Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review, Implementation of Rio+20 Outcome Draw Attention as General Assembly Takes Up Second Committee Reports

21 December 2012
GA/11332

Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review, Implementation of Rio+20 Outcome Draw Attention as General Assembly Takes Up Second Committee Reports

21 December 2012
General Assembly
GA/11332
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-seventh General Assembly

Plenary

61st Meeting (AM)

Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review, Implementation of Rio+20 Outcome Draw

Attention as General Assembly Takes Up Second Committee Reports

 

Delegations Adopt 41 Texts, Including 2 Plenary-generated Draft Resolutions

The Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review of United Nations operational activities for development, and implementation of the outcome document of the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, were among the most prominent concerns today as the Second Committee (Economic and Financial) recommended its draft resolutions for adoption by the General Assembly.

As it took action on 36 draft resolutions and 3 draft decisions presented by the Committee, the Assembly adopted 34 of those texts without a vote and 5 by recorded vote.  Of great significance to delegations was the adoption of a draft resolution on the Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review of United Nations operational activities for development.

The representative of the United States said negotiations on the draft had been “complex and often difficult”, but the final text provided clear and constructive guidance to the United Nations system on the need to increase its efficiency, transparency and cost effectiveness.  The representative of the United Republic of Tanzania praised delegations for their flexibility in negotiations and welcomed the “robust” resolution.

Adopted without a vote, the resolution stressed national responsibility for development and coordination of assistance as well as the need to make United Nations operational activities for development more relevant, coherent, efficient and effective in supporting the efforts of developing countries to meet their development targets.  It also stressed that reform efforts should enhance organizational efficiency, achieve concrete development results and strengthen the system’s accountability and transparency to Member States.  It further stressed the need for consistent work across United Nations entities, funds, programmes and specialized agencies, as well as the need for adequate quantities and quality of funding for operational activities.

The resolution also called for the strengthening of cooperation and coordination among the operational activities for development, humanitarian assistance and peacebuilding efforts of the United Nations system, and for a strengthened role for country-level United Nations Resident Coordinators.  Also in its cluster on operational activities for development, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, draft resolution calling upon the United Nations regional commissions to promote South-South cooperation.

With the bulk of draft resolutions falling under the sustainable development cluster, many were linked closely to the Rio+20 outcome document, “The future we want”.  In all, the Assembly adopted 17 texts on sustainable development, including a draft decision.

Two drafts dealing with sustainable development issues required recorded votes.  By one text, titled “Oil slick on Lebanese shores”, the Assembly requested, for the sixth consecutive year, that Israel compensate Lebanon and Syria for pollution of their shores following the destruction of oil storage tanks near Lebanon’s El-Jiyeh power plant.  The Assembly adopted the text by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 9 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, South Sudan, United States), with 5 abstentions (Cameroon, Colombia, Panama, Tonga, Vanuatu).  (See Annex I for voting details).

The Assembly adopted a text on entrepreneurship for development by 141 votes in favour to 31 against, with 11 abstentions.  Israel’s representative said he had hoped for consensus on the text, noting that the Arab States that had voted against it were among those that could benefit most from entrepreneurship.  (See Annex II.)

Syria’s representative, speaking in exercise of the right of reply, described that statement as “truly strange”, given the criticism that Israel had received over human rights violations and denial of economic opportunities to people living under occupation.  Saudi Arabia’s representative defended his country’s record as a peace-loving nation, and his counterpart from Sudan said her country had not turned its back on its people, as the Israeli representative had said, but had instead turned its face towards those living under Israeli occupation.

The focus fell on small island developing States as the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a text on follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States.  It also adopted a draft resolution and a draft decision relating to the sustainable development of the Caribbean Sea for present and future generations.  In addition, the Assembly adopted a text calling on States to take advantage of the International Year of Small Island Developing States.

Adopting another text, the Assembly stressed the challenges that desertification, land degradation and drought posed to sustainable development, including to food security in developing countries, and emphasizing also the need for financial resources, technology transfer and capacity-building to deal with those challenges.

Another draft stressed the importance of the continued substantive consideration of disaster risk reduction, and encouraged Member States and relevant United Nations bodies to take into consideration the important role of disaster risk reduction activities for sustainable development.  Two related texts stressed international cooperation to reduce the impact of the El Niño phenomenon and to protect the global climate for present and future generations.

