General Assembly Adopts 38 Resolutions, 2 Decisions from Fourth Committee, Including Texts on Decolonization, Israeli‑Palestinian Issues

GA/11987
7 December 2017
Seventy-second Session, 66th Meeting (AM)

General Assembly Adopts 38 Resolutions, 2 Decisions from Fourth Committee, Including Texts on Decolonization, Israeli‑Palestinian Issues

Upon the recommendation of its Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization), the General Assembly adopted 38 resolutions and two decisions today, on issues including decolonization and the Israeli‑Palestinian conflict.

Among the 22 decolonization texts before the Assembly was a draft resolution on the question of Guam, which it adopted by a recorded vote of 93 in favour to 8 against (France, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Morocco, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States), with 65 abstentions.  By its terms, the General Assembly called once again upon the administering Power to take into consideration the expressed will of Guam’s Chamorro people, as supported by Guam voters in the referendum of 1987, and as subsequently provided for in Guam law regarding Chamorro self‑determination efforts.

By other terms, the Assembly encouraged the administering Power and the territorial government to enter negotiations on that matter, and stressed the need for continued close monitoring of the overall situation in the Territory.  By further terms, it called upon the administering Power to participate in and cooperate fully with the Special Committee on Decolonization in efforts to promote self‑government in Guam, encouraging it to facilitate visits and special missions to the Territory.  The Assembly also requested that the Territory and the administering Power protect and conserve the environment against degradation and the impact of militarization.

Also requiring a recorded vote was a draft resolution titled “Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations”.  The Assembly adopted it by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon, Israel, Morocco, United Kingdom, United States), with 40 abstentions.  By that text, the General Assembly recommended that all States intensify their efforts to ensure full and effective implementation of the decolonization Declaration — contained in General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV) — and other relevant resolutions.  It also urged specialized agencies and organizations that had not yet provided assistance to Non‑Self‑Governing Territories to do so as soon as possible.

Turning to Israeli‑Palestinian issues, the General Assembly took up nine draft resolutions.  It adopted a draft resolution titled “Work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories” by a recorded vote of 83 in favour to 10 against (Australia, Canada, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 77 abstentions.

By that text, the Assembly requested that the Special Committee continue investigating Israeli policies and practices in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and to consult with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in order to ensure safeguards for the welfare and human rights of the peoples of the occupied territories.  It also requested that the Special Committee submit regular periodic reports to the Secretary‑General on the current situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, and to continue to investigate the treatment and status of prisoners and detainees.

The Assembly also took up a draft titled “Operations of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East”, by which it expressed deep concern about the Agency’s critical financial situation and stressed the need for further efforts to comprehensively address its recurrent funding shortages.  The Assembly called upon donors to provide early annual voluntary contributions, in accordance with the Grand Bargain on humanitarian financing announced at the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul, Turkey, in May 2016.  The Assembly also expressed concern about continuing restrictions on free movement and access for UNRWA personnel, vehicles and goods, as well as the injury, harassment and intimidation of its staff.  The Assembly adopted that draft resolution by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 7 abstentions (Cameroon, Guatemala, Nauru, Paraguay, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Vanuatu).

Actin again by recorded vote, the General Assembly adopted drafts relating to election of officers nominated for election to the bureaux of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space; assistance to Palestine refugees; persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities; Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues; Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem and the occupied Syrian Golan; Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem; and the occupied Syrian Golan.  It also adopted a text on the applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and other occupied Arab Territories.

The Assembly went on to adopt, also by recorded vote, draft resolutions on information from Non‑Self‑Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the United Nations Charter; economic and other activities affecting the interests of the peoples of the Non‑Self‑Governing Territories; dissemination of information on decolonization; and implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.

Closely following the Fourth Committee’s recommendations, the Assembly adopted — without a vote — a series of annual texts on the right of the following Non‑Self‑Governing Territories to self‑determination: Western Sahara, American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, French Polynesia, Montserrat, New Caledonia, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Tokelau, Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands.

Acting again without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolutions relating to assistance in mine action; atomic radiation; the peaceful uses of outer space affairs; special political missions; questions relating to information; and offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non‑Self‑Governing Territories.  It also took note of a report on the comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects, and another on programme planning for the Fourth Committee.

The General Assembly also adopted, without a vote, two draft decisions, one on the question of Gibraltar and the other relating to revitalization of its own work.

Presenting reports for the Assembly’s consideration was the Rapporteur of the Fourth Committee.

