General Assembly, Taking Up Reports of Fourth Committee, Adopts New Resolution on Special Political Missions, Texts on Outer Space, Palestine Refugees

11 December 2013
GA/11469

General Assembly, Taking Up Reports of Fourth Committee, Adopts New Resolution on Special Political Missions, Texts on Outer Space, Palestine Refugees

11 December 2013
General Assembly
GA/11469
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-eighth General Assembly

Plenary

65th Meeting (AM)

General Assembly, Taking Up Reports of Fourth Committee, Adopts New Resolution

on Special Political Missions, Texts on Outer Space, Palestine Refugees

 

Draft on Global Public Health, Foreign Policy

Calls for Accelerated Transition towards Universal Health Coverage

A mix of consensus and recorded votes characterized the General Assembly’s consideration today of Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) drafts, which culminated in the adoption of 29 resolutions and decisions, including a new one on special political missions and a range of texts on, among others, the Palestine refugee agency, effects of atomic radiation, and national legislation relevant to the peaceful exploration and use of outer space.

The resolution on special political missions, under consideration for the first time, gathered universal support with the Assembly acknowledging the significant increase in the missions’ number and complexity and requesting the Secretary-General to hold regular, inclusive and interactive dialogue on the overall policy matters pertaining to them.

Traditional texts on the Middle East required recorded votes, including the resolution on the work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices affecting the Human Rights of the People of the Occupied Arab Territories.  By a vote of 95 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, United States), with 75 abstentions, the Assembly deplored those policies and practices of Israel that violated the human rights of the Palestinian people and other Arabs of the occupied territories and expressed grave concern about the critical situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, especially in Gaza.

According to the terms of a related text, adopted by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, United States), with 8 abstentions (Cameroon, Honduras, Kiribati, Malawi, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, South Sudan, Vanuatu), the Assembly condemned all acts of violence, including all acts of terror, provocation, incitement and destruction, especially the excessive use of force by the Israeli occupying forces against Palestinian civilians, particularly in the Gaza Strip, while at the same time, expressed grave concern at the firing of rockets against Israeli civilian areas resulting in loss of life and injury.

Also requiring votes were draft resolutions on the applicability of the Geneva Convention; occupied Syrian Golan; and on Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, as well as the raft of resolutions on the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA).

The Assembly, deeply concerned about UNRWA’s extremely critical financial situation, urged all States, specialized agencies and non-governmental organizations to urgently increase their contributions.  It called on Israel to cease obstructing the movement and access of Agency staff, vehicles and supplies and encouraged the Agency to provide increased assistance to affected Palestine refugees in Syria, as well as those who had fled to neighbouring countries.

It was adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, Kiribati, Malawi, Paraguay, South Sudan, Vanuatu).

Related resolutions also requiring recorded votes were on assistance to Palestine refugees; persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities; and Palestine refugees’ properties and revenues.

Of the 12 draft texts on decolonization, five took recorded votes, including one on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories, adopted by a vote of 179 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions ( France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States).  By its terms, the Assembly asked the administering Powers to transmit regularly to the Secretary-General statistical and other information of a technical nature relating to economic, social and educational conditions in the Territories for which they were responsible, as well as the fullest possible information on political and constitutional developments in the Territories.

A text on dissemination of information on decolonization was adopted by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 1 abstention (France) while the resolution on economic and other activities affecting the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories was adopted by a recorded vote of 180 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions (France, United Kingdom).

The draft resolution on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations was adopted by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to none against, with 55 abstentions.  A related text on the Declaration’s implementation was adopted by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 3 against ( Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 1 abstention ( France).

The Assembly continued its tradition of consensus on the omnibus draft resolution on questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands.

It also acted without a vote on the passage of draft resolutions on French Polynesia — reinstated just this year on the United Nations list of Non-Self-Governing Territories, as well as on New Caledonia, Tokelau, Western Sahara and a decision on Gibraltar.  A further text on study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories was also adopted without a vote.

Texts on the following also enjoyed consensus: the effects of atomic radiation; mine action; and two on outer space.  Two draft resolutions on information were also adopted without a vote, the first of which concerned information in the service of humanity, while the second focused on the Organization’s public information policies and activities.

The Assembly acted without a vote on a draft decision submitted by its Bureau on its programme of work and timetable for the sixty-ninth session.  It took note of the report on programme planning (document A/68/434).  It also took note of the Committee’s report on the comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects.