By a text on implementation of Agenda 21, the Assembly stressed the need to develop the post-2015 development agenda.  Also under the sustainable development umbrella were two annual texts stressing, respectively, the need for continued substantive consideration of the promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, and of biological diversity.  Other sustainable development texts concerned the International Day of Forests and the Tree; Implementation of the International Year of Water Cooperation, 2013; Harmony with nature; Convention on Biological Diversity; and the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on its twelfth special session. 

Taking up globalization and interdependence, the Assembly adopted two texts by recorded votes.  The first, titled “Towards a New International Economic Order”, reaffirmed the need to continue working to integrate the principles of equity, sovereign equality, interdependence, common interest, cooperation and solidarity among all States into global economics.  It was adopted by 132 votes in favour to 47 against, with 5 abstentions ( Australia, Palau, Republic of Korea, Turkey, Ukraine).  By the second, on international migration and development, the Assembly decided to hold a two-day High-Level Dialogue on International Migration and Development on 3 and 4 October 2013.  It was adopted by 129 votes in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States), with 49 abstentions (Annexes III and IV).  .

Iceland’s representative, speaking also for Australia, Liechtenstein, New Zealand, Norway and Switzerland, said he had abstained due to concerns over the process for accrediting non-governmental organizations.  Minor changes to the text would have allowed a favourable vote, he added.  Israel’s representative also said she had opposed the text because of the limitations placed on participation by non-governmental organizations.  The process lacked transparency, she added, emphasizing that reservations should be aired openly and publicly.

Employment, especially youth unemployment, was a key aspect of a draft resolution on the Second United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2008-2017).  Adopting that text without a vote, the Assembly called on States to address the global challenge of youth unemployment by developing and implementing strategies that would give young people everywhere a real chance to find decent and productive work.  Another draft stressed the potential contribution of a dynamic industrial and manufacturing sector to helping prevent growth of the income gap between rich and poor.  Another draft called for the development of ecotourism as a way to boost poverty eradication while taking into consideration the need to respect and promote indigenous cultures, traditions and knowledge.

The Assembly’s action on drafts relating to macroeconomic policy questions was coloured by the current global economic and financial crisis, with its heightened impact on developing countries a key consideration.  One text called for decisive action to tackle global economic challenges in such a way as to promote balanced, sustainable, inclusive and equitable global growth.  Another stressed the need for sustainable external debt, stressing the importance of responsible international lending and borrowing while emphasizing also the shared responsibility of creditors and debtors for preventing unsustainable debt situations.  By another draft, the Assembly stressed the need to increase investment from all sources in agriculture and rural development.

With least developed countries particularly dependent on agriculture, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on agriculture development and food security, which underlined the importance of food security and addressed the root causes of excessive food-price volatility, as well as the consequences of that volatility for global food security, smallholder farmers and poor urban-dwellers.

The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on follow-up to the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries.  Also without a vote, it adopted a text that sought the smooth transition of countries graduating from the list of least developed countries.  Another draft adopted without a vote reaffirmed the right of landlocked developing countries to have access to and from the sea, and to freedom of transit through the territory of transit countries.

A draft on the follow-up to the International Conference on Financing for Development, adopted without a vote, stressed the essential role of official development assistance (ODA) in financing for development, and the need for strengthened South-South cooperation to complement North-South cooperation.

And anannual draft resolution on implementing the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat) recalled the importance of timely action to respond to disasters, particularly in addressing post-disaster and post-conflict housing and infrastructure needs.  The Assembly urged donors to support preparations for the Third United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development, to be held in 2016.  The Assembly adopted it without a vote.

In another recorded vote, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution demanding that Israel stop exploiting, damaging, depleting, and endangering natural resources in occupied Arab lands.  It recognized the right of the Palestinian and other Arab peoples to claim restitution for such illegal actions.  The text was adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 7 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 9 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, El Salvador, Honduras, Malawi, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Vanuatu).

Stressing the need to harness the development potential of information and communications technology, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a draft that sought to bridge the digital divide through the effective and development-oriented use of information and communications technology.  Also aimed at closing the digital divide, a second text sought to build regional connectivity through the Trans-Eurasian Information Super Highway.  The Assembly also adopted a draft decision noting the report of the Director-General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) on communication for development programmes in the United Nations system.

Other Assembly actions today included its adoption of the programme of work for the Second Committee’s sixty-seventh session, and the Committee’s report titled “Programme planning”.

In other action, the Assembly adopted two plenary-generated draft resolutions titled, respectively, “The role of the United Nations in promoting a new global human order” and “Strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations”.

It adopted the first text, introduced by the representative of Guyana, without a vote.

