Security Council Imposes Fresh Sanctions on Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Unanimously Adopting Resolution 2270 (2016)

2 March 2016
SC/12267

Security Council Imposes Fresh Sanctions on Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Unanimously Adopting Resolution 2270 (2016)

7638th Meeting (AM)

New Measures Cover Cargo Inspections, Prohibitions on Aviation Fuel, Rare Minerals

The Security Council today condemned in the strongest terms the nuclear test conducted by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea on 6 January 2016 “in violation and flagrant disregard” of the relevant resolutions, its actions thereby constituting a challenge to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and to peace and stability in the region and beyond.

Unanimously adopting resolution 2270 (2016), the 15-member Council also condemned the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea launch of 7 February 2016, using ballistic missile technology, and demanded that it comply immediately with its international obligations.  Its previous actions on the subject included the adoption of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013) and 2094 (2013).

By today’s resolution, the Council decided that all States should inspect cargo within or transiting through their territory — including airports, sea ports and free trade zones — that was destined for or originating from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.  It also decided that Member States should prohibit that country’s nationals and those in their own territories from leasing or chartering their flagged vessels and aircraft to it, or providing it with crew services.  The prohibition should apply also to any designated individuals or entities assisting in the evasion of sanctions or violation of all related resolutions.

The Council also decided that all States should prohibit their own nationals and others subject to their jurisdiction, as well as entities incorporated in their respective territories from registering vessels in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and obtaining authorization for vessels to use their respective flag.  In addition, it decided that all States should deny permission for any aircraft to take off from, land at or overfly their respective territories if such aircraft contained items for supply, sale, transfer or export of which were prohibited by all related resolutions, except in cases of emergency landing.

Further by the text, the Council decided that Pyongyang should not supply, sell or transfer coal, iron, iron ore, gold, titanium ore, vanadium ore, and rare earth minerals, and that all States should prohibit their nationals from procuring such materials.  By other terms, it decided that all States should prevent the sale or supply of aviation fuel — including aviation gasoline, naphtha-type jet fuel, kerosene-type jet fuel, and kerosene-type rocket fuel — whether or not originating in their own territory, to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

By other terms, the Council decided that Member States should expel Pyongyang’s diplomats, governmental representatives or nationals acting in a governmental capacity who assisted in the evasion of sanctions or the violation of related resolutions.  It decided further that all Member States should prevent specialized teaching or training of Democratic People’s Republic of Korea nationals within their territories, or by their nationals, in disciplines that could contribute to the proliferation of sensitive nuclear activities or the development of nuclear-weapon delivery systems.

Speaking after the adoption, the representative of the United States said the resolution went further than any other sanctions regime in two decades, emphasizing that multilateral pressure could be effective in bringing Pyongyang back to the table for serious and credible negotiations on denuclearization.  Describing the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea as the only State that had conducted nuclear tests in the twenty-first century, routinely threatening other countries with nuclear annihilation, she noted that the chronic suffering of its people was the direct result of the choices made by their Government.

Echoing that sentiment, the Republic of Korea’s representative warned that a nuclear-armed Pyongyang would impair the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons regime and trigger an arms race in the region.  Deploring the use of scarce resources for weapons development while citizens lived in abject poverty, he expressed hope that the resolution would help to alleviate the population’s plight.

The United Kingdom’s representative noted that the resolution contained some of the toughest measures ever taken by the Council, while emphasizing that it was not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences, nor to affect those activities not prohibited by Council resolutions, nor to affect international relief efforts.  New provisions on cargo inspection were consistent with obligations set out in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, he added.

China’s representative stressed that the resolution should be a starting point to ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula, emphasizing that progress on the ground would depend on resuming peace talks and advancing denuclearization.  Concurring, the Russian Federation’s representative described the new sanctions as “quite harsh” but necessary for resumption of the six-party process and for Pyongyang’s return to the negotiating table.

Also speaking today were representatives of Japan, France, Spain, Venezuela, Malaysia, New Zealand, Ukraine, Egypt, Senegal, Uruguay and Angola.

The meeting began at 10:10 a.m. and ended at 11:26 a.m.

Statements

SAMANTHA POWER (United States) said the chronic suffering of the people in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was the direct result of the choices made by the country’s Government, which had been spending tremendous resources to build intercontinental ballistic missiles that could strike most of the countries on the Council.  “It would rather grow its nuclear weapons programme than its own children,” she added.  It was the only State that had conducted nuclear tests in the twenty-first century and the only Member State that had routinely threatened other countries with nuclear annihilation.  Noting that the new resolution went further than any other sanctions regime in two decades, she emphasized that its purpose was not to inflict greater hardship on the country’s people.  The United States had repeatedly urged the Council to address human rights violations, she recalled, stressing that while there should be no illusion that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea would now abruptly halt its pursuit of nuclear weapons, multilateral pressure could be effective in bringing Pyongyang back to the table for serious and credible negotiations on denuclearization.

MOTOHIDE YOSHIKAWA (Japan) said the message to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was from the international community as a whole, calling upon Member States to fulfil their obligations.  In that regard, the Chair of the 1718 Committee should arrange an open briefing to go through the provisions of the new resolution with all Member States, he said.  Depending on the behaviour and attitude of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, the Security Council was prepared to suspend or lift sanctions, which were not meant to target ordinary citizens.  Welcoming the resolution’s stronger emphasis on humanitarian and human rights concerns, including abductions, he emphasized that it was essential that the Council remain seized of the situation in all relevant aspects.

FRANÇOIS DELATTRE (France) said the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea had defied international law by conducting nuclear tests and using ballistic missile technology, undermined the non-proliferation regime, and violated resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013) and 2094 (2013).  In that context, Council members had been compelled to react decisively and adopt the resolution, sending a unanimous message to Pyongyang.  The ultimate goal was to achieve denuclearization and restore peace and security to the Korean Peninsula, he stressed.

