Security Council Demands End to Yemen Violence, Adopting Resolution 2216 (2015), with Russian Federation Abstaining

SC/11859
14 April 2015
7426th Meeting (AM)

Security Council Demands End to Yemen Violence, Adopting Resolution 2216 (2015), with Russian Federation Abstaining

Also Imposes Sanctions on Key Figures in Militia Operations

Imposing sanctions on individuals it said were undermining the stability of Yemen, the Security Council today demanded that all parties in the embattled country, in particular the Houthis, immediately and unconditionally end violence and refrain from further unilateral actions that threatened the political transition.

Adopting resolution 2216 (2015) by 14 affirmative votes to none against, with one abstention (Russian Federation), the Council also demanded that the Houthis, withdraw from all areas seized during the latest conflict, relinquish arms seized from military and security institutions, cease all actions falling exclusively within the authority of the legitimate Government of Yemen and fully implement previous Council resolutions.

Acting under chapter VII of Charter, the body also called upon the Houthis to refrain from any provocations or threats to neighbouring States, release the Minister for Defence, all political prisoners and individuals under house arrest or arbitrarily detained, and end the recruitment of children.

Imposing sanctions, including a general assets freeze, travel ban and arms embargo, on Abdulmalik al-Houthi, who it called the Houthi leader, and Ahmed Ali Abdullah Saleh, son of the president who stepped down in 2011, the resolution called upon all Yemeni parties to abide by the Gulf Cooperation Council and other initiatives and to resume the United Nations-brokered political transition.

Reaffirming the need for all parties to ensure the safety of civilians, the Council called on parties to facilitate the evacuation by concerned States and international organizations of their civilians and personnel from Yemen.  The resolution requested the Secretary-General to report on the implementation of the resolution within 10 days.

Explaining his delegation’s decision to abstain, the representative of the Russian Federation said the text failed to take into account proposals his country had made, refused to call on all sides to halt fire and lacked clarity on a humanitarian pause.  There were inappropriate references to sanctions, he added, stating that resolution must not result in an escalation of the crisis.

The representative of Jordan, Council President for April, said, however, that the adoption of the resolution under Chapter VII was a clear and firm signal to the Houthis and all those supporting them to comply with their obligations.  Stressing the regional ramifications of the escalating conflict, she stated that the Council was prepared to consider any additional measures required.

The Council had for months demanded that the parties in Yemen proceed with the agreed upon political transition, the representative of the United States recalled.  In response, however, the Houthis had intensified their military actions, threatening the country’s and region’s security.  For that reason, she strongly supported the resolution, which provided a general asset freeze and travel ban on spoilers.

Also welcoming the adoption, the representative of Yemen described it as a tangible demonstration of the seriousness of the international community’s support for his people’s effort to restore peace, rule of law and democracy.  He said that while the Yemeni Government and other parties were finalizing a comprehensive peace framework, opposition forces had mounted a coup d’état, threatening the social fabric and cohesion of the Yemeini people.  He applauded the response of the Gulf Cooperation Council to the crisis as consistent with the imperative of preserving Yemen’s Constitution and rebuffing Iran’s designs.

While also voting in favour of the text, the representative of Venezuela expressed concern at what he called the lack of inclusion and transparency in the deliberations, maintaining that the views of non-permanent members were side-lined.

Also speaking today were the representatives of the United Kingdom, Spain, China, Malaysia, Chile, Lithuania, France, New Zealand, Chad, Nigeria and Angola.

The meeting began at 10:05 a.m. and ended at 11 a.m.

Statements

MARK LYALL GRANT (United Kingdom), supporting Saudi-led military action at the request of Yemeni President Hadi, said that, ultimately, an inclusive political process would have to be reached.  A political solution was also the best way to fight extremism and promote humanitarian relief.  The resolution just adopted was aimed at ensuring that everyone engaged in the United Nations-negotiated process in good faith.  It was right to increase political pressure against individuals who did not do so, he added.  The security and stability of Yemen was in the interest of the world; the United Kingdom would use all tools in its disposal towards that end.