When it turned to issues of global health and foreign policy, it garnered consensus on an orally revised resolution on the topic, by which it called on partnerships for global health to support member States in carrying out their responsibilities to accelerate the transition towards universal health coverage.

Introducing that draft was Indonesia’s representative on behalf of the Foreign Policy and Global Health Group.  Prior to action on the text, statements were made on the issue by representatives of Israel, Russian Federation, Japan, United States and Singapore.

Michal Komada, Fourth Committee Rapporteur, introduced that body’s report.

The Assembly will meet again at 3 p.m., Thursday, 12 December to consider humanitarian and disaster relief assistance, as well as assistance to survivors of the Rwanda genocide, particularly orphans, widows and victims of sexual violence.

Background

The General Assembly met this morning to take action on draft resolutions and decisions contained in the reports of its Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization).  It was also expected to consider an item on global health and foreign policy. 

Consideration of Fourth Committee Reports

First, a member of the Secretariat reminded delegations that according to paragraph 7 of decision 34/401, the Assembly agreed that “when the same draft resolution is considered in a Main Committee and in plenary meeting, a delegation should, as far as possible, explain its vote only once, that is, either in the Committee or in plenary meeting, unless that delegation’s vote in plenary meeting is different from its vote in the Committee.”

MICHAL KOMADA ( Slovakia), Rapporteur of the Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization), introduced the following reports and the draft texts contained therein in one intervention.

Action on Texts

The General Assembly first took up the draft resolution on assistance in mine action(document A/C.4/68/L.9) contained in the report by the same name (document A/68/421), adopting it without a vote.

By so doing, the Assembly called on States to foster the establishment and development of national mine-action capacities in countries where mines and explosive remnants of war still constituted a serious threat.  It urged all States, as well as the United Nations system and other relevant bodies, to support mine-affected States in developing national mine-action capacities, including reliable financial contributions toward mine-action activities.

Also without a vote, the Assembly adopted a resolution on the effects of atomic radiation (document A/C.4/L.7/Rev.1) contained in document A/66/422.  It thus concluded that the detrimental effects of radiation from nuclear disasters such as Chernobyl — and, most recently, the 2011 emergency at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant — required further examination.  In a related provision, the Assembly insisted that the Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation continue its work on Chernobyl and Fukushima, and on other initiatives, with a view to providing important conclusions on the levels, effects and risks of ionizing radiation — especially as they related to children, who were five times as likely to be affected from all possible sources, including medical technology.

Next, the Assembly turned to the two resolutions contained in the Report of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (document A/68/423), adopting both without a vote.

The first, Draft I, concerned recommendations on national legislation relevant to the peaceful exploration of outer space (document A/C.4/68/L.2).  By its terms, the Assembly urged the adoption of national frameworks to increase regulation of the scope of space activities, including the launch of objects into outer space, their control while in outer space and the return of those objects from that realm.  It required that all United Nations treaties on outer space guide international space activities.

Under Draft II, on international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space (document A/C.4/68/L.3/Rev.1), the Assembly urged all States — particularly those with major space capabilities — to actively adhere to agreements on the prevention of an arms race in outer space as a condition for the exploration and use of outer space.  By a further provision, it required States to devote national research to the problem of collisions of space objects, especially those with nuclear power sources, with natural space debris.  Moreover, it urged all States, particularly those with major space capabilities, to contribute actively to the goal of preventing an arms race in outer space. 

Moving forward on its work, the Assembly next considered the document A/68/424, which contained four resolutions. 

Draft I, on assistance to Palestine refugees (document A/C.4/68/L.12), was adopted by a recorded vote of 173 in favour to 1 against ( Israel), with 8 abstentions ( Cameroon, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Palau, Paraguay, South Sudan, United States).  Amongits terms, the Assembly called on all donors to strengthen their efforts to meet the Agency’s anticipated needs, including increased expenditures arising from the serious socioeconomic and humanitarian instability in the region. 

The Assembly next adopted Draft II on persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities (document A/C/68/L.13) by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Palau, Marshall Islands, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, Kiribati, Panama, Paraguay, South Sudan, Vanuatu), thereby endorsing the recommendations of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), which encouraged continuing humanitarian assistance on an emergency basis and as a temporary measure to currently displaced persons and those in serious need of aid as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities in the occupied territories.  It also reaffirmed their right of return to their homes or former places of residence in the territories occupied by Israel since 1967.

