On Recommendation of Fourth Committee, General Assembly Adopts Nearly 30 Texts, Nine on Palestinian Refugees, UN Agency Tasked with Mitigating their Plight

18 December 2012
GA/11330

On Recommendation of Fourth Committee, General Assembly Adopts Nearly 30 Texts, Nine on Palestinian Refugees, UN Agency Tasked with Mitigating their Plight

18 December 2012
General Assembly
GA/11330
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-seventh General Assembly

Plenary

59th Meeting (AM)

On Recommendation of Fourth Committee, General Assembly Adopts Nearly 30 Texts,

Nine on Palestinian Refugees, UN Agency Tasked with Mitigating their Plight

In other Action, adds South Sudan to Least Developed Countries List,

Reaffirms Support for Kimberley Process, Welcomes Cooperation with la Francophonie

The General Assembly today, acting on the recommendation of its Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization), drew divided support among its resolutions and decisions on decolonization and issues concerning Israeli practices and the United Nations Agency tasked with mitigating the plight of the region’s refugees, but attracted broad backing for drafts on the effects of atomic radiation, peacekeeping, outer space, information and University for Peace.

Against the backdrop of the grim escalation of Gaza violence in November, the Fourth Committee forwarded nine texts to the General Assembly on the Arab-Israeli conflict, similar to those on the topics submitted last year.  Among them were five resolutions contained in the report of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian Peoples and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories.

By the terms of a text on the work of the Special Committee, the Assembly stressed the urgency of bringing a complete end to the Israeli occupation that began in 1967 and deplored those Israeli policies and practices that violated the human rights of the Palestinian people and other Arabs of the occupied territories.  It was adopted by a recorded vote of 98 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, United States), with 72 abstentions.  (For details of the vote, see Annex V.)

Among its other provisions, the Assembly commended the Special Committee for its impartiality, but expressed grave concern about the critical situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, particularly in the Gaza Strip, as a result of unlawful Israeli practices and measures.  It called for the immediate cessation of all illegal Israeli settlement activities and the construction of the wall, as well as the excessive and indiscriminate use of force against the civilian population.

Other resolutions concerning Israeli practices obtained wider support, such as the text on Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, as well as a text on the applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the protection of civilian persons in time of war, both of which required recorded votes.  (Respectively, Annexes VII and VI.)

The Assembly condemned all acts of violence, especially the excessive use of force by the Israeli occupying forces against Palestinian civilians, particularly in the Gaza Strip, and expressed grave concernat the firing of rockets against Israeli civilian areas resulting in loss of life and injury, in a resolution it adopted by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, El Salvador, Honduras, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Vanuatu).  (Annex VIII)

Further to that text, the Assembly demanded that Israel, the occupying Power, cease all practices and actions that violated the human rights of the Palestinian people, including the killing and injuring of civilians, the arbitrary detention and imprisonment of civilians and the destruction and confiscation of civilian property.  It called on Israel, the occupying Power, to cease its imposition of prolonged closures and economic and movement restrictions, including those amounting to a blockade on the Gaza Strip.

Also requiring recorded votes were the four texts on the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), concerning:  UNRWA’s operations (Annex III); persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities (Annex II); entitlement of the Palestine refugees to their property and income (Annex IV); and assistance to Palestine refugees (Annex I).

By the terms of the latter text, the Assembly affirmed the imperative of resolving the problem of the Palestine refugees for the achievement of lasting peace in the region.  It meanwhile noted with regret that the situation remained a matter of grave concern and that the refugees continued to require assistance to meet basic health, education and living needs.  It thus reaffirmed the need for the Agency’s continued work.  That resolution was adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 1 against ( Israel), with 8 abstentions ( Cameroon, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, United States).

Taking up the 11 texts on decolonization, the Assembly adopted six by consensus, including the omnibus draft resolution on Questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands.

By its terms, the Assembly stressed the importance of the decolonization process by expediting the application of the work programme for the decolonization of each of the 16 Non-Self-Governing Territories on its list, on a case-by-case basis.  It reaffirmed that in the process of decolonization, there was no alternative to the principle of self-determination, which was a fundamental human right.

Also adopted without a vote were resolutions on measures by the administering Powers to ensure the widespread dissemination in their Territories of information relating to study and training offers; the search of a mutually acceptable political solution to the Western Sahara dispute; on question of New Caledonia; Tokelau; and a draft decision on Gibraltar.

