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GA/12231
18 December 2019
Seventy-fourth Session 50th Meetings (AM)

General Assembly Adopts 60 Third Committee Resolutions, Proclaims International Decade of Indigenous Languages, Covering Broad Themes of Social Equality

The General Assembly proclaimed 2022‑2032 as the International Decade of Indigenous Languages today, inviting indigenous peoples — as custodians — to initiate ideas for preserving this endangered facet of their cultural and social life, as it adopted 60 resolutions and one decision recommended by its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural).

Covering a range of issues — from the rights of children, women and older persons to questions of justice, fairness and equality under international law — the Assembly adopted most resolutions without a vote.  Women and girls were the focus of several, directly or indirectly, including one designating 18 September as International Equal Pay Day, to be observed annually beginning in 2020.  Gender equality has been held back due to the persistence of unequal power relations, the Assembly recognized, and work traditionally held by women undervalued.

Similarly, a consensus resolution on the human rights to safe drinking water and sanitation called on States to ensure access to equitable sanitation and hygiene for all women and girls, and to address the shame surrounding menstruation and menstrual hygiene.  A resolution on the girl child likewise pressed States to foster a culture in which menstruation is recognized as healthy and natural, and girls are not stigmatized on this basis, while another consensus text on the situation of women and girls in rural areas urged States to improve women’s health through legislation providing them access to land.

The broad theme of migration also surfaced, as did differences around ways to handle migratory flows — notably seen in the Assembly’s passage of its annual resolution on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) by a recorded vote of 179 in favour, to 2 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Syria), with 5 abstentions (Eritrea, Hungary, Iran, Libya, Poland).  By its terms, the Assembly urged States party to the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol to respect their obligations, and called on States that have not yet contributed to burden‑sharing to do so.

Denmark’s representative, whose delegation facilitated negotiation of the text on behalf of the Nordic countries, lamented that a Member State had requested a vote, disrupting years of consensus.  The text is a humanitarian one and non‑political in nature, she assured.

Hungary’s representative took a different view, arguing that the Global Compact for Refugees cited in the resolution encourages people to move away from home, violating international law.  He strongly rejected the notion that solidarity means welcoming migrants within one’s borders.  He likewise said the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration — cited in a resolution on violence against women migrant workers, among others, which encourages States to offer better protections — does not take the right approach.  It portrays migration as “the best thing that ever happened to humanity”, supporting smugglers who earn millions of dollars exploiting people, especially women.

On questions of social development, the Assembly decided to hold a high‑level meeting commemorating the twenty‑fifth anniversary of the World Summit on Social Development, within existing resources, at its seventy‑fifth session in 2020 and request the Assembly President to conduct consultations to determine the relevant modalities.  The resolution passed by a recorded vote of 186 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with no abstentions.

It also adopted a resolution on follow‑up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing, calling on Member States to ensure that a host of services respond to the needs of older persons:  affordable serviced land, housing, modern and renewable energy, safe drinking water and sanitation, waste disposal and health care, among them.

The Assembly deferred action on draft resolutions related to the human rights situation in Myanmar, and on countering the use of information and communications technologies (ICT) for criminal purposes.

Also speaking today were representatives of Finland (on behalf of the European Union), Chile, Venezuela, Burundi, Philippines, Russian Federation, Canada, United States, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Iran, Ukraine, China, Turkey, Cuba and Syria.

Action on Third Committee Draft Resolutions

FIRAS HASSAN JABBAR AL‑KHAQANI (Iraq), Rapporteur of the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural), introduced the following reports of that body:  Social development (document A/74/391); Advancement of women (document A/74/392); Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/74/583); Report of the Human Rights Council (document A/74/394); Promotion and protection of the rights of children (document A/74/395); Rights of indigenous peoples (document A/74/396); Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance (document A/74/397); and Rights of peoples to self‑determination (document A/74/398).

He also presented the Committee’s reports on:  Promotion and protection of human rights (document A/74/399); Implementation of human rights instruments (document A/74/399/Add.1); Human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms (document A/74/399/Add.2); Human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives (document A/74/399/Add.3); Comprehensive implementation of and follow‑up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action (document A/74/399/Add.4); Crime prevention and criminal justice (document A/74/400); “Countering the use of information and communications technologies for criminal purposes” (document A/74/401), International drug control (document A/74/402); Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/74/404); and Programme planning (document A/74/403).

The Assembly began by taking up the report on Social Development (document A/74/391), which contained seven draft resolutions.

The representative of Finland, speaking on behalf of the European Union, reiterated that human rights are central to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  The European Union participated in discussions on all Third Committee resolutions — from thematic to country‑specific ones — engaging with all States and regional groups to promote economic, social and political rights.  He welcomed the resolutions on the situations in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and the Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar, stressing more broadly that the international community must continue to send a strong message that all perpetrators of international humanitarian law violations must be held to account in national and international tribunals, including the International Criminal Court.

Welcoming the resolution on the rights of the child, he said Member States have again reiterated their resolve to protect all minors, especially in conflict zones.  He recalled support for resolutions on the human rights situations in Syria, Iraq, and Crimea and Sevastopol, Ukraine, also welcoming drafts focused on women’s rights that send a strong message of commitment and stressing that the European Union will continue to strongly oppose all forms of discrimination, including on the grounds of sex, race, age, political and religious affiliation, and sexual orientation and gender identity.  The bloc supports an open and free cyberspace where rules apply, he added, noting that it is not for the Third Committee to question decisions taken by the Human Rights Council. 

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution I, “Cooperatives in social development” (document A/C.3/74/L.16), inviting Governments and international organizations to build the capacity of cooperatives — especially those run by the poor, young people and women — so that they can empower people to transform their communities.  It also invited Member States to enhance food security and focus efforts on smallholders, women farmers, and agricultural and food cooperatives, to create enabling domestic and international environments.

