Security Council Unanimously Adopts Resolution Extending Number, Scope of Sanctions against Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

SC/12853
2 June 2017
7958th Meeting (PM)

Security Council Unanimously Adopts Resolution Extending Number, Scope of Sanctions against Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

United States Representative Vows Self-Defence ‘by Other Means if Necessary’

The Security Council decided today to extend the number of individuals and entities targeted by sanctions first imposed under resolution 1718 (2006) — an asset freeze and travel ban for those involved in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s nuclear-weapon programme.

Unanimously adopting resolution 2356 (2017) under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Council condemned, in the strongest terms, Pyongyang’s recent nuclear-weapon and ballistic-missile-development activities, including a series of launches and other related activities conducted since 9 September 2016, in violation and “flagrant disregard” of various relevant Council resolutions.

The Council reaffirmed its decision that the Pyongyang must abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programmes in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner, and immediately cease all related activities.  It further decided to apply measures specified in paragraph 8(d) and 8(e) of resolution 1718 (2006) to individuals and entities listed in Annexes I and II of the text adopted today.

Specifically, those measures mandated all Member States immediately to freeze the funds, other assets and economic resources on their respective territories that were either owned or controlled by the persons and entities listed in Annexes I and II, designated by the Council or its “1718 Committee” as being engaged in or providing support for Pyongyang’s nuclear-related programme — and to prevent the entry into or transit through their territories by individuals listed in Annex I.

Following the adoption, the representative of the United States — the resolution’s sponsor — said the Council’s unity sent a strong message to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea:  “Stop firing ballistic missiles or face the consequences.”  The pressure would not cease until Pyongyang ended its provocative and illegal actions, she emphasized, recalling that the latter had openly stated that it sought the ability to deliver nuclear weapons over long distances in order to reach cities in the United States, the Republic of Korea and Japan.  While the United States supported a diplomatic resolution of the dispute, all options nevertheless remained on the table, she said, adding that her country would defend itself “by other means if necessary”.

Japan’s representative said Pyongyang’s continuing provocations trampled upon international efforts to resolve the nuclear and missile issue peacefully, constituting a direct challenge to his country’s security, as well as that of the region and beyond.  The international community must not allow Pyongyang’s total defiance of the Security Council to go unanswered, he emphasized.

China’s representative expressed support for the “double strengthening” of the non-proliferation regime and for promoting peace through dialogue.  It was incumbent upon all sides to exercise restraint and build mutual trust, he said, calling attention to China’s “suspension-for-suspension” proposal, which called for suspending Pyongyang’s nuclear and missile activities, as well as large-scale military exercises by the United States and the Republic of Korea.

The Republic of Korea’s representative noted that today’s resolution built upon the existing sanctions regime and expanded its scope, thereby further restricting Pyongyang’s ability to finance its illicit activities.  “We sincerely hope that the [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea] heeds the concerted demands of the international community and seizes the opportunity, without further delay, to chart a new beginning in inter-Korean relations, as well as in its relations with the international community.”

Also speaking today were representatives of Italy, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, France, Sweden, Uruguay, Egypt, Senegal, Ethiopia and Bolivia.

The meeting began at 4:46 p.m. and ended at 5:39 p.m.

Statements

NIKKI HALEY (United States) said today’s action sent a strong message to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea:  “Stop firing ballistic missiles or face the consequences.”  Indeed, Council members — including three of the country’s closest allies — agreed that it was time for it “to see the writing on the wall”.  Emphasizing that the pressure would not cease until Pyongyang ended its provocative and illegal actions, she said the latter had openly said it sought the ability to deliver nuclear weapons over long distances in order to reach cities in the United States, the Republic of Korea and Japan.  Recalling that foreign ministers had met in the Council a month ago to demand an end to such activities, she said today’s resolution showed “these were not just words”.  She pledged that the United States would work tirelessly to ensure that the world never grew accustomed to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s dangerous activities.  There was still room to improve implementation of resolution 1718 (2006) and all States must do their part, she emphasized, saying that, for its own part, the United States would continue to seek a negotiated diplomatic resolution of the conflict.  However, Pyongyang must first take concrete steps towards ending its nuclear weapons programme, she said, while stressing:  “Our goal is not regime change.”  Nevertheless, all options remained on the table and the United States would defend itself “by other means if necessary”.

