‘Record-Breaking’ Participation Defined First Committee Session, Says Chair at Closing, as Delegations Send 53 Drafts to General Assembly

5 November 2013
GA/DIS/3494

‘Record-Breaking’ Participation Defined First Committee Session, Says Chair at Closing, as Delegations Send 53 Drafts to General Assembly

5 November 2013
General Assembly
GA/DIS/3494
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-eighth General Assembly

First Committee

25th Meeting (PM)

 ‘Record-Breaking’ Participation Defined First Committee Session, Says Chair

at Closing, as Delegations Send 53 Drafts to General Assembly

 

As the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) session drew to a close today, Committee Chair Ibrahim Dabbashi of Libya said that the “record-breaking” number of statements delivered during the general and thematic debates indicated an increase in international awareness on the issues of disarmament and international security, as well as more dynamic participation by the delegations.

During the substantive session, which began on 7 October, the Committee had heard 101 statements during the general debate, and 241 statements during the thematic debates, Mr. Dabbashi said.  Building on the growing momentum for multilateral disarmament, the Committee had achieved significant progress in advancing the disarmament and non-proliferation agenda, he said.

It approved 48 resolutions and five decisions, 21 by recorded vote, in addition to 27 separate votes on individual provisions.  A new draft, on follow up to the 2013 High-Level Meeting on the General Assembly on Nuclear Disarmament, called for the urgent start of negotiations in the Conference on Disarmament on a nuclear weapons convention.  It was among those requiring a recorded vote.  Deep division was evident during consideration of the draft on transparency in armaments, which required nine separate recorded votes on individual provisions.

Squarely addressing the pressing challenges to global security, the Committee nevertheless had worked collegially to live up to the expectations of the international community, he added.  In the field of nuclear weapons, Member States had intensified their efforts to move forward on nuclear disarmament by seizing the momentum created by last year’s initiatives to take forward multilateral negotiations on nuclear disarmament, such as the Open-ended Working Group in Geneva and the high-level meeting of the General Assembly in September.

Focus on the humanitarian dimension of nuclear disarmament had also provided further impetus to the effort to achieve nuclear disarmament, he said, noting that the Committee had highlighted the need to accelerate that process and to strengthen the non-proliferation regime.  There were strong calls for holding the conference on the establishment of a Middle East zone free of nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction.  There was strong condemnation of the chemical weapons use in Syria, but also approval for the country’s accession to the Chemical Weapons Convention.  Also welcomed in that context was the decision by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the Security Council resolution on eliminating Syria’s chemical weapons programme.

In the field of conventional arms, the Committee welcomed the adoption by the General Assembly of the Arms Trade Treaty in April, and Security Council resolution 2117 (2013) on small arms and light weapons.  Member States underscored the importance of the Treaty’s early entry into force.  Addressing other pressing security threats, the Committee welcomed the report of the Group of Governmental Experts on transparency and confidence-building measures on outer space activities, and identified the importance of addressing the question of emerging weapons systems, such as fully autonomous weapons.

During this afternoon’s meeting, the Committee approved 11 more draft resolutions and one draft decision, three of which required recorded votes, from the clusters on nuclear weapons, other disarmament measures and international security, regional disarmament and security, and disarmament machinery.  The drafts covered such issues as women and disarmament, the relationship between disarmament and development, observance of environmental norms, and the Treaty of Tlatelolco.

More than a quarter of Member States chose to abstain on a draft to promote multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation, which was approved by a recorded vote of 123 in favour to 5 against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Palau, United Kingdom, United States), with 50 abstentions.

According to that text, the General Assembly would express concern at the continuous erosion of multilateralism in the disarmament and non-proliferation field and reaffirm it as the core principle in resolving disarmament and non-proliferation concerns.  It would request States parties to relevant instruments to consult and cooperate in cases of non-compliance and to refrain from resorting or threatening to resort to unilateral actions or directing unverified non-compliance accusations against each other.