A recorded vote was required for the adoption of the draft resolution on economic and other activities that affect Non-Self-Governing Territories, by which the Assembly affirmed the value of foreign economic investment undertaken in collaboration with the peoples of the Territories and urged the administering Powers to safeguard and guarantee the right of those to their natural resources and to ensure that no discriminatory working conditions prevailed in the Territories.

Also by recorded votes, the Assembly adopted resolutions concerning information from Non-Self-Governing Territories; implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples; implementation of the Declaration by United Nations specialized agencies; and the dissemination of information on decolonization. 

Moving on to outer space, the Assembly, acting without a vote, adopted a resolution on international cooperation in that field, and a decision to increase the membership of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, with the addition of Armenia, Costa Rica and Jordan.

Also acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted its annual resolution on peacekeeping, by which it, among other things, acknowledged the increase in the number and the complexity of special political missions and requested the Secretary-General to submit a report on all policy matters pertaining to those operations, including their evolution, trends and nature, as well as their role in activities of the Organization. 

The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, two resolutions and one decision on information.  By the terms of the annual wide-ranging text, it emphasized that public information and communications should be placed at the heart of the strategic management of the United Nations and that a culture of communications and transparency should permeate all levels of the Organization.  It stressed the importance of ensuring that the texts of all new public United Nations documents in all six official languages, information materials and all older United Nations documents are made available through the United Nations website and are accessible to Member States without delay.  The Assembly decided to appoint Oman as a member of that Committee, bringing its membership up from 113 to 114.

Adopting without a vote was a resolution on atomic radiation, by which it requested the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation to continue its work and to increase knowledge of the levels, effects and risks of ionizing radiation.  The resolution on the University for Peace, also adopted without a vote, requested that the Secretary-General expand the scope for using the University as part of his conflict-resolution and peacebuilding efforts.

Finally, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a decision on the Fourth Committee’s programme of work for its sixty-eighth session.  It took note of the report on programme planning.

Finishing up its consideration of the reports of the Fourth Committee, the Assembly then took up a number of outstanding plenary matters, holding its annual review of the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme and the role of diamonds in fuelling conflict, and taking action on a number of draft resolutions.

On the Kimberley Process, the Assembly adopted a wide-ranging consensus resolution on conflict diamonds, introduced by the representative of the United States, which holds the Chairmanship of the Certification Scheme this year.

Also taking the floor during the brief debate on that topic were the representatives of Israel, Russian Federation, South Africa and Panama.  A representative of the Delegation of the European Union also spoke.

In other business, the Assembly, endorsing the recommendation of the Economic and Social Council, adopted a resolution by which it decided to add South Sudan to the list of United Nations-identified “least developed countries”.  That text was introduced by the representative of Kenya.

Finally today, the Assembly adopted a consensus resolution on strengthening cooperation with the International Organization of la Francophonie, which was introduced by the representative of Kenya.  The Observer of the organization made a statement following the Assembly’s action.

The Rapporteur of the Fourth Committee introduced that body’s reports.

The representatives of the United States and Azerbaijan spoke in explanation of positions on those texts.

Speaking in exercise of the right of reply in that segment were the representatives of Armenia and Azerbaijan.

The General Assembly is expected to reconvene at 10 a.m., 20 December, to take up the reports of its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural).

Fourth Committee Reports

The Rapporteur of the Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization), ZULFI ISMAILI of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, introduced the reports of the Committee in one intervention.

The Assembly first took up the report on University for Peace (document A/67/420), adopting the draft resolution contained therein without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly asked the Secretary-General to expand the scope for using the University as part of his conflict-resolution and peace-building efforts through the training of staff, especially those concerned with peacekeeping and peacebuilding.

Next, the Assembly took up the report on the effects of atomic radiation (document A/67/421), adopting a text by the same name without a vote.

By its terms, the Assembly requested the Scientific Committee to continue its work and to increase knowledge of the levels, effects and risks of ionizing radiation.  It endorsed the Committee’s intention to complete, at its next session, an assessment of the levels of exposure and radiation risks attributable to the accident following the great east-Japan earthquake and tsunami and a report on the effects of radiation exposure on children. 

Turning to the report on international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space (document A/67/422), the Assembly adopted without a vote the draft resolution by the same name, deciding to urge States that have not yet become parties to the international treaties governing the uses of outer space to consider ratifying or acceding to them, as well as incorporating them into their national legislation. 

