Opening 2016 Session, Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations Recommends Special Consultative Status for 57 Entities, Defers Action on 64

25 January 2016
ECOSOC/6727-NGO/818

Opening 2016 Session, Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations Recommends Special Consultative Status for 57 Entities, Defers Action on 64

Committee on NGOs,
1st & 2nd Meetings (AM & PM)

Opening its regular session for 2016, the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations today recommended 57 organizations for special consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council, and deferred action on the status of 64 others.

The 19-member Committee vets applications submitted by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), recommending general, special or roster status on the basis of such criteria as the applicant’s mandate, governance and financial regime.  Organizations enjoying general and special status can attend meetings of the Council and issue statements, while those with general status can also speak during meetings and propose agenda items.  Organizations with roster status can only attend meetings.

Action on several applications were postponed because Committee members requested further information from the candidates about, among other items, details of their respective organizations’ projects, partners, expenditures, sources of funding and relationship with United Nations system actors.

At the start of the meeting, the Committee adopted its agenda (document E/C.2/2016/1) and programme of work.  It re-elected by acclamation Jorge Dotta (Uruguay), on behalf of the Group of Latin American and Caribbean States as its Chair; and Elif Çaliskan (Turkey), on behalf of the Western European and other States Group, Farid Jabrayilov (Azerbaijan), on behalf of the Eastern European States Group, and Hacen Eleyatt (Mauritania), on behalf of the African States Group, as Vice-Chairs.  It postponed the election of its remaining Vice-Chair.  The Committee also decided that Mr. Jabrayilov (Azerbaijan) would continue to serve as Rapporteur.

Navid Hanif, Director of the Office for Economic and Social Council Support and Coordination in the Department of Economic and Social Affairs, said with the adoption of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Agreement, the focus had turned to the their implementation.  Over the years, such organizations had increasingly become a part of the process through their participation in consultations, high-level meetings, thematic debates or briefings.  It was widely acknowledged that non-governmental organizations had an important role in the delivery of results and the review of implementation.

The 2016 theme of the Economic and Social Council was “Implementing the post-2015 development agenda:  moving from commitments to results”, he said.  The Committee could benefit from active participation of the non-governmental organizations in engendering a culture of results.  An increase in the applications and reports was a direct reflection of the level of interest that the organizations were showing in the work of the United Nations.  The Committee, to that end, needed to consider ways to handle with growing workload in an efficient and timely manner.  Furthermore, the support that the Secretariat provided to the Committee was under strain.  While his office made every effort, it was a challenge to handle the fast growing commitments with the existing resources.

Mr. Dotta, Committee Chair, said he was fully committed to working closely with all to enable a seamless and successful session.  The newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals should spur the Committee’s efforts to ensure that organizations were acknowledged by granting consultative status with the Economic and Social Council as speedily as possible.  In that effort, the Committee must remain true to the spirit of resolution 1996/31.

In 2016, the Committee would consider 275 new applications, in addition to 200 applications deferred from previous sessions, 404 quadrennial reports of NGOs in general and special consultative status and 47 quadrennial reports deferred from earlier sessions.  While those numbers indicated a sharp growth in the workload, the number of days at the disposal of the Committee was not changed.  To that end, the Committee would only be able to complete its task by working expeditiously and managing its time efficiently.

Alberto Padova, Acting Chief of the Non-Governmental Organization Branch of the Office for Economic and Social Council Support and Coordination, drawing attention to the daunting workload, said the Committee was the victim of its own success.  His office wanted to ensure the Committee could successfully implement its mandate.  For its part, the Office monitored the activities of the non-governmental organizations which were currently in consultative status with the Council.  As the workload had increased over the years, he called upon Committee members to give due consideration to allocate more resources to meet growing needs.

The Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations will meet again at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, 26 January, to continue its session, which runs from 25 January to 3 February.