Acting again without a vote, the Assembly then adopted the second text, introduced by the representative of Algeria on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China.

Taking part in a brief discussion on that topic were representatives of South Africa, Singapore and Malaysia.

Introducing the report of the Second Committee was that body’s Rapporteur.

The Assembly will reconvene at 3 p.m. today when it is expected to consider reports of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) and to take action on a number of outstanding plenary matters.

Background

The General Assembly met this morning to consider the 33 reports of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial) and to take action on the draft resolutions contained therein.  The Assembly was also expected to take action on two plenary generated texts, respectively, on the role of the United Nations in promoting a new global human order, and strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations.

Action on Second Committee Reports

AIDA HODŽIĆ ( Bosnia and Herzegovina), Rapporteur of the Second Committee,introduced that body’s reports.

The General Assembly first took up the report on information and communications technologies for development (document A/67/434),adopting the related draft resolution without a vote.  By that text, titled “Building connectivity through the Trans-Eurasian Information Super Highway”, the Assembly stressed the importance of strengthened and continued cooperation among all stakeholders to build and run information infrastructures in order to bridge the digital divide in the region.

It then adopted, without a vote, the draft titled “Information and communications technologies for development”, by which the Assembly stressed that for most of the poor, the development promise of science and technology, including information and communications technologies, remained unfulfilled.  It also emphasized the need to effectively harness technology, including information and communications technologies, so as to bridge the digital divide.

The Assembly then took up a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Director-General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), on communication for development programmes in the United Nations system.  Acting again without a vote, the Assembly decided to take note of the related draft decision.

Taking up the report on macroeconomic policy questions(document A/67/435), the Assembly first took up the draft resolution titled “International trade and development” (document A/67/435/Add.1), adopting it without a vote.  By that text, the Assembly stressed the need to increase investment from all sources in agriculture and rural development, including by providing technical and financial assistance to least developed and net food-importing developing countries.

The Assembly then adopted, without voting, draft resolutions on the international financial system and development(document A/67/435/Add.2), which stressed the need to act decisively to tackle challenges confronting the global economy in order to ensure balanced, sustainable, inclusive and equitable global growth with full and productive employment and quality jobs; and on external debt sustainability and development (document A/67/435/Add.3), which stressed the importance of responsible lending and borrowing, while emphasizing the shared responsibility of creditors and debtors for preventing unsustainable debt situations.

Taking up the report on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the 2002 International Conference on Financing for Development and the 2008 Review Conference (document A/67/436), the Assembly adopted the eponymous draft resolution, which stressed the essential role of official development assistance (ODA) in complementing, leveraging and sustaining development-financing objectives, including internationally agreed development targets.

The Assembly then took up the report on sustainable development (documents A/67/437, Add.1, Add.2, Add.3, Add.4, Add.5, Add.6, Add.7, Add.8 and Add.9), adopting, without a vote, the draft resolution titled “International Day of Forests and the Tree”.  By that text, it encouraged all Member States to organize activities relating to all types of forests, and trees outside forests, such as tree-planting campaigns.

Following a request for a recorded vote on the draft titled “Oil slick on Lebanese shores”, the Assembly adopted the text by 172 votes in favour to 9 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, South Sudan, United States), with 5 abstentions (Cameroon, Colombia, Panama, Tonga, Vanuatu).  (See Annex I for voting details.)

By its terms, the Assembly reiterated, for the seventh consecutive year, its deep concern over the destruction by the Israeli Air Force of oil storage tanks near Lebanon’s El-Jiyeh electric power plant due to its adverse implications for sustainable development in that country.  The Assembly would also request that Israel assume responsibility for paying prompt and adequate compensation to Lebanon and Syria — whose shores had also been partially polluted — to pay for the cost of restoring the marine environment and repairing environmental damage.

The representative of Kenya said he had not voted but wished the record to reflect that he was in favour of the resolution.

Turning to the draft resolution titled “Entrepreneurship for development”, the Assembly adopted it by a recorded vote of 141 in favour to 31 against, with 11 abstentions (Annex II). 

By that text, the Assembly emphasized the important role of partnerships with the private sector in promoting entrepreneurship, generating employment and investment, increasing revenue potential, developing new technologies and innovative business models, and enabling high, sustained, inclusive and equitable economic growth while protecting the rights of workers.

