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Why Online Courses are Trending

Why Online Courses are Trending

Hundreds of university students in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa and other African countries took to the streets, protesting high tuition fees, lack of equal access to education and inferior learning environments at their institutions. The introduction of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) may, however, provide a lifeline for African students desiring to circumvent college entry difficulties. According to a study by the Technology and Social Change Group (TASCHA) at the University of Washington Information School, low and middle income populations make up to 80 percent of MOOCs’ users. In addition, a 2015 survey by Coursera, a prominent MOOCs platform, found that because of taking online courses, an overwhelming 87 percent of participants reported career benefits, with 33 percent mentioning tangible career benefits. Extracted from paper by Africa Renewal.  More.

Young African Women Turn to Coding

Young African Women Turn to Coding

Coding is a specialized technique that enables users to create computer software, apps and websites. Training more females in this area is one way to close the gender gap in computing. Africa Renewal  interviewed one recent youth female graduate, Angela Koranteng, who concurred that in most cases, unlike girls, boys are exposed to technical matters in childhood so not many young African women can imagine themselves as coders. In a survey by the US Department of Labor, findings revealed that even in most developed countries, the computer field is disproportionately dominated by men. However, more and more opportunities are being provided for girls to learn code: technology institutions are working to increase financial support and awareness about computer programming through conferences where girls can discuss career prospects. Gender equality enthusiasts are optimistic this increase in women coders will help close the gender wage inequality gap. More.