Special Consultative Status

The Committee recommended that the Economic and Social Council grant special consultative status to the following 57 organizations:

“Coup de Pousse” Chaîne de l'Espoir Nord-Sud (Togo);

“IDEA” International Dialogue for Environmental Action Public Association (Azerbaijan);

“Tort for Torture Victims Centre” (Cameroon);

ABAAD Resource Center for Gender Equality (Lebanon);

Action Communautaire Femme et Enfant (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Action Jeunesse pour le Développement (Congo);

Action pour la protection des droits de l'homme en Mauritanie (Mauritania);

Action pour le Développement Humain au Congo (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Agency for Health and Food Security (Ghana);

Alliance nationale des consommateurs et de l'environnement (Togo);

ANAJA (L’Eternel a répondu) (Togo);

Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (Thailand);

Asociación Civil Generación Par (Argentina);

Asociaţia Obştească “Centrul Ecologic-Recuperare, Reciclare, Reintegrare” (Moldova);

Association Aide aux femmes et enfants (Congo);

Association Genèse (Congo);

Association mauritanienne pour la promotion des droits de l’homme (Mauritania);

Association pour le Développement Humain en Mauritanie (Mauritania);

Association Togolaise “Femmes et SIDA” (Togo);

Bakhter Development Network (BDN) (Afghanistan);

Buddies Association of Volunteers for Orphans, Disabled and Abandoned Children (Cameroon);

Bureau Pour la Croissance Intégrale et la Dignité de L’enfant (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Center of Civil Initiatives Support (Uzbekistan);

Centre d’accompagnement des filles désoeuvrées (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Change Human’s Life (Côte d'Ivoire);

Climate Change Excellence Africa (Kenya);

Conquer Nepal (Nepal);

DHAN (Development of Humane Action) Foundation (India);

Disability Association of Tavana (Iran);

Enable India (India);

Fondation Monseigneur Emmanuel Kataliko (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Fondation Ngangambi (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Fondation Tamukwidi Matiti Donatien (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Global Youth Organization (Iraq);

Indian Trust for Rural Heritage and Development (India);

Jeevan Jyothi Charitable Trust (India);

Kapo Seba Sangha (KSS) (Bangladesh);

Karna-Subarna Welfare Society (India);

Malankara Social Service Society (India);

Mouvement des Jeunes pour le Réveil et le Développement (Benin);

National Educational, Social and Traditional Knowledge (NEST) Foundation (India);

National Old Folks of Liberia, Inc. (Liberia);

Nimbus Foundation (Ghana);

Observatório Nacional de Segurança Viária e Veicular (Brazil);

ONG Aesadev Togo (Togo);

Orphan Charity Foundation (Iraq);

Pakistan Lions Youth Council Khanewal (Pakistan);

Pakistan Rural Workers Social Welfare Organization (PRWSWO) (Pakistan);

Palestinian Center for Development and Media Freedoms “MADA” (State of Palestine);

Phamous Vision (Ghana);

Porini Welfare Association (Kenya);

Potohar Organization for Development Advocacy (PODA) (Pakistan);

Redemption Research for Health and Educational Development Society (India);

Regroupement des Jeunes Africains pour la Démocratie et le Développement — Section Togo (Togo);

Réseau Unité pour le Développement de Mauritanie (Mauritania);

The Committee postponed consideration of the following 64 organizations:

African Arts Institute (South Africa) — as several delegates posed questions.  The representative of South Africa requested that the group was retained on the pending list because some of the answers provided were incoherent.  The representative of the United States asked if there was a specific question and if it was the Chair’s plan to revisit the application before moving onto the deferred applications.  The representative of India asked the organization to provide details on its negative budget, its expenditures and how it would continue its work.

Aleradah & Altageer National Society (Bahrain) — as the representative of Mauritania asked for details on activities in 2015.  The representative of India asked about financial details, including the negative budget.

Association du Développement et de la Promotion de Droits de l'Homme (Mauritania) — as the representative of South Africa asked about financial details.

Association for Integrated Sustainable Development Initiatives (Cameroon) — as the representative of South Africa asked how the organization was coping with its negative budget expenditure.

Association for the Protection of Women and Children’s Rights (Cameroon) — as the representative of South Africa asked about its income and expenditure, as those items were exactly the same, which needed to be explained.

Association locale pour le devéloppement integral (Democratic Republic of the Congo) — as the representative of South Africa asked for an explanation of the negative balance of $14 million.

Association nationale de promotion et de protection des droits de l'homme (Cameroon) — as the representative of Cuba asked the organization to provide details of its local partners.  The representative of the United States asked if the previous question had referred to partner organizations, to which Cuba’s delegate replied that it had.

Association of Youths with Vision (Gambia) — as the representative of South Africa asked about the group’s negative budget balance and how it would meet its objectives.

Association pour la lutte contre la dependence (Mauritania) — as the representative of South Africa asked for financial details.

Association pour la solidarité & développement durable (Mauritania) — as the representative of Mauritania asked about details on financial information.

Association pour le Développement Durable la Promotion des Droits Humains et la Lutte Contre la Pauvreté (Mauritania) — as the representative of Mauritania asked about the group’s work and cooperation with international organizations.