The representative of Israel said he had hoped for consensus on the text, stressing that States in the Arab world especially could benefit from entrepreneurship.  Their people were demanding better lives, better economies and better governance, and did not wish to live with rampant corruption, discrimination against women and economic stagnation.  By voting against the resolution, Arab delegations were turning their backs on their own people and trying to turn back the clock on the important work of the United Nations.  It was now time to take the words of the resolution off the page and breathe life into them on the ground, he stressed, adding that the stakes were high.

The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution titled “Implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development”.  By its terms, the Assembly stressed the need for synergy, coherence and mutual support among all those and other processes that were also relevant to the post-2015 development agenda.  It also reaffirmed “The future we want”, the outcome document of the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, and urged its speedy implementation.

Acting once again without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on implementation of the International Year of Water Cooperation, 2013, which emphasized that water was critical for sustainable development and the eradication of poverty and hunger, indispensible for human health and well-being, and central to achieving the Millennium Goals.

The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the text titled “Towards the sustainable development of the Caribbean Sea for present and future generations”, which called upon Member States to improve, as a matter of priority, their emergency-response capabilities and the containment of environmental damage, particularly in the Caribbean Sea, in the event of disasters, accidents or incidents relating to maritime navigation.

It then adopted, also without a vote, the draft titled “International Year of Small Island Developing States”, by which it encouraged all Member States, the United Nations system and all other stakeholders to take advantage of the Year to promote actions at all levels, including through international, regional and subregional cooperation aimed at achieving the sustainable development of small island developing States.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted the draft titled “Follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States”.  By that text, the Assembly stressed the importance of continued substantive consideration of the follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy.  It stressed, by further terms, the need for effective participation by civil society, in particular non-governmental organizations and other major groups, in regional and international preparatory processes for the upcoming Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States.

The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, the draft decision by which it took note of the report of the Secretary-General towards the sustainable development of the Caribbean Sea for present and future generations (document A/67/313).

Acting again without a vote, the Assembly went on to adopt the text titled “International cooperation to reduce the impact of the El Niño phenomenon”, by which it underlined the importance of maintaining the El Niño/Southern Oscillation observation system, continuing research into extreme weather events, as well as improving forecasting skills.

The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a text titled “International Strategy for Disaster Reduction” by which it stressed the importance of continued substantive consideration of disaster risk reduction, and encouraged Member States and relevant United Nations bodies to take into consideration the important role of disaster risk reduction activities for sustainable development.

It went on to adopt, once again without a vote, the draft titled “Protection of global climate for present and future generations on humankind”, which reaffirmed that climate change was one of the greatest challenges, and expressed profound alarm that greenhouse gas emissions continued to rise globally.

Taking up the draft resolution titled “Implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa”, the Assembly adopted it without a vote.  The text stressed the importance of efforts to strengthen the scientific base of activities to address desertification and drought.

Acting once again without a vote, the Assembly went on to adopt the draft resolution titled “Convention on Biological Diversity and its contribution to sustainable development”, which stressed the importance of private-sector engagement for the implementation of the three objectives of the Convention — conservation of biodiversity; sustainable use of its components; and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the use of genetic resources.

The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution titled “Report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twelfth special session and on the implementation of section IV.C, entitled ‘Environmental pillar in the context of sustainable development’, of the outcome document of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development”,which urged donors to increase voluntary funding for the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), including to the Environment Fund.

It then adopted, without a vote, the draft titled “Harmony with nature”, which called for holistic and integrated approaches to sustainable development that would guide humanity to live with nature, leading to efforts to restore the health and integrity of the earth’s ecosystems.

The Assembly then adopted, also without a vote, the draft titled “Promotion of new and renewable sources of energy”, which stressed the need to increase the share of new and renewable sources of energy in the global mix as an important contribution to ensuring universal access to sustainable modern energy services.  Also by that text the Assembly declared the period 2014-2024 the United Nations Decade of Sustainable Energy for All, to be promoted through all sources of energy, mindful of the provisions of the annex to Economic and Social Council resolution 1980/67 of 25 July 1980.

Several delegations spoke in exercise of the right of reply.

The representative of Syria said it was “truly strange” that his counterpart from Israel would make such a statement at a time when the latter was being condemned for human rights violations and the denial of economic opportunity to those living under occupation.  Listing several examples of such violations, he noted that other resolutions upon which the Assembly would take decisions today called for an end to the confiscation of agricultural land and other breaches of human and economic rights.  Despite repeated international calls, the Israeli Government refused to adhere to international law and to end the occupation, he said.  Once the Israelis did that, once they respected all the resolutions adopted today, and once they read the report of the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA), which stressed the impediment to development posed by occupation, it would be possible to talk about resolutions such as the one on entrepreneurship for development.