It then adopted draft resolution II, “Promoting social integration through social inclusion” (document A/C.3/74/L.17/Rev.1), without a vote, stressing the importance of promoting inclusive and equitable quality education and lifelong learning opportunities for all, especially for young people, older persons, women and girls, and persons with disabilities.  It also called upon Member States to promote more equitable participation in and access to economic growth gains through policies that ensure inclusive labour markets.

The Assembly then turned to draft resolution III, “Policies and programmes involving youth” (document A/C.3/74/L.8/Rev.1).

First, the Assembly adopted paragraphs 10, 12 and 13 by a recorded vote of 138 in favour to 15 against, with 17 abstentions.

It then adopted draft resolution III as a whole, calling on Member States to promote the fundamental freedoms of all young people and ensure a human rights‑based approach to youth policies and programmes.  It also called on them to scale up scientifically accurate age‑appropriate comprehensive education that provides adolescents and young people with information on sexual and reproductive health, gender equality and the empowerment of women, enabling them to build informed decision‑making skills.

Moving on, the Assembly adopted draft resolution IV, “Implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly” (document A/C.3/74/L.12/Rev.1) by a recorded vote of 186 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with no abstentions.  By its terms, the Assembly decided to devote one high‑level meeting to commemorating the twenty‑fifth anniversary of the World Summit on Social Development, within existing resources, at its seventy‑fifth session in 2020 and request the Assembly President to conduct consultations with States to determine the relevant modalities.  On universal access to health care, the Assembly recognized that health is an investment in human capital and social and economic development, towards the full realization of human potential.

It then adopted draft resolution V, “Persons with albinism” (document A/C.3/74.L.9/Rev.1), calling on Member States to ensure accountability through the conduct of impartial, speedy and effective investigations into crimes against persons with albinism falling within their jurisdiction, to hold perpetrators accountable and to ensure that victims, survivors and family members have access to appropriate remedies, as well as to therapy and psychosocial, socioeconomic, legal and medical support.  It also encouraged Member States to adopt national action plans and legislation on the rights of persons with albinism, in line with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, among other instruments.

Next, it adopted draft resolution VI, “Follow‑up to the twentieth anniversary of the International Year of the Family and beyond” (document A/C.3/74.L.13/Rev.1), calling on Member States and United Nations agencies, along with civil society and other relevant stakeholders, to continue to provide information on good practices at national, regional and international levels in support of the International Year of the Family.

It then adopted draft resolution VII, “Follow‑up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing” (document A/C.3/74.L.14/Rev.1), calling on Member States to promote — in accordance with their national priorities — equitable and affordable access to physical and social infrastructure for all, without discrimination, and to ensure that the following services respond to the needs of older persons:  affordable serviced land; housing; modern and renewable energy; safe drinking water and sanitation; safe, nutritious and adequate food; waste disposal; sustainable mobility; health care and family planning; education; culture; and information and communications technologies (ICT).  It invited Member States to continue to share their national experiences, including within the Open‑ended Working Group on Ageing.

Next, the Assembly took up the report on the Advancement of women (document A/74/392), containing three draft resolutions, all of which were adopted without a vote, namely:

Draft resolution I, “Improvement of the situation of women and girls in rural areas” (document A/C.3/74.L.20/Rev.1), urging States to improve women’s health, including maternal health by enhancing the prevention and treatment of infections, such as HIV; eliminating all forms of violence against rural women and girls in public and private spaces; adopting strategies to decrease women’s and girls’ vulnerability to environmental factors; and developing legislation that provides rural women with access to land;

Draft resolution II, “Violence against women migrant workers (document A/C.3/74/L.22), calling on Governments to adopt or strengthen measures to protect the rights of women migrant workers regardless of their migratory status, notably in policies that regulate their recruitment and deployment; and

Draft resolution III, “Follow‑up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly” (document A/C.3/74.L.65), noting with concern that the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN‑Women) continues to draw on voluntary contributions to carry out its mandate.  It emphasized the need to fully implement resolution 64/289 in this regard.

The representative of Hungary said preventing violence and rights violations against all female workers is a major focus of the Government.  However, the focus of the international discussion “is not at the right spot”.  There must be more emphasis on prevention.  It is essential to prevent situations which force women to leave their homes.  Unfortunately, the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration does not represent the right approach.  It promotes migration and portrays it “as if it was the best thing that ever happened to humanity” and supports the business model of smugglers who earn tens of millions of dollars by taking advantage of vulnerable people, especially women.  The international community must break the business model of these smugglers.  He disassociated from the text’s references to the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.

The representative of Chile said her country did not participate in the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, and therefore, distances itself from related commitments made in such resolutions.

Next, the Assembly took up the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/74/393), containing three draft resolutions.

The representative of Denmark, speaking on behalf of the Nordic countries (Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and her own), said UNHCR’s work is of a non‑political character and the resolution is likewise humanitarian and non‑political, dealing with the common ground that allows the Office to work for the benefit of those forcibly displaced.  It mentions the Global Compact for Refugees and the Global Refugee Forum, currently taking place in Geneva.  She expressed deep regret that one Member State requested a vote, disrupting years of consensus, and encouraged delegates to support the text.

The representative of Hungary expressed deep concern that the number of displaced people worldwide is at a record high.  All displacements should be temporary in nature.  International law is clear:  everyone has a right to a safe life in their home country.  The Global Compact for Refugees, on the other hand, encourages people to move far away from their home.  “This violates international law,” he said, disassociating himself with this document and strongly rejecting the notion that solidarity means welcoming migrants within one’s borders.  “We have to bring help where it is needed,” he said, recalling Hungary’s efforts to help refugees and migrants.  Turning to the burgeoning youth population in Africa, he said the solution is not to invite people to Europe, but rather, to keep young people at home by helping to build circumstances for them to stay.  Assistance should be provided to the continent to create the circumstances for young people to stay and thrive in their home countries.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted draft resolution I, “Enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees” (document A/C.3/74/L.57), deciding to increase the number of Executive Committee members from 102 to 106 States and request the Economic and Social Council to elect the additional members during its management segment in 2020.