LIU JIEYI (China) recalled that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea had conducted a nuclear test on 6 January 2016, in violation of the relevant Council resolutions.  As a close neighbour, China had always supported efforts to resolve that complex crisis through peaceful means.  In that regard, the resolution should be a starting point to ease the tension on the Korean Peninsula, he said, emphasizing that progress on the ground would depend on resuming peace talks and advancing denuclearization.

VITALY I. CHURKIN (Russian Federation) said the sanctions imposed by the resolution were quite harsh, but they left the door open to a resumption of the six-party process.  The idea was to ensure a return to the negotiating table.  Negative trends had been seen in north-east Asia and it was a matter of concern that Pyongyang’s actions were being used to justify enhancing weapons systems such as THAAD missiles.  The hasty imposition of unilateral sanctions that could have negative humanitarian consequences was also a concern.  He called upon all those participating in the six-party talks to resume negotiations, saying the Russian Federation would support the talks.

MATTHEW RYCROFT (United Kingdom) noted that the resolution contained some of the toughest measures ever taken by the Council, adding that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea had to be deterred from pursing illegal actions.  However, the resolution was not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences, nor to affect those activities not prohibited by Council resolutions, nor to affect international relief efforts, he emphasized, pointing out that the new provisions on cargo inspection were consistent with obligations set out in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.  Encouraging all States to implement the new resolution’s provisions in full, he urged Pyongyang to return to credible and authentic multilateral talks and permit full access by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors.

RAMLAN BIN IBRAHIM (Malaysia) said he would have preferred ample time to consider the text so as to avoid being presented with a fait accompli.  Emphasizing that the illicit development and procurement of weapons of mass destruction and related technologies by any State could not be tolerated, he said it was for that reason that he had voted in favour of the resolution.  The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea should resume peaceful negotiations under the six-party talks framework, so that the Korean Peninsula could benefit from greater predictability of inter-State behaviour through greater engagement.  “It requires a change of attitude and embracing more trust” to resolve outstanding issues, he said, expressing his delegation’s support for the resolution’s language on safeguarding humanitarian exemptions, a crucial element that would prevent possible unintended consequences against legitimate interests.

CAROLYN SCHWALGER (New Zealand) described Pyongyang’s pursuit of nuclear weapons as among the most serious threats to the international non-proliferation regime.  Its actions defied international law and Council resolutions alike, she said, noting that New Zealand had co-sponsored today’s resolution “with a heavy heart”, hoping that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea would choose a path that met its citizens’ basic needs.  The measures outlined in the text sent a clear message that the country would not benefit from its provocative behaviour and that the best path forward was a return to negotiations on denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula, she said.

VOLODYMYR YELCHENKO (Ukraine) commended the efforts of the United States and China in drafting and tabling the resolution.  Noting that expert-level meetings conducted by the United States delegation had given Member States the opportunity to raise questions, he said the text was a comprehensive and balanced document that strengthened the sanctions regime, reflecting the findings of the 1872 Committee’s Panel of Experts.  Today’s collective decision was an historic step that emphasized the Council’s firm stance on countering any threat to non-proliferation, he said.

AMR ABDELLATIF ABOULATTA (Egypt) said the resolution reflected a message from the Council that it would not accept recent actions by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea that violated Council resolutions and undermined the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.  It was a balanced formula that took into consideration the resumption of the six-party talks and denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula without aggravating the humanitarian situation.  It marked a step on the long road to prevent the thwarting of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, he said, pointing out that in the Middle East, one State remained outside that instrument.  Today’s action in adopting the resolution was an opportunity to remind the international community of that fact, he added.

GORGUI CISS (Senegal), calling for the total prohibition of nuclear testing and launching of ballistic missiles, welcomed the resolution’s unanimous adoption, saying that the recent activities undertaken by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea threated international peace and security.  Expressing regret that previous sanctions had not prevented Pyongyang from advancing its nuclear programme, he emphasized that all goods headed to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea must be inspected to exert pressure on Pyongyang.  However, sanctions were not a goal in themselves, but a way to maintain peace and security, he stressed.

ELBIO ROSSELLI (Uruguay) said he would not repeat the comments made by his colleagues, and called for the strict application of the resolution, stressing that it should not have a negative impact on the delivery of humanitarian assistance.

ISMAEL ABRAÃO GASPAR MARTINS (Angola), Council President for March, spoke in his national capacity, saying that with the resolution, the Council was sending a clear signal of the international community’s outright rejection of nuclear proliferation.  The text sought to strike a balance by strengthening sanctions without punishing the people of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, while also creating a window of opportunity for negotiations to resume.  He called upon Pyongyang to negotiate a solution within the agreed framework, with a view to ending its violations and reaping all the benefits of being a rightful member of the international community.