The Assembly would also urge all States, in particular those with major space capabilities, to contribute actively to the goal of preventing an arms race in outer space.  It would emphasize the need to increase the benefits of space technology and its applications and to contribute to an orderly growth of space activities favourable to sustained economic growth and sustainable development in all countries, including mitigation of the consequences of disasters, in particular, in developing countries.

The Assembly then turned to the draft decision on increase in the membership of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, also contained in that report, adopting it without a vote.  By so doing, the Assembly decided to appoint Armenia, Costa Rica and Jordan as members of that Committee.

Speaking in explanation of position, the representative of Azerbaijan said that the position of his delegation had been voiced in the Fourth Committee.  Although his delegation fully supported the membership of Costa Rica and Jordan to the Outer Space Committee, Armenia’s application had not received consensus in June at the meeting in Vienna.  He expressed concern that as soon as Armenia became a member, action against Azerbaijan would intensify.  “It is hard to associate Armenia with peace,” he said, as that country had been carrying out crimes against civilians, in particular, against children and women.  It should face international resistance, rather than inclusion with peace-loving countries.

In exercise of the right of reply, the representative of Armenia said that he had deep concern regarding the irresponsible conduct and unacceptable behaviour of Azerbaijan’s representative; its grounds for discussion were outrageous and ran counter to United Nations principles.  

He said Armenia recognized the peaceful use of outer space for the betterment of mankind and development, and was confident that its membership would contribute to the efforts of the international community in that regard.  Further, his delegation had briefed the Outer Space and Fourth Committees on the contributions of Armenian scientists and their active role in the peaceful use of outer space.  His country was committed to the Outer Space Committee’s work.

Also speaking in exercise of the right of reply, the representative of Azerbaijan said that Armenia did not engage in a sober search for peace and did not deserve to stand with peace-loving countries or benefit from international bodies advocating peace.  It was curious that when Armenia was unleashing war on Azerbaijan it espoused principles of peace, in remarks that were full of distortions and misinterpretations.  Nothing new had been introduced and Armenia had abused its right to speak, demonstrating irrelevant aspects of the real situation on the ground. 

The delegate of Armenia, again exercising his right of reply, stated that he regretted that the representative of Azerbaijan was using the debate as a means of distracting attention from the reality on the ground and its own obligation with regard to the ceasefire.  Such “cheap steps” in the General Assembly were unconvincing and shameful.  Further, the delegation of Armenia, as well as other Member States, was tired of such propaganda, hearing the delegation of Azerbaijan repeat the same comments in one meeting after the next.

Also in right of reply, the representative of Azerbaijan said that the remarks of Armenia’s delegation testified to its disregard for its obligation and the validity of his country’s concerns regarding the Outer Space Committee.  Further, the delegation disregarded international law, openly challenging resolution of the conflict.  Its out-of-context comments failed to respond to the argument.  He was confident that Armenia’s agenda would not be realized.

The Assembly then turned to the report on United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) (document A/67/423), which contained four draft resolutions.

The Assembly adopted draft resolution I on assistance to Palestine refugees, by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 1 against (Israel), with 8 abstentions (Cameroon, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, United States).  By so doing, (document L.10) it noted with regret that the situation of the refugees remained a matter of grave concern and that they continued to require assistance to meet basic health, education and living needs.  (For details of the vote, see Annex I.)

The Assembly adopted draft resolution II on persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities, by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 4 abstentions (Cameroon, Honduras, Panama, Papua New Guinea), by which it reaffirmed the right of those persons to return to their homes or former places of residence in the territories occupied by Israel since 1967 and stressed the necessity for their accelerated return.  (Annex II)

The Assembly adopted draft resolution III on UNRWA’s operations, by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 1 abstention (Cameroon), expressing deep concern about the Agency’s extremely critical financial situation and urging all States, specialized agencies and non-governmental organizations to urgently increase their contributions in order to address the Agency’s persistent, growing and serious financial constraints.  (Annex III)

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution IV on Palestine refugees’ properties and revenues, by a recorded vote of 173 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 2 abstentions (Cameroon, Papua New Guinea).  By that text, the Assembly urged the Palestinian and Israeli sides to deal with that important issue within the framework of the final status negotiations of the Middle East peace process.  (Annex IV)

In explanation of position on the package of texts, the representative of the United States said that a secure Jewish State of Israel and a prosperous Palestine was the goal, and he was dismayed at the one-sided General Assembly resolutions that condemned Israel.  There had been 17 such resolutions that were unbalanced against Israel, and those did not recognize that each side had direct responsibility to end the conflict.  It was worrying that United Nations Member States were singling out Israel without acknowledging both sides.  That, he stressed, set back the peaceful resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 

He further pointed out that the Assembly would adopt five resolutions critical of a single Member State.  Such a stance did not contribute to a just, lasting, comprehensive peace in the Middle East, but pushed a pre-supposed outcome, when any resolution could only be achieved through negotiations between the relevant parties.  That damaged the reputation of the United Nations.

