements of the Committee’s seventy-fifth session and required no action.

Remaining texts focused on information and communications technologies, tourism, the United Nations Human Settlements Programme, immigration, landlocked developing countries, the poverty eradication decade (2018-2027), industrial development, South-South cooperation and sovereignty of the Palestinian people and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan.

Two decisions the Assembly adopted focused on the Second Committee’s programme for the General Assembly’s seventy-sixth session and the convening of informal dialogues in December 2020 and the first months of 2021 to discuss revitalization of the Committee’s work.

In other business, the Assembly then turned to its item “Election of members to the Committee for Programme and Coordination”, electing Germany for a three-year term beginning 1 January 2021, on nomination of the Economic and Social Council.

Action on Draft Resolutions

DIAMANE DIOME (Senegal), Second Committee Rapporteur, introduced the reports of the Second Committee (Economic and Financial) containing 36 draft resolutions and 2 draft decisions.

The Assembly first took up the report “Information and communications technologies for sustainable development” (document A/75/454), containing the eponymous draft resolution.  Adopting the text without a vote, it  expressed concern over the substantial continued digital and broadband divides between and within developed and developing countries, including the fact that there are 122 mobile broadband subscriptions per 100 people in developed countries, compared with 75 in developing countries and 33 in the least developed States.

Next, the Assembly took up the report “Macroeconomic policy questions” (document A/75/455), which contained five draft resolutions.

The Assembly turned to the report on “International trade and development” (document A/75/455/ADD.1) which contained the eponymous resolution, adopting it by a recorded vote of 177 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with no abstentions.  In doing so, the Assembly emphasized the urgent need to combat protectionism in all its forms and rectify any trade-distorting measures that are inconsistent with World Trade Organization (WTO) rules.

In light of the COVID‑19 pandemic, the Assembly also called on Member States to reaffirm the critical importance of connected global supply chains in ensuring the unimpeded flow of vital medical aid and food supplies and other essential goods across borders — by air, land and sea.  It further encouraged cooperation to facilitate cross-border travel; for essential purposes without undermining efforts to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

It then considered the report “International financial system and development” (document A/75/455/Add.2), adopting the resolution of the same name contained therein by a recorded vote of 177 in favour to 1 against (United States), with no abstentions.  By its terms, the Assembly stressed the critical importance of a stable, inclusive and enabling global economic environment for the advancement of sustainable development.

Next, the Assembly took up the report “External debt sustainability and development” (document A/75/455/Add.3), adopting the eponymous resolution without a vote.  By that text, it stressed the need to continue to assist developing countries in avoiding a build-up of unsustainable debt so as to reduce the risk of relapsing into another debt crisis.

By other terms, the Assembly recognized steps taken by the Group of 20, including the extraordinary leaders summit hosted by Saudi Arabia on COVID‑19, to provide a time-bound suspension of debt service payments for the poorest countries, calling for all official bilateral creditors to implement this initiative fully.  It also noted the need to respond to the needs of countries not covered by the initiative, reaffirming the growing urgency to deal with liquidity and also solvency risks.

It then turned to the report “Promotion of international cooperation to combat illicit financial flows and strengthen good practices on assets return to foster sustainable development” (document A/75/455/Add.4), adopting without a vote a resolution of the same name.  By the text, the Assembly reaffirmed its commitment to strive to eliminate safe havens that create incentives for the transfer abroad of stolen assets and illicit financial flows.

The Assembly then considered the report “Promoting investments for sustainable development” (document A/75/455/Add.5), adopting the eponymous resolution without a vote.  By the text, the organ noted with concern that many of the least developed countries and small island developing States continue to be side‑lined by foreign direct investment that could help to diversify their economies, and note the gap in access to capital for micro-, small and medium-sized enterprises.

It then took up the reportFollow-up to and implementation of the outcomes of the International Conferences on Financing for Development” (document A/75/456), which contained the resolution of the same name, adopting it without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly reiterated that States will not be able to achieve the ambitious Goals and targets of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development without a revitalized and enhanced global partnership and comparably ambitious means of implementation, and reaffirm the commitment at the very heart of the 2030 Agenda to leave no one behind.

Next, the Assembly considered the report “Sustainable development” (document A/75/457) containing three draft resolutions.  It first adopted the resolution I titled “Oil slick on Lebanese shores” by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Papua New Guinea, Tonga).  By the text, the Assembly reiterated for the fifteenth consecutive year, its deep concern about the adverse implications of the destruction by the Israeli Air Force of the oil storage tanks in the direct vicinity of the Jiyah electric power plant for the achievement of sustainable development in Lebanon. 