OH JOON (Republic of Korea) said Pyongyang’s latest nuclear test and long-range missile launch were grave violations of Security Council resolutions and posed a clear threat to international peace and security.  A nuclear-armed Democratic People’s Republic of Korea would impair the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) regime and trigger an arms race in the region, he said, emphasizing that the international community must act quickly and decisively.  The resolution tabled today introduced some of the most robust sanctions in the history of the United Nations, he noted, adding that, when fully implemented, the measures would impede Pyongyang’s activities relating to weapons of mass destruction.  Deploring the use of scarce resources for weapons development while citizens lived in abject poverty, he stressed that the new sanctions targeted the regime and not the population, expressing hope that the resolution would help to alleviate their plight.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 2270 (2016) reads as follows:

The Security Council,

Recalling its previous relevant resolutions, including resolution 825 (1993), resolution 1540 (2004), resolution 1695 (2006), resolution 1718 (2006), resolution 1874 (2009), resolution 1887 (2009), resolution 2087 (2013) and resolution 2094 (2013), as well as the statements of its President of 6 October 2006 (S/PRST/2006/41), 13 April 2009 (S/PRST/2009/7) and 16 April 2012 (S/PRST/2012/13),

Reaffirming that proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, as well as their means of delivery, constitutes a threat to international peace and security,

Expressing gravest concern at the nuclear test conducted by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (“the DPRK”) on 6 January 2016 in violation of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013) and 2094 (2013), and at the challenge such a test constitutes to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (“the NPT”) and to international efforts aimed at strengthening the global regime of non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, and the danger it poses to peace and stability in the region and beyond,

Underlining once again the importance that the DPRK respond to other security and humanitarian concerns of the international community,

Underlining also that measures imposed by this resolution are not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian population DPRK,

Regretting the DPRK’s diversion of financial, technical and industrial resources toward developing its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile program, and condemning its declared intent to develop nuclear weapons,

Expressing deep concern at the grave hardship that the DPRK people are subjected to,

Expressing great concern that the DPRK’s arms sales have generated revenues that are diverted to the pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles while DPRK citizens have great unmet needs,

Expressing serious concern that the DPRK has continued to violate relevant Security Council resolutions through repeated launches of ballistic missiles in 2014 and 2015, as well as the submarine-launched ballistic missile ejection test in 2015 and noting that all such ballistic missile activities contribute to the DPRK’s development of nuclear weapons delivery systems and increase tension in the region and beyond,

Expressing continued concern that the DPRK is abusing the privileges and immunities accorded under the Vienna Conventions on Diplomatic and Consular Relations,

Expressing its gravest concern that the DPRK’s ongoing nuclear-, and ballistic missile-related activities have further generated increased tension in the region and beyond, and determining that there continues to exist a clear threat to international peace and security,

Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, and taking measures under its Article 41,

“1.   Condemns in the strongest terms the nuclear test conducted by the DPRK on 6 January 2016 in violation and flagrant disregard of the Council’s relevant resolutions, and further condemns the DPRK’s launch of 7 February 2016, which used ballistic missile technology and was in serious violation of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), and 2094 (2013);

“2.   Reaffirms its decisions that the DPRK shall not conduct any further launches that use ballistic missile technology, nuclear tests, or any other provocation, and shall suspend all activities related to its ballistic missile program and in this context re-establish its pre-existing commitments to a moratorium on missile launches, and demands that the DPRK immediately comply fully with these obligations;

“3.   Reaffirms its decisions that the DPRK shall abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner, and immediately cease all related activities;

“4.   Reaffirms its decision that the DPRK shall abandon all other existing weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missile programs in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner;

“5.   Reaffirms that, pursuant to paragraph 8 (c) of resolution 1718 (2006), all Member States shall prevent any transfers to the DPRK by their nationals or from their territories, or from the DPRK by its nationals or from its territory, of technical training, advice, services or assistance related to the provision, manufacture, maintenance or use of nuclear-related, ballistic missile-related or other weapons of mass destruction-related items, materials, equipment, goods and technology, and underscores that this provision prohibits the DPRK from engaging in any form of technical cooperation with other Member States on launches using ballistic missile technology, even if characterized as a satellite launch or space launch vehicle;

“6.   Decides that the measures in paragraph 8 (a) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall also apply to all arms and related materiel, including small arms and light weapons and their related materiel, as well as to financial transactions, technical training, advice, services or assistance related to the provision, manufacture, maintenance or use of such arms and related materiel;

“7.   Affirms that the obligations imposed in paragraphs 8 (a), 8 (b) and 8 (c) of resolution 1718 (2006), as extended by paragraphs 9 and 10 of resolution 1874 (2009), apply with respect to the shipment of items to or from the DPRK for repair, servicing, refurbishing, testing, reverse-engineering, and marketing, regardless of whether ownership or control is transferred, and underscores that the measures specified in paragraph 8 (e) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall also apply to any individual traveling for the purposes of carrying out the activities described in this paragraph;

“8.   Decides that the measures imposed in paragraphs 8 (a) and 8 (b) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall also apply to any item, except food or medicine, if the State determines that such item could directly contribute to the development of the DPRK’s operational capabilities of its armed forces, or to exports that support or enhance the operational capabilities of armed forces of another Member State outside the DPRK, and decides also that this provision shall cease to apply to the supply, sale or transfer of an item, or its procurement, if:

(a)   the State determines that such activity is exclusively for humanitarian purposes or exclusively for livelihood purposes which will not be used by DPRK individuals or entities to generate revenue, and also not related to any activity prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, provided that the State notifies the Committee in advance of such determination and also informs the Committee of measures taken to prevent the diversion of the item for such other purposes, or

(b)   the Committee has determined on a case-by-case basis that a particular supply, sale or transfer would not be contrary to the objectives of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution;

“9.   Recalls that paragraph 9 of resolution 1874 (2009) requires States to prohibit the procurement from the DPRK of technical training, advice, services or assistance related to the provision, manufacture, maintenance or use of arms and related materiel, and clarifies that this paragraph prohibits States from engaging in the hosting of trainers, advisors, or other officials for the purpose of military-, paramilitary- or police-related training;

“10.  Decides that the measures specified in paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall apply also to the individuals and entities listed in Annex I and II of this resolution and to any individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, and to entities owned or controlled by them, including through illicit means;

“11.  Decides that the measures specified in paragraph 8 (e) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall apply also to the individuals listed in Annex I of this resolution and to individuals acting on their behalf or at their direction;

