More than $1 Billion Pledged at Conference, as Member States Dramatically Increase Financial Commitments to Development Activities

DEV/3252-SAG/490
7 November 2016
2016 United Nations Pledging Conferences for Development/World Food Programme, AM Meetings

More than $1 Billion Pledged at Conference, as Member States Dramatically Increase Financial Commitments to Development Activities

At a United Nations pledging conference today, 24 countries committed to provide approximately $1.09 billion towards development activities.  The amount represented an increase of more than of fourteen-fold over those commitments made in 2015.

The event consisted of two conferences:  the United Nations Pledging Conference for Development Activities and the United Nations/Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Pledging Conference for the World Food Programme (WFP).

Opening the session, Zina Mounla, Chief of the Development Cooperation Policy Branch, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, highlighted the growing gap between core and non-core resources pledged by Member States.  In 2015, the share of core funding had dropped to 23.1 per cent, its lowest share ever.  That made it increasingly difficult for United Nations entities to implement their priorities.  The United Nations development system would need to receive adequate and predictable funding to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, she said.  Moreover, much of the non-core resources had been tightly earmarked to specific projects, which had resulted in fragmentation.

In 2015, the United Nations had continued to rely heavily on a few donors, with just two States accounting for 40 per cent of all Government contributions, and just six accounting for more than half of core funding.  The general trend in the quantity of funding had been positive, she said, with the volume of contributions more than doubling in real terms since 2000.

The Conference then elected Luke Daunivalu (Fiji) as President of the 2016 Pledging Conference by acclamation, and Inga Kanchaveli (Georgia) as Vice-President.

Mr. Daunivalu said that the ability of the United Nations to remain relevant and have the adequate capacity to deliver on its evolving multilateral mandates in a changed development landscape would depend heavily on the quality and quantity of funding it received.  At the 2015 Conference, pledges made by countries had declined compared to 2014.  “While I recognize that these are challenging times for many countries, I would like to strongly encourage countries to increase their pledges at this year’s Conference,” he said, particularly in core resource commitments.

Member States then made their pledges.  The representatives of Andorra and Armenia said their countries would announce pledges separately.

Concluding the Pledging Conference for Development Activities, Sumathi Jayaraman, Director of Innovation and Strategy, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), said that it was committed to finding integrated approaches in implementing the 2030 Agenda.  UNDP looked forward to the new quadrennial comprehensive policy review and joint programming across the United Nations development system.  The Programme’s priority was to determine a new strategic plan going forward, but adequate and predictable resources were vital in achieving development plans and addressing the results of the quadrennial comprehensive policy review.  She also stressed the need to strengthen South-South cooperation, which presented a momentous opportunity to meet development goals.

Joelle Tanguy, Director of Strategic Partnerships, United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women), expressed gratitude for the pledges made.  Supporting women and girls to reach their potential was not a cost but a macroeconomic development opportunity, she said.  UN-Women’s achievements made it a vital vehicle for realizing the gender equality and women empowerment goals for humanity and therefore it was an entity deserving of significantly increased resources.  UN-Women was particularly grateful to have a wide donor base:  146 Governments had contributed to it in 2015, “a strong testament to the political will and the relevance of UN-Women’s mandate”, she said.

Mandeep O'Brien, Associate Director of the Public Partnership Division, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), stressed the importance of flexible funding at a time when the Organization had adopted a new development agenda.  The 2030 Agenda provided not only a historic opportunity that was Government-owned and led but also a programme for the people.  Partnerships were key, especially since the Agenda required working across sectors, goals and communities.  Flexible funding such as regular resources allowed for a global reach, reduced transaction costs and greater scope as they were not directed to specific programmes.  As such, offices could plan more strategically as well as respond quickly to humanitarian crises.

Mira Ihalainen, Resource Mobilization Adviser, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), expressed appreciation for the commitments and remarks made.  The tangible results achieved during the first two years of the Fund’s Strategic Plan 2014-2017 showed what it could accomplish with sufficient financing.  Nearly 53 million additional users accessed modern family planning methods; 23 million adolescents benefited from integrated sexual and reproductive health services; 23,579 fistula repairs were supported; 2,920 communities publicly declared abandonment of female genital mutilation; and more than 10.6 million women and girls in humanitarian crises benefited from sexual and reproductive health services and gender-based violence prevention services.  As of 1 November, UNFPA’s projection for regular resources, the bedrock of its institutional integrity, was $340 million, a decline of $58 million, or 15 per cent, over 2015.  That represented a $142 million shortfall against the 2016 Strategic Plan target of $482 million.