LIU JIEYI (China) recalled that relevant Council resolutions contained explicit statements against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s ballistic missile launches, and expressed his own country’s opposition.  Reiterating the need to maintain peace on the Korean Peninsula, he called for a diplomatic resolution of the situation, and urged all parties to implement relevant Council resolutions fully.  China supported a “double strengthening” of the non-proliferation regime and the promotion of peace and dialogue, he said, emphasizing that it was incumbent upon all sides to exercise restraint and build mutual trust.  As a close neighbour of the Korean Peninsula, China had always supported a negotiated diplomatic solution, and proposed, in that regard, a “suspension-for-suspension” mechanism that was both pragmatic and feasible.  Hopefully, all concerned would consider that proposal in a constructive manner and work for early denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

KORO BESSHO (Japan) recalled that for three consecutive weeks the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea had launched ballistic missiles in blatant violation of relevant Security Council resolutions.  “This is totally unacceptable,” he said, expressing strong condemnation of all such launches, which had ignored the will of the international community.  Those continued provocations had trampled upon international efforts to peacefully resolve the nuclear and missile issue, and constituted a direct challenge to the security of Japan, the region and beyond.  The international community must not allow the total defiance of the Security Council to go unanswered.  Today’s resolution sent a very strong message that those ballistic missile launches would have consequences.  The pattern of frequent and alarmingly provocative launches indicated that Pyongyang was nowhere close to resuming a meaningful dialogue, which left the international community no choice but to increase pressure on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

SEBATIANO CARDI (Italy) said that with today’s resolution, the Council had sent another message of unity and determination against the continued provocations of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, which constituted a flagrant violation of international law, and a serious threat to international and regional peace and security.  Reaffirming his strong condemnation of all missile activities of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, as well as its blatant disregard of its international commitments, he said that as Chair of the 1718 Committee, Italy would work tirelessly to ensure the full implementation of all Council resolutions by the entire United Nations membership.

VLADIMIR SAFRONKOV (Russian Federation) expressed support for the resolution, which demanded the end to inappropriate behaviour by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, calling its missile launches without prior notification unacceptable.  It was clear that Pyongyang was violating its international commitments, but the proactive mention of chemical or biological weapons in the context of Security Council resolutions was counterproductive.  Resolution 1514 (XV) was, first and foremost, a platform for cooperation for States to prevent non-State actors for obtaining weapons of mass destruction.  There was no evidence that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was pursuing chemical or biological military programmes, he said, recalling that the country was a member of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction.  There had been no claims against it under that mechanism.  Tensions on the peninsula were due to the heightened military activity of some regional and non-regional States, as well as the recent deployment in the Republic of Korea of an American anti-missile system.  If the international community continued to speak to each other in the language of ultimatums, it would never move forward, he said.

PETER WILSON (United Kingdom) said “we have sent a clear message” that the Council, faced with the repeated reckless actions of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea regime, “will act”.  Noting that Pyongyang was placing its destructive ambitions above the welfare of its own people — and that its actions and rhetoric demonstrated a clear ambition to pursue a nuclear programme — he said the international community must continue to show unity against those activities.  “We will not tolerate or be distracted” from that goal, he said, noting that the Council’s sanctions “have bite” and would continue to bring pressure to bear on Pyongyang.  The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea faced a clear choice, and the international community must remain steadfast in implementing those sanctions.  All Member States bore a collective responsibility to bring an end to Pyongyang’s destabilization and illegal actions.

VOLODYMYR YELCHENKO (Ukraine), pointing out that the world had witnessed almost weekly missile launches from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, said Pyongyang continued to evade existing prohibitions and restrictions.  “We must admit that the current sanctions regime needs to be strengthened,” he said, adding that each test or missile launch made it more difficult for the Council and the wider international community to bring an end to Pyongyang’s “sinister” activities.  Cautioning against allowing such activities to destabilize the region and discredit the Council, he called on members to remain united as “only a consolidated and firm stance will bear fruit”.

KAIRAT UMAROV (Kazakhstan), condemning in the strongest terms the launch of any ballistic missiles, said such actions undermined common global efforts to strengthen international peace and security.  Noting that Pyongyang’s possession of nuclear arms would likely lead to further nuclearization on the Korean Peninsula, he urged Pyongyang to refrain from any actions that threatened regional and international peace and security.  Stressing that there was no option but a collective commitment taken through Council resolutions, he expressed strong support for the resolution of the conflict through dialogue, and called on all parties to refrain from actions that could further escalate tensions.  The Council must maintain its unity on the issue, he stressed.