“12.  Affirms that “economic resources,” as referred to in paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 1718 (2006), includes assets of every kind, whether tangible or intangible, movable or immovable, actual or potential, which potentially may be used to obtain funds, goods, or services, such as vessels (including maritime vessels);

“13.  Decides that if a Member State determines that a DPRK diplomat, governmental representative, or other DPRK national acting in a governmental capacity, is working on behalf or at the direction of a designated individual or entity, or of an individual or entities assisting in the evasion of sanctions or violating the provisions of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, then the Member State shall expel the individual from its territory for the purpose of repatriation to the DPRK consistent with applicable national and international law, provided that nothing in this paragraph shall impede the transit of representatives of the Government of the DPRK to the United Nations Headquarters or other UN facilities to conduct United Nations business, and decides that the provisions of this paragraph shall not apply with respect to a particular individual if: a) the presence of the individual is required for fulfillment of a judicial process, b) the presence of the individual is required exclusively for medical, safety or other humanitarian purposes, or c) the Committee has determined on a case-by-case basis that the expulsion of the individual would be contrary to the objectives of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) and this resolution;

“14.  Decides that, if a Member State determines that an individual who is not a national of that State is working on behalf of or at the direction of a designated individual or entity or assisting the evasion of sanctions or violating the provisions of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, then Member States shall expel the individual from their territories for the purpose of repatriation to the individual’s state of nationality, consistent with applicable national and international law, unless the presence of the individual is required for fulfillment of a judicial process or exclusively for medical, safety or other humanitarian purposes, or the Committee has determined on a case-by-case basis that the expulsion of the individual would be contrary to the objectives of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, provided that nothing in this paragraph shall impede the transit of representatives of the Government of the DPRK to the United Nations Headquarters or other UN facilities to conduct United Nations business;

“15.  Underscores that, as a consequence of implementing the obligations imposed in paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 1718 (2006) and paragraphs 8 and 11 of resolution 2094 (2013), all Member States shall close the representative offices of designated entities and prohibit such entities, as well as individuals or entities acting for or on their behalf, directly or indirectly, from participating in joint ventures or any other business arrangements, and underscores that if a representative of such an office is a DPRK national, then States are required to expel the individual from their territories for the purpose of repatriation to the DPRK consistent with applicable national and international law, pursuant to and consistent with paragraph 10 of resolution 2094 (2013);

“16.  Notes that the DPRK frequently uses front companies, shell companies, joint ventures and complex, opaque ownership structures for the purpose of violating measures imposed in relevant Security Council resolutions, and, in this regard, directs the Committee, with the support of the Panel, to identify individuals and entities engaging in such practices and, if appropriate, designate them to be subject to the measures imposed in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) and this resolution;

“17.  Decides that all Member States shall prevent specialized teaching or training of DPRK nationals within their territories or by their nationals of disciplines which could contribute to the DPRK’s proliferation sensitive nuclear activities or the development of nuclear weapon delivery systems, including teaching or training in advanced physics, advanced computer simulation and related computer sciences, geospatial navigation, nuclear engineering, aerospace engineering, aeronautical engineering and related disciplines;

“18.  Decides that all States shall inspect the cargo within or transiting through their territory, including in their airports, seaports and free trade zones, that has originated in the DPRK, or that is destined for the DPRK, or has been brokered or facilitated by the DPRK or its nationals, or by individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, or entities owned or controlled by them, or by designated individuals or entities, or that is being transported on DPRK flagged aircraft or maritime vessels, for the purposes of ensuring that no items are transferred in violation of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) and this resolution, and calls upon States to implement such inspections in a manner that minimizes the impact on the transfer of cargo that the State determines is for humanitarian purposes;

“19.  Decides that Member States shall prohibit their nationals and those in their territories from leasing or chartering their flagged vessels or aircraft or providing crew services to the DPRK, and decides that this prohibition shall also apply with respect to any designated individuals or entities, any other DPRK entities, any other individuals or entities whom the State determines to have assisted in the evasion of sanctions or in violating the provisions of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, any individuals or entities acting on behalf or at the direction of any of the aforementioned, and any entities owned or controlled by any of the aforementioned, calls upon Member States to de‑register any vessel that is owned, operated or crewed by the DPRK, further calls upon Member States not to register any such vessel that is de-registered by another Member State pursuant to this paragraph, and decides that this provision shall not apply with respect to such leasing, chartering or provision of crew services notified to the Committee in advance on a case-by-case basis accompanied by: a) information demonstrating that such activities are exclusively for livelihood purposes which will not be used by DPRK individuals or entities to generate revenue, and b) information on measures taken to prevent such activities from contributing to violations of the aforementioned resolutions;

“20.  Decides that all States shall prohibit their nationals, persons subject to their jurisdiction and entities incorporated in their territory or subject to their jurisdiction from registering vessels in the DPRK, obtaining authorization for a vessel to use the DPRK flag, and from owning, leasing, operating, providing any vessel classification, certification or associated service, or insuring any vessel flagged by the DPRK, and decides that this measure shall not apply to activities notified in advance by the Committee on a case-by-case basis, following provision to the Committee of detailed information on the activities, including the names of individuals and entities involved in them, information demonstrating that such activities are exclusively for livelihood purposes which will not be used by DPRK individuals or entities to generate revenue and on measures taken to prevent such activities from contributing to violations of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution;

“21.  Decides that all States shall deny permission to any aircraft to take off from, land in or overfly, unless under the condition of landing for inspection, their territory, if they have information that provides reasonable grounds to believe that the aircraft contains items the supply, sale, transfer or export of which is prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, except in the case of an emergency landing, and calls upon all States, when considering whether to grant overflight permission to flights to assess known risk factors;