VITALY CHURKIN (Russian Federation) said his delegation had abstained because the resolution was not fully in line with what was required by the crisis in Yemen.  The text failed to take into account proposals his country had made and to call on all sides to halt fire, did not provide for due reflection on consequences and lacked clarity on a humanitarian pause.  There were also inappropriate references to sanctions, he added, stating that the resolution must not result in an escalation of the crisis.  He stressed that there was no alternative to a political solution and action by the Council must be engendered from already-existing documents.

SAMANTHA POWER (United States) said the Council had for months demanded that the parties in Yemen proceed with the agreed-upon political transition.  In response, however, the Houthis had intensified military action, threatening the country’s and the region’s security.  The United States strongly supported the resolution, which provided a general asset freeze and travel ban on spoilers.  The resolution also recognized the costs of the rapidly deteriorating humanitarian crisis.  A consensus agreement of all political parties was the only way forward; the United Nations must continue its efforts in that light.

ROMÁN OYARZUN MARCHESI (Spain) said that the Council, through the resolution, had made its resolve clear to all parties.  He underscored the need for an inclusive dialogue based on political consensus towards resolving the crisis, leading to a democratic transition led by the Yemeni people themselves.  Such dialogue, he stressed, could be successful only if the armed conflict ended.  While expressing strong support for the resolution, he underscored the need for the Council to ensure greater transparency and inclusiveness in its consultations.

LIU JIEYI (China) said the resolution reiterated the international community’s support for the unity, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Yemen and it commitment to ensure that differences were resolved in a peaceful manner through dialogue.  It was extremely important to restore stability in Yemen and the wider region, he added, stressing that there was no military solution.  All parties must work towards achieving a prompt ceasefire and restoring stability and order through an inclusive political transition led by the Yemeni people.  China hoped all parties would abide by all relevant resolutions, including those on humanitarian issues and on the evacuation and protection of diplomatic personnel and installations.

SITI HAJJAR ADNIN (Malaysia) said that the Council had been compelled to adopt another resolution on Yemen because of the deteriorating situation.  She emphasized that the political transition hinged on the political will of the parties themselves.  Strongly condemning spoilers of the peace process, she said their pursuit of narrow political interests had betrayed the hopes and aspirations of the Yemeni people.  The blatant attack by the Houthis on the presidential palace was unacceptable and the Council had the duty and responsibility to press all parties to return to the negotiating table.  Malaysia was deeply concerned at the worsening humanitarian situation and the difficulties in providing relief assistance to the most vulnerable.  All parties to the conflict must protect civilians from the violence.

CRISTIÁN BARROS MELET (Chile) said that, despite different interpretations of the situation in Yemen, there was firm agreement on the disastrous effects the violence had on civilians.  Expressing satisfaction at the final text that emerged from consultations on the resolution, he stressed that the humanitarian situation would not improve without a ceasefire and an inclusive political settlement.  He regretted the fact that the resolution did not include references to the deadly violence committed against children and to attacks on hospitals and schools, saying they were dimensions the Council could not overlook.  He called on Council members to make the negotiating process more transparent, in the effort of making resolutions more effective.

RAFAEL DARÍO RAMÍREZ CARREÑO (Venezuela) said he voted in favour of the text because the Council had the primary role vis-à-vis the crisis in Yemen.  There was no alternative to a political solution; all parties must support efforts towards that end and diligently observe international human rights and humanitarian law and facilitate assistance to those in need.  As the only ones who benefited from the current conflict were terrorist and extremist groups, it was essential to return to dialogue.  He expressed concern at the lack of inclusion and transparency in Council deliberations, stating that non-permanent members were put on the side-lines.  He urged an end to such practices.

RAIMONDA MURMOKAITĖ (Lithuania) said all parties should re-launch the transition process in Yemen, incorporating the outcomes of national dialogue conference.  “The humanitarian situation is dire,” she added, pointing out that 16 million people were in need of humanitarian assistance.  A solution could be found and violence was not the answer.  The arms embargo against the spoilers of peace, including Houthi leaders, would send a strong signal that the use of violence in defiance of Council resolutions would not be tolerated.  The Council must now ensure that sanctions were fully implemented by all.  The United Nations role remained vital in a return to stability, if that was still possible.