Association Saemaul Undong Burundi (Burundi) — as the representative of Burundi wanted further details on organizations that fund the group and on its participation in United Nations conferences.

Association tunisienne de la santé de la reproduction (Tunisia) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked for further details about the group.

Association un Enfant un Cartable du Burkina Faso (Burkina Faso) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on its finances.

Ballerina Management Institute (India) — as the representative of South Africa asked about clarifications on its broad goals to help anyone in any sector.

Beijing NGO Association for International Exchanges (China) — as the representative of South Africa asked for an explanation of the group’s deficit.

Cameroon League for Development (Cameroon) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details about the group’s declaration that it was based on “godly principles”.

Centre for Corrections and Human Development (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked about further elaboration on the term “socially and maladjusted” persons and on its efforts to work with Parliament.  He also asked about details on the group’s budget deficit.

Coastal Association for Social Transformation (COAST) Trust (Bangladesh) — as the representative of India asked for details about what “service charges” were and about grants received and project expenditures.

Conglomeration of Bengal’s Hotel Owners (India) — as the representative of India said the address listed in the application did not exist and asked for a correct address.

Coordination Waï (Eveil) relative à l’unité nationale et la lutte contre l’esclavage (Mauritania) — as the representative of Mauritania asked for details on the group’s expenditures.

Dalit Welfare Organization (Nepal) — as the representative of India asked for clarification and details on its work and dialogue with the Economic and Social Council, on its budget’s deficit.  The representative of South Africa shared the concerns of the India’s delegate.

Démocratie Dans le Monde (DDM) (Benin) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on expenditures.

Eaglesworth Human Empowerment Foundation (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked about the donations made by exactly which “president” and about clarification of the group’s mission.

Education, Communication and Development Trust (EDUCATR) (India) — as the representative of India asked the group if it had applied for consultative status.  He also requested details on how Government funding was used.

Entrepreneurship Development and Support Initiative (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for clarification on the group’s mandate and budget.

Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB) (Bangladesh) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked about the sources of funding and how that influenced its work with the local population.

Fédération de la Ligue Démocratique des Droits des Femmes (Morocco) — as the representative of South Africa asked about the $1 million deficit and the reasons behind it.

FESTHES “Festival Pour la Santé” (Togo) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on the budget.

Frontier Reconstruction Welfare Agency (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for further details about the organization.

Fundamental Human Rights & Rural Development Association (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for more information on the organization’s funding.

Gestos Soropositividade Comunicação e Gênero (Brazil) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked about details on the deficit in the organization’s budget.

Global Campaign for Education (South Africa) — as the representative of South Africa asked about the organization’s partnership with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and Chile’s representative hoped that the organization will deliver on their commitments soon.

Global Initiative for Positive Change (South Africa) — as the representative of South Africa asked for further details about the relationship between the organization’s mandate and funding.

Glozells Renewable Energy and Environment Society (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for more information on the organization’s funding arrangements.

Gulf Centre for Human Rights (GCHR) Limited (Lebanon) — as the representative of Sudan asked for an explanation of the centre’s deficit.

Heal the Land Initiative in Nigeria (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for clarification on the term ‘internally generated source’.  He also asked whether the organization had applied for a consultative status with the African Union.

Hill-tribes’ Mission Aid of India (India) — as the representative of India asked for the clarification on the activities.

Humanity Family Foundation for Peace & Dev (Nigeria) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked if the organization had only one project at the moment.

Initiative d’opposition contre les discours extrémistes (Mauritania) — as the representative of South Africa noted the controversial concepts used by the organization.

Instituto de Desenvolvimento e Direitos Humanos — IDDH (Brazil) — as the representative of South Africa asked for an explanation of the institute’s deficit.

International Human Right Organization (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for clarification on the organization’s registration.  India’s representative inquired about the names of the board members.

International Non-Olympic Committee (India) — as the representative of India said the organization did not fit the requirements of the Committee.  He recommended that it should not be given a consultative status.  Greece’s delegate asked for more background information about the organization before closing the application.  India’s representative, taking the floor for a second time, said he would circulate a paper explaining his delegation’s objection.

Ishaatool Mohammadiya Research and Development Foundation, Shevgaon (India) — as the representative of India asked for clarification about the organization’s activities.

Leadership Initiative for Transformation & Empowerment (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for the sources of funding.  Iran’s representative asked for details on the deficit in the organization’s budget.