“22.  Decides that all Member States shall prohibit the entry into their ports of any vessel if the Member State has information that provides reasonable grounds to believe the vessel is owned or controlled, directly or indirectly, by a designated individual or entity, or contains cargo the supply, sale, transfer or export of which is prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, unless entry is required in the case of emergency or in the case of return to its port of origination, or for inspection, or unless the Committee determines in advance that such entry is required for humanitarian purposes or any other purposes consistent with the objectives of this resolution;

“23.  Recalls that the Committee has designated the DPRK firm Ocean Maritime Management (OMM), notes that the vessels specified in Annex III of this resolution are economic resources controlled or operated by OMM and therefore subject to the asset freeze imposed in paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 1718 (2006), and underscores that Member States are required to implement the relevant provisions of that resolution;

“24.  Decides that the DPRK shall abandon all chemical and biological weapons and weapons-related programs, and shall act strictly in accordance with its obligations as a State Party to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, or Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and Their Destruction, and calls upon the DPRK to accede to the Convention of the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and Their Destruction, and then to immediately comply with its provisions;

“25.  Decides to adjust the measures imposed by paragraph 8 of resolution 1718 (2006) and this resolution through the designation of additional goods, directs the Committee to undertake its tasks to this effect and to report to the Security Council within fifteen days of adoption of this resolution, and further decides that, if the Committee has not acted, then the Security Council will complete action to adjust the measures within seven days of receiving that report;

“26.  Directs the Committee to review and update the items contained in S/2006/853/CORR.1 no later than sixty days from the adoption of this resolution and on an annual basis thereafter;

“27.  Decides that the measures imposed in paragraphs 8 (a) and 8 (b) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall also apply to any item if the State determines that such item could contribute to the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programs or other weapons of mass destruction programs, activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), and this resolution, or to the evasion of measures imposed by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), and this resolution;

“28.  Reaffirms paragraphs 14 through 16 of resolution 1874 (2009), and paragraph 8 of resolution 2087 (2013), and decides that these paragraphs shall apply also with respect to any items the supply, sale or transfer of which is prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution identified in inspections conducted pursuant to paragraph 18 of this resolution;

“29.  Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, coal, iron, and iron ore, and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of such material from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, and whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK, and decides that this provision shall not apply with respect to:

(a)   Coal that the procuring State confirms on the basis of credible information has originated outside the DPRK and was transported through the DPRK solely for export from the Port of Rajin (Rason), provided that the State notifies the Committee in advance and such transactions are unrelated to generating revenue for the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programs or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution; and,

(b)   Transactions that are determined to be exclusively for livelihood purposes and unrelated to generating revenue for the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programs or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution;

“30.  Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, gold, titanium ore, vanadium ore, and rare earth minerals, and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of such material from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, and whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK;

“31.  Decides that all States shall prevent the sale or supply, by their nationals or from their territories or using their flag vessels or aircraft, of aviation fuel, including aviation gasoline, naptha-type jet fuel, kerosene-type jet fuel, and kerosene-type rocket fuel, whether or not originating in their territory, to the territory of the DPRK, or unless the Committee has approved in advance on an exceptional case-by-case basis the transfer to the DPRK of such products for verified essential humanitarian needs, subject to specified arrangements for effective monitoring of delivery and use, and decides also that this provision shall not apply with respect to the sale or supply of aviation fuel to civilian passenger aircraft outside the DPRK exclusively for consumption during its flight to the DPRK and its return flight;

“32.  Decides that the asset freeze imposed by paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall apply to all the funds, other financial assets and economic resources outside of the DPRK that are owned or controlled, directly or indirectly, by entities of the Government of the DPRK or the Worker’s Party of Korea, or by individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, or by entities owned or controlled by them, that the State determines are associated with the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programs or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, decides further that all States except the DPRK shall ensure that any funds, financial assets or economic resources are prevented from being made available by their nationals or by any individuals or entities within their territories, to or for the benefit of such individuals or entities, or individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, or entities owned or controlled by them, and decides that these measures shall not apply with respect to funds, other financial assets and economic resources that are required to carry out activities of the DPRK’s missions to the United Nations and its specialized agencies and related organizations or other diplomatic and consular missions of the DPRK, and to any funds, other financial assets and economic resources that the Committee determines in advance on a case-by-case basis are required for the delivery of humanitarian assistance, denuclearization or any other purpose consistent with the objectives of this resolution;

“33.  Decides that States shall prohibit in their territories the opening and operation of new branches, subsidiaries, and representative offices of DPRK banks, decides further that States shall prohibit financial institutions within their territories or subject to their jurisdiction from establishing new joint ventures and from taking an ownership interest in or establishing or maintaining correspondent relationships with DPRK banks, unless such transactions have been approved by the Committee in advance, and decides that States shall take the necessary measures to close such existing branches, subsidiaries and representative offices, and also to terminate such joint ventures, ownership interests and correspondent banking relationships with DPRK banks within ninety days from the adoption of this resolution;

“34.  Decides that States shall prohibit financial institutions within their territories or subject to their jurisdiction from opening new representative offices or subsidiaries, branches or banking accounts in the DPRK;

“35.  Decides that States shall take the necessary measures to close existing representative offices, subsidiaries or banking accounts in the DPRK within ninety days, if the State concerned has credible information that provides reasonable grounds to believe that such financial services could contribute to the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programs, or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, and decides further that this provision shall not apply if the Committee determines on a case-by-case basis that such offices, subsidiaries or accounts are required for the delivery of humanitarian assistance or the activities of diplomatic missions in the DPRK pursuant to the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations or the activities of the United Nations or its specialized agencies or related organizations, or for any other purposes consistent with resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution;

“36.  Decides that all States shall prohibit public and private financial support from within their territories or by persons or entities subject to their jurisdiction for trade with the DPRK (including the granting of export credits, guarantees or insurance to their nationals or entities involved in such trade) where such financial support could contribute to the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programs or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, including paragraph 8;