FRANÇOIS DELATTRE (France) noting that his country was a co-sponsor of today’s resolution, said that the text dealt with the root causes of tensions in Yemen, which were political.  Condemning the Houthi militia, he called on it to act in line with Council resolutions, as well as other negotiations being held under the United Nations aegis.  The Houthis were jeopardizing the country’s stability.  “We have tirelessly indicated to spoilers the Council’s determination to bring pressure to bear upon them,” he stated.  That message must now be put into practice, he maintained, adding that sanctions in this case were a means to realizing a political goal.  He supported dialogue to establish a national unity Government, calling on the United Nations to help re-start inter-Yemeni dialogue, and he called for compliance with international humanitarian law, as well as unimpeded access to those in need.  In addition, he supported ongoing efforts to bolster Yemen’s legitimate presidency; firmness as regards spoilers; resumption of the political transition through an inclusive agreement; and combating terrorists.  He called on the Yemeni parties, regional players and influential countries to cooperate along those lines.

JIM MCLAY (New Zealand) said it was important that the Council send a clear signal on the urgent need to end hostilities in Yemen and return to the political process agreed previously by the Council.  In that light, he welcomed the fact that the resolution imposed measures for non-compliance.  “This time the parties must listen”, he stated.  He also supported the call for resumed political dialogue, which, he noted, was in the best interests of all parties.  Expressing deep concern about the humanitarian situation, he called for parties involved in military operations to comply with international humanitarian and human rights law.  Absent a political solution, the humanitarian situation would continue to deteriorate, he warned.  All parties should facilitate delivery of humanitarian assistance.

MAHAMAT ZENE CHERIF (Chad) said the situation in Yemen was extremely worrisome on the security and humanitarian fronts.  He had voted for the resolution as it addressed the conflict’s root causes.  He was hoping to see the international community pool its efforts with those of the Gulf Cooperation Council to prevent Yemen’s total collapse.  He endorsed the Gulf Council’s efforts to re-establish peace in Yemen, underscoring the need for robust international mobilization to stop the conflict’s escalation and to promote United Nations-led negotiations in line resolution 2201 (2015).  The Security Council must send strong and firm message to all parties, notably the Houthis, to immediately stop the violence and comply with the transition process, he stated, adding that it was unacceptable for an armed militia to use violence to jeopardize the constitutional order.  All parties were obliged to comply with international humanitarian law and to not target civilian infrastructure.

KAYODE LARO (Nigeria) urged all parties in Yemen to abide by the Gulf Cooperation Council Initiative and other relevant road maps to ensure that all communities could live in peace and harmony.  He expressed hope that the resolution just adopted would make an important contribution in that direction.

JULIO HELDER DE MOURA LUCAS (Angola) said the resolution had been necessitated by the Houthis’ actions, which jeopardized what seemed to be a promising political transition in Yemen.  Praising Jordan and the Gulf Cooperation Council for their contributions to drafting the resolution, he expressed growing concern at the number and scale of attacks by terrorists.  All parties needed to resume negotiations at the earliest to reach a political solution, he stressed.

DINA KAWAR (Jordan) said the irresponsible practices of the Houthis and those who supported them had led the Council to name those who threatened peace and stability in Yemen and impose sanctions.  The adoption of the resolution under Chapter VII of Charter was a clear and firm signal to them; a return to peace and stability in Yemen required unconditional implementation of the measures.  Pointing to the regional ramifications of the escalating conflict, she stressed that the Council was prepared to consider any additional action that was required.  She urged all parties to attend the peace conference scheduled to be held in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  Noting that the resolution called for the evacuation of nationals from other countries and international organizations, she added that a humanitarian pause should be put in place when at an appropriate time and in consultation with the Yemeni Government.