The Pledging Conference for WFP was then held.  No delegations made commitments at that time, though many had previously done so.

Speaking at the conclusion of the WFP Pledging Conference, Carla Mucavi, Director, Food and Agriculture Organization Liaison Office to the United Nations, said that the life-saving activities of WFP were central to the first response to crises and emergencies and part of the wider United Nations effort to support Member States.  FAO and WFP worked together in critical situations, and in the spirit of the 2030 Agenda, it was necessary to make efforts complementary, coordinated and coherent.  “The generous contributions you have offered today will allow WFP to…respond to food security related emergencies and provide direct humanitarian assistance in crisis situations,” she said.

Erika Joergensen, Director, World Food Programme Office in New York, said that in 2015, WFP provided direct assistance to 76.7 million of the world’s most vulnerable people in 81 countries.  WFP continued to tackle the drivers of hunger through innovative approaches such as local procurement and cash and voucher transfer mechanisms.  As of November 2016, the Programme had received $4.9 billion confirmed contributions towards its 2016 requirements of $8.6 billion, or 57 per cent of its management plan needs.  WFP continued to receive most of its contributions through Governments, and increasingly those were multi-year contributions, allowing the Programme to maximize effectiveness and adaptability.  However, multilateral contributions had slightly decreased in 2016.

Pledges Made

(Converted from local currencies into United States dollars)

 

Country/Agencies

Amount Pledged

Notes

TOTAL

$1,095,431,526

 

Kuwait

   

UNRWA

$2,000,000

 

UNHCR

$1,000,000

 

CERF

$1,000,000

 

UNDP

$570,000

 

Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

$500,000

 

OHCHR

$500,000

 

UN-Habitat

$354,000

 

UNICEF

$200,000

 

UNEP

$200,000

 

UN-Women

$50,000

 

UNITAR

$20,000

 

UNVFVT

$10,000

 

UNFPA

$10,000

 

UNDCP

$5,000

 

India

   

UNDP

$4,500,000

 

UNICEF

$837,000

 

UNFPA

$500,000

 

UN-Women

$1,000,000

 

UNEP

$100,000

 

WFP

$1,920,000

 

UNRWA

$1,250,000

 

UNODC

$100,000

 

UN-Habitat

$150,000

 

CERF

$500,000

 

Voluntary Fund for Technical Cooperation

$100,000

 

Russian Federation

 

Volume and timetable for payments shall hinge on implementation of the Russian Federation’s federal budget.

WFP

$20,000,000

 

UNIDO

$2,600,000

 

UNHCR

$2,000,000

 

OHCHR

$2,000,000

 

UNODC

$2,000,000

 

CERF

$1,500,000

 

UNDP

$1,100,000

 

OCHA

$1,000,000

 

UNICEF

$1,000,000

 

UNEP

$900,000

 

UNAIDS

$500,000

 

UN-Habitat

$400,000

 

UNFPA

$300,000

 

UNITAR

$200,000

 

Sri Lanka

   

UNICEF

$20,000

 

UN-Women

$5,000

 

UNVFVT

$5,000

 

United Nations Youth Fund

$5,000

 

United Nations Voluntary Fund on Disability

$5,000

 

United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund for Victims of Trafficking

$5,000

 

Hamilton Shirley Amerasinghe Memorial Fellowship on the Law of the Sea

$10,000

 

OHCHR

$5,000

 

China

   

WFP

$6,500,000

 

Singapore

   

UNICEF

$50,000

 

UN-Women

$50,000

 

UNDP

$300,000

 

G77 Account for Cooperation

$5,000

 

UNHCR

$60,000

 

UNOCHA

$20,000

 

CERF

$50,000

 

UNFPA

$5,000

 

United Nations Voluntary Fund for Trafficking in Persons

$5,000

 

OHCHR

$15,000

 

UNEP

$50,000

 

East Asian Seas Trust Fund

$20,000

 

UNDCP

$5,000

 

New Zealand

   

UNDP

$5,839,416

 

UNICEF

$4,379,562

 

UNFPA

$4,379,562

 

WFP

$4,379,562

 

OHCHR

$2,189,781

 

CERF

$2,189,781

 

UN-Women

$1,824,818

 

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

   

UNDP

$65,575

 

UNICEF

$130,070

 

WFP

$117,252

 

UNFAO

$37,094

 

UNFPA

$32,046

 

Luxembourg

   

UNDP

$5,659,341

 

UNFPA

$5,439,560

 

UNICEF

$5,934,066

 

UN-Women

$1,428,571

 