Saudi Arabia’s representative also spoke.

The General Assembly will reconvene at 3 p.m. on Thursday, 7 December, to consider reports of its Sixth Committee (Legal).

Background

Meeting to consider reports of its Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) today, the General Assembly took up the following agenda items: assistance in mine action (document A/72/444); effects of atomic radiation (document A/72/445); international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space (document A/72/446); United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (document A/72/447); report of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories (document A/72/448); comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects (document A/72/449); and comprehensive review of special political missions (document A/72/450).

Also awaiting action were reports on: Questions relating to information (document A/72/451); information from Non‑Self‑Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations (document A/72/452); economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non‑Self‑Governing Territories (document A/72/453); implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/72/454); offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non‑Self‑Governing Territories (document A/72/455); implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (document A/72/456); revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/72/481); and programme planning (document A/72/486).

Action on Draft Resolutions

ANGEL ANGELOV (Bulgaria), Rapporteur of the Fourth Committee, introduced that body’s reports, saying they contained 38 draft resolutions and 4 draft decisions negotiated over the course of 28 formal meetings.  Recalling the high level of cooperation prevailing during those meetings, he said the Committee had fulfilled the mandate that the General Assembly had entrusted to it, having completed its work effectively and constructively.

The General Assembly began by taking up the draft resolution “Assistance in mine action” (document A/72/444/L.12), adopting it without a vote.  By that text, the Assembly urged States affected by landmines to identify all areas under their jurisdiction or control containing anti‑personnel mines and other explosive remnants of war.  It also urged States to provide humanitarian assistance for victims of anti‑personnel mines, emphasizing the primary responsibility of national authorities in that respect, while stressing the supporting role of the United Nations.

The representative of Saudi Arabia, speaking in explanation of position, said that while her delegation supported the resolution, Saudi Arabia denounced the provision of $14 million to Yemen’s Ministry of Education, which went to Houthi fighters, who were planting thousands of mines on Saudi Arabia’s borders as well as inside Yemen.  She called for reconsidering that contribution in order to ensure that all agencies were committed to relevant Security Council resolutions, including 2216 (2015).  Any support provided to the Houthis — who represented a great threat to regional and international peace and security — could not be justified or accepted, she emphasized.

Acting again without a vote, the General Assembly adopted the draft resolution “Effects of atomic radiation” (document A/72/445/L.13).  By its terms, the Assembly supported the Scientific Committee’s intentions and plans for the conduct of its programme of work, in particular its next periodic global surveys of radiation exposure.  The Assembly also asked the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to continue, within existing resources, to service the Scientific Committee and disseminate its findings to Member States, the scientific community and the public.  In addition, it asked UNEP to take proactive steps to ensure continuity through the timely appointment of the next Secretary of the Scientific Committee.  By other terms, the Assembly decided to review a possible increase in the Scientific Committee’s membership with a view to establishing, at its seventy‑third session, a procedure for further increases.

Next, the General Assembly took up three draft resolutions and a draft decision on outer space affairs, adopting the draft “International cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space” (document A/72/446/L.2) without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly recommended that States that had not yet become signatories to international treaties governing outer space ratify or accede, and incorporate them into national legislation.  It further urged all States, in particular those with major space capabilities, to help prevent an arms race in outer space.

Also adopted without a vote was the draft resolution “Declaration on the fiftieth anniversary of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies” (document A/72/446/L.3).  By that text, the Assembly urged States not yet party to that instrument, particularly members of the Outer Space Committee, to consider signing up.

The Assembly adopted went on to adopt, again without a vote, the draft resolution “Consideration of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space” (document A/72/446/L.4).  By its terms, the Assembly requested that the Outer Space Committee submit a draft resolution on the outcomes of UNISPACE+50 for the Assembly’s consideration in plenary at its seventy‑third session.  The Assembly further endorsed the Outer Space Committee’s decisions relating to the preparations for UNISPACE+50, including the holding of intersessional consultations from 7 to 11 May 2018.

Next, the Assembly adopted — by a recorded vote of 142 in favour to 21 against, with 3 abstentions (Bangladesh, China, Malaysia), the draft decision “Election of officers nominated for the bureaux of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its subsidiary bodies for the period 2018‑2019” (document A/72/446/L.8).  By its terms, the Assembly noted that, in accordance with the agreement reached by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space at its forty‑sixth session — on measures relating to the future composition of its bureaux and those of its subsidiary bodies — regional groups had nominated their candidates for various positions for the period 2018‑2019.