Next, it adopted draft resolution II, “Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees” (document A/C.3/74/L.59) by a vote of 179 in favour to 2 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Syria), with 5 abstentions (Eritrea, Hungary, Iran, Finland, Libya).  By the text, the Assembly urged States party to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol thereto to respect their obligations.  It also called on States and other stakeholders that have not yet contributed to burden-sharing to do so.

It then adopted draft resolution III, “Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa (document A/C.3/74/L.50/Rev.1) without a vote, urging the international community, in line with the principle of international solidarity and burden‑sharing, to continue to fund the refugee programmes of UNHCR and other relevant organizations and — taking into account the substantially increased needs of programmes in Africa as a result of repatriation possibilities — to ensure that the continent receives a fair and equitable share of the resources.  It welcomed efforts by African States to strengthen regional mechanisms to protect and assist internally displaced persons, calling on them to pre-empt internal displacement.

The Assembly then turned to the report of the Human Rights Council (document A/74/394), and the eponymous draft resolution contained therein (document A/C.3/74/L.56).

The representative of Venezuela said his delegation will support the text, reaffirming that the Human Rights Council is the ideal forum of addressing such questions and that Venezuela is dedicated to the principle of non‑selectivity in such efforts.  He condemned the adoption of country‑specific resolutions and rejected “selective dealing”, disassociating from such parts of the text.

The representative of Burundi reaffirmed the importance of the Human Rights Council but opposed its use to advance “hidden interests”, particularly through resolutions targeting specific countries, like Burundi.  The international community must break from this counter‑productive attitude, she said, disassociating from any references to Burundi.

The Assembly then adopted the resolution by a recorded vote of 120 in favour to 4 (Belarus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Israel, Myanmar) against, with 59 abstentions, thereby taking note of the Human Rights Council report, including the addendum thereto and its recommendations.

The representative of the Philippines said her delegation abstained from the vote, noting that the Human Rights Council report refers to the situation in her country.  However, not even half of the Council’s membership adopted this resolution, clearly placing into question the validity of the resolution.  Respect for sovereignty and non‑interference are important principles that the United Nations and the Human Rights Council must uphold, she said, urging the Assembly to assess the effectiveness of country‑specific resolutions.

Moving on, the Assembly next considered the report on “Promotion and protection of the rights of children” (document A/74/395), containing two draft resolutions.

First, the Assembly voted on operative paragraph 13 of draft resolution I, “The Rights of the Child” (document A/C.3/74/L.21/Rev.1), retaining the operative paragraph by a recorded vote of 138 in favour, to 10 against (Belarus, Burundi, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United States) and 20 abstentions.

Then, the Assembly adopted draft resolution I as a whole, “Rights of the Child” (document A/C.3/74/L.21/Rev.1), urging States to consider becoming parties to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Optional Protocols.  It urged them to improve the situation of children living in poverty, take measures to secure the prohibition of the worst forms of child labour and to end child labour by 2025.  It also urged States to ensure the enjoyment of human rights for all children without parental care and to cooperate with the Special Representative on violence against children in promoting implementation of the recommendations of the related United Nations study.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution II, titled “The girl child” (document A/C.3/74/L.23), thereby urging States to ratify or accede to the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Minimum Age Convention, 1973 (No. 138), and the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182).  It called on States to recognize the right to education on the basis of equal opportunity and non-discrimination by making primary education compulsory and available free to all children and to foster a culture in which menstruation is recognized as healthy and natural, and girls are not stigmatized on this basis.  It also called on them to strengthen national health systems and enforce legislative or other measures to prevent Internet distribution of child pornography and other child sexual abuse material.

The representative of the Russian Federation said his delegation cannot support the wording in operative paragraph 20 of draft resolution I, and thus, dissociates from that paragraph.

Next, the Assembly took up the report titled, “Rights of indigenous peoples” (document A/74/396), adopting the eponymous draft resolution (document A/C.3/74/L.19/Rev.1) contained therein and thereby expanding the mandate of the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Peoples to support the participation of these peoples in United Nations business and human‑rights and climate‑change processes.  It also decided to continue to observe the International Day of Indigenous Peoples on 9 August and requested the Secretary‑General to support its observance from within existing resources.  It also proclaimed 2022‑2032 as the International Decade of Indigenous Languages to draw attention to the loss of indigenous languages and the urgent need to preserve and promote them.

The representative of Chile said his delegation did not participate in the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, and thus, dissociates itself from all references to that Compact in the text adopted.

Turning to the report titled, “Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance” (document A/74/397), containing two draft resolutions, the Assembly first adopted draft resolution I, “Combating glorification of Nazism, neo‑Nazism and other practices that contribute to fuelling contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance” (document A/C.3/74/L.62) by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 2 against (Ukraine, United States), with 52 abstentions.

By its terms, the Assembly expressed deep concern about the glorification of the Nazi movement, neo-Nazism and former members of the Waffen SS organization — including by erecting monuments and memorials; holding public demonstrations glorifying the Nazi past, the Nazi movement and neo‑Nazism; declaring or attempting to declare such members and those who fought against the anti‑Hitler coalition, collaborated with the Nazi movement and committed war crimes and crimes against humanity participants in national liberation movements; and by the renaming of streets glorifying them.

By other terms, the Assembly called for the universal ratification and implementation of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.  It urged those States parties that have not done so to consider making the declaration under its article 14, thus providing the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination with the competence to receive communications from individuals or groups within their jurisdiction claiming to be victims of a violation by a State party of any of the rights set forth in the Convention.  It further urged States to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination by all appropriate means.

By a recorded vote of 135 in favour to 9 against (Czech Republic, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, United Kingdom, United States), with 43 abstentions, the Assembly then adopted draft resolution II, “A global call for concrete action for the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action” (document A/C.3/74/L.60/Rev.1). 