FRANÇOIS DELATTRE (France), stressing that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was methodically pursuing an operational nuclear arsenal at the sacrifice of its own people, said each launch brought the regime closer to a precise, diversified, operational nuclear capacity, all of which was happening at an alarming pace.  Furthermore, the country possessed chemical and biological weapons, the danger of which must not be underestimated, as the security of every nation was under threat.  The entire non-proliferation regime was in danger.  Despite repeated warnings, Pyongyang had flouted every Council resolution and defied the international community.  It was imperative for the Council to demonstrate its concern and reaffirm its authority.  If the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea insisted on pursuing the choice of escalation and provocation, the international community would have no other choice but to increase pressure, he warned.

OLOF SKOOG (Sweden) condemned in the strongest terms the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s persistence in accelerating its nuclear weapons programme, including by repeatedly launching ballistic missiles.  Such actions were in blatant violation of relevant Security Council resolutions, he pointed out.  Pyongyang continued to demonstrate blatant disregard for its international obligations.  Sanctions alone would not resolve the situation on the Korean Peninsula, he said, adding that intensified and creative diplomatic efforts would be needed to avoid future escalation and to prepare for a peaceful, diplomatic and comprehensive solution to the situation.

LUIS BERMÚDEZ (Uruguay) condemned the repeated ballistic missile launches by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, which had increased tensions on the Korean Peninsula.  While sanctions were a tool the Council could use to perform its functions, they were not an end unto themselves.  Rather, they could help achieve a political goal.  He called on Member States to demonstrate commitment and firm will to comply with their obligations and ensure the corrective application of sanctions, which would help avoid adverse humanitarian impacts on populations.

AMR ABDELLATIF ABOULATTA (Egypt), agreeing that the Council had today demonstrated its clear unity, called on all parties to pursue a diplomatic path towards denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.  Reaffirming the importance of avoiding deterioration of the humanitarian situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, he underscored the need to “speak with one voice” on the issue and urged the 1718 Committee to continue its work.

GORGUI CISS (Senegal) said Pyongyang’s repeated ballistic missile launches had demonstrated its will to pursue its missile programme.  It was clear that previous sanctions had not prevented the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from developing that programme.  Its actions were not just a threat to the Korean Peninsula and the region, but also undermined the non-proliferation regime.  He reaffirmed the importance of rigorous compliance with Council resolutions and of resumed dialogue that sought a comprehensive diplomatic solution to the issue.

TEKEDA ALEMU (Ethiopia) said that the situation on the Korean Peninsula was a source of continued concern, as the activities of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea had seriously endangered regional and international peace and security.  Today’s resolution reaffirmed the Council’s unequivocal position, calling on Pyongyang to abandon its ballistic programme in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner, and to immediately cease all related activities.  There was a window of opportunity that could lead to peaceful resolution of the problem, he stressed.

SACHA SERGIO LLORENTTY SOLÍZ (Bolivia), Council President for June, spoke in his national capacity, calling on Pyongyang to abandon its nuclear programme in a verifiable and irreversible manner.  Emphasizing that sanctions were a “means, not an end”, he called on all the parties to prevent an escalation of any rhetoric or actions that would put international peace and security at risk.  Any military solution to the conflict must be discarded in favour of diplomatic negotiations, he stressed.

CHO TAE-YUL (Republic of Korea) said that, in adopting resolution 2356 (2017), the Council had demonstrated the united resolve to respond squarely to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s ballistic missile provocations.  By building upon the existing sanctions regime and expanding its scope, the resolution would further restrict Pyongyang’s ability to finance its illicit activities.  Strongly urging Member States to implement all relevant sanctions resolutions fully, he said the ultimate goal was to bring the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea back to the negotiating table for talks on denuclearization.  “We sincerely hope that the [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea] heeds the concerted demands of the international community and seizes the opportunity, without further delay, to chart a new beginning in inter-Korean relations, as well as in its relations with the international community,” he said, while emphasizing that any further provocations should be addressed in a more proactive manner.  He urged the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to cease all forms of provocation, take immediate steps towards dialogue and undertake actions towards denuclearization.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 2356 (2017) reads as follows:

The Security Council,

Recalling its previous relevant resolutions, including resolution 825 (1993), resolution 1540 (2004), resolution 1695 (2006), resolution 1718 (2006), resolution 1874 (2009), resolution 1887 (2009), resolution 2087 (2013), resolution 2094 (2013), resolution 2270 (2016) and resolution 2321 (2016), as well as the statements of its President of 6 October 2006 (S/PRST/2006/41), 13 April 2009 (S/PRST/2009/7) and 16 April 2012 (S/PRST/2012/13),

Reaffirming that proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, as well as their means of delivery, constitutes a threat to international peace and security,

Expressing serious concern that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea has continued to violate relevant Security Council resolutions through repeated launches and attempted launches of ballistic missiles, and noting that all such ballistic missile activities contribute to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s development of nuclear weapons delivery systems and increase tension in the region and beyond,

Expressing great concern that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s prohibited arms sales have generated revenues that are diverted to the pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles while the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea citizens have unmet needs,

Expressing its gravest concern that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s ongoing nuclear- and ballistic missile-related activities have further generated increased tension in the region and beyond, and determining that there continues to exist a clear threat to international peace and security,

Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, and taking measures under its Article 41,

“1.   Condemns in the strongest terms the nuclear weapons and ballistic missile development activities including a series of ballistic missile launches and other activities conducted by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea since 9 September 2016 in violation and flagrant disregard of the Security Council’s resolutions;

“2.   Reaffirms its decisions that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea shall abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programmes in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner, and immediately cease all related activities; shall not conduct any further launches that use ballistic missile technology, nuclear tests, or any other provocation; shall suspend all activities related to its ballistic missile programme and in this context re-establish its pre-existing commitments to a moratorium on missile launches; and shall abandon any other existing weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missile programmes in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner;

“3.   Recalls the measures imposed by paragraph 8 of resolution 1718 (2006), as modified by subsequent resolutions, and decides that the measures specified in paragraph 8(d) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall apply to the individuals and entities listed in Annex I and II of this resolution and to any individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, and to entities owned or controlled by them, including through illicit means, and that the measures specified in paragraph 8(e) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall apply to the individuals listed in Annex I of this resolution and to individuals acting on their behalf or at their direction;

“4.   Reiterates the importance of maintaining peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and in North-East Asia at large, expresses its commitment to a peaceful, diplomatic, and political solution to the situation, and welcomes efforts by Council members, as well as other States to facilitate a peaceful and comprehensive solution through dialogue and stresses the importance of working to reduce tensions in the Korean Peninsula and beyond;

“5.   Decides to remain seized of the matter.”

Annex I

Travel Ban/Asset Freeze (Individuals)

1.  CHO IL U
a.  Description: Director of the Fifth Bureau of the Reconnaissance General Bureau. Cho is believed to be in charge of overseas espionage operations and foreign intelligence collection for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.
b.  AKA: Cho Il Woo
c.  Identifiers: DOB: May 10, 1945; POB: Musan, North Hamgyo’ng Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Passport Number 736410010

2.  CHO YON CHUN
a.  Description: Vice Director of the Organization and Guidance Department, which directs key personnel appointments for the Workers’ Party of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s military.
b.  AKA: Jo Yon Jun
c.  Identifiers: DOB: September 28, 1937; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

3.  CHOE HWI
a.  Description: First Vice Director of the Workers’ Party of Korea Propaganda and Agitation Department, which controls all Democratic People’s Republic of Korea media and is used by the government to control the public.
b.  A.K.A.: n/a
c.  Identifiers: YOB: 1954 or 1955, Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Gender: male; Address: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

4.  JO YONG-WON
a.  Description: Vice Director of the Worker’s Party of Korea’s Organization and Guidance Department, which directs key personnel appointments for the Workers’ Party of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s military.
b.  A.K.A.: Cho Yongwon
c.  Identifiers: DOB: October 24, 1957; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Gender, male; Address: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

5.  KIM CHOL NAM
a.  Description: President of Korea Kumsan Trading Corporation, a company that procures supplies for General Bureau of Atomic Energy and serves as a cash route to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.
b.  A.K.A.: n/a
c.  Identifiers: DOB: February 19, 1970; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Passport no.: 563120238; Address: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