The General Assembly then took up four draft resolutions relating to Palestine refugees.  It first adopted the draft resolution “Assistance to Palestine refugees” (document A/72/447/L.17) by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 1 against (Israel), with 12 abstentions.  By that text, the Assembly expressed grave concern at the difficult situation of Palestine refugees under occupation, in particular those in the Gaza Strip, and underlined the importance of assistance and urgent reconstruction efforts there.  The Assembly upon all donors to continue strengthening their efforts to meet the anticipated needs of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), including for recent emergency, recovery and reconstruction appeals, plans for Gaza and for regional crisis responses to the situation of Palestine refugees in Syria.

Next, the Assembly adopted — by a recorded 158 votes in favour to 7 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau United States), with 10 abstentions (Cameroon, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Togo, Vanuatu) — the draft “Persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities” (document A/72/447/L.18).  By its terms, the Assembly reaffirmed the right of all those displaced to return to their homes or former places of residence.  It further stressed the need for the accelerated return of the displaced, strongly appealing to all Governments, organizations and individuals to contribute generously to UNRWA and others in that regard.

The General Assembly then took up the draft resolution “Operations of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East” (document A/72/447/L.19), adopting it by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 7 abstentions (Cameroon, Guatemala, Nauru, Paraguay, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Vanuatu).  Expressing deep concern about UNRWA’s critical financial situation, the Assembly stressed the need for further efforts to comprehensively address recurrent funding shortages.  It called upon donors to provide early annual voluntary contributions, in accordance with the Grand Bargain on humanitarian financing announced at the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul, Turkey, in May 2016.  It also voiced concern about the continuing imposition of restrictions on free movement and access for UNRWA personnel, vehicles and goods, as well as the injury, harassment and intimidation of its staff.

Taking up the draft “Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues” (document A/72/447/L.20), the General Assembly adopted it by a recorded 159 votes in favour to 7 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 9 abstentions (Cameroon, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Paraguay, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Togo, Vanuatu).  By that text, the Assembly requested that the Secretary‑General take all appropriate steps to protect Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel.  Further, it called on Israel to render all facilities and assistance to the Secretary‑General for the resolution’s implementation.  Moreover, the Assembly urged the Palestinian and Israeli sides, as agreed between them, to deal with the important issue of Palestine refugees’ properties and revenues within the framework of final‑status peace negotiations.

Next, the General Assembly took up five drafts relating to Israel’s illegal practices in occupied Palestinian and other Arab territories.  It adopted the draft resolution “Work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories” (document A/72/448/L.21) by a recorded vote of 83 in favour to 10 against (Australia, Canada, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 77 abstentions.

By that text, the General Assembly requested that the Special Committee continue investigating Israeli policies and practices in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, and that it consult with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in order to ensure safeguards for the welfare and human rights of the peoples of the occupied territories.  It also requested that the Special Committee submit regular periodic reports to the Secretary‑General on the current situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, and to continue to investigate the treatment and status of prisoners and detainees.

The General Assembly then considered the draft “Applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the other occupied Arab territories” (document A/72/448/L.22).  By its terms, the Assembly demanded that Israel accept the de jure applicability of the Geneva Convention in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and other Arab territories occupied by Israel since 1967, and that it comply scrupulously with the provisions of that Convention.  The Assembly adopted that text by a recorded 157 votes in favour to 7 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 10 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, Guatemala, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Rwanda, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Togo, Vanuatu).

In another action, the General Assembly adopted — by a recorded vote of 155 in favour to 7 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 12 abstentions — the draft resolution “Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the occupied Syrian Golan” (document A/72/448/L.23).  According to that text, the General Assembly condemned acts of violence, destruction, harassment, provocation and incitement by Israeli settlers in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, called on Israel to accept the de jure applicability of the Geneva Convention.  It also demanded that Israel comply with its legal obligations, as mentioned in the advisory opinion rendered by the International Court of Justice on 9 July 2004.

Taking up the draft resolution “Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem” (document A/72/448/L.24), the Assembly adopted it by a recorded vote of 153 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 10 abstentions (Cameroon, Guatemala, Honduras, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Rwanda, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Togo, Vanuatu).