The representative of Saudi Arabia said his country had made several positive contributions to the world and had built its relations with other States on its standing as a peace-loving nation.

The representative of Sudan said she had not turned her back on her people, but rather towards those living under the Israeli occupation.  Sudan could not therefore vote in favour of the resolution.

Taking up the report on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (document A/67/438), the Assembly adopted the eponymous draft resolution without a vote.  By that text, it urged international and bilateral donors, as well as the private sector, financial institutions, foundations and other donors in a position to do so, to support the preparations for the Conference through voluntary contributions to the trust fund.  It also urged them to support the participation of developing-world representatives in meetings of the Preparatory Committee and in the Conference itself.

Turning to the report on Globalization and interdependence(documents A/67/439, Add.1 and Add.2),the Assembly adopted the draft resolution titled “Towards a New International Economic Order” by a recorded vote of 132 in favour to 47 against, with 5 abstentions (Australia, Palau, Republic of Korea, Turkey, Ukraine).  (See Annex III.)  By that text the Assembly reaffirmed the need to enhance the voice of developing countries in international economic decision-making and norm-setting.  It also reaffirmed the critical role of a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system in stimulating economic growth and development worldwide.

The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution titled “Promoting transparency, participation and accountability in fiscal policies” without a vote, encouraging Member States to intensify efforts to enhance transparency, participation and accountability in fiscal policies.

Following a request for a recorded vote, the Assembly adopted the draft titled “International migration and development” by 129 votes in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States), with 49 abstentions (Annex IV).  By its terms, the Assembly would decide to hold a two-day high-level dialogue on international migration and development on 3 and 4 October 2013, following the general debate of its sixty-eighth session, at United Nations Headquarters.  It invited all relevant entities of the United Nations system, as well as relevant special rapporteurs and representatives, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and other relevant international organizations to participate as observers in the Assembly’s work, to contribute to the preparation of the Dialogue and to participate in it.

The representative of Iceland, speaking for Australia, Liechtenstein, New Zealand, Norway and Switzerland, said that, notwithstanding the importance his delegation attached to the High-Level Dialogue, he had been unable to vote in favour.  Non-governmental organizations without consultative status with the Economic and Social Council still needed to take part, he noted, adding that, had slight changes been made on accreditation, he would have been able to support the text.

The representative of Israel expressed disappointment that some delegations had suggested language that would limit participation by non-governmental organizations.  The rejection by a single State or organization contravened the principles of transparency, she said, adding that any reservations should be made openly and publicly.  For that reason, Israel had voted against the resolution.

Taking up the report on groups of countries in special situations(documents A/67/440, Add.1 and Add.2), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, the draft resolutions titled “Follow-up to the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries”, expressing its serious concern that after a decade of welcome, steady economic growth, least developed countries faced significant challenges in sustaining economic growth, while their economies were projected to grow considerably below the annual 7 per cent set out in the Istanbul Programme of Action.

The Assembly went on to adopt, also without a vote, the draft resolution titled “Smooth transition for countries graduating from the list of least developed countries”, emphasizing that a successful transition must be based on the national smooth-transition strategy, elaborated as a priority by each graduating country, in the period between the date on which the Assembly took note of the recommendation that it graduate and the effective graduation date.

It went on to adopt, again without a vote, the text titled “Specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation”.  By that text, it reaffirmed the right of landlocked countries to access to and from the sea, and their freedom of transit through the territory of transit countries by all means of transport, in accordance with the applicable rules of international law.

Taking up the report on eradication of poverty and other development issues (documents A/67/441, Add.1 and Add.2), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a draft titled “Promotion of ecotourism for poverty eradication and environment protection”, by which it stressed the need to consider, respect and promote indigenous cultures, traditions and knowledge in developing ecotourism policy.

It then adopted, also without a vote, a draft titled “Second United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2008-2017)”, urging Member States to address the global challenge of youth unemployment by developing and implementing strategies that would give young people everywhere a real chance to find decent and productive work.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution titled “Industrial development cooperation”, by which it stressed that the lack of a dynamic industrial and manufacturing sector was one of the factors that could lead to a widening of the income gap between rich and poor, and to the erosion of social protection nets.