By its terms, the Assembly called on States to accede to and/or ratify the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, and on States parties to consider making the declaration under its article 14 and withdrawing reservations to article 4, along with any reservations that are incompatible with the Convention.  It expressed concern at the lack of progress in elaborating complementary standards to the Convention.  It also welcomed the decision to establish the Permanent Forum on People of African Descent.

It next turned to the report titled “Right of peoples to self-determination” (document A/74/398), which contained three draft resolutions.

Turning to draft resolution I, “Use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self‑determination” (document A/C.3/74/L.36), the Assembly adopted that text by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to 52 against, with 7 abstentions (Brazil, Colombia, Fiji, Mexico, Palau, Switzerland, Tonga).  By its terms, the Assembly urged all States to exercise the utmost vigilance against mercenary activities and take legislative measures to ensure that their territories are not used for the recruitment, assembly, financing, training, protection or transit of mercenaries for the planning of activities designed to impede the right to self‑determination, to destabilize or overthrow any Government or to dismember or impair the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States.  It also called on States to investigate the possibility of mercenary involvement and to bring to trial those found responsible, or to consider their extradition in accordance with national law and applicable bilateral or international treaties.

The Assembly also adopted draft resolution II titled, “The right of the Palestinian people to self‑determination” (document A/C.3/74/L.58), by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 5 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, United States), with 11 abstentions, reaffirming the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, including to their independent State of Palestine.  It also urged all States and United Nations specialized agencies to continue to support and assist Palestinians in the early realization of their right to self-determination.

Next, the Assembly adopted draft resolution III, “Universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination” (document A/C.3/74/L.61) without a vote, reaffirming that right as a fundamental condition for the guarantee, preservation and promotion of human rights, and declaring its firm opposition to acts of foreign military intervention, aggression and occupation, which have suppressed that right.  It called on those States responsible to cease immediately their military intervention in and occupation of foreign countries and territories, deploring the plight of refugees and displaced persons who have been uprooted, and reaffirming their right to return to their homes voluntarily in safety and with honour.

The representative of Canada said his country is a close friend of Israel and is strongly committed to the goal of peace in the Middle East, including the creation of a Palestinian State.  Thus, Canada supported the resolution, and strongly supports international consensus on a two‑State solution.  This is particularly important when the prospect of two States for two peoples is increasingly under threat.  However, he expressed concern that resolutions on the topic unfairly single out Israel for criticism, and do not indicate the destructive role played by terrorist organizations.  The international community should channel its efforts towards a lasting peace instead. 

Next, the Assembly turned to the report titled, “Promotion and protection of human rights” (document A/74/399) containing two draft resolutions.

The representative of Hungary said migration is not a fundamental human right, while a safe and secure life at home does constitute such a right.  Migration policy is a national competence, and all countries have the right to decide whom they should allow to enter their territory.  The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration does not show respect to such competencies, and considers all countries as a source, transit or destination of migration.  Countries have the right to identify with none of these three categories, he emphasized.  Hungary’s experience proves that migratory flows can provide terrorist organizations the opportunity to send their ideologies around the world and parallel societies can be created.  The protection of a border is a national obligation and the violation of a border is a crime, he said, noting that it cannot be considered a human rights issue.  The best way to protect migrants is to create circumstances under which they do not become migrants.  As such, Hungary dissociates from any reference to the Global Compact or the International Migration Review Forum.

The representative of the United States said General Assembly resolutions do not change the state of conventional or customary international law.  This applies to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and others to which his delegation is not party.  The Universal Declaration of Human Rights does not create binding obligations on States, he said, noting that each country should develop its own approach to the provision of health care and that patient control and access to high quality care are critical.  He also recalled objections expressed by certain States to the conclusions of the sixty‑third Commission on Status of Women, which includes language that undermines the role of the family.  The outcome documents of that meeting are not the product of consensus, he clarified.  On the International Criminal Court, he said any references to war crimes or crimes against humanity under the Rome Statute should be understood in the context of how those terms are defined in the Statute.

On sexual and reproductive health, he said the United States does not accept any language that suggests access to abortion must be included in health care programmes, stressing that there is no international right to abortion.  On migration, he said the United States did not participate in the negotiation of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, and as such, is not bound by its commitments or outcomes.  On the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, he said it is not binding, does not create rights or obligations or financial commitments, and does not interpret or alter any World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements.  Moreover, the United States will act in its sovereign interest on trade matters and the United Nations is not the appropriate venue for such discussions.  Much of the trade language contained in the Addis Ababa outcome document has been overtaken by events since 2015, and as such, the document has no bearing on subsequent work.

Next, by consensus, the Assembly adopted draft resolution I, The human rights to safe drinking water and sanitation (document A/C.3/74/L.33/Rev.1), calling on States to ensure the realization of the human rights to safe drinking water and sanitation for all in a non‑discriminatory manner; take into consideration the New Urban Agenda, which envisages cities and human settlements that fulfil their social function; ensure access to equitable sanitation and hygiene for all women and girls, as well as for menstrual hygiene management, including for hygiene facilities and services in public and private spaces; and address the widespread stigma and shame surrounding menstruation and menstrual hygiene by promoting educational and health practices.

The Assembly then adopted without a vote draft resolution II, “International Equal Pay Day” (document A/C.3/74/L.49), deciding to proclaim 18 September as International Equal Pay Day, to be observed each year beginning in 2020.

The Assembly next took up the report titled, “Promotion and protection of human rights: implementation of human rights instruments” (document A/74/399/Add.1), adopting draft resolution I, “Torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment” (document A/C.3/74/L.24) without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly called on all States, as well as the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and other United Nations bodies and agencies, to commemorate, on 26 June, the United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture.  It also called on States Parties to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment to submit for prosecution or extradite those alleged to have committed acts of torture, regardless of where such acts were committed.

It then adopted draft resolution II, “Implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Optional Protocol thereto:  accessibility” (document A/C.3/74/L.32/Rev.1), calling on States to develop national accessibility standards that promote the principle of universal design, in close consultation with persons with disabilities.  It also called on States to improve the access of persons with disabilities to information by providing accessible forms of assistance and support, as well as promote access to assistive technologies.  It called on the United Nations to implement the Disability Inclusion Strategy across its programmes and operations.