By that text, the Assembly demanded that Israel cease all practices and actions violating the human rights of the Palestinian people, including the killing and injury of civilians, arbitrary detention and imprisonment, forced displacement, and any obstruction of humanitarian assistance, among other things.  The Assembly also demanded that Israel comply fully with the Fourth Geneva Convention and cease all settlement activity, construction of the wall, and any other measures aimed at altering the character, status and demographic composition of the Occupied Palestinian Territory.

The Assembly went on to adopt the draft resolution “The occupied Syrian Golan” (document A/72/448/L.25) by a recorded 151 votes in favour to 2 against (Israel, Palau), with 20 abstentions.  By its terms, the Assembly called upon Israel to comply with the relevant resolutions on the occupied Syrian Golan, in particular Security Council resolution 497 (1981).  It further called upon Israel to desist from changing the physical character, demographic composition, institutional structure and legal status of the occupied Syrian Golan, and to desist, in particular, from establishing settlements.

Taking note of the report “Comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects” (document A/72/449), the General Assembly then moved to adopt the draft resolution “Comprehensive review of special political missions” (document A/72/450/L.10) without a vote.  By that text the Assembly stressed the need for the United Nations to continue improving its capabilities in the peaceful settlement of disputes.  It also requested that the Secretary‑General hold regular, inclusive and interactive dialogue on overall policy matters pertaining to special political missions, and to reach out to Member States beforehand in order to ensure their participation.

Turning to questions relating to information, the Assembly adopted two draft resolutions by consensus.  It first adopted draft resolution A, “Information in the service of humanity” (document A/72/451), by which it urged all countries and United Nations system entities to reduce existing disparities in information flows by increasing assistance for the development of communications infrastructure and capabilities in developing countries.  The text sought to ensure for journalists the free and effective performance of their professional tasks, and to condemn resolutely all attacks against them.  By further terms, it provided support for practical training programmes for broadcasters and journalists from public, private and other media in developing countries.  The Assembly also urged Member States and United Nations system organizations to enhance regional efforts and cooperation among developing countries, as well as between developed and developing countries.

Acting again without a vote, the General Assembly adopted draft resolution B, “United Nations public information policies and activities” (document A/72/451).  By its terms, the Assembly stressed the Secretariat’s importance in providing clear, timely, accurate and comprehensive information to Member States, upon request, within the framework of existing mandates and procedures.  Further by that text, the Assembly underlined the critical need to address, in the most appropriate manner, violations of relevant international rules and regulations governing broadcasting.  The Assembly further underlined the Secretariat’s responsibility for mainstreaming multilingualism into all its communication and information activities, within existing resources and on an equitable basis, calling upon the Department of Public Information to continue to work on best practices with the Coordinator for Multilingualism.

Also by that text, the Assembly further stressed the importance of efforts to strengthen outreach activities to those Member States remaining outside the network of United Nations information centres.  Further, the Assembly stressed the need for the Department to continue to review the allocation of both staff and financial resources to United Nations information centres in developing countries.

By the terms of two operative paragraphs that triggered discussion about resources in the Fourth Committee’s 24 October meeting on the topic, the Assembly underlined the Secretariat’s responsibility in mainstreaming multilingualism into all its communication and information activities, within existing resources and on an equitable basis.  It also emphasized the importance of making use of all the official languages of the United Nations, ensuring their full and equitable treatment in all activities of all the Department’s divisions and offices, with the aim of eliminating the disparity between the use of English and the five other official languages.  In that regard, the Assembly reaffirmed its request that the Secretary‑General ensure that the Department had the necessary capacity to undertake its activities, as necessary, in all official languages.  It requested that that aspect be included in the Department’s future programme budget proposals, bearing in mind the principle of parity among all six official languages and while respecting the workload in each.

Turning to several drafts on decolonization, the General Assembly first adopted the draft “Information from Non‑Self‑Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations” (document A/72/452) by a recorded vote of 173 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions (France, United Kingdom).

By that text, the General Assembly requested that the administering Powers concerned, in accordance with their Charter obligations, transmit or continue to transmit regularly to the Secretary‑General statistical and other technical information relating to the economic, social and educational conditions in the Territories under their respective responsibility.