“37.  Expresses concern that transfers to the DPRK of gold may be used to evade the measures imposed in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) and this resolution, and clarifies that all States shall apply the measures set forth in paragraph 11 of resolution 2094 (2013) to the transfers of gold, including through gold couriers, transiting to and from the DPRK so as to ensure such transfers of gold do not contribute to the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programs, or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, or to the evasion of measures imposed by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution;

“38.  Recalls that the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) has called upon countries to apply enhanced due diligence and effective countermeasure to protect their jurisdictions from the DPRK’s illicit financial activity, and calls upon Member States to apply the FATF Recommendation 7, its Interpretive Note, and related guidance to effectively implement targeted financial sanctions related to proliferation;

“39.  Reaffirms the measures imposed in paragraph 8 (a) (iii) of resolution 1718 (2006) regarding luxury goods, and clarifies that the term “luxury goods” includes, but is not limited to, the items specified in Annex V of this resolution;

“40.  Calls upon all States to report to the Security Council within ninety days of the adoption of this resolution, and thereafter upon request by the Committee, on concrete measures they have taken in order to implement effectively the provisions of this resolution, requests the Panel of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1874 (2009), in cooperation with other UN sanctions monitoring groups, to continue its efforts to assist States in preparing and submitting such reports in a timely manner, and directs the Committee to prioritize outreach to those Member States who have never submitted implementation reports as requested by the Security Council;

“41.  Calls upon all States to supply information at their disposal regarding non-compliance with the measures imposed in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution;

“42.  Encourages all States to examine the circumstances of previously reported sanctions violations, particularly the items seized or activities prevented pursuant to the relevant resolutions, so as to assist in ensuring full and appropriate implementation of these resolutions, especially paragraph 27 of this resolution, and notes in this regard the reporting of the Panel of Experts and the information regarding sanctions violations that the Committee has released publicly;

“43.  Directs the Committee to respond effectively to violations of the measures decided in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), and this resolution, and, in this regard, directs the Committee to designate additional individuals and entities to be subject to the measures imposed in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), and this resolution;

“44.  Directs the Committee to continue its efforts to assist Member States in implementing the measures imposed on the DPRK, and, in this regard, requests the Committee to draft and circulate a comprehensive compilation of all the measures imposed in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), and this resolution so as to facilitate Member State implementation;

“45.  Directs the Committee to update the information contained on the Committee’s list of individuals and entities, including new aliases and front companies, and directs the Committee to complete this task within 45 days of the adoption of this resolution and every twelve months thereafter;

“46.  Decides that the mandate of the Committee, as set out in paragraph 12 of resolution 1718 (2006), shall apply with respect to the measures imposed in resolution 1874 (2009), 2094 (2013) and this resolution;

“47.  Emphasizes the importance of all States, including the DPRK, taking the necessary measures to ensure that no claim shall lie at the instance of the DPRK, or of any person or entity in the DPRK, or of persons or entities designated for measures set forth in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, or any person claiming through or for the benefit of any such person or entity, in connection with any contract or other transaction where its performance was prevented by reason of the measures imposed by this resolution or previous resolutions;

“48.  Underlines that measures imposed by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) and this resolution are not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian population of the DPRK or to affect negatively those activities, including economic activities and cooperation, that are not prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) or this resolution, and the work of international organizations and non‑governmental organization carrying out assistance and relief activities in the DPRK for the benefit of the civilian population of the DPRK;

“49.  Reiterates the importance of maintaining peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and in north-east Asia at large, and expresses its commitment to a peaceful, diplomatic and political solution to the situation and welcomes efforts by Council members as well as other States to facilitate a peaceful and comprehensive solution through dialogue and to refrain from any actions that might aggravate tensions;

“50.  Reaffirms its support to the Six Party Talks, calls for their resumption, and reiterates its support for the commitments set forth in the Joint Statement of 19 September 2005 issued by China, the DPRK, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States, including that the goal of the Six-Party Talks is the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner, that the United States and the DPRK undertook to respect each other’s sovereignty and exist peacefully together, and that the Six Parties undertook to promote economic cooperation, and all other relevant commitments;

“51.  Affirms that it shall keep the DPRK’s actions under continuous review and is prepared to strengthen, modify, suspend or lift the measures as may be needed in light of the DPRK’s compliance, and, in this regard, expresses its determination to take further significant measures in the event of a further DPRK nuclear test or launch;

“52.  Decides to remain seized of the matter.”

Annex I

Travel Ban/Asset Freeze (Individuals)

1.    CHOE CHUN-SIK

a.    Description: Choe Chun-sik was the director of the Second Academy of Natural Sciences (SANS) and was the head of the DPRK’s long-range missile program.

b.    AKA: Choe Chun Sik; Ch’oe Ch’un Sik

c.    Identifiers: DOB: 12 October 1954; Nationality: DPRK

2.    CHOE SONG IL

a.    Description: Tanchon Commercial Bank Representative in Vietnam

b.    AKA: NA

c.    Identifiers: Passport: 472320665; Passport Date of Expiration: 26 Sep 2017; Passport: 563120356; Nationality: DPRK

3.    HYON KWANG IL

a.    Description: Hyon Kwang Il is the Department Director for Scientific Development at the National Aerospace Development Administration.