The representative of the Russian Federation said he cannot support the wording in preambular paragraph 7 and operative paragraph 4 in resolution I, and thus, dissociates from consensus on those paragraphs.

Next, the Assembly took up the report titled “Human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms” (document A/74/399/Add.2), containing 21 draft resolutions.

The Assembly first turned to draft resolution I, “Freedom of religion or belief” (document A/C.3/74/L.25), adopting it without a vote.  By its terms, the General Assembly stressed that everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion or belief — which includes the freedom to have or not to have, or to adopt, a religion or belief of one’s own choice.  It would also strongly condemn any advocacy of hatred based on religion that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence, whether involving the use of print, audiovisual or electronic media or any other means.

Also without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution II, “Implementing the Declaration on Human Rights Defenders through providing a safe and enabling environment for human rights defenders and ensuring their protection” (document A/C.3/74/L.31/Rev.1), strongly condemning the killing of and all other human rights violations against human rights defenders, including women, environmental and indigenous rights defenders, by State and non‑State actors.  It condemned all acts of intimidation and reprisal, both online and offline, by State and non‑State actors against individuals, groups and organs of society — including against defenders and their legal representatives, associates and family members — who seek to cooperate, are cooperating or have cooperated with subregional, regional and international bodies, including the United Nations.

By other terms, the Assembly urged States to investigate — in a prompt, effective, independent and accountable manner — complaints and allegations regarding threats or violations and abuses perpetrated by State and non‑State actors against human rights defenders, and to initiate, when appropriate, proceedings against the perpetrators.  It urged States to develop and implement protection initiatives for those at risk or in vulnerable situations.

The Assembly then adopted without a vote draft resolution III, “Terrorism and Human Rights” (document A/C.3/74/34), urging States to ensure that measures taken to counter terrorism — and violent extremism conducive to terrorism — do not profile based on ethnic, racial or religious stereotypes or any other ground of discrimination prohibited by international law.  It also urged States to do all they can to prevent political, material or financial support from reaching terrorist groups, to deny terrorists safe haven and to criminalize the wilful provision or collection of funds to be used by terrorist groups.  States must remain alert to the use of ICT for terrorist purposes and prevent and counter violent extremist propaganda and incitement to violence on the Internet and social media, including by developing effective counter‑narratives.

The Assembly adopted draft resolution IV, “Protection of migrants” (document A/C.3/74/L.35/Rev.1), calling on States to promote and protect the human rights of all migrants, regardless of their migration status, and to address international migration through international, regional or bilateral cooperation and a comprehensive and balanced approach.  It recognized the responsibilities of countries of origin, transit and destination in promoting and protecting their rights and avoiding approaches that might aggravate their vulnerability.  It called on States to protect the rights of migrant children — particularly unaccompanied migrant children — ensuring that their best interests are a primary consideration in legislation, policies and practices, including on integration, return and family reunification.

By a recorded vote of 188 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with no abstentions, the Assembly then adopted draft resolution V, “The right to food” (document A/C.3/74/L.37/Rev.1), reaffirming that hunger constitutes an outrage and a violation of human dignity, and thus requires urgent measures at the national, regional and international levels for its elimination.  It expressed deep concern that the number of hungry people is growing, that 2 billion people experience moderate or severe food insecurity, and that while women contribute more than 50 per cent of the food produced worldwide, they also account for 70 per cent of the hungry.

By a recorded vote of 128 in favour, to 53 against, with 8 abstentions (Armenia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Liberia, Mexico, Peru), the Assembly then adopted draft resolution VI, “Promotion of a democratic and equitable international order” (document A/C.3/74/L.38), by which it called on Member States to maximize the benefits of globalization by strengthening cooperation to increase equal opportunities for trade, economic growth and sustainable development, global communications and intercultural exchange.  It urged all actors to build an international order based on inclusion, social justice, equality, human dignity, mutual understanding and the promotion of and respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights.

The Assembly then turned to draft resolution VII, “Strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non‑selectivity, impartiality and objectivity” (document A/C.3/74/L.39/Rev.1).  It adopted the text without a vote, calling on all Member States to base their activities for the promotion and protection of human rights on the Charter of the United Nations; the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; and other relevant global instruments.

By a recorded vote of 138 in favour, to 23 against, with 26 abstentions, the Assembly then adopted draft resolution VIII, “The right to development” (document A/C.3/74/L.40/Rev.1), expressing support for realizing the mandate of the Working Group on the Right to Development and calling on Member States to contribute to its efforts, including on the elaboration of a draft legally binding instrument on the right to development on the basis of the draft prepared by the Chair‑Rapporteur, as decided by the Human Rights Council in its resolution 42/23 of 27 September 2019.  By other terms, the Assembly called on all States to spare no effort in promoting the right to development, notably while implementing the 2030 Agenda, and on specialized United Nations agencies to mainstream that right into their operational programmes and objectives.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution IX, “Enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights” (document A/C.3/74/L.41*), urging States to take measures to enhance bilateral, regional and international cooperation to address the adverse impact of consecutive and compounded global crises — such as financial and economic crises, food crises, climate change and natural disasters — on the full enjoyment of human rights.

By a recorded vote of 135 in favour to 55 against, with no abstentions, the Assembly then adopted draft resolution X, “Human rights and unilateral coercive measures” (document A/C.3/74/L.42*), urging all States to cease adopting or implementing any unilateral measures not in accordance with international law, in particular those of a coercive nature, which create obstacles to trade relations.  The Assembly also strongly urged States to refrain from promulgating and applying any unilateral economic, financial or trade measures not in accordance with international law and the Charter of the United Nations that would impede the full achievement of sustainable economic and social development.