Leah Charity Foundation (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked whether the organization had a consultative status with the African Union.

Liberia Widow Assistance and Development Agency (Liberia) — as the representative of South Africa asked whether the agency was a bank institution.

Ligue Camerounaise des Droits de l’Homme (Cameroon) — as the representative of South Africa asked whether the organization had a consultative status with the African Union.

Lotus Initiative for the Blind (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa noted that the organization had a New Jersey address, yet it operated in Nigeria.  She asked how the organization operated at the grass-roots level.

Maison d’Abraham (Congo) — as the representative of South Africa asked about details on the organization’s budget deficit.

Maiti Nepal (Nepal) — as the representative of South Africa asked about details on the organization’s budget deficit.

Message Welfare Society (Pakistan) — as the representative of India asked for clarification on the membership fee.

Neighbourhood Community Network (India) — as the representative of South Africa asked for clarification on the source of funding.  She also asked for further information about the current projects.  India’s representative asked for clarification about “neighbourhood forums”.

Neighbourhood Environment Watch Foundation (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for clarification on the organization’s address.

Network for Adolescent and Youth of Africa (NAYA) (Kenya) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked for more information about the funding.

Ngamiland Council of Non-Governmental Organisations (Botswana) — as the representative of South Africa said the organization received its major source of income from the United States Agency for International Development.  He then asked why it did not receive funding from the Government of Botswana.

O.N.G. ACHE Internacional (Chile) — as the representative of Cuba asked which Governments provided funding for the organization.

Pakistan Society for the Rehabilitation of the Disabled (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on the current projects.

Pan African Institute for Entrepreneurship and Community Development (Ltd/Gte) (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for clarification on the “ltd” status.  She also asked about the relationship between the Ministry of Finance and the organization.

Partnership for Justice Ltd/Gte (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for clarification on the funding.

People and Police for Egypt for Culture and Scientific Services (Egypt) — as the representative of Sudan asked for more information about the organization’s future plans.  India’s representative asked for clarification on the application.

Pranab Gandharva Gurukul (India) — as the representative of India asked for clarification on the list of activities undertaken by the organization.

Ruldin-Society for Neglected Women of Nigeria (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for clarification on the organization’s investments.

Saavan Foundation (India) — as the representative of India asked for clarification on the sources of funding.

Interactive Discussion

During a question-and-answer session this afternoon, a representative of the organization Asian Association for Public Administration said his group’s main activity was holding annual conferences to increase exchange and interactive dialogue within the academic community.

The representative of India said the work of the organization was primarily academic in nature, were there any guidelines with regard to the work of Economic and Social Council.

In response, that organization’s representative said his group tried to enhance interactive opportunities of scholars.  The group’s agenda had also embraced the topics of concern to the Council, including the Sustainable Development Goals.  Scholars could provide an academic perspective by working with colleagues in the field.South Africa’s representative said, given that the group was solely academic in nature, his delegation was interested in working with groups that made a difference on the ground in terms of, for instance, the Sustainable Development Goals.  As such, he asked how the association made such an impact.

Iran’s representative then asked for details on relations with regional countries and on the group’s budget.

The group’s representative said that while he had focused on his organization’s work in the academic field, the topics related to public administration.  As such, considerations were made in how scholars could work with practitioners in the field.

With regard to the budget, he said it was relatively low because host-country universities typically sponsored events.  The annual budget was based on membership fees.  He said more projects could be considered in the future, perhaps through involvement with the Economic and Social Council.

The Committee then granted special consultative status to the Asian Association for Public Administration.

A representative of the Ariel Foundation International said her group had worked with children and youth in leadership, entrepreneurship and community service since 2002.  The organization had served children in poverty, orphans and other vulnerable groups around the world on the ground level and in the international arena.

Continuing, she said youth could connect via a website, blog and other social media in addition to children’s summits that had coincided with United Nations events.  The organization had also issued reports of transcribed meetings with children delegates, sharing their point of view.

India’s representative welcomed the organization, noting that, according to the website, many activities had taken place in Geneva, which was commendable.  With almost 3,500 volunteers participating, he asked about the impetus for starting the organization and how volunteers were recruited.

Responding, the group’s representative said two ambassadors and herself had launched their idea of a volunteer-driven organization for children and youth within smaller areas.  While the group worked in some cities, they also worked with communities, such as children with HIV/AIDS, she said, underlining that the programmes were made by the people for the people.

The Committee then granted special consultative status to the Ariel Foundation International.

For information media. Not an official record.