The Committee also approved a draft on the Follow-up to the Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice on the Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons, by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 24 against, with 27 abstentions.  By its terms, the Assembly, convinced that the continuing existence of nuclear weapons posed a threat to humanity and all life on Earth, would recognize that the only defence against a nuclear catastrophe was the total elimination of those weapons and the certainty that they would never be produced again.

By a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 4 against (France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 45 abstentions, the Committee approved a third draft, on the implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace, by which the Assembly would reiterate its conviction that the participation of all permanent Security Council members and the major maritime users of the Indian Ocean in the work of the Ad Hoc Committee would greatly facilitate the development of a mutually beneficial dialogue to advance peace, security and stability in the Indian Ocean region.

Acting without a vote, the Committee also approved drafts on:  women, disarmament, non-proliferation and arms control; the Declaration on the Strengthening of International Security; observance of environmental norms in disarmament and arms control agreements; the relationship between disarmament and development; developments in the field of information and telecommunications in international security; regional confidence-building measures; United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament; the Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean; and consolidation of the Treaty of Tlatelolco.

Delivering general statements on Cluster 5:  Other Disarmament Measures and International Security, were representatives of Sweden on behalf of 40 countries, Trinidad and Tobago, Cuba, Venezuela, United States and Canada.

Speaking in explanation of vote during action on that Cluster were representatives of Pakistan, Iran and France, also speaking on behalf of United Kingdom.

Delivering a general statement on Cluster 6:  Regional Disarmament and Security, was the representative of Rwanda, who spoke in his country’s current capacity as the Chair of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa, as well as on behalf of Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Congo, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Sao Tome and Principe, Central African Republic and Chad.  The representative of Indonesia on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement also made a general statement.

That representative, also on behalf of the Movement, introduced the draft resolution on Implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace.

The representative of Ecuador spoke in explanation of vote during Cluster 6.

Delivering general statements on Cluster 7:  Disarmament Machinery, were the representatives of Cuba, and Indonesia on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement.

The latter representative introduced a resolution on the United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament, also on the Movement’s behalf.

Speaking in explanation of vote during action on Cluster 1: Nuclear Weapons, were the representatives of Japan and Sweden.

Background

The First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) met this afternoon to continue its consideration of all draft resolutions and decisions before it across a spectrum of its agenda items.

Cluster 5:  Other Disarmament Measures and International Security

JAN A. LODDING ( Sweden) spoke in a general statement on that cluster on behalf of a group of 40 countries that would join consensus on “L.37” on developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security.  Of particular note had been the adoption in June of the report of the Group of Governmental Experts on developments in that field, which was a significant contribution to building an effective framework for international norms on that topic.  The Internet should continue to facilitate a free flow of information in cyberspace, which was fundamental for the delegations he represented.  The same rights that individuals had off-line must also be protected on-line, in particular, freedom of expression.

He said that an open, free and secure Internet was essential for economic, social and political development in the twenty-first century, adding that countering threats to freedom and security in cyberspace could require global cooperation between States, as well as with the private sector and civil society.  Welcoming several recommendations of the Group of Governmental Experts, he emphasized in particular that voluntary confidence-building measures could promote trust and assurance among States and help to reduce the risk of conflicts.

CHARLENE ROOPNARINE (Trinidad and Tobago), introducing draft resolution “L.7” on women, disarmament, non-proliferation and arms control, said her country had in the past called on the General Assembly to consider women’s role in that context, which had resulted in the adoption of two resolutions by consensus.  Her country would continue to strengthen the resolution in an effort to raise the international community’s awareness of that important topic.  As in 2010 and 2012, Trinidad and Tobago requested adoption of the text without a vote.