By a recorded vote of 134 in favour, to 52 against with 1 abstention (Brazil), the Assembly adopted draft resolution XI, “Promotion of equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies” (document A/C.3/74/L.43*), encouraging States parties to United Nations human rights instruments to consider the possible establishment of quotas by geographical region for membership of the treaty bodies.  It recommended, when considering the possible allocation of seats on each treaty body on a regional basis, the introduction of flexible procedures that encompass the following criteria:  each of the five regional groups is allocated seats on each treaty body in equivalent proportion to the number of States parties to the instrument in that group; there must be provision for periodic revisions of the seat allocation in order to reflect relative changes in the level of treaty ratification in each regional group; and automatic periodic revisions should be envisaged in order to avoid amending the text of the instrument when quotas are revised. 

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution XII, “National human rights institutions” (document A/C.3/74/L.44/Rev.1), stressing the importance of the financial and administrative independence and stability of such institutions, noting with satisfaction efforts by those States that have provided their national institutions with more autonomy and independence and encouraging other Governments to take similar steps.  By other terms, the Assembly requested the Secretary‑General to continue to provide assistance for holding international and regional meetings of national institutions, including those of the Global Alliance of National Human Rights Institutions.  It also underlined the value of these institutions — operating in accordance with the United Nations Paris Principles — in the monitoring of existing legislation and in consistently informing the State about the impact of such legislation on the activities of human rights defenders.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution XIII, “The safety of journalists and the issue of impunity” (document A/C.3/74/L.45/Rev.1), condemning unequivocally all attacks and violence against journalists and media workers, such as torture, extrajudicial killings, enforced disappearances, arbitrary arrest and arbitrary detention, expulsion, intimidation, threats and online and offline harassment.  It urged the immediate and unconditional release of journalists and media workers who have been arbitrarily arrested, detained or taken hostage or who have become victims of enforced disappearances.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution XIV, “Strengthening the role of the United Nations in enhancing periodic and genuine elections and the promotion of democratization” (document A/C.3/74/L.46/Rev.1), reaffirming States’ obligation to take all measures to ensure that every citizen has the effective right and opportunity to equally participate in elections.  It strongly condemned any manipulation of election processes, coercion and tampering with vote counts, particularly when done by States, and called on all States to respect the rule of law and the human rights of all persons — including the right to vote and to be elected at genuine periodic elections — which shall be by universal and equal suffrage, and held by secret ballot, guaranteeing free expression of will.

By other terms, the Assembly called on all Member States to ensure that persons with disabilities can fully participate in political and public life on an equal basis with others, as well as enhance the political participation of women.

By a recorded vote of 136 in favour, to 55 against, with no abstentions, the Assembly then adopted draft resolution XV “Human rights and cultural diversity” (document A/C.3/74/L.47/Rev.1), urging relevant international organizations to conduct studies on how respect for cultural diversity fosters international solidarity and cooperation.  The Assembly also stressed the necessity of freely using the media and new ICT to create the conditions for a renewed dialogue among cultures and civilizations.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution XVI, “Protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons” (document A/C.3/74/L.48/Rev.1), recognizing that Member States have the primary responsibility to promote durable solutions for their internally displaced persons, as well as to respect, protect and fulfil their human rights.  As such, it requested them to strengthen efforts to ensure better assistance to internally displaced persons by adopting and implementing gender‑sensitive policies and strategies.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution XVII, “International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance” (document A/C.3/74/L.51), requesting the Secretary‑General and the High Commissioner for Human Rights to increase efforts to assist States in becoming parties to the Convention.  It also requested United Nations bodies to continue their dissemination of information on the Convention, promote understanding of the instrument and assist States parties in implementing their obligations.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution XVIII, “Subregional Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Central Africa” (document A/C.3/74/L.52/Rev.1), requesting the Secretary‑General and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to continue to provide additional funds and human resources — including human resources from within the subregion, and within existing resources — to enable the Centre to respond to growing needs in the subregion.  It encouraged the Centre to consider the requested activities, needs and demands of countries in the subregion in the implementation of the Office’s strategic thematic priorities.

By a recorded vote of 187 in favour, to 1 against (Syria), with 2 abstentions (Iran, Palau), the Assembly adopted draft resolution XIX, “United Nations Human Rights Training and Documentation Centre for South‑West Asia and the Arab Region” (document A/C.3/74/L.53/Rev.1), recognizing that the Centre has made progress in the promotion of human rights and advocacy in the region and will continue to strengthen its effectiveness.  It encouraged the Centre’s engagement with other United Nations regional offices to strengthen its work and avoid duplication.

The Assembly adopted the remainder of its draft resolutions without a vote, namely:

Draft resolution XX, “Combating intolerance, negative stereotyping, stigmatization, discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against persons, based on religion or belief” (document A/C.3/74/L.54), calling on States to foster a domestic environment of religious tolerance, peace and respect by promoting dialogue and inspiring constructive action, as well as encouraging the training of Government officials in outreach strategies.  It also called on them to adopt policies promoting full respect for and the protection of places of worship and religious sites; and

Draft resolution XXI, “Effective promotion of the Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities” (document A/C.3/74/L.55/Rev.1), requesting the Special Rapporteur on minority issues to report annually with recommendations for strategies to better implement the rights of persons belonging to national or ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities. 

Further by that text, the Assembly urged States to promote and protect the rights of persons belonging to these minorities, including by encouraging conditions for the promotion of their identity, the provision of education and the facilitation of their participation in all aspects of political, economic, social, religious and cultural life — without discrimination — and to apply a gender perspective while doing so.  It also called on States to ensure the protection of children who belong to national or ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities and who are at risk of becoming or have become stateless.

Several delegates explained their positions on those texts.  On the resolution titled “Protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons”, the representative of the Russian Federation said he does not support wording therein related to the Rome Statute, and disassociated himself from those paragraphs.  He also disassociated from operative paragraph 14 of the text titled “Strengthening the role of the United Nations in enhancing periodic and genuine elections and the promotion of democratization” and from any references to migrants in the context of disaster displacement, pointing out that there is no internationally recognized or scientifically established direct link between such events and climate change.