The Assembly then took up the report on operational activities for development(documents A/67/442, Add.1 and Add.2), adopting a draft resolution titled “Quadrennial comprehensive policy review” without a vote.  By that text, the Assembly stressed the primary responsibility of Governments for their countries’ development and for coordinating all external assistance, including that provided by multilateral organizations, on the basis of national strategies and priorities; and the need to make the Organization’s development system more relevant, coherent, efficient and effective in supporting the efforts of developing countries to achieve the internationally agreed development targets.

It also stressed that reform efforts should enhance organizational efficiency, achieve concrete development results and strengthen the system’s accountability and transparency to Member States; the need for the United Nations system to work consistently across its entities, funds, programmes and specialized agencies by enhancing coordination within programme countries, and building strong linkages within them as well as between the national, regional and global levels; and the need for adequate quantity and quality of funding for operational activities, as well as the need to make funding more predictable, effective and efficient.  Further, the Assembly stressed that the Resident Coordinator system, while managed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), was owned by the United Nations development system as a whole and its functioning should be participatory, collegial and mutually accountable within that system.

The representative of the United States said negotiations had been complex and often difficult, but the text gave clear and constructive guidance to the United Nations system to increase its efficiency, transparency, and cost effectiveness.  She said adequate and timely resources must be voluntary and made on a grant basis.  The United States would continue to make voluntary contributions to United Nations operational activities for development and was pleased that there would be more rigorous evaluation in the future.  Greater emphasis was falling on results, which was important in helping to target waste and inefficiency, she said.  However, the “critical mass” for funding did not adequately reflect the emphasis on results-based management.

She went on to stress the importance of United Nations Resident Coordinators, saying she was pleased to see the strengthening of their role.  They would be better able to draw on the values of the United Nations Charter and better held accountable for upholding and promoting those values.  She said technology transfer was vital, but an intellectual property regime was required.  Most intellectual property was created by the market, so its transfer would be necessarily voluntary, she said, adding that she had joined the consensus on the express understanding that the resolution did not recognize any new rights, expand others or change the current state of international and customary law.  Any discussion of the “right to development” must focus on the established universal human rights that individuals could demand of their own Governments, she emphasized.  Additionally, the statement on programme budget implications had been made extremely late, and the Second Committee had been unable to respond quickly enough, she said.

The representative of the United Republic of Tanzania said the resolution was robust and provided clear guidance to States.  Even in areas where consensus had not been achieved, dialogue had been frank and sustained throughout, laying the framework for future debates.  The resolution was strongly oriented towards building coherence, supporting country programmes in the field and helping people to live better lives, he said.

Taking up a draft resolution titled “South-South cooperation”, the Assembly adopted it without a vote, calling upon the United Nations regional commissions to play a catalytic role in promoting South-South as well as triangular cooperation, and in strengthening their technical, policy and research support for countries in their respective regions.

The Assembly then turned to the report on agriculture development and food security(document A/67/443), adopting the eponymous draft resolution without a vote.  By its terms the Assembly stressed the need to address the root causes of excessive volatility in food prices, including its structural causes, and the need to manage risks linked to excessively volatile prices in agricultural commodities and their consequences for global food security and nutrition, as well as for smallholder farmers and poor urban-dwellers.

Moving on the report on the permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/67/444), the Assembly adopted the related text by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 7 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 9 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, El Salvador, Honduras, Malawi, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Vanuatu).  By that text, the Assembly demanded that Israel stop exploiting, damaging, depleting and endangering the natural resources in occupied Arab lands.  It called upon Israel to cease all actions that harmed the environment in all the territories under its occupation, as well as the destruction of infrastructure, including water pipelines and sewage networks.  (See Annex V.)

The Assembly then unanimously adopted the Second Committee’s draft programme of work for the sixty-sixth session of the General Assembly, as contained in its report on revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/67/445).

It also adopted, by consensus, the Committee’s report on programme planning (document A/67/446), deciding that no action was required on the item.

The Assembly then took up two plenary-generated draft resolutions.

Promoting New Global Human Order

GEORGE TALBOT ( Guyana) introduced a draft resolution on the role of the United Nations in promoting a new global human order (document A/67/L.49).  He said that two years ago, when the related item had last been considered, the Assembly had recognized, through resolution 65/120, that inequality within and among countries had been a concern for all countries regardless of their level of development — a concern requiring the constructive engagement of the international community.  The concept of a new global human order was one of people-centred development; it appealed to the international community to focus on bridging the increasing disparity in human development through a multilateral approach. 