The Assembly also adopted the draft “Economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non‑Self‑Governing Territories” (document A/72/453/L.14) by a recorded vote of 173 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions (France, United Kingdom).  By that text, the General Assembly expressed deep concern at the number and scale of natural disasters and their devastating impact on Non‑Self‑Governing Territories in the Caribbean in 2017, particularly Anguilla, British Virgin Islands, Turks and Caicos Islands, United States Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

Further by that text, the Assembly called upon the administering Powers to ensure that the exploitation of marine and other natural resources of Non‑Self‑Governing Territories did not violate relevant United Nations resolutions, nor adversely affect the interests of their peoples.  It called upon administering Powers to provide all necessary assistance to the peoples of the Non‑Self‑Governing Territories affected by recent hurricanes in order to alleviate humanitarian suffering, support recovery and rebuilding efforts, and enhance emergency-preparedness and risk‑reduction capabilities.

Also requiring a recorded vote was the draft resolution “Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations” (document A/72/454), which the Assembly adopted by a recorded 118 votes in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 54 abstentions.

Also by that text, the General Assembly recommended that all States intensify their efforts, through United Nations specialized agencies and other entities, to ensure the full and effective implementation of the Declaration, contained in General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV), and other relevant resolutions.  It also urged specialized agencies and organizations that had not yet provided assistance to Non‑Self‑Governing Territories to do so as soon as possible.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted the text “Offers of study and training for inhabitants of Non‑Self‑Governing Territories” (document A/72/455/L.6), by which it urged administering Powers to ensure the widespread and continuous dissemination of information relating to offers of study and training facilities, and to provide all facilities needed to enable students to avail themselves of such offers.

The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on Western Sahara (document A/72/456/L.5), by which it called upon parties and States of the region to cooperate with the efforts of the Secretary‑General and his Personal Envoy to resolve the dispute over that Territory.  It welcomed the parties’ commitment to working in an atmosphere propitious for dialogue, in order to enter into a more intensive phase of negotiations.

Acting again without a vote, the Assembly adopted a series of draft resolutions on the following individual Non‑Self‑Governing Territories: American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, French Polynesia, Montserrat, New Caledonia, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Tokelau, Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands (document A/72/456).

The General Assembly also took up a draft resolution on the question of Guam (document A/72/456/L.16), adopting it by a recorded vote of 93 in favour to 8 against (France, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Morocco, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States), with 65 abstentions.  By that text, the Assembly stressed that the decolonization process in Guam should be compatible with the United Nations Charter, the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  It called once again upon the administering Power to take into consideration the expressed will of Guam’s Chamorro people, as supported by Guam voters in the referendum of 1987, and as subsequently provided for in Guam law regarding Chamorro self‑determination efforts.

Further by that text, the Assembly encouraged the administering Power and the territorial government to begin negotiations on that matter, stressing the importance of apprising the Special Committee on Decolonization of the Guam people’s views and wishes, and of enhancing their understanding of their condition, including the nature and scope of existing political and constitutional arrangements between the Territory and the administering Power.  Also by the text, the Assembly requested that the administering Power, in cooperation with the territorial government, continue to transfer land to the Territory’s original landowners, and continue to recognize and respect the political rights as well as the cultural and ethnic identity of Guam’s Chamorro people, and continue to take all measures necessary to address the territorial government’s concerns about the immigration question.  The Assembly requested that the Territory and the administering Power protect and conserve the environment against degradation and the impact of militarization.

The General Assembly went on to adopt — by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 2 abstentions (France, Togo) — the resolution “Dissemination of information on decolonization” (document A/72/456).  By that text, the Assembly requested that the Department of Public Information continue its efforts to update Web‑based information on assistance programmes available to Non‑Self‑Governing Territories.  It also requested that the Department, alongside the Department of Political Affairs, implement the recommendations of the Special Committee on Decolonization and continue their efforts through all available media.

Taking up the report titled “Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples” (document A/72/456), the Assembly adopted the draft resolution contained therein by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon, Israel, Morocco, United Kingdom, United States), with 40 abstentions.  By its terms, the General Assembly urged administering Powers to effectively safeguard and guarantee the inalienable right of the peoples of Non‑Self‑Governing Territories to their natural resources, and to establish and maintain control over the future development of those resources.  It called upon the administering Powers concerned to terminate military activities and eliminate military bases in the Non‑Self‑Governing Territories under their administration, in compliance with the relevant resolutions.

Acting without a vote, the General Assembly then adopted two draft decisions, the first being the “Question of Gibraltar” (document A/72/456/L.7), and the other concerning the proposed programme of work and timetable for the seventy‑third Assembly session (document A/72/481/L.11).

Finally, the General Assembly took note of the Fourth Committee’s report on programme planning (document A/72/486).

For information media. Not an official record.