Next, by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, Kiribati, Malawi, Paraguay, South Sudan, Vanuatu), the Assembly adopted Draft III on UNRWA’s Operations (document A/C.4/68/L.14), by which it called on Israel to cease its restrictions on the Agency’s staff and vehicles and its movement of supplies across the occupied territories.  It demanded that Israel desist from levying taxes, extra fees and charges on the Agency, which detrimentally affected its work.  Among its other provisions, it urged all United Nations Member States, its specialized agencies and non-governmental organizations to urgently increase their contributions to UNRWA in order to address its persistent and serious underfunding.

 Draft IV on Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues (document A/C.4/68/L.15) was adopted by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 5 abstentions (Cameroon, Kiribati, Paraguay, South Sudan, Vanuatu).  By that text, the Assembly urged the Palestinian and Israeli sides, as agreed between them, to deal with that important issue within the framework of the final status negotiations of the Middle East peace process.

The Assembly then turned to the five resolutions contained in its report A/68/425.  It first considered Draft I (document A/C.4/68/L.16) on the work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories, which it adopted by a recorded vote of 95 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, United States), with 75 abstentions.

Among its terms, the Assembly requested the Special Committee to continue its effort to investigate Israeli violations of the Geneva Convention of 12 August 1949 pertaining to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem and other Arab territories occupied by Israel since 1967. 

Next, the Assembly took up Draft II on the applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the other occupied Arab territories (document A/C.4/68/L.17), adopting it by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 7 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, South Sudan, Vanuatu). 

Under that resolution, the Assembly demanded Israel accept the de jure requirements of — and scrupulously comply with — the provisions of the 1949 Geneva Convention.  It also issued a call upon all parties to that Convention make every effort to ensure Israel respect the provisions set forth within the agreement.

Moving forward, the Assembly took up Draft III on Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the occupied Syrian Golan (document A/C.4/68.L.18), adopting it by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 9 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, Honduras, Kiribati, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, South Sudan, Vanuatu).

By its terms, the Assembly reiterated its demand for the immediate and complete cessation of all Israeli settlement activities in all of the occupied territories.  Furthermore, it called for the prevention of all acts of violence, destruction, harassment and provocation by Israeli settlers, as they pertained to Palestinian civilians and their properties, including historic and religious sites.

The Assembly then adopted Draft Resolution IV regarding Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem (document A/C.4/68/L.19) by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, United States), with 8 abstentions (Cameroon, Honduras, Kiribati, Malawi, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, South Sudan, Vanuatu).  By so doing, the Assembly called on Israel to cease construction of its wall, dismantle it and make reparation for all the physical and economic damage it had caused.  The resolution further required Israel to halt its prolonged closures, as well as economic and movement restrictions on the Gaza Strip, followed by the sustained and regular movement of persons and goods for the area’s long overdue reconstruction. 

Draft Resolution V on the occupied Syrian Golan (document A/C.4/68/L.20), adopted by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 1 against (Israel), with 12 abstentions, had the Assembly call on Israel, the occupying Power, to comply with Security Council resolution 497 (1981), which declared that Israel’s imposition of its laws, jurisdiction and administration on the occupied Syrian Golan were null, void and without international legal effect.  The Assembly also required Israel to desist from imposing Israeli citizenship, Israeli identity cards and other repressive measures on the Syrian citizens in the occupied Syrian Golan.

The Assembly then decided to take note of the Committee’s report on the comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects (document A/68/426).

Next, it adopted, without a vote, a resolution on a comprehensive review of special political missions (document A/C.4/68/L.11) contained in document A/68/427.  By its terms, the Assembly expressed respect for the purview of the mandate of those missions and their specificity, and emphasized its role in discussing the overall policy matters pertaining to them.  It requested the Secretary-General to submit a report on overall policy matters in that regard,

including efforts towards ensuring their transparency, accountability, geographical representation, gender participation, proper expertise and effectiveness of all special political missions.

Report A/68/428 contained two draft resolutions, both adopted without a vote.  Draft A, on information in the service of humanity, recognized the call for “a new world information and communication order” and urged all countries and organizations of the United Nations system to strengthen communications capacities and improve media infrastructure and technology within developing countries.  It also expressed significant support for the use of traditional media to reach populations in developing countries due to a lack of access to new media.