YADIRA LEDESMA HERNÁNDEZ ( Cuba) said that draft “L.37” pertained to an issue of great relevance.  The covert use of information and communications technology was a violation of international norms and standards, which could create tensions and undermine international peace and security, contravening Charter-based principles.  The present resolution placed appropriate emphasis on the need to prevent the use of those technologies for criminal purposes.  In that context, Cuba was obliged once again to denounce aggressive acts by the Government of the United States against her country, in violation of international law, specifically, the use of aircraft to broadcast telecommunications in Cuba.  Such activity was illegal and created harmful interferences in Cuba’s own broadcasting services.  Cuba would repel those unacceptable aggressive acts, and insisted on an end to such violations.

The potential benefits of information and communications technology for development were immense, she continued, but the possibility of their abuse, for example by espionage, was a violation of the sovereignty of States.  Cuba hoped that the draft resolution would receive broad support.

Turning to draft resolutions submitted by the Non-Aligned Movement under that cluster, namely, “L.14”, “L.17” and “L.15”, she said that those addressed issues of relevance for the international community.  Regarding “L.14”, on observance of international norms in the drafting and implementation of disarmament and arms control agreements, Cuba believed that negotiating treaties should take place in conformity with environmental norms and that all States must implement those standards.  On the importance of “L.17”, on promotion of multilateralism in the areas of disarmament and non-proliferation, she said that the text made a significant contribution to the quest for multilateral and lasting solutions in that field.  Regarding “L.15”, on the relationship between disarmament and development, she said her country noted the unacceptable levels of military expenditure and stressed that those could be better diverted to development.  She reiterated her country’s call for a United Nations fund for that purpose.

ALFREDO FERNANDO TORO-CARNEVALI ( Venezuela), regarding “L.37”, highlighted the need to improve the security of information networks globally, in order to guarantee State sovereignty and the privacy of citizens.  A recent New York Times article had revealed that Venezuela had been among the six “most targeted” by espionage.  With that in mind, he drew attention to the extended nature of the international espionage campaign of the United States, and called on all to understand the relevance of that behaviour in terms of friendly relations between nations.

KATHARINE CRITTENBERGER (United States), also speaking on behalf of Italy and Japan, said those delegations would join consensus on “L.37”, but were disappointed to see the programme budget implications with respect to the 20‑person Group of Governmental Experts, at a cost of nearly twice that of the previous group.  During informal consultations, the United States had made it clear that it did not support a group larger than the standard size of 15.  In addition, based on previous experience, a governmental expert group with 15 members would be the most conducive to efficient and effective work.  The United States did not support a group of 20 experts and had urged for a more timely sharing of cost information, so that delegations did not receive that important information at the last minute.

Concerning “L.14”, she said she saw no direct connection between general environmental standards and multilateral arms control, and would not participate in action on that text.  Nor would her delegation participate in the Committee’s action “L.15”, as it believed that disarmament and development were two distinct issues.

JEAN-FRANCOIS JUNEAU ( Canada), associating with the statement delivered by Sweden, said his delegation supported “L.37” and reaffirmed the importance of international cooperation to maintain international stability.  However, Canada was deeply concerned that some Governments feared free expression, which, at the heart, meant that they feared their own citizens.  Freedom of opinion and expression was not a source of insecurity.  He also insisted upon a free, open and secure Internet.  While supporting “L.37”, his delegation was also aware that it contained programme budget implications, and it had repeatedly stressed that the objectives should be achieved within existing budgets.

Acting without a vote, the Committee approved the draft resolution on women, disarmament, non-proliferation and arms control (document A/C.1/68/L.7).  By its terms, the General Assembly, recognizing the valuable contribution of women to practical disarmament measures, would urge Member States to support and strengthen women’s effective participation in the field of disarmament at local, national, subregional and regional levels.

Next, also acting without a vote, the Committee approved the draft decision on the review of the implementation of the Declaration on the Strengthening of International Security (document A/C.1/68/L.12), by which the Assembly would include the item in the provisional agenda of its seventieth session.