6.  KIM KYONG OK
a.  Description: Vice Director of the Organization and Guidance Department, which directs key personnel appointments for the Workers’ Party of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s military.
b.  AKA: Kim Kyong Ok
c.  Identifiers: YOB: 1937 or 1938; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Address: Pyongyang, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

7.  KIM TONG-HO
a.  Description: Vietnam Representative for Tanchon Commercial Bank, which is the main Democratic People’s Republic of Korea financial entity for weapons and missile-related sales.
b.  A.K.A.: n/a
c.  Identifiers: DOB: August 18, 1969; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Passport no.: 745310111; Gender: male; Address: Vietnam

8.  MIN BYONG CHOL
a.  Description: Member of the Worker’s Party of Korea’s Organization and Guidance Department, which directs key personnel appointments for the Workers’ Party of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s military.
b.  A.K.A.: Min Pyo’ng-ch’o’l, Min Byong-chol, Min Byong Chun
c.  Identifiers: DOB: August 10, 1948; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Gender: male; Address: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

9.  PAEK SE BONG
a.  Description: Paek Se Bong is a former Chairman of the Second Economic Committee, a former member of the National Defense Commission, and a former Vice Director of Munitions Industry Department (MID).
b.  AKA: n/a
c.  Identifiers: DOB: 21 March 1938; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

10.  PAK HAN SE
a.  Description: Vice Chairman of the Second Economic Committee, which oversees the production of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s ballistic missiles and directs the activities of Korea Mining Development Corporation, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s premier arms dealer and main exporter of goods and equipment related to ballistic missiles and conventional weapons.
b.  A.K.A.: Kang Myong Chol
c.  Identifiers: Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Passport no.: 290410121; Address: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

11.  PAK TO CHUN
a.  Description: Pak To Chun is a former Secretary of Munitions Industry Department (MID) and currently advises on affairs relating to nuclear and missile programmes. He is a former State Affairs Commission member and is a member Workers’ Party of Korea Political Bureau.
b.  AKA: Pak Do Chun
c.  Identifiers: DOB: 9 March 1944; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

12.  RI JAE IL
a.  Description: Vice Director of the Workers’ Party of Korea Propaganda and Agitation Department, which controls all Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s media and is used by the government to control the public.
b.  AKA: RI, Chae-Il
c.  Identifiers: YOB 1934; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

13.  RI SU YONG
a.  Description: Official for Korea Ryonbong General Corporation, specializes in acquisition for Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s defence industries and support to Pyongyang’s military-related sales. Its procurements also probably support the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s chemical weapons programme.
b.  A.K.A.: n/a
c.  Identifiers: DOB: June 25, 1968; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Passport no.: 654310175; Gender: male; Address: Cuba

14.  RI YONG MU
a.  Description: Ri Yong Mu is a Vice Chairman of the State Affairs Commission, which directs and guides all Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s military, defence, and security-related affairs, including acquisition and procurement.
b.  AKA: n/a
c.  Identifiers: DOB: 25 January 1925; Nationality: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Annex II

Asset Freeze (Entities)

1.  KANGBONG TRADING CORPORATION
a.  Description: The Kangbong Trading Corporation sold, supplied, transferred, or purchased, directly or indirectly, to or from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, metal, graphite, coal, or software, where revenue or goods received may benefit the Government of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea or the Workers’ Party of Korea. The Kangbong Trading Corporation’s parent is the Ministry of People’s Armed Forces.
b.  AKA: N/A
c.  Location: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

2.  KOREA KUMSAN TRADING CORPORATION
a.  Description: Korea Kumsan Trading Corporation is owned or controlled by, or acting or purporting to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, the General Bureau of Atomic Energy, which oversees the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s nuclear programme.
b.  AKA: N/A
c.  Location: Pyongyang, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

3.  KORYO BANK
a.  Description: Koryo Bank operates in the financial services industry in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s economy and is associated with Office 38 and Office 39 of the KWP.
b.  AKA: N/A
c.  Location: Pyongyang, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

4.  STRATEGIC ROCKET FORCE OF THE KOREAN PEOPLE’S ARMY
a.  Description: The Strategic Rocket Force of the Korean People’s Army is in charge of all Democratic People’s Republic of Korea ballistic missile programmes and is responsible for SCUD and NODONG launches.
b.  AKA: Strategic Rocket Force; Strategic Rocket Force Command of KPA; Strategic Force; Strategic Forces
c.  Location: Pyongyang, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

For information media. Not an official record.