The draft resolution under consideration was premised on the previous resolution of December 2010, and had been updated and revised to reflect the current realities.  He said the current text highlighted the significance of inequality in the global development agenda, the progress of the United Nations system and other actors in addressing inequality, the need for mainstreaming inequality in the activities of the United Nations agencies and programmes, and the progress in efforts of many Member States to address inequality.  The text also requested the convening of an informal thematic debate of the General Assembly to address the issue of inequality in 2013 and encouraged appropriate consideration to the need to reduce inequality in the elaboration of the post-2015 development agenda.  He called for the adoption of the text by consensus.   

JILL MAIMELA (South Africa) said the nexus between the three Organizational imperatives — namely development, peace and security and human rights — dictated that the international community should remain focused on extricating humanity from “the doldrums of insecurity” in all its dimensions.  That was all the more important in the current context of slow global economic growth.  The most pressing problems confronting her country today were poverty, inequality and unemployment.  Those challenges were not unique to South Africa or Africa but affected a number of regions in the Global South.  There was progress in the last 18 years despite such challenges as poor infrastructure, development backlogs, the unsustainable use of natural resources, the spatial divides that excluded the poor from economic advancement and the uneven quality of public services.

“The link between poverty and inequality is well known,” she continued, adding that poverty continued to engender inequality in communities, countries, regions and around the world.  Yet, inequality, in its own turn, continued to be a scourge with the potential to frustrate the very efforts aimed at eradicating poverty.  South Africa’s current reconstruction and development efforts stemmed from its historical experience of segregation and were aimed at tackling the triple challenges of unemployment, poverty and inequality.  Her Government was guided by the conviction that the State must intervene decisively in the economy with the aim of promoting growth and development.  It was the State that should drive the correct policies to ensure the delivery of social justice and cohesion to its people.  Further, she stressed the important role of the United Nations in global governance and multilateralism.

THAM BORG TSIEN ( Singapore) said he was pleased at significant progress in addressing absolute income poverty but was concerned about the growth in income inequality.  That phenomenon was a special challenge to Singapore, he said, and noted that his Government had set out a strategy that was focused on ensuring that all Singaporeans benefited from growth, focusing especially on the lower income groups.  Skills received emphasis to enable people to take up better paying jobs and benefits and subsidies existed to redistribute incomes in a fair and sustainable manner. 

He said the key principles of Singapore’s approach were the provision of social protection without discouraging work, the involvement of the community through a “many-helping-hands” approach, inclusive opportunities for all, such as access to high quality health care, education and employment opportunities, and the recognition of the idea that “one size does not fit all.”  That was the spirit in which Singapore had worked towards the Millennium Development Goals, as well as tackling poverty and inequality, and such efforts needed to continue to include capacity- and capability-building efforts customized to the particular circumstances faced by a given country.  He supported the High-Level Panel on the Post-2015 Development Agenda in its efforts to create a “bold yet practical” vision, and also supported the Secretary-General’s calls for negotiations to continue on the World Trade Organization (WTO) Doha Development Round.

SAIFUL AZAM MARTINUS ABDULLAH (Malaysia) said that since 1970, his Government had undertaken ambitious socioeconomic programmes intended to balance the economic participation of various groups of citizens and to promote equitable growth.  As a result, Malaysia’s per capita income had grown significantly, with poverty dropping from 75 per cent in 1957 to only 3.8 per cent in 2010.  Hardcore poverty had virtually been eradicated. 

Malaysia believed education was a prerequisite for a nation to fully address inequality, he said.  That was due to the belief that knowledge was the key to higher income for its people.  At the same time, development of human capital was a crucial ingredient in the journey towards becoming a developed country.  Since the mid-1990s, the Government had consistently allocated at least a fifth of the national development expenditure towards education and training.  Malaysia’s literacy rate was now above 93 per cent.  Malaysia was also always supportive in providing an enabling environment for the advancement of women at both the national and international levels.  “We are witnessing more women in high-level political positions and as top administrators and managers in all key socioeconomic areas,” he said.

Following those statements, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution without a vote.  By it, Member States expressed deep concern about “persistent and considerable” disparities between rich and poor, both within and among countries, and about the adverse implications of those disparities for the promotion of human development throughout the world.  States were also concerned about the worldwide prevalence of gender inequality in various forms, which was often expressed in poorer outcomes for women relative to men on many social development indicators.

Considering that such disparities continued to pose major barriers to attaining the Millennium Development Goals and to other internationally agreed development targets, the Assembly emphasized the importance of efforts to address all aspects and dimensions of inequality and called upon Member States to pursue “ambitious efforts” to tackle it, and to consider, among others, programmes to promote the participation and empowerment of all members of society, implementing social protection floors or extending the scope of existing social programmes.