b.    AKA: Hyon Gwang Il

c.    Identifiers: DOB: 27 May 1961; Nationality: DPRK

4.    JANG BOM SU

a.    Description: Tanchon Commercial Bank Representative in Syria

b.    AKA: Jang Pom Su

c.    Identifiers: DOB: 15 April 1957; Nationality: DPRK

5.    JANG YONG SON

a.    Description: Korea Mining Development Trading Corporation (KOMID) Representative in Iran

b.    AKA: NA

c.    Identifiers: DOB: 20 February 1957; Nationality: DPRK

6.    JON MYONG GUK

a.    Description: Tanchon Commercial Bank Representative in Syria

b.    AKA: Cho’n Myo’ng-kuk

c.    Identifiers: Passport: 4721202031; Passport Date of Expiration: 21 Feb 2017; Nationality: DPRK; DOB: 18 Oct 1976

7.    KANG MUN KIL

a.    Description: Kang Mun Kil has conducted nuclear procurement activities as a representative of Namchongang, also known as Namhung.

b.    AKA: Jiang Wen-ji

c.    Identifiers: Passport: PS 472330208; Passport Date of Expiration: 4 July 2017; Nationality: DPRK

8.    KANG RYONG

a.    Description: Korea Mining Development Trading Corporation (KOMID) Representative in Syria

b.    AKA: NA

c.    Identifiers: DOB: 21 August 1969; Nationality: DPRK

9.    KIM JUNG JONG

a.    Description: Tanchon Commercial Bank Representative in Vietnam

b.    AKA: Kim Chung Chong

c.    Identifiers: Passport: 199421147 Passport Date of Expiration: 29 Dec 2014; Passport: 381110042, Passport Date of Expiration: 25 Jan 2016; Passport: 563210184, Passport Date of Expiration: 18 Jun 2018; DOB: 07 Nov 1966, Nationality: DPRK

10.   KIM KYU

a.    Description: Korea Mining Development Trading Corporation (KOMID) External Affairs Officer

b.    AKA: NA

c.    Identifiers: DOB: 30 July 1968, Nationality: DPRK

11.   KIM TONG MY’ONG

a.    Description: Kim Tong My’ong is the President of Tanchon Commercial Bank and has held various positions within Tanchon Commercial bank since at least 2002. He has also played a role in managing Amroggang’s affairs.

b.    AKA: Kim Chin-So’k, Kim Tong-Myong, Kim Jin-Sok; Kim, Hyok-Chol

c.    Identifiers: DOB: 1964; Nationality: DPRK

12.   KIM YONG CHOL

a.    Description: KOMID Representative in Iran

b.    AKA: NA

c.    Identifiers: DOB. 18 February 1962; Nationality: DPRK

13.   KO TAE HUN

a.    Description: Tanchon Commercial Bank Representative

b.    AKA: Kim Myong Gi

c.    Identifiers: Passport: 563120630; Passport Date of Expiration: 20 March 2018, D.O.B. 25 May 1972; Nationality: DPRK

14.   RI MAN GON

a.    Description: Ri Man Gon is the Minister of the Munitions Industry Department.

b.    AKA: n/a

c.    Identifiers: DOB: 29 October 1945; Passport number: PO381230469; Passport Date of Expiration: 6 April 2016; Nationality: DPRK

15.   RYU JIN

a.    Description: KOMID Representative in Syria

b.    AKA: NA

c.    Identifiers: DOB: 07 August 1965; Passport Number: 563410081; Nationality: DPRK

16.   YU CHOL U

a.    Description: Yu Chol U is the Director of the National Aerospace Development Administration.

b.    AKA: n/a

c.    Identifiers: Nationality: DPRK

List Update for Alias: Ra, Kyong-Su (KPi.008) — New AKA: Chang, Myong Ho

Annex II

Asset Freeze (Entities)

1.    ACADEMY OF NATIONAL DEFENSE SCIENCE

a.    Description: The Academy of National Defense Science is involved in the DPRK’s efforts to advance the development of its ballistic missile and nuclear weapons programs.

b.    AKA: n/a

c.    Location: Pyongyang, DPRK

2.    CHONGCHONGANG SHIPPING COMPANY

a.    Description: The Chongchongang Shipping Company, through its vessel, the Chong Chon Gang, attempted to directly import the illicit shipment of conventional weapons and arms to the DPRK in July 2013.

b.    AKA: Chong Chon Gang Shipping Co. Ltd.

c.    Location: Address: 817 Haeun, Donghung-dong, Central District, Pyongyang, DPRK; Alternate Address: 817, Haeum, Tonghun-dong, Chung-gu, Pyongyang, DPRK; IMO Number: 5342883

3.    DAEDONG CREDIT BANK (DCB)

a.    Description: Daedong Credit Bank has provided financial services to the Korea Mining Development Trading Corporation (KOMID) and Tanchon Commercial Bank. Since at least 2007, DCB has facilitated hundreds of financial transactions worth millions of dollars on behalf of KOMID and Tanchon Commercial Bank. In some cases, DCB has knowingly facilitated transactions by using deceptive financial practices.

b.    AKA: DCB; AKA: Taedong Credit Bank

c.    Location: Address: Suite 401, Potonggang Hotel, Ansan-Dong, Pyongchon District, Pyongyang, DPRK; Alternate Address: Ansan-dong, Botonggang Hotel, Pongchon, Pyongyang, DPRK; SWIFT: DCBK KKPY

4.    HESONG TRADING COMPANY

a.    Description: The Korea Mining Development Trading Corporation (KOMID) is the parent company of Hesong Trading Corporation.

b.    Location: Pyongyang, DPRK

5.    KOREA KWANGSON BANKING CORPORATION (KKBC)

a.    Description: KKBC provides financial services in support to Tanchon Commercial Bank and Korea Hyoksin Trading Corporation, a subordinate of the Korea Ryonbong General Corporation. Tanchon Commercial Bank has used KKBC to facilitate funds transfers likely amounting to millions of dollars, including transfers involving Korea Mining Development Corporation related funds.