The Division on Palestinian Rights, the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People and the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices wasted resources and time, he said.  Those who supported a Palestinian State should support the efforts of all parties to bring about a lasting peace and avoid resolutions that hindered the negotiation process.  His delegation did not support the resolutions, but, instead, remained focused on the parties, the diplomatic Quartet and international efforts to resume talks.

The Assembly then took up the report of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories (document A/67/424), which contains five draft resolutions.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution I on the work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories by a recorded vote of 98 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, United States), with 72 abstentions.  (Annex V)

By its terms, the Assembly stressed the urgency of bringing a complete end to the Israeli occupation that began in 1967 and deplored those policies and practices of Israel that violated the human rights of the Palestinian people and other Arabs of the occupied territories.

The Assembly adopted draft resolution II on the applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the protection of civilian persons in time of war, of 12 August 1949, to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the other occupied Arab territories, by a recorded vote of 171 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 3 abstentions (Cameroon, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu).  (Annex VI)

By that text, the Assembly stressed that Israel should comply strictly with its obligations under international law and reaffirmed that the Geneva Convention, relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, was applicable to the Occupied Palestinian Territory.

The Assembly adopted draft resolution III on Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the occupied Syrian Golan, by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 5 abstentions (Cameroon, Honduras, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu), thereby reiterating its demand for the cessation of all Israeli settlement activities in those areas (Annex VII)

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution IV on Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, El Salvador, Honduras, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Vanuatu).  Among its provisions, the text demanded that Israel, the occupying Power, cease all practices and actions that violate the human rights of the Palestinian people, including the killing and injuring of civilians, the arbitrary detention and imprisonment of civilians and the destruction and confiscation of civilian property.  (Annex VIII)

Next, the Assembly adopted draft resolution V on the occupied Syrian Golan, by a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 1 against (Israel), with 11 abstentions.  That text called upon Israel to desist from changing the physical character, demographic composition, institutional structure and legal status of the occupied Syrian Golan and in particular to desist from the establishment of settlements.  (Annex IX)

Turning to the report on the comprehensive review of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects (document A/67/425), the Assembly adopted without a vote the draft resolution of the same name, by which it acknowledged the increase in the number and the complexity of those missions and requested the Secretary-General to submit a report on all policy matters pertaining to them, including their evolution, trends and nature, as well as their role in activities of the Organization. 

Next, the Assembly turned to the report on questions relating to information (document A/67/426), which contained two draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Acting without a vote, it adopted the draft resolution on information in the service of humanity, by which it urged all countries to cooperate with a view to reducing existing disparities in information flows at all levels, to ensure for journalists the free and effective performance of their professional tasks and condemn resolutely, all attacks against them, and to provide all possible support and assistance to developing countries and their media.

The wide-ranging draft resolution on United Nations public information policies and activities would have the Assembly request the Secretary-General to implement fully the recommendations contained in relevant resolutions.  It would request the Department of Public Information to continue to evaluate its products and activities with the objective of enhancing their effectiveness, and to undertake other endeavours related to bridging the digital divide, strengthening information services and supporting peacekeeping missions, among others.  The Assembly would also ask the Secretary-General to exert all efforts to ensure that information services of the Secretariat contained information in all official languages, and to take other measures, including those related to taking full advantage of developments in information technology, in order to improve the dissemination of information in a cost-neutral manner.

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution without a vote.

By the draft decision on increase in the membership of the Committee on Information, the Assembly would appoint Oman as a member of that Committee, bringing its membership up from 113 to 114.

The Assembly adopted the decision without a vote.

Turning to the report on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations (document A/67/427), the Assembly adopted the draft resolution  contained therein, by a recorded vote of 175 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States).  (Annex X)

By its terms, the Assembly asked the administrating Powers concerned to transmit regularly to the Secretary-General statistical and other information of a technical nature relating to economic, social and educational conditions in the Territories for which they are respectively responsible, as well as the fullest possible information on political and constitutional developments in the Territories concerned.