Strengthening Coordination of United Nations Emergency Relief Assistance

Next, KAMEL CHIR (Algeria), speaking on behalf of the Group of 77 developing countries and China, introduced a draft resolution on international cooperation on humanitarian assistance in the field of natural disasters, from relief to development (document A/67/L.50).  He said that the text reaffirmed the importance of international cooperation in dealing with such situations.  At the same time, it emphasized that the affected State had the primary responsibility in the initiation, organization, coordination and implementation of humanitarian assistance within its territory and in the facilitation of the work of relief organizations in mitigating the consequences of natural disasters.

It also recognized the clear relationship between emergency response, rehabilitation and development, he said.  To ensure a smooth transition from relief to rehabilitation and development, emergency assistance must be provided in ways that will be supportive of short- and medium-term recovery leading to long-term development.  “The draft resolution is the result of informal consultations and bilateral negotiations,” he said.

Continuing, he said the text contained new elements, such as a paragraph on strengthening partnerships at the global, regional, national and local levels in support of national efforts in situations of natural disasters, in order to cooperate effectively in providing humanitarian assistance to those in need.  Another important factor was that Member States were encouraged to develop or improve data collection and analysis to enhance the effectiveness of a needs-based humanitarian response. 

He went on to note that the text stressed the need to strengthen resilience at all levels and encouraged Member States, the United Nations system and other relevant actors to support efforts to integrate resilience in humanitarian and development programming.  The text also encouraged giving appropriate consideration to disaster risk reduction and building of resilience to disasters within the post-2015 development agenda and promoting a complementary and coherent approach between that agenda and the post-2015 framework for disaster risk reduction.

The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution without a vote and through it, expressed concern that global challenges, including the impact of climate change, the ongoing fallout from the global financial and economic crisis and other key factors exacerbating the vulnerability of populations, were putting increasing pressure on Member States and the United Nations humanitarian response capacity to deal with the consequences of natural disasters.  It recognized the high numbers of persons affected by such disasters, including internally displaced persons, and the need to address the humanitarian and development needs arising from displacement owing to natural disasters.

Emphasizing the need to address vulnerability and to integrate disaster risk reduction, including preparedness, into all phases of natural disaster management, post-natural disaster recovery and development planning, through close collaboration of all relevant actors and sectors, the Assembly called upon Member States, the United Nations system and other relevant humanitarian and development actors to accelerate the full implementation of the Hyogo Declaration and the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015.

In addition, the Assembly stressed the importance of strengthening international cooperation, particularly through the effective use of multilateral mechanisms, in the timely provision of humanitarian assistance through all phases of a disaster — relief and recovery to development, including the provision of adequate resources.  By another provision of the text, Member States were encouraged to facilitate, to the extent possible, the transit of emergency humanitarian relief and development assistance, provided in the context of international efforts, and in full respect of the humanitarian principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence.

ANNEX I

Vote on Oil Slick on Lebanese Shores

The draft resolution on the oil slick on Lebanese shores (document A/67/437) was adopted by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 9 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, South Sudan, United States.

Abstain:   Cameroon, Colombia, Panama, Tonga, Vanuatu.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Sao Tome and Principe, Somalia, Turkmenistan.

ANNEX II

Vote on Entrepreneurship for Development

The draft resolution on entrepreneurship for development (document A/67/437) was adopted by a recorded vote of 141 in favour to 31 against, with 11 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Zambia.

Against:  Algeria, Bahrain, Bolivia, Comoros, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Yemen.

Abstain:  Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, China, Ecuador, Mali, Mauritius, Namibia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Antigua and Barbuda, Central African Republic, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Sao Tome and Principe, Somalia, Swaziland, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam.

ANNEX III

Vote on New International Economic Order

The draft resolution on a new international economic order (document A/67/439/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 132 in favour to 47 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Australia, Palau, Republic of Korea, Turkey, Ukraine.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Gabon, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Somalia, South Sudan, Turkmenistan.

ANNEX IV

Vote on International Migration and Development

The draft resolution on international development and development (document A/67/439/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 3 against, with 49 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Canada, Israel, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Estonia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan.

ANNEX V

Vote on Permanent Sovereignty

The draft resolution on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/67/444) was adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 7 against, with 9 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Australia, Cameroon, El Salvador, Honduras, Malawi, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Vanuatu.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Sao Tome and Principe, Somalia, South Sudan.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.