KHALED HUSSEIN MOHAMED ALYEMANY (Yemen) said the resolution was a tangible demonstration of the seriousness of the international community in supporting the Yemini people’s effort to restore peace, rule of law and democracy.  He recalled the Council’s “historic” visit to Yemen in January during which it underscored its commitment to the Gulf Cooperation Council Initiative and other agreed frameworks.  While the Yemeni Government and other parties were finalizing a comprehensive peace framework, however, opposition forces mounted what he called a coup d’état against the Constitution that had continued through manipulation by Iran, threatening the social fabric and cohesion of the Yemeni people.  The “putschists” attempted to undermine and even attack the President, who was forced to seek refuge in a neighbouring country to preserve the unity of the country.  The response of the Gulf countries was in consonance with the imperative of preserving the constitution and rebuffing Iran’s designs.  Yemen, he stressed, would remain ever grateful to Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries.  Yemenis had risen in unified defence, given the urgency of mitigating the suffering of the people.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 2216 (2015) reads as follows:

Security Council,

Recalling its resolutions 2014 (2011), 2051 (2012), 2140 (2014), 2201 (2015), and 2204 (2015) and presidential statements of 15 February 2013, 29 August 2014, and 22 March 2015,

Noting the letter dated 24 March 2015 from the Permanent Representative of Yemen, to the United Nations, transmitting a letter from the President of Yemen, in which he informed the President of the Security Council that ‘he has requested from the Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf and the League of Arab States to immediately provide support, by all necessary means and measures, including military intervention, to protect Yemen and its people from the continuing aggression by the Houthis’, and noting the letter dated 26 March 2015 from the Permanent Representative of the State of Qatar, S/2015/217, transmitting a letter from the Representatives of the Kingdom of Bahrain, the State of Kuwait, the State of Qatar, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates,

Recalling the resolution of Summit XXVI of the League of Arab States on the developments in Yemen, stressing inter alia the necessity to resume Yemen’s political transition process with the participation of all Yemeni parties in accordance with the Gulf Cooperation Council Initiative and its Implementation Mechanism and the outcomes of the comprehensive National Dialogue conference,

Reaffirming its strong commitment to the unity, sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of Yemen, and its commitment to stand by the people of Yemen,

Condemning the growing number of and scale of the attacks by Al-Qaida in the Arabian peninsula (AQAP),

Expressing concern at the ability of AQAP to benefit from the deterioration of the political and security situation in Yemen, mindful that any acts of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable regardless of their motivation, whenever, wherever and by whomsoever committed,

Reiterating its support for the efforts of the Gulf Cooperation Council in assisting the political transition in Yemen and commending its engagement in this regard,

Reaffirming its support for the legitimacy of the President of Yemen, Abdo Rabbo Mansour Hadi, and reiterating its call to all parties and Member States to refrain from taking any actions that undermine the unity, sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of Yemen, and the legitimacy of the President of Yemen,

Expressing grave alarm at the significant and rapid deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Yemen, and emphasizing that the humanitarian situation will continue to deteriorate in the absence of a political solution,

Recalling that arbitrary denial of humanitarian access and depriving civilians of objects indispensable to their survival, including wilfully impeding relief supply and access, may constitute a violation of international humanitarian law,

Emphasizing the need for the return to the implementation of the Gulf Cooperation Council Initiative and its Implementation Mechanism and the outcomes of the comprehensive National Dialogue conference, including drafting a new constitution, electoral reform, the holding of a referendum on the draft constitution and timely general elections, to avoid further deterioration of the humanitarian and security situation in Yemen,

Reaffirming its full support for, and commitment to, the efforts of the United Nations and the Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on Yemen, in particular to the UN-brokered negotiations, and its support for the efforts of the Group of Ambassadors in Sana’a,

Alarmed at the military escalation by the Houthis in many parts of Yemen including in the Governorates of Ta’iz, Marib, AlJauf, Albayda, their advance towards Aden, and their seizure of arms, including missile systems, from Yemen’s military and security institutions,

