Côte d’Ivoire tells Assembly it stands as living example of UN’s role in averting chaos

August - November 2019

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Côte d’Ivoire tells Assembly it stands as living example of UN’s role in averting chaos

Permanent Representative of Côte d’Ivoire to the United Nations, Claude Stanislas Bouah-Kamon, addresses the general debate of the General Assembly’s seventieth session. UN Photo/Cia Pak
Permanent Representative of Côte d’Ivoire to the United Nations, Claude Stanislas Bouah-Kamon, addresses the general debate of the General Assembly’s seventieth session. UN Photo/Cia Pak

Côte d’Ivoire, where the United Nations played a major role in restoring peace and stability after violently disputed presidential elections in 2010, stood before the General Assembly today to praise the world Organization for its “irreplaceable” contribution to advancing peace, security and development over the 70 years of its existence.

“I wish to here reiterate the gratitude of the Ivoirian people for the invaluable role the United Nations played and continues to play at our sides,” the West African country’s Permanent Representative Claude Bouah-Kamon told the Assembly on the sixth day of its 70th annual General Debate.

“ Thanks to this precious support, Côte d’Ivoire has resumed its march forward, thus finding the path of stability, growth and economic and social development.”

“The UN Operation in Côte d'Ivoire (UNOCI), which in 2011 helped restore legitimacy and stability along with French forces after incumbent President Laurent Gbagbo’s refusal to concede defeat in the 2010 elections to Alassane Ouattara, currently maintains some 7,000 uniformed personnel in the country.

“Mr. Bouah-Kamon warned the despite the numerous UN successes, the world must not lose sight of the many challenges still confronting it, such as ongoing conflicts, transnational crime and extremism, including that of the Nigerian-based terrorist Boko Haram group, as well as the need to achieve the ambitious new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

“ Poverty, terrorism, epidemics, food and climate insecurity, which today are the new threats to international peace and security provide fertile terrain for intolerance, fundamentalism and extremisms of all stripes which threaten the fragile edifice of a world at peace to which all our peoples aspire,” he declared.

“ It is thus undeniable that the world is confronting a period of great challenge, but it is also true that we are presented with an historic opportunity to consolidate the foundations of inclusive development and a better world, as much for present-day generations as for those of the future.”