By further terms, the Assembly acknowledged the conclusions in the report of the Secretary‑General, in which he stated that studies show that the value of the damage to Lebanon amounted to $856.4 million in 2014 and reiterated its request to the Government of Israel to assume responsibility for prompt and adequate compensation to the Government of Lebanon.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted resolution II, “International cooperation and coordination for the human and ecological rehabilitation and economic development of the Semipalatinsk region of Kazakhstan”.  By the text, it urged the international community to provide assistance to Kazakhstan in formulating and implementing special programmes and projects for the treatment and care of the affected population, as well as in efforts to ensure economic growth and sustainable development in the Semipalatinsk region. 

Next, the organ adopted resolution IIIEntrepreneurship for sustainable developmentby a recorded vote of 147 in favour to 24 against, with 7 abstentions (Bangladesh, Maldives, Namibia, Nicaragua, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Turkey).  By the text, it recognized the vital role of entrepreneurship in the development of regional economic integration, which can be an important catalyst for implementing economic reforms, reducing trade barriers and decreasing trade costs.

The Assembly then turned to the report “Towards the achievement of sustainable development:  implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including through sustainable consumption and production, building on Agenda 21” (document A/75/457/Add.1), which contained two draft resolutions.

The organ first adopted resolution I “United Nations Conference on the Midterm Comprehensive Review of the Implementation of the Objectives of the International Decade for Action, “Water for Sustainable Development”, 2018–2028” without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly reiterated the critical importance of effective review of the implementation of the Decade at the national, regional and international levels, and encouraged Member States, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, international donors, the private sector and others to support the preparations for the Conference through voluntary contributions to a trust fund.

Next, the Assembly took up the resolution II “Promoting sustainable consumption and production patterns for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, building on Agenda 21”, adopting it by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 1 against (United States), with no abstentions.  By the text, the organ acknowledged the link between plastic waste and sustainable consumption and production patterns, and encourages further efforts at all levels to reduce, reuse and recycle plastics and to address through innovative approaches different types of plastic waste, including marine plastic litter.

The Assembly then turned to the report “Follow-up to and implementation of the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway and the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States” (document A/75/457/Add.2), which contained two draft resolutions.

The Assembly first addressed resolution I “Towards the sustainable development of the Caribbean Sea for present and future generations”, adopting the eponymous resolution without a vote.  By its terms, it recognized  the Caribbean Sea as an area of unique biodiversity and a highly fragile ecosystem that requires relevant regional and international development partners to work together to promote the sustainable conservation and management of coastal and marine resources.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted the resolution “Follow-up to and implementation of the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway and the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States”.  By its terms, the Assembly called for urgent and ambitious global action, in line with the Paris Agreement, to address the threat and impact of climate change on small island developing States.

The representative of Colombia, speaking in explanation of position on “L.16”, reaffirmed support for the sustainable development of the Caribbean region, but reiterated his delegation has not ratified the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and its support for consensus on the resolution cannot be interpreted as affirmation of that instrument.  He further objected to operative paragraph 9.

The representative of Venezuela, also addressing “L.16”, said his country is not party to the Convention and the standards of that instrument are therefore not binding.

The representative of El Salvador disassociated her delegation from language in preambular paragraph 9 of the Convention, reiterating that her Government is ready and willing to cooperate in management of coastal resources.

The representative of Turkey said her delegation had joined consensus on “L.16” but disassociated itself from references to the Convention.

The Assembly then turned to the report “Disaster risk reduction” (document A/75/457/Add.3), adopting the eponymous resolution without a vote.  By its terms, the organ urged States to conduct inclusive and multi-hazard disaster risk assessments that consider climate change projections to support evidence‑based disaster risk reduction strategies and guide risk-informed development investments by the private and public sectors.

Next, it turned to the report “Protection of global climate for present and future generations of humankind” (document A/75/457/Add.4) containing the eponymous draft resolution.  Prior to acting on the draft as a whole, the Assembly first decided, by separate recorded vote, to retain two paragraphs.

The Assembly retained operative paragraph 2 by recorded vote of 155 in favour to 6 against (Colombia, Eritrea, Guyana, Japan, Russian Federation, United States), with 1 abstention (Madagascar).

The organ decided to retain operative paragraph 10 by a recorded vote of 111 in favour to 44 against, with 5 abstentions (Iceland, Kiribati, Madagascar, Norway, Switzerland).

It then adopted, without a vote, the resolution as a whole.  By that text, the Assembly underlines the need to address the economic, social and environmental impacts of climate change, and emphasizes the need for action at all levels, to enhance efforts to build resilience through, inter alia, the sustainable management of ecosystems, and to build resilience to reduce the impacts and costs of natural hazards.

The Assembly then turned to the report “Implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, particularly in Africa” (document A/75/457/Add.5), adopting the eponymous resolution without a vote.  By that text, the Assembly reiterates the need to combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world.