The representative of Chile recalled that her delegation did not participate in the negotiation of the 2018 Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration and disassociated from any such references in the resolutions.

Moving on, the Assembly then turned to the report titled, “Human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives” (document A/74/399/Add.3), containing five draft resolutions.

The representative of the Russian Federation said the sponsors of these resolutions are trying to jeopardize cooperation on a host of human rights issues.  As such, the Russian Federation will vote against the draft resolutions focused on Iran, Myanmar and Syria and dissociate from consensus on text related to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.  On the draft resolution about Crimea, he noted that its population enjoyed the right to self‑determination in 2014.  Today, Crimea is part of the Russian Federation and is fully integrated.  Residential areas are not being shot at, people are not being burned alive, there are no Nazi marches, and no one is forbidden from speaking their mother tongue, he said.  Moreover, in addition to existing air, sea and road connections to the peninsula, a railway passenger connection will soon be opened as well.  “A vote for this resolution is a vote against Russia,” he stressed, expressing thanks to the States that did not support this odious draft.

The representative of Democratic People’s Republic of Korea rejected the draft resolution focused on his country sponsored by the European Union, as it has nothing to do with the genuine promotion of human rights and seeks only to tarnish his country’s image.  All material contained in this draft is fabricated, he emphasized, noting that dignity and human rights are valued in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.  The United Nations should not allow infringements upon his country’s sovereignty.  The European Union should correct its own human rights situation, including issues such as Islamophobia, racial discrimination and the refugee crisis, he said, condemning the adoption of this draft resolution in the strongest possible terms.

The representative of Venezuela rejected selectivity for politically motivated ends on this issue.  Cooperation and dialogue are the correct ways to promote human rights, he noted, expressing support for calls by the Non‑Aligned Movement on this issue.  As such, Venezuela will dissociate from any consensus reached on the resolution concerning the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. 

The representative of Iran welcomed Canada’s decision to revisit its position on the inhumane policies practiced by Israel in the State of Palestine, expressing hope that it will also abandon the futile resolution on Iran.  He asked why the resolution on Iran should be taken seriously when Israel is among its main advocates.  “Why should anyone take human rights advice from the main sponsors of this resolution?” he asked, noting that they have promoted racism, colonialism and the uprooting of indigenous peoples.  Iran’s people are struggling to protect themselves against a genocidal economic war waged by the United States, he stressed, noting that its acts of economic terrorism violate his people’s rights to food, education and life.  In the United States, “a white man’s gun is more protected than a black child’s life,” he said.  The resolution on Iran is harmful and is in keeping with the political agenda of only a few actors.

The representative of Ukraine expressed gratitude to all those States that stood firmly against the aggression of one Member State against his country, namely, the Russian Federation’s illegal occupation of Crimea and other areas.  The Assembly’s text on that matter, now in its fourth year, highlights the negative impact of the occupation on the human rights of Ukrainians.  By supporting the text, the international community will strengthen its stance against attempts to redraw national borders in contravention of international law.  He rejected all the mantras of the Russian Federation related to Ukraine, which were unfortunately echoed again today by that country’s delegate.

The representative of China reiterated his country’s longstanding position against attempts to politicize human rights, which is perpetuated in the Assembly’s country‑specific resolutions.  He announced his intention to disassociate China from consensus on the resolution on the human rights situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and to vote against all the other country‑specific resolutions.

By consensus, the Assembly then adopted draft resolution I, “Situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea” (document A/C.3/74/L.26), condemning ongoing violations in and by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, including those that may amount to crimes against humanity.  It also condemned the systematic abduction, denial of repatriation and subsequent enforced disappearance of persons, on a large scale and as a matter of State policy.  It expressed concern at the humanitarian situation, which could deteriorate due to limited resilience to natural disasters and to Government policies causing limits on the availability of and access to adequate food.

By a recorded vote of 81 in favour, to 30 against, with 70 abstentions, the Assembly adopted draft resolution II, “Situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran” (document A/C.3/74/L.27), calling on that country to ensure that no one is subjected to torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, either in law or in practice.  It urged Iran to cease the widespread use of arbitrary arrests and detention, release persons detained for the exercise of their human rights and fundamental freedoms, and to end serious restrictions on the right to free expression and opinion.

Next, by a recorded vote of 65 in favour, to 23 against, with 83 abstentions, the Assembly adopted draft resolution III, “Situation of human rights in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol, Ukraine” (document A/C.3/74/L.28), deploring the failure of the Russian Federation to comply with its repeated requests and demands, as well as with the International Court of Justice order of 19 April 2017.  It strongly condemned the total disregard by the Russian Federation of its obligations under the Charter of the United Nations and international law regarding its legal responsibility for the occupied territory, including to respect Ukrainian law and the rights of all civilians.

By a recorded vote of 106 in favour, to 15 against, with 57 abstentions, the Assembly adopted draft resolution V, “Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic” (document A/C.3/74/L.30/Rev.1), urgently requesting a high‑level panel discussion — led by the OHCHR, the Independent International Commission of Inquiry and Syrian civil society — to brief its seventy‑fifth session.  It called for significant enhancement of the verification measures of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) and welcomed the establishment and operationalization of that body’s Investigation and Identification Team, which is authorized to identify the perpetrators of chemical weapons use.

The representative of Turkey expressed regret that this year’s drafting exercise was handled inadequately by the penholder and in a manner far from impartial, casting doubts on the competence of this delegation to hold the pen on this issue.  This is particularly true for the paragraph on developments in northeast Syria, which deliberately distorts facts on the ground.  Therefore, Turkey is regrettably forced to vote against this resolution for the first time in nine years, she said.  Except for one specific paragraph, Turkey subscribes to the resolution’s core message.  She went on to note that the violence in northeast Syria has been inflicted by YPG [People’s Protection Units], the Syrian offshoot of the terrorist organization PKK [Kurdish Workers Party/Democratic Union Party], which has attempted to establish its own totalitarian state in northeast Syria.  It also released Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh) terrorists to conduct terror acts in Turkey or northwest Syria, but there has been no mention of this action in the resolution.  Turkey is the only country engaged in “chest‑to‑chest” combat against ISIL/Da’esh, and thus, it is disingenuous to claim that Turkey’s operation eroded the fight against that group, she said.  The text is also misleading on the humanitarian situation, she said, adding that Turkey provides protection to around 9 million Syrians in both Turkey and Syria.