UNCFD

$1,043,956

 

WFP

$934,066

 

UNEP

$274,725

 

Thailand

   

UNDP

$865,122

 

Local UNDP office

$442,277

 

UNICEF

$112,500

 
 

$59,511

 

Local UNICEF office

$58,638

 

UNFPA

$150,000

 

UNDCP

$30,000

 

UN-Women

$20,000

 

UNCDF

$2,500

 

UNITAR

$2,000

 

UNV

$1,428

 

CERF

$20,000

 

UNDIP

$1,000

 

UNRCPD

$3,000

 

Trust Fund (for the Pacific Island Countries)

$1,000

 

Trust Fund for the Alliance of Civilizations

$10,000

 

UNHCR

$20,000

 

UNRWA

$40,000

 

OHCHR

$20,000

 

UNTFHS

$2,000

 

Asia-Pacific Forum of National Human Rights Institutions

$5,000

 

Implementation Support Unit of Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention

$10,309

 

ECDC

$5,000

 

GSTP

$5,000

 

Technical Cooperation Fund

$219,780

 

Norway

 

Subject to parliamentary approval

UNDP

$65,000,000

 

UNICEF

$44,000,000

 

flexible thematic support

$90,000,000

 

UNFPA

$50,000,000

 

UNHCR

$43,000,000

 

WFP

$28,000,000

 

UNRWA

$15,000,000

 

UNAIDS

$14,000,000

 

UN-Women

$9,000,000

 

Netherlands

 

Some contributions subject to parliamentary approval

UNDP

$54,774,969

 

UN-Women

$6,505,495

 

UNFPA

$67,190,119

 

UNICEF

$62,126,921

 

UNEP

$3,379,409

 

WFP

$46,258,242

 

OCHA

$65,984,615

 

UNHCR

$50,549,451

 

UNRWA

$14,285,714

 

UN-Habitat

$1,366,201

 

OHCHR

$274,725

 

UNCTAD

$549,451

 

UNAIDS

$19,790,923

 

UNOPS

$12,105,495

 

FAO

$7,227,027

 

WHO

$12,571,429

 

IFAD

$30,266,484

 

ILO

$7,619,793

 

UNESCO

$3,846,677

 

UNIDO

$2,142,857

 

Mongolia

   

UNDP

$17,000

 

UNICEF

$11,000

 

UNFPA

$4,000

 

CERF

$10,000

 

UN-Women

$7,000

 

UNEP

$1,000

 

Czech Republic

   

UNDP-Czech Trust Fund

$440,000

 

UN Volunteers

$240,000

 

UN-Women

$16,000

 

OCHA

$4,000

 

United Kingdom

   

UNDP

$67,901,235

 

UNICEF

$49,382,716

 

UN-Women

$15,432,099

 

UNFPA

$24,691,358

 

Malta

   

UNDP

$21,978

 

UN-Women

$659

 

Guatemala

   

UN Peacebuilding Fund

no amount provided

 

Myanmar

   

UNDP

$900

 

UNDP Local Office Cost

$550

 

UNFPA

$166

 

ESCAP

$2,000

 

SIAP

$1,000

 

UNCDF

$5,000

 

UNIDO

$5,000

 

Trinidad and Tobago

   

UN-Women

$5,000

 

Bangladesh

   

UNDP Headquarters

$500,000

 

UNDP Local office

$18

 

UNICEF

$43,200

 

UNFPA

$31,300

 

UN-Women

$13,200

 

UNEP

$900

 

UN Volunteers

$1,300

 

UNODC

$1,300

 

UN Fund for South-South Cooperation

$1,300

 

Indonesia

   

UNODC

$45,000

 

OHCHR

$20,000

 

UNICEF

$110,000

 

UN-Women

$147,000

 

CERF

$220,000

 

UNEP

$75,000

 

UNDP

$70,000

 

UNFPA in Indonesia (RP)

$14,508

 

Perez-Guerrero Trust Fund for South-South Cooperation

$10,000

 

UNCITRAL

$20,000

 

Lao People's Democratic Republic

 

Will continue its contribution to the core resources for development activities of relevant UN agencies at 2015 levels

Latvia

 

Pending final approval from Government

UN-Women

$10,000

 

Algeria

   

UNICEF

$24,000

 

UNDP

$550,000

 

UNFPA

$10,000

 

UNVFVT

$5,000

 

Preservation for Migratory Birds

$2,000

 

Preservation of the Sea

$10,000

 

UN-Habitat

$10,000

 

Stockholm Convention

$14,974

 
For information media. Not an official record.