Next, it took up the report “Convention on Biological Diversity” (document A/75/457/Add.6), containing the draft resolution “Implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity and its contribution to sustainable development”.  Adopting the text without a vote, the Assembly urged parties to the Convention to ensure the coherence and complementarity of a post-2020 global biodiversity framework with other existing or upcoming international processes, in particular with regard to the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement and other related processes, frameworks and strategies. 

The Assembly then took up the report “Harmony with nature” (document A/75/457/Add.7).  Adopting the eponymous resolution without a vote, it called for holistic and integrated approaches to sustainable development, in its three dimensions, that will guide humanity to live in harmony with nature and lead to efforts to restore the health and integrity of the Earth’s ecosystems.

The organ then considered the report “Ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all” (document A/75/457/Add.8), adopting the eponymous resolution without a vote.  By the text, it emphasized, while noting progress, that the large-scale deployment of technologies has been insufficient and uneven and that support is required to realize their potential.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly then took up “Combating sand and dust storms” (document A/75/457/Add.9), adopting the resolution of the same name by a recorded vote of 174 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 1 abstention (Australia).  By the text, it recognized that such phenomena cause numerous human health problems in different regions around the world, especially in arid and semi-arid regions.

The Assembly then took up the report on “Global Ethics for Tourism” (document A/75/458), adopting a resolution therein of the same name without a vote.

By the text, the organ encouraged WTO to promote and disseminate the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism and monitor implementation of ethical principles related to tourism.   It also recognized the need to promote sustainable tourism to increase its benefits for host communities, while maintaining the cultures and environmental integrity of those communities.

Next, it turned to the report on “Follow-up to the implementation of the New Urban Agenda and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat)” (document A/75/459), adopting the resolution therein without a vote on “Implementation of the outcomes of the United Nations Conferences on Human Settlements and on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat)”.

Addressing that text, the representative of Tunisia, speaking in a point of order, said he had erred, that his delegation voted “against”, not “in favour” of the resolution.

By the text, the Assembly recognized the importance of implementing the New Urban Agenda at the national, subnational, local, regional and global levels.  Further, it urged UN-Habitat to continue developing innovative methods, approaches and guidelines for data collection, analysis, monitoring and implementation to support Member States in dealing with emerging urban challenges and opportunities.

Turning then to the report on “Globalization and Interdependence:  Towards a New International Economic Order” (document A/75/460/Add.1), the Assembly adopted a draft resolution therein titled “Towards a New International Economic Order” in a recorded vote of 123 in favour to 48 against, with 4 abstentions (Armenia, Madagascar, Tonga, Turkey).

By the text, the Assembly called on States and international institutions to provide more financial liquidity to assist in tackling the COVID‑19 crisis.  Further, it emphasized the need to increase access to concessional finance in dealing with the global pandemic, calling on donors to fulfil their development assistance commitments.

Next, the organ took up the report on “Globalization and interdependence:  international migration and development” (document A/75/460/Add.2), adopting a resolution therein on “International migration and development” in a recorded vote of 175 in favour to 3 against (Hungary, Israel, United States), with 1 abstention (Libya).

By the text, the Assembly noted that the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration is the first intergovernmental negotiated outcome, prepared under the auspices of the United Nations, to cover international migration in all its dimensions.

Turning then to a text on “Groups of countries in special situations:  follow-up to the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries” (document A/75/461/Add.1), the Assembly adopted a resolution on “Follow-up to the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries” without a vote.

By the text, the Assembly expressed deep concern at the recent devastating impacts of COVID‑19 on least developed countries, inviting development partners, international organizations and other stakeholders to support them in recovering.  By other terms, it noted that exports of goods and services of least developed countries declined by 1.6 per cent in 2019 compared with 2018, expressing concern that the share of goods and services exports, which stood at 0.91 per cent in 2019, remains far from the target of 2 per cent of global exports called for in the Istanbul Programme of Action.

Next, the Assembly took up the report on “Groups of countries in special situations:  follow-up to the second United Nations Conference on Landlocked Developing Countries” (document A/75/461/Add.2), adopting it without a vote.

By that text, it called on landlocked developing countries and transit countries to develop and upgrade international transport and transit corridors, including roads, railroads, inland waterways, ports and pipelines.  It also called for stronger partnerships to support landlocked developing nations in diversifying their economies and enhancing value addition to their exports to eradicate poverty and achieve sustainable, inclusive and sustained economic growth.

The Assembly then turned to the report on “Eradication of poverty and other development issues” (document A/75/462), adopting without a vote a resolution on “Eradication of poverty and other development issues:  implementation of the Third United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2018–2027)” (document A/75/462/Add.1).

Next, it adopted a resolution on “Eradication of poverty and other development issues:  industrial development cooperation” (document A/75/462/Add.2) without a vote.

By the text, the Assembly would emphasize that each country must take responsibility for its own industrial development, that national ownership and leadership are indispensable in development and that national policies, resources and development strategies cannot be overemphasized.  Further, it stressed that national development efforts must be supported by an enabling international economic environment, including coherent and mutually supporting world trade, monetary and financial systems.