Also acting without a vote, the Committee then approved the draft resolution on observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (document A/C.1/68/L.14).  By its terms, the Assembly would reaffirm that international disarmament forums should take fully into account relevant environmental norms in negotiating treaties and agreements on disarmament and arms limitation.  It would call upon States to adopt measures to ensure the application of scientific and technological progress within the framework of international security and related spheres, without detriment to the environment or to attaining sustainable development.

Next, the Committee approved, also without a vote, the draft resolution on the relationship between disarmament and development (document A/C.1/68/L.15), by which the Assembly would stress the central role of the United Nations in that context and urge the international community to devote part of resources made available by disarmament and arms limitation agreements to economic and social development, with a view to reducing the ever-widening gap between developed and developing countries.  It would encourage the international community to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and to make reference to the contribution disarmament could make in meeting them when it reviewed progress, as well as to make greater efforts to integrate disarmament, humanitarian and development activities.

It approved the draft resolution on the promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (document A/C.1/68/L.17) by a recorded vote of 123 in favour to 5 against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Palau, United Kingdom, United States), with 50 abstentions.  According to the text, the Assembly, concerned at the continuous erosion of multilateralism in that field, would reaffirm it as the core principle in resolving disarmament and non-proliferation concerns, and request State parties to relevant instruments to consult and cooperate in cases of non-compliance, and to refrain from resorting or threatening to resort to unilateral actions or directing unverified non-compliance accusations against each other.

Acting without a vote, the Committee approved the draft resolution on developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security (document A/C.1/68/L.37).  By that text, the Assembly, concerned that such technologies and means could be used for purposes inconsistent with the objectives of maintaining international stability and security, would call upon Member States to promote consideration of existing and potential threats, as well as possible strategies to address those threats consistent with the need to preserve the free flow of information.

Speaking in explanation of vote after the vote on “L.37”, the representative of Pakistan said that misuse and unregulated use of information and communications technology could lead to serious international peace and security implications.  In that context, the hostile use of cyber technologies could indeed be characterized as weapons of mass destruction.  To ensure the required level of ownership of the Group of Governmental Experts, the composition should be expanded and diversified.

The representative of Iran said that his delegation had joined consensus on “L.7” to the extent that it was in line with the constitutional laws and administrative procedures.

France’s representative, speaking also on behalf of the United Kingdom, said they had joined consensus on “L.15”.  They supported the mainstreaming of development, but regarding the notion of a symbiotic relationship between development and disarmament, there was no automatic link between the two; that was a complex relationship not accurately captured in the draft.  Defence investments were also necessary to develop peacekeeping, improve natural disaster responses, and stability under certain conditions.  On “L.14”, they had also joined consensus, but wished to make it clear that the United Kingdom and France operated under strict domestic environmental impact regulations for many activities, including the implementation of arms control and disarmament agreements.

Cluster 6:  Regional Disarmament and Security

ISAÏE BAGABO ( Rwanda) spoke in his country’s current capacity as the Chair of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa, as well as on behalf of Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Congo, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Sao Tome and Principe, Central African Republic and Chad.  He said that more than a decade after the adoption of the United Nations Programme of Action Trade Treaty to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in all its Aspects, tremendous progress had been made.  Beyond classic disarmament, “L.53/Rev.1” addressed two new security threats, namely, maritime piracy in the Gulf of Guinea and poaching in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad and Gabon.

He said that the new regional threat was caused by poachers and armed groups that used sophisticated weapons acquired through income generated from the illegal ivory trade.  That was why such activities remained a serious security threat to the Central African region.  Despite remarkable political will and determination, the lack of a regional legally binding framework against the proliferation of small arms and light weapons had delayed plans for civilian disarmament.  The entry into force of the Central African Convention for the Control of Small Arms and Light Weapons, known as the Kinshasa Convention, remained a priority.

AGUSTINUS ANINDITYO ADI PRIMASTO (Indonesia), speaking on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement, said he was tabling draft resolution “L.13”, entitled Implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace, which, among other things, would reiterate the importance of the participation of all permanent members of the Security Council as well as maritime users in the work of the Indian Ocean Ad Hoc Committee.   Indonesia sought the support of all Member States on the draft.