Next, the Assembly took up the report on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/67/428), adopting the resolution contained therein by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions (France, United Kingdom).  (Annex XI)

By its terms, the Assembly reaffirmed the need to avoid any economic and other activities that adversely affect the interests of the peoples of those Territories and urged the administering Powers concerned to take effective measures to safeguard and guarantee their inalienable right to their natural resources.

The Assembly then turned to the report on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/67/429), which contained a draft resolution by the same name.

According to the text, the Assembly would request United Nations bodies and regional organizations to strengthen existing measures of support and formulate appropriate programmes of assistance to the remaining Non-Self-Governing Territories, within the framework of their respective mandates, in order to accelerate progress in the Territories’ economic and social sectors.

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to none against, with 54 abstentions.  (Annex XII)

Moving to the report on offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/67/430); the Assembly adopted the resolution of the same name contained therein without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly urged the administering Powers to take effective measures to ensure the widespread and continuous dissemination in the Territories under their administration of information relating to study and training offers.

The Assembly then turned to the report on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (document A/67/431), which contained six draft resolutions and one draft decision.

The first of those, draft resolution I on the question of Western Sahara, was adopted without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly welcomed the efforts of the Secretary-General and his Personal Envoy in search of a mutually acceptable political solution to the dispute, and supported the process of negotiations initiated by Security Council resolution 1754 (2007) and sustained by various other resolutions with a view to achieving a just, lasting and mutually acceptable political solution that would provide for the self-determination of the people of Western Sahara.  Further, the Assembly welcomed the commitment of the parties to continue to show political will and work in an atmosphere propitious for dialogue, in order to enter into a more intensive phase of negotiations, in good faith and without preconditions, taking note of efforts and developments since 2006.  It also welcomed the ongoing negotiations between the parties held in 2007 and 2008 in the presence of the neighbouring countries and under the auspices of the United Nations.

By the terms of draft resolution II, on the question of New Caledonia, the Assembly would urge all the parties involved, in the interest of all the people of New Caledonia, to maintain, in the framework of the Noumea Accord, their dialogue in a spirit of harmony, and in this context, welcome the unanimous agreement, reached in Paris on 8 December 2008, on the transfer of powers to New Caledonia in 2009.

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution without a vote.

By the terms of draft resolution III, on the question of Tokelau, the Assembly would note that Tokelau and New Zealand remain firmly committed to Tokelau’s ongoing development for the long-term benefit of its people, and call upon the administering Power and United Nations agencies to continue to provide assistance to Tokelau as it further develops.

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution without a vote.

By the terms of draft resolution IV, on questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Turks and Caicos Islands and United States Virgin Islands, the Assembly would call upon the administering Powers to participate in and cooperate fully with the Special Committee in order to implement the provisions of Article 73 e of the Charter and the Decolonization Declaration and in order to advise the Special Committee on the situation with regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples on the promotion of self-government in the Territories.  It would reaffirm the responsibility of the administering Powers to promote the Territories’ economic and social development and to preserve their cultural identity, and, as a priority, to mitigate the effects of the current global financial crisis, in consultation with the territorial Governments.

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution, as orally revised, without a vote.

By the terms of draft resolution V, on dissemination of information on decolonization, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to enhance the information provided on the United Nations decolonization website and to continue to include the full series of reports of the regional seminars on decolonization, the statements and scholarly papers presented at those seminars and links to the full series of reports of the Special Committee.

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution by a recorded vote of 174 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 1 abstention (France).  (Annex XIII)

By the terms of draft resolution VI, on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, the Assembly would call upon the administering Powers to ensure that economic and other activities in the Non-Self-Governing Territories under their administration do not adversely affect the interests of the peoples but instead promote development, and to assist them in the exercise of their right to self-determination.  The Assembly would urge all States, directly and through the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system, to provide moral and material assistance to the peoples of the Territories.

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution, as orally revised, by a recorded vote of 175 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 2 abstentions (Belgium, France).  (Annex XIV)

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft decision on the question of Gibraltar, by which it urged the Governments of Spain and the United Kingdom, while listening to the interests and aspirations of Gibraltar, to reach, in the spirit of the statement of 27 November 1984, a definitive solution to the question of Gibraltar.  The Assembly took note of the desire of the United Kingdom to continue with the trilateral Forum for Dialogue on Gibraltar, and of Spain’s desire to replace the Forum with a new mechanism for local cooperation in the interest of social well-being and regional economic development, in which the people of the Campo de