The representative of Cuba disassociated from consensus on the resolution concerning the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, in accordance with Cuba’s position against selective and politically‑oriented mandates.  Underlining the need for respectful cooperation with the countries concerned, he said the resolution furthers the unwanted intervention of the Security Council in situations beyond its remit — namely, those that do not threaten international peace and security.  United Nations resolutions should not be based on some countries’ value judgements about others, he stressed.

The representative of Iran disassociated from the text on the human rights situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, whose approach Iran considers counterproductive.

The representative of Burundi, explaining her delegation’s position on several of the resolutions just adopted, underlined Burundi’s objection to country‑specific texts and rejected the selectivity and double standards which have regrettably led the Human Rights Council to lose focus on its original mandate.

Right of Reply

The representative of Syria, exercising the right of reply, responded to Turkey’s delegate, saying that Turkey carried out aggression against the Syrian people.  That country does not wish to protect human rights and despite international condemnation, persists in aggression inside Syria.  As such, Syria has rejected Turkey’s aggression, struck terrorists sent by Turkey and prevailed.  Counter‑terrorism efforts in Syria will not be hindered by Turkey’s words, he emphasized, noting that the protection of its people is the main task of the Syrian army and State.  Turkey sent passage points to thousands of terrorists and has been doing so for eight years, he added. 

The representative of Turkey, exercising the right of reply, said Syria’s representative is not her legitimate counterpart, because this regime has the blood of innocent Syrians on its hands.  As such, she will not honour him with a response, she said.

The representative of Syria requested a point of order, calling on the representative of Turkey to respect protocol and call his country the Syrian Arab Republic and not the Syrian regime.

Action on Third Committee Draft Resolutions

The Assembly’s report titled, “Promotion and protection of human rights: comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action” (document A/74/399/Add.4) contained no draft resolutions.

The Assembly next took up the report titled “Crime prevention and criminal justice” (document A/74/400) containing eight draft resolutions, adopting all of them without a vote, namely:

Draft resolution I, “Integrating sport into youth crime prevention and criminal justice strategies” (document A/C.3/74/L.2), requesting the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to continue to identify and disseminate information and good practices on the use of sport in connection with crime and violence prevention;

Draft resolution II, “Follow‑up to the Thirteenth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and preparations for the Fourteenth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice” (document A/C.3/74/L.3), requesting the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice to prepare a draft declaration addressing the main topics to be discussed at the Fourteenth Congress;

Draft resolution III, “Education for Justice and the rule of law in the context of sustainable development” (document A/C.3/74/L.4), urging Member States to provide access to education for all, including technical and professional skills, and  promote lifelong learning skills for all, and calling on them to integrate crime prevention and criminal justice strategies into all relevant social and economic policies and programmes;

Draft resolution IV, “Promoting technical assistance and capacity‑building to strengthen national measures and international cooperation to combat cybercrime, including information‑sharing” (document A/C.3/74/L.5), urging Member States to encourage the training of law enforcement officers, investigative authorities, prosecutors and judges in the field of cybercrime, and to equip them to carry out their roles in investigating, prosecuting and adjudicating cybercrime offences;

Draft resolution V, “Countering child sexual exploitation and sexual abuse online” (document A/C.3/74/L.6), urging Member States to criminalize child sexual exploitation and sexual abuse, including online, allowing for the prosecution of perpetrators, to grant law enforcement agencies appropriate powers and to provide tools to identify perpetrators and victims and effectively combat child sexual exploitation and sexual abuse.  By other terms, it urged States to strengthen efforts to combat cybercrime in relation to child sexual exploitation and sexual abuse and called on States parties to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography to implement their legal obligations;

Draft resolution VI, “Technical assistance provided by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime related to counter‑terrorism” (document A/C.3/74/L.7), calling on States to strengthen international coordination to prevent and counter terrorism, as well as to implement relevant international instruments and United Nations resolutions;

Draft resolution VII, “Improving the coordination of efforts against trafficking in persons” (document A/C.3/74/L.10/Rev.1), as orally revised, deciding to convene a high-level meeting on the progress achieved in implementing the Global Plan of Action to Combat Trafficking in Persons at its seventy-sixth session, no later than December 2021.  It urged Member States that have not done so to consider ratifying or acceding to the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children; and

Draft resolution VIII, “Strengthening the United Nations crime prevention and criminal justice programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity” (document A/C.3/74/L.18/Rev.1), calling on Member States to strengthen international, regional, subregional and bilateral cooperation to counter the threat posed by foreign terrorist fighters — including those who are returning and relocating — notably through enhanced operational and timely information‑sharing, logistical support and capacity‑building activities.  Such cooperation should also cover the sharing of best practices to identify foreign terrorist fighters, to prevent their travel from, into or through Member States, and to prevent their financing, mobilization, recruitment and organization.

Turning next to the report titled, “Countering the use of information and communications technologies for criminal purposes” (document A/74/401), the Assembly postponed its consideration of the eponymous resolution contained therein (document A/C.3/74/L.11/Rev.1), pending review by its budgetary committee. 

The Assembly then took up the report titled, “International drug control” (document A/74/402), containing the draft resolution of the same name (document A/C.3/74/L.15/Rev.1), which it adopted without a vote.

Taking up a report titled, “Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly” (document A/74/404), the Assembly adopted a draft decision contained therein, titled “Draft programme of work of the Third Committee for the seventy-fifth session of the General Assembly”.

It also took note of the report “Programme planning” (document A/74/403), which contained no proposed action.

For information media. Not an official record.