Condemning in the strongest terms the ongoing unilateral actions taken by the Houthis, and their failure to implement the demands in resolution 2201 (2015) to immediately and unconditionally withdraw their forces from Government institutions, including in the capital Sana’a, normalize the security situation in the capital and other provinces, relinquish government and security institutions, and safely release all individuals under house arrest or arbitrarily detained, and reiterating its call on all non-State actors to withdraw from government institutions across Yemen and to refrain from any attempts to take over such institutions,

Deploring any attempt by the Houthis to take actions that are exclusively within the authority of the legitimate Government of Yemen, and noting that such actions are unacceptable,

Expressing alarm that such actions taken by the Houthis undermine the political transition process in Yemen, and jeopardize the security, stability, sovereignty and unity of Yemen,

Noting with concern the destabilizing actions taken by the former President of Yemen, Ali Abdullah Saleh, including supporting the Houthis’ actions, which continue to undermine the peace, security and stability of Yemen,

Welcoming the intention of the Gulf Cooperation Council to convene a conference in Riyadh, upon the request of the President of Yemen, with the participation of all Yemeni parties to further support the political transition in Yemen, and to complement and support the UN-brokered negotiations,

Recalling its resolution 2117 (2013) and expressing grave concern at the threat to peace and security in Yemen arising from the illicit transfer, destabilising accumulation and misuse of small arms and light weapons,

Recognizing that the continuing deterioration of the security situation and escalation of violence in Yemen poses an increasing and serious threat to neighbouring States and reaffirming its determination that the situation in Yemen constitutes a threat to international peace and security,

Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

“1.   Demands that all Yemeni parties, in particular the Houthis, fully implement resolution 2201 (2015), refrain from further unilateral actions that could undermine the political transition in Yemen, and further demands that the Houthis immediately and unconditionally:

(a)  end the use of violence;

(b)  withdraw their forces from all areas they have seized, including the capital Sana’a;

(c)  relinquish all additional arms seized from military and security institutions, including missile systems;

(d)  cease all actions that are exclusively within the authority of the legitimate Government of Yemen;

(e)  refrain from any provocation or threats to neighbouring States, including through acquiring surface-surface missiles, and stockpiling weapons in any bordering territory of a neighbouring State;

(f)  safely release Major-General Mahmoud al-Subaihi, the Minister of Defence of Yemen, all political prisoners, and all individuals under house arrest or arbitrarily detained; and

(g)  end the recruitment and use of children and release all children from their ranks;

“2.   Requests the Secretary-General to report on the implementation of this resolution and resolution 2201 (2015), in particular paragraph 1 of this resolution, in 10 days from the adoption of this resolution; and in case of further non-implementation, expresses its intent to consider designating additional individuals and entities who are engaged in or providing support for acts that threaten the peace, security or stability of Yemen, to be subject to the measures imposed by paragraphs 11 and 15 of resolution 2140 (2014);

“3.   Decides that the individuals listed in Annex I of this resolution shall be subject to the measures imposed by paragraphs 11 and 15 of resolution 2140 (2014);

“4.   Reiterates the importance of the implementation of all measures imposed by resolution 2140 (2014), as extended in resolution 2204 (2015);

“5.   Calls upon all Yemeni parties, in particular the Houthis, to abide by the Gulf Cooperation Council Initiative and its Implementation Mechanism, the outcomes of the comprehensive National Dialogue conference, and the relevant Security Council resolutions and to resume and accelerate inclusive United Nations-brokered negotiations, including on issues relating to governance, to continue the political transition in order to reach a consensus solution and stresses the importance of full implementation of agreements reached and commitments made towards that goal and calls on the parties, in this regard, to agree on the conditions leading to an expeditious cessation of violence, in accordance with the United Nations Charter and relevant Security Council resolutions, including this resolution and resolution 2201 (2015);

“6.   Demands that all Yemeni parties adhere to resolving their differences through dialogue and consultation, reject acts of violence to achieve political goals, and refrain from provocation and all unilateral actions to undermine the political transition and stresses that all parties should take concrete steps to agree and implement a consensus-based political solution to Yemen’s crisis in accordance with the Gulf Cooperation Council Initiative and its Implementation Mechanism and the outcomes of the comprehensive National Dialogue conference;