By a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 4 against ( France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 45 abstentions, the Committee approved the draft resolution on Implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace (document A/C.1/68/L.13).  By its terms, the Assembly would reiterate its conviction that the participation of all permanent Security Council members and the major maritime users of the Indian Ocean in the work of the Ad Hoc Committee would greatly facilitate the development of a mutually beneficial dialogue to advance peace, security and stability in the Indian Ocean region.

The Committee next took action on “L.53/Rev.1”, entitled Regional confidence-building measures: activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa, which would have the Assembly reaffirm its support for efforts aimed at promoting such measures at the regional and subregional levels in order to ease tensions and conflicts in Central Africa and further sustainable peace, stability and development in the subregion.

By further provisions, the Assembly would express concern over the negative impact of poaching and illegal wildlife trafficking on the ecosystem, human development and regional security, and decide to take steps to develop a regional approach to counter that phenomenon.  It would urge other Member States and intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to support the activities of the Standing Advisory Committee through voluntary contributions to the Trust Fund.

The text, as orally revised, was approved without a vote.

The representative of Ecuador said that his delegation was outside the room during the vote on “L.13”, but would have voted in its favour.

Cluster 7:  Disarmament Machinery

Mr. PRIMASTO (Indonesia), speaking on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement, said he was tabling draft resolution “L.16”, on the United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament, which, among other things, reiterated the importance of the centres’ activities at regional levels to advance disarmament efforts and increase the security and stability of its Member States.  He hoped that the resolution could be approved without a vote.

Ms. LEDESMA HERNÁNDEZ (Cuba) said that, with regard to “L.33.Rev.1”, on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean, her delegation wished to explain that Cuba recognized the work of the regional centres and supported it, in particular, that of the centre in her region.  Underscoring the work it had accomplished over many years, she said that Cuba, however, did not entirely share in the interest or position expressed in the resolution concerning the Arms Trade Treaty.  Nonetheless, Cuba would join consensus on the resolution in support of the States of the region.  At the same time, Cuba wished to stress that, in its view, the Arms Trade Treaty was an imbalanced instrument that contained inconsistencies and promoted the interest of arms-exporting States.

Then, acting without a vote, the Committee approved “L.16”, by which the Assembly would reiterate the importance of United Nations activities at the regional level to advance disarmament and to increase the stability and security of its Member States.  It would appeal to Member States to make voluntary contributions to the regional centres in their respective regions in order to strengthen their activities and initiatives.

Next, the Committee approved “L.33/Rev.1”, also without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly would reiterate its strong support for the role of the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean and encourage that Centre to further develop such activities in all countries of the region, and to provide support to Member States in implementing relevant disarmament and non-proliferation instruments, including the Programme of Action on small arms and light weapons.

Cluster 1:  Nuclear Weapons

The Committee then took action on a draft resolution on the Follow-up to the Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice on the Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons (document A/C.1/68/L.26).  By its terms, the Assembly, convinced that the continuing existence of nuclear weapons posed a threat to humanity and all life on earth, would recognize that the only defence against a nuclear catastrophe was the total elimination of those weapons and the certainty that they would never be produced again.  Also by that text, the Assembly would underline the unanimous conclusion of the Court that there existed an obligation to pursue negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament.  It would call on States to immediately fulfil that obligation by commencing multilateral negotiations leading to the early conclusion of a nuclear weapons convention.

That text was approved by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 24 against, with 27 abstentions.

Next, acting without a vote, the Committee approved the draft resolution on the Consolidation of the regime established by the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Treaty of Tlatelolco) (document A/C.1/68/L.42/Rev.1), which would have the Assembly urge the countries of the region that had not yet done so to sign or deposit their instruments of ratification of the amendments to the Treaty of Tlatelolco.

