Security Council Committee pursuant to resolutions
1267 (1999) and 1989 (2011) concerning Al-Qaida
and associated individuals and entities


NARRATIVE SUMMARIES OF REASONS FOR LISTING

QI.M.31.01. OMAR MAHMOUD UTHMAN

Date on which the narrative summary became available on the Committee’s website: 9 March 2009

Omar Mahmoud Uthman was listed on 17 October 2001 pursuant to paragraph 8 (c) of resolution 1333 (2000) as being associated with “Usama bin Laden and individuals and entities associated with him” for "participating in the financing, planning, facilitating, preparing or perpetrating of acts or activities by, in conjunction with, under the name of, on behalf or in support" of Al-Qaida (QE.A.4.01.), the Armed Islamic Group (GIA) (QE.A.6.01.), the Organization of Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (QE.T.14.01.), and Egyptian Islamic Jihad (QE.A.3.01.).

Additional information:

Omar Mahmoud Uthman a.k.a. Abu Qatada al-Filistini has been involved in terrorism-related activity since at least 1995 and has been described as the “spiritual ambassador in Europe to Usama bin Laden” (deceased). He is a significant international terrorism figure and a leading advisor with extensive links to, and influence over, Al-Qaida-related (QE.A.4.01.) groups in the United Kingdom and other countries, including the Armed Islamic Group (GIA) (QE.A.46.01.), the Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC), listed as the Organization of Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (QE.T.14.01.) and Al-Jihad/Egyptian Islamic Movement, listed as Egyptian Islamic Jihad (QE.A.3.01.). He has engaged in conduct which facilitates and gives encouragement to the commission, preparation and instigation of acts of terrorism. He has conducted such facilitation by personal contact, telephone, letters and the Internet.  He also raised funds for Al-Qaida-related terrorist groups.

Omar Mahmoud Uthman has significant and long standing connections with terrorist organizations operating in Algeria: the GIA and the GSPC. He was an adviser to the GIA until 1996 and saw himself as the group’s representative in London. He allied himself to the more violent elements of the organization, and it is reported that he told a newspaper in 1995 that the killing of foreigners in Algeria was justified because they held entry visas issued by an illegal regime. He sent money to the GIA from London.

Omar Mahmoud Uthman provided financial assistance to Bin Laden’s associates in Amman, Jordan. He was twice convicted in absentia in Jordan for involvement in terrorist attacks there in March and April 1998 and in relation to a plot to plant bombs to coincide with the millennium. He faced a 15-year prison term.

Omar Mahmoud Uthman has long-established connections with Usama bin Laden and Al- Qaida, and has maintained close contacts with London-based Al-Qaida associates. He was in close contact with Khalid Abd al-Rahman Hamd al-Fawaz (QI.A.59.02.) who was Bin Laden’s representative in the United Kingdom prior to Al-Fawaz’s arrest in the United Kingdom in 1998. In 1998, it was reported that Omar Mahmoud Uthman had in the past received funding directly from Bin Laden. He has repeatedly associated himself with and expressed his support for him, in particular in a television broadcast in January 2000 and in an interview in December 2001. He also has links with Al-Jihad/Egyptian Islamic Movement through Aiman Muhammed Rabi al-Zawahiri (QI.A.6.01.).

In the late 1990s, he became a mentor and provided financial support to the GSPC, as well as became an adviser to Moroccan, Tunisian and Libyan extremist groups. He was also a significant counselor to the Al-Tawhid movement, listed as Al-Qaida in Iraq (QE.J.115.04.), whose leader was Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, also known as Ahmad Fadil Nazal al-Khalayleh (deceased).

In 1997, it was reported that he was actively recruiting for Afghan training camps. In the period 1999-2001 he played a leading role in the United Kingdom in raising funds and providing logistic support and recruits for fighters in Chechnya.

In February 2001, he was arrested by anti-terrorism police officers in the United Kingdom because he was suspected of involvement with the Abu Doha terrorist cell in Frankfurt which had been responsible for plotting to cause explosions at the Christmas market in Strasbourg, France. United Kingdom and foreign currency with a value in excess of £170,000 was found in his possession. £805 was found attached to a note indicating that it was bound for fighters in Chechnya. This money was collected from supporters around Europe and was destined for both legitimate causes and illegal causes, including funding for training camps and international terrorist and violent groups in places like Jordan and Chechnya. Omar Mahmoud Uthman was responsible for the safekeeping and distribution of this money. There is also evidence that he was involved in funding individuals involved in violent activities in Indonesia.

In January 2002, it was reported that persons attending the Fatimah Center mosque in London, United Kingdom, believed that he was responsible for organizing trips to Afghanistan for military training. The Special Immigration Appeals Commission of the United Kingdom (SIAC) concurred that he encouraged and raised funds for individuals to go to Afghanistan and considered as probably correct that he had links with Ansar al-Islam (QE.A.98.03.), that he had given them money and had suggested to them that they should seek more support from Al-Qaida.

Omar Mahmoud Uthman was deported to Jordan from the United Kingdom on 7 July 2013 to face terrorism charges.

Related listed individuals and entities:

Al Qaida (QE.A.4.01.), listed on 6 October 2001
Armed Islamic Group (QE.A.6.01.), listed on 6 October 2001
Egyptian Islamic Jihad (QE.A.3.01.), listed on 6 Oct. 2001
The Organization of Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (QE.T.14.01.), listed on 6 October 2001
Ansar Al-Islam (QE.A.98.03.), listed on 24 February. 2003
Al-Qaida in Iraq (QE.J.115.04.), listed on 18 October 2004.

Aiman Muhammed Rabi al-Zawahiri (QI.A.6.01.), listed on 25 January 2001
Khalid Abd al-Rahman Hamd al-Fawaz (QI.A.59.02.), listed on 24 April 2002