“7.   Urges all Yemeni parties to respond positively to the request of the President of Yemen to attend a conference in Riyadh, under the auspices of the Gulf Cooperation Council, to further support the political transition in Yemen, and to complement and support the UN-brokered negotiations;

“8.   Calls on all parties to comply with their obligations under international law, including applicable international humanitarian law and human rights law;

“9.   Reaffirms, consistent with international humanitarian law, the need for all parties to ensure the safety of civilians, including those receiving assistance, as well as the need to ensure the security of humanitarian personnel and United Nations and its associated personnel, and urges all parties to facilitate the delivery of humanitarian assistance, as well as rapid, safe and unhindered access for humanitarian actors to reach people in need of humanitarian assistance, including medical assistance;

“10.  Calls on all parties to facilitate the evacuation by concerned States and international organizations of their civilians and personnel from Yemen and commends steps already taken in this regard;

“11.  Reaffirms the principle of the inviolability of diplomatic and consular premises and the obligations of host Governments, including under the 1961 Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations and under the 1963 Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, to take all appropriate steps to protect diplomatic and consular premises against any intrusion or damage, and to prevent any disturbance of the peace of these missions or impairment of their dignity;

“12.  Requests the Secretary-General to intensify his efforts in order to facilitate the delivery of humanitarian assistance and evacuation, including the establishment of humanitarian pauses, as appropriate, in coordination with the Government of Yemen, and calls on Yemeni parties to cooperate with the Secretary-General to deliver humanitarian aid to those in need;

“13.  Further requests the Secretary-General to intensify his good offices role in order to enable a resumption of a peaceful, inclusive, orderly and Yemeni-led political transition process that meets the legitimate demands and aspirations of the Yemeni people, including women, for peaceful change and meaningful political, economic and social reform, as set out in the Gulf Cooperation Council Initiative and Implementation Mechanism and the outcomes of the comprehensive National Dialogue conference, and stresses the importance of the United Nations’ close coordination with international partners, in particular the Gulf Cooperation Council, Group of Ambassadors in Sana’a, and other actors, in order to contribute to a successful transition;

Arms Embargo

“14.  Decides that all Member States shall immediately take the necessary measures to prevent the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer to, or for the benefit of Ali Abdullah Saleh, Abdullah Yahya al Hakim, Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi, and the individuals and entities designated by the Committee established pursuant to paragraph 19 of resolution 2140 (2014) (hereinafter referred to as ‘the Committee’) pursuant to paragraph 20 (d) of this resolution, the individuals and entities listed in Annex I of this resolution, and those acting on their behalf or at their direction in Yemen, from or through their territories or by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, of arms and related materiel of all types, including weapons and ammunition, military vehicles and equipment, paramilitary equipment, and spare parts for the aforementioned, and technical assistance, training, financial or other assistance, related to military activities or the provision, maintenance or use of any arms and related materiel, including the provision of armed mercenary personnel whether or not originating in their territories;

“15.  Calls upon Member States, in particular States neighbouring Yemen, to inspect, in accordance with their national authorities and legislation and consistent with international law, in particular the law of the sea and relevant international civil aviation agreements, all cargo to Yemen, in their territory, including seaports and airports, if the State concerned has information that provides reasonable grounds to believe the cargo contains items the supply, sale or transfer of which is prohibited by paragraph 14 of this resolution for the purpose of ensuring strict implementation of those provisions;

“16.  Decides to authorize all Member States to, and that all Member States shall, upon discovery of items the supply, sale, or transfer of which is prohibited by paragraph 14 of this resolution, seize and dispose (such as through destruction, rendering inoperable, storage or transferring to a State other than the originating or destination States for disposal) of such items and decides further that all Member States shall cooperate in such efforts;

“17.  Requires any Member State when it undertakes an inspection pursuant to paragraph 15 of this resolution, to submit promptly an initial written report to the Committee containing, in particular, explanation of the grounds for the inspections, the results of such inspections, and whether or not cooperation was provided, and, if prohibited items for supply, sale, or transfer are found, further requires such Member States to submit to the Committee within 30 days a subsequent written report containing relevant details on the inspection, seizure, and disposal, and relevant details of the transfer, including a description of the items, their origin and intended destination, if this information is not in the initial report;