The organ then took up a resolution on “Eradicating rural poverty to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” (document A/75/462/Add.3), adopting it in a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 49 against, with 3 abstentions (Tonga, Turkey, Palau).

By the text, it expressed deep concern that progress in reducing poverty remains uneven, with 1.46 billion people still living in multidimensional poverty.  Further, it emphasized that 2 billion people globally, primarily in rural areas in developing countries, have no access to formal financial services.

Turning then to the report on “Operational activities for development of the United Nations system” (document A/75/463/Add.1), the Assembly took up a draft resolution titled “Quadrennial comprehensive policy review of operational activities for development of the United Nations system” (document A/75/463/Add.1).

By that text, the Assembly would recognize that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development, as set out in the 2030 Agenda, note concern the rise in global poverty, and request the United Nations development system to strengthen actions to accelerate progress on poverty eradication.

By further terms, it would urge donor countries and encourage other contributors to maintain and substantially increase their core contributions to the United Nations development system, in particular its funds, programmes and specialized agencies.

The Committee first adopted Paragraph 30 in separate recorded vote of 148 in favour to 3 against (Belarus, Cambodia, Russian Federation), with 3 abstentions (Egypt, Madagascar, United States).

The text was then adopted as a whole in a recorded vote of 182 in favour to none against, with 1 abstention (Russian Federation).

The Assembly then turned to the report “Operational activities for development:  South-South cooperation for development” (document A/75/463/Add.2), adopting a draft resolution therein without a vote on “South-South cooperation”.

By the text, the organ would encourage the continuation and advancement of South-South cooperation on COVID‑19 response and recovery efforts in the pursuit of the 2030 Agenda.  Further, it reaffirmed the commitment to take more tangible steps in supporting people in vulnerable situations and the most vulnerable countries, reaching the furthest behind.

The Assembly then took up the report on “Agriculture development, food security and nutrition” (document A/75/464), adopting an eponymous resolution therein without a vote.  By the text, it urged Member States and other stakeholders to advance collective actions to address the impacts of the COVID‑19 pandemic on agriculture development, food security and nutrition, including through sustainable agriculture and food systems, access to safe drinking water and sanitation, effective measures to ensure food security and nutrition during the pandemic, promotion of healthy diets, promotion of food safety and prevention of the emergence of novel diseases.

It further emphasized that sustainable agricultural production, food security, food safety and nutrition are key elements for eradicating poverty in all forms, calling for greater efforts to sustainably enhance agricultural production capacities, productivity and food security of developing countries.

Next, it turned to the report on “Permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources” (document A/75/465), adopting a resolution of the same name in a recorded vote of 153 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, United States), with 17 abstentions.

By that text, the Assembly demanded that Israel cease exploiting, damaging, causing loss or depleting and endangering natural resources in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and in the occupied Syrian Golan.  Further, it called on Israel to cease destroying vital infrastructure, including water pipelines, sewage networks and electricity networks, and to cease demolishing and confiscating Palestinian homes as well as civilian infrastructure, agricultural lands and water wells.

Next, it took up the report on “Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly” (document A/75/467), which contained two draft decisions.  Acting without a vote, it adopted decision I on “Draft programme of work of the Second Committee for the seventy-sixth session of the General Assembly”.

The Assembly then adopted decision II on “Revitalization of the work of the Second Committee”, deciding that the Bureau of the Second Committee will convene informal dialogues to discuss revitalization of its work in December 2020 and in the first months of 2021.  Further, it decided that the Second Committee will convene a plenary meeting following those dialogues to take stock of deliberations and act on any recommendations, for subsequent approval by the General Assembly.

The Assembly then took up the report on “Programme planning” (document A/75/466), regarding the working arrangements of the Committee for the seventy-fifth session, as set out in the organization of work of the Committee.  It decided that no action was required on the item.

The representative of Guyana, speaking for the “Group of 77” developing countries and China in explanation of position, noting informal consultations on the quadrennial comprehensive policy review, reaffirmed the bloc’s support for the resolution, which is an important document providing strong guidance to the United Nations development system.

However, voicing concern about the continuous efforts to dilute the focus of the review on development activities, he observed that various issues, including human rights, humanitarian issues, sustaining peace, sexual exploitation and abuse, and gender equality were introduced into the resolution often in an unbalanced manner.  Stressing that the review should retain its development focus, he said the Group worked constructively in the spirit of compromise with all delegations to address these issues in a balanced way, agreeing on language in these areas as part of a package to find consensus.

In other business, the Assembly then turned to its item titled “Election of members to the Committee for Programme and Coordination”, electing Germany for a three-year term beginning 1 January 2021, on nomination of the Economic and Social Council.

For information media. Not an official record.