Among the many provisions in Draft B, on United Nations public information policies and activities, the Assembly emphasized the need to ensure that all new public United Nations documents and information materials, in addition to past United Nations press records, were made available on the United Nations website in all six of the United Nations languages.  Also, by that text, the Assembly requested the Department of Public Information, as from the sixty‑eighth session, to provide on the United Nations website live webcasts and video archives of its open, formal meetings — including sessions of the Security Council — in all six languages of the United Nations.

The Assembly next considered a draft resolution on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations contained in a report of the same name (document A/68/429), adopting it by a recorded vote of 179 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States).  Among its terms, the Assembly stressed the importance of timely transmission of adequate information from the administering Powers to territories under their protectorates.

Next, the Assembly took up a draft resolution on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories contained in document A/68/430, by which it reaffirmed the responsibility of administering Governments to promote the economic and social development of territories under their oversight, as well as take all measures necessary to protect those territories’ environments.  It was adopted by a recorded vote of 180 in favour to 2 against ( Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions ( France, United Kingdom).  

By a recorded vote of 128 in favour to none against, with 55 abstentions, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations contained in report A/68/431.  By its terms, the Assembly recommended that all States intensify their efforts in those agencies and other organizations of the United Nations to which they belong to ensure the Declaration’s full and effective implementation.  It would request the specialized agencies, the United Nations system and regional organizations to strengthen existing measures of support and formulate appropriate programmes of assistance to the remaining Non‑Self-Governing Territories.  It would also request that they provide information on, among others, environmental problems facing the Territories; the impact of natural disasters; and ways and means to assist the Territories to fight drug trafficking, money laundering and other criminal activities. 

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a resolution on offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/C.4/68/L.4) contained in report A/68/432.  The resolution invited Member States to extend to the inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories offers of facilities for study and training at post-primary and university levels, as well as technical and vocational training.  The initiative of Member States to make available to prospective applicants information on scholarships offered through the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) was welcome.

  The Assembly next turned to the seven resolutions contained in document A/68/433.  No recorded votes were required for Draft Resolution I on the question of Western Sahara (document A/C.4/68/L.5); Draft Resolution II on the question of New Caledonia (document A/63/23, chap. XIII); Draft Resolution III on the question of French Polynesia (document A/63/23, chap. XIII); Draft Resolution IV on the Question of Tokelau (document A/68/23, chap. XIII); and Draft Resolution V on the questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands (document A/68/23, chap. XIII). 

Draft Resolution VI, on the dissemination of information on decolonization (document A/68/23, chap. XIII), was passed by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 3 against ( Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 1 abstention ( France).  Among the terms of the text, the Assembly urged the United Nations to expand its global efforts on the disbursal of information on decolonization, with particular emphasis on options available for self-determination by the peoples of Non-Self-Governing Territories.  Further, it advocated for the Department of Public Information — through the United Nations Information Centres — to actively seek new and innovative ways to distribute such material to the Territories. 

Draft Resolution VII on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples(document A/67/23, chap. XIII) and adopted by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 1 abstention (France).  Among its provisions, the Assembly affirmed its support for the aspirations of the peoples under colonial rule to exercise their right to self-determination, including full independence. 

The Assembly made several requests of the Special Committee on the Situation with regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and People.  Among them was that it develop and finalize, as soon as possible and in cooperation with the administering Power and the Territory in question, a constructive programme of work on a case-by-case basis for the Non-Self-Governing Territories to facilitate the implementation of the Special Committee’s mandate and the relevant resolutions on decolonization, including resolutions on specific Territories.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted Draft Decision VIII on the question of Gibraltar (document A/C.4/68/L.6), by which it reiterated the call for both the United Kingdom and Spain to reach a solution to the matter “in the spirit of the 1984 Brussels Agreement” urging that the mutual agreement is reached by “listening to the interests and aspirations of Gibraltar”.

The Assembly then adopted, also without a vote, a draft decision on the proposed programme of work and timetable of the Special Political and Decolonization Committee (Fourth Committee) for the sixty-ninth session of the General Assembly (document A/C.4/68/L.10) contained in report A/68/591.

The Assembly also took note of the report on programme planning (document A/68/434).

Global Health and Foreign Policy

YUSRA KHAN (Indonesia), speaking on behalf of the Foreign Policy and Global Health Group, consisting of Brazil, France, Indonesia, Norway, Senegal, South Africa and Thailand, said that last year, with the support and cooperation of all member States, the Group had succeeded in facilitating one of the hallmark General Assembly resolutions for health, on universal health coverage.  This year, the initiative had raised partnerships for global health as the focus of its resolution for the current session.  Working in partnership, the international community could multiply the impact of health outcomes, and it was in that spirit that this year’s text had been negotiated and agreed by consensus.