The representative of Japan, explaining his abstention from “L.26”, said that, due to the immense destructive power of nuclear weapons, their use did not comply with the spirit of humanitarianism, which was the foundation of international humanitarian law.  Japan supported the unanimous conclusion of the judges of the International Court of Justice regarding the need to conclude negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament.  However, realistic measures were needed to make progress.  The condition had not yet ripened to the point where such an approach could be made.  Japan would continue to work towards creating that condition.

The representative of Sweden, explaining his delegation’s vote on “L.26”, said he remained supportive of the Court’s advisory opinion, including the obligation to bring to a conclusion negotiations on nuclear disarmament.  At the same time, Sweden had abstained because it did not believe that this was the right approach at this stage.  Disarmament was more effectively pursued through the construction of a framework of “building blocks” and a step-by-step approach to a world without nuclear weapons.  The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and its 2010 Action Plan was the cornerstone of those building blocks.

The Committee then approved its draft programme of work and timetable for 2014 contained in document A/C.1/68/CRP.5.

Committee Session Closing

IBRAHIM DABBASHI ( Libya), Chair of the First Committee, said that the Committee had held 25 meetings, seven of which had been dedicated to the general debate, where 101 statements had been delivered.  During the thematic discussions, the Committee saw a record-breaking 241 speakers, which indicated the increase in international awareness on the issues of disarmament and international security, and more dynamic participation by the delegations.  He had asked delegations to make comments on the Committee’s working methods, and would call an informal meeting in that regard shortly.

Building on the growing momentum for multilateral disarmament, he said that the Committee had achieved significant progress in advancing the disarmament and non-proliferation agenda.  The Committee squarely addressed pressing challenges to global security and worked collegially to live up to the international community’s expectations.  In the field of nuclear weapons, Member States had intensified their efforts to move forward on nuclear disarmament by seizing the momentum created by the initiatives taken last year to take forward multilateral negotiations on that process, such as through the establishment of the Open-ended Working Group in Geneva and the convening of the high-level meeting of the General Assembly.  The focus on the humanitarian dimension of nuclear disarmament had also provided further impetus to the effort to achieve nuclear disarmament.

He said that the Committee had identified crucial tasks that needed to be achieved urgently.  Member States had highlighted the need to accelerate nuclear disarmament and to strengthen the non-proliferation regime.  Many States stressed the urgency of fully implementing the Action Plan adopted at the 2010 NPT Review Conference.  In particular, there were strong calls for holding urgently the conference on the establishment of a Middle East zone free of nuclear and all other weapons of mass destruction.  In the area of chemical weapons, Member States had strongly condemned their use in Syria, and welcomed that country’s accession to the Chemical Weapons Convention, as well as the decision by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the resolution of the Security Council regarding the elimination of Syria’s chemical weapons programme.

In the field of conventional arms, the Committee welcomed the adoption by the General Assembly of the Arms Trade Treaty in April and Security Council resolution 2117 (2013) on small arms and light weapons.  Member States also underscored the importance of an early entry into force of the Arms Trade Treaty, and the full implementation of its provisions.  The Committee also recognized the importance of transparency in armaments, and mandated studies by groups of governmental experts on the operation of the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms and the United Nations Report on Military Expenditures.

The Committee had addressed other pressing security threats as well, he said.  It welcomed the report of the Group of Governmental Experts on transparency and confidence-building measures on outer space activities, and encouraged Member States to review and implement the measures contained in that report.  The Committee also welcomed the work of the Group of Governmental Experts on information security, and decided to establish another expert group to continue to study the existing and potential threat.  Member States also identified the value of addressing the question of emerging weapons systems, such as fully autonomous weapons.

He said the First Committee had once again provided a useful forum for discussing a wide range of disarmament and international security issues.  It had recognized the urgent need to revitalize the work of disarmament machinery, especially calling on the Conference on Disarmament to start substantive work and the United Nations Disarmament Commission to produce a substantive final document next year.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.