b.    AKA: KKBC

c.    Address: Jungson-dong, Sungri Street, Central District, Pyongyang, DPRK

6.    KOREA KWANGSONG TRADING CORPORATION

a.    Description: The Korea Ryongbong General Corporation is the parent company of Korea Kwangsong Trading Corporation.

b.    Address: Rakwon-dong, Pothonggang District, Pyongyang, DPRK

7.    MINISTRY OF ATOMIC ENERGY INDUSTRY

a.    Description: The Ministry of Atomic Energy Industry was created in 2013 for the purpose of modernizing the DPRK’s atomic energy industry to increase the production of nuclear materials, improve their quality, and further develop an independent DPRK nuclear industry. As such, the MAEI is known to be a critical player in the DPRK’s development of nuclear weapons and is in charge of day-to-day operation of the country’s nuclear weapons program, and under it are other nuclear-related organizations. Under this ministry are a number of nuclear-related organizations and research centers, as well as two committees: an Isotope Application Committee and a Nuclear Energy Committee. The MAEI also directs a nuclear research center at Yongbyun, the site of the DPRK’s known plutonium facilities. Furthermore, in the 2015 Panel of Experts (POE) report, the POE stated that Ri Je-son, a former director of the GBAE who was designated by the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1718 (2006) in 2009 for engagement in or support for nuclear related programs, was appointed as head of the MAEI on April 9, 2014.

b.    AKA: MAEI

c.    Address: Haeun-2-dong, Pyongchon District, Pyongyang, DPRK

8.    MUNITIONS INDUSTRY DEPARTMENT

a.    Description: The Munitions Industry Department is involved in key aspects of the DPRK’s missile program. MID is responsible for overseeing the development of the DPRK’s ballistic missiles, including the Taepo Dong-2. The MID oversees the DPRK’s weapons production and R&D programs, including the DPRK’s ballistic missile program. The Second Economic Committee and the Second Academy of Natural Sciences — also designated in August 2010 — are subordinate to the MID. The MID in recent years has worked to develop the KN08 road-mobile ICBM.

b.    AKA: Military Supplies Industry Department

c.    Location: Pyongyang, DPRK

9.    NATIONAL AEROSPACE DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

a.    Description: NADA is involved in the DPRK’s development of space science and technology, including satellite launches and carrier rockets.

b.    AKA: NADA

c.    Location: DPRK

10.   OFFICE 39

a.    Description: DPRK government entity.

b.    AKA: Office #39; AKA: Office No. 39; AKA: Bureau 39; AKA: Central Committee Bureau 39; AKA: Third Floor; AKA: Division 39

c.    Location: DPRK

11.   RECONNAISSANCE GENERAL BUREAU

a.    Description: The Reconnaissance General Bureau is the DPRK’s premiere intelligence organization, created in early 2009 by the merger of existing intelligence organizations from the Korean Workers’ Party, the Operations Department and Office 35, and the Reconnaissance Bureau of the Korean People’s Army. The Reconnaissance General Bureau trades in conventional arms and controls the DPRK conventional arms firm Green Pine Associated Corporation.

b.    AKA: Chongch’al Ch’ongguk; KPA Unit 586; RGB

c.    Location: Address: Hyongjesan-Guyok, Pyongyang, DPRK; Alternate Address: Nungrado, Pyongyang, DPRK.

12.   SECOND ECONOMIC COMMITTEE

a.    Description: The Second Economic Committee is involved in key aspects of the DPRK’s missile program. The Second Economic Committee is responsible for overseeing the production of the DPRK’s ballistic missiles, and directs the activities of KOMID.

b.    AKA: N/A

c.    Location: Kangdong, DPRK

List Update for Alias: NAMCHONGANG TRADING CORPORATION (KPe.004) — New AKA: Namhung Trading Corporation

Annex III

OMM Vessels

Ship Name

IMO Number

 

 

1. CHOL RYONG (RYONG GUN BONG)

8606173

2. CHONG BONG(GREENLIGHT)(BLUE NOUVELLE)

8909575

3. CHONG RIM 2

8916293

4. DAWNLIGHT

9110236

5. EVER BRIGHT 88 (J STAR)

8914934

6. GOLD STAR 3 (BENEVOLENCE 2)

8405402

7. HOE RYONG

9041552

8. HU CHANG (O UN CHONG NYON)

8330815

9. HUI CHON (HWANG GUM SAN 2)

8405270

10. JH 86

8602531

11. JI HYE SAN (HYOK SIN 2)

8018900

12. JIN Tal

9163154·

13. JIN TENG

9163166

14. KANG GYE (PI RYU GANG)

8829593

15. MI RIM

8713471

16. MI RIM 2

9361407

17. O RANG (PO THONG GANG)

8829555

18. ORION STAR (RICHOCEAN)

9333589

19. RA NAM 2

8625545

20. RANAM 3

9314650

21. RYO MYONG

8987333

22. RYONG RIM (JON JIN 2)

8018912

23. SE PHO (RAK WON 2)

8819017

24. SONGJIN (JANG JA SAN CHONG NYON HO)

8133530

25. SOUTH HILL 2

8412467

26. SOUTH HILL 5

9138680

27. TAN CHON (RYONG GANG 2)

7640378

28. THAE PYONG SAN (PETREL 1)

9009085

29. TONG HUNG SAN (CHONG CHON GANG)

7937317

30. GRAND KARO

8511823

31. TONG HUNG 1

8661575

Annex IV:

Luxury Goods

(a)   Luxury watches: wrist, pocket, and other with a case of precious metal or of metal clad with precious metal

(b)   Transportation items, as follows:

(1)   aquatic recreational vehicles (such as personal watercraft)

(2)   snowmobiles (valued greater than $2,000)

(c)   Items of lead crystal

(d)   Recreational sports equipment

For information media. Not an official record.