The resolution, he added, called for enhanced partnerships by States and other relevant stakeholders, including with the private sector, civil societies and academia.  The aim was to improve health for all, in particular, by supporting the development of a sustainable and comprehensive health system, ensuring equity and universal access to quality health services, fostering innovations to meet current and future health needs, strengthening capacities for regulation and production as well as research and development, and promoting health through the life course.  “The adoption of the resolution would not be the end but the beginning of the real hard work,” he added.

Some oral corrections were required to some of the paragraphs in document A/68.L.26, which, after editing, did not reflect the essence agreed upon in consultations, he said, detailing the adjustments made to preambular paragraphs 4, 6, and 16.  Corrections were also made to operative paragraphs 11 and 12.

Statements

DAVID ROET ( Israel) said that “diseases did not discriminate” and a health crisis in one country could easily spread to others in its region and beyond.  Promoting good health had always been a priority for Israel, which had pioneered the practice of universal health care.  The Israeli Governments’ health-care system had benefitted tremendously from partnerships and, for decades, Israel had provided its expertise, technology, medicine and training to developing countries in the field of health.  Looking beyond 2015, the international community must focus on improving the quantity and quality of data and, in particular, be able to disaggregate data to enable progress to be measured effectively.  “We can learn from each other’s policies, but there is not one solution for every nation,” he said.  Those issues should be addressed in foreign policy in order to assert the position of global health in the international agenda.

Dmitry I. Maksimychev ( Russian Federation) said that his country fully backed the strengthening of multilateral cooperation and promoting national capacity‑building in health.  The inclusion of health care as one of the priorities of the global socioeconomic agenda was a significant achievement.  The Russian Federation was a co-sponsor of the current resolution, which demonstrated the need to incorporate health care into the new global development agenda.  It was especially vital to counter non-communicable diseases, which were one of the main causes of mortality in developing States.  An effective response to global health‑care related challenges was only possible on the basis of international partnership.  His country would step up its cooperation with the World Health Organization and it fully intended to continue its support for relevant United Nations organizations.

EIJI HINOSHITA (Japan) said that his country regarded global health issues as an important element of its foreign policy.  Universal health coverage could be a powerful tool to reinforce national ownership and set priorities in health care.  Japan had committed to contributing $5 billion over five years to address health-related development issues and was steadily implementing that commitment.  Some problems had been pointed out with regard to global health services, such as the fact that some policies only addressed specific issues and/or allocated resources inappropriately.  Japan hoped that the current resolution would extend global partnerships to resolve those problems.  His country had also taken the lead in formulating the Global Health Innovative Technology Fund in order to address neglected tropical diseases.  It expected that similar initiatives would be formulated and expanded.

Jill Derderian ( United States) said efforts to address AIDS and diseases such as tuberculosis and malaria had succeeded through partnerships.  Development assistance had, for example, helped countries by strengthening capacities and scaling up efforts.  Noting that most of the people who lived in extreme poverty lived in middle-income countries, she said new partnerships that shared lessons learned would make an impact on providing health care to those who needed it most.  Those partnerships could bolster capacity‑building and the development of services, she said, emphasizing that advancing global health through partnerships was a top priority for her country.

PETER LEE ( Singapore) cited steady progress in his country’s health care, which was based on a sound and sustainable financing system that included a multilayer social safety net.  There was no “one-size-fits-all” model of health system delivery; each country’s socioeconomic and political background should be considered.  Singapore faced challenges, including an ageing population, and it was ramping up efforts to address them.  Health care should be incorporated into the post-2015 development agenda.  By taking a long-term view, Governments would be in a better position to look after the health-care needs of their citizens in the longer term.

The Assembly then proceeded to adopt without a vote the draft resolution entitled global health and foreign policy (document A/68/L.26), as orally revised.  By its terms, the Assembly reiteratedthe call for more attention to health as an important cross-cutting policy issue on the international agenda as it was a precondition for and an outcome and indicator of all three dimensions of sustainable development and for recognition that global health challenges required concerted and sustained efforts.  It urged Member States to continue to consider health issues in the formulation of foreign policy.  Among its other provisions, it called for strengthening of the global partnership for development with an inclusive and people-centred development agenda.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.