Additional Designation Criteria

“18.  Reaffirms the designation criteria set out in paragraph 17 of resolution 2140 (2014), the measures imposed by paragraph 11 and 15 of the same and stresses the importance of their full implementation;

“19.  Reaffirms paragraph 18 of resolution 2140 (2014), and underscores that acts that threaten the peace, security, or stability of Yemen may also include the violations of the arms embargo imposed by paragraph 14 or obstructing the delivery of humanitarian assistance to Yemen or access to, or distribution of, humanitarian assistance in Yemen;

Mandate of the Sanctions Committee

“20.  Decides that the Committee established pursuant to paragraph 19 of resolution 2140 (2014) shall also undertake the following tasks:

(a)  monitoring implementation of the measures imposed in paragraph 14 of this resolution;

(b)  seeking from all States whatever information it may consider useful regarding the actions taken by them to implement effectively the measures imposed by paragraph 14 above;

(c)  examining and taking appropriate action on information regarding alleged non-compliance with the measures contained by this resolution;

(d)  designating as may be necessary additional individuals and entities subject to the measures imposed by paragraph 14 above;

Mandate of the Panel of Experts

“21.  Decides that the mandate of the Panel of Experts established pursuant to paragraph 21 of resolution 2140 (2014) and renewed by resolution 2204 (2015) shall also include monitoring implementation of the measures imposed by paragraph 14;

“22.  Requests the Secretary-General, having due regard for the increased mandate of the Panel of Experts, to increase the Panel to five members, and make the necessary financial and security arrangements to support the work of the Panel;

“23.  Calls upon the Panel of Experts to cooperate actively with other Panels or Groups of Experts established by the Security Council, including the 1267 Monitoring Team, as relevant to the implementation of their mandate;

Commitment to review

“24.  Reaffirms its readiness to take further measures in case of non-implementation by any Yemeni party of this resolution and resolution 2201 (2015);

“25.  Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

Annex

“1. Abdulmalik al-Houthi

“Abdul Malik al Houthi is a leader of a group that has engaged in acts that threaten the peace, security, or stability of Yemen.

“In September 2014, Houthi forces captured Sanaa and in January 2015 they attempted to unilaterally replace the legitimate government of Yemen with an illegitimate governing authority that the Houthis dominated. Al-Houthi assumed the leadership of Yemen’s Houthi movement in 2004 after the death of his brother, Hussein Badredden al-Houthi. As leader of the group, al-Houthi has repeatedly threatened Yemeni authorities with further unrest if they do not respond to his demands and detained President Hadi, Prime Minister, and key cabinet members. Hadi subsequently escaped to Aden.  The Houthis then launched another offensive towards Aden assisted by military units loyal to former president Saleh and his son, Ahmed Ali Saleh.

“2. Ahmed Ali Abdullah Saleh

“Ahmed Ali Saleh has engaged in acts that threaten the peace, security, and stability of Yemen.

“Ahmed Ali Saleh has been working to undermine President Hadi’s authority, thwart Hadi’s attempts to reform the military, and hinder Yemen’s peaceful transition to democracy. Saleh played a key role in facilitating the Houthi military expansion. As of mid-February 2013, Ahmed Ali Saleh had issued thousands of new rifles to Republican Guard brigades and unidentified tribal shaykhs. The weapons were originally procured in 2010 and reserved to purchase the loyalties of the recipients for political gain at a later date.

“After Saleh’s father, former Republic of Yemen President Ali Abdullah Saleh, stepped down as President of Yemen in 2011, Ahmed Ali Saleh retained his post as commander of Yemen’s Republican Guard. A little over a year later, Saleh was dismissed by President Hadi but he retained significant influence within the Yemeni military, even after he was removed from command. Ali Abdullah Saleh was designated by the UN under United Nations Security Council resolution 2140 in November 2014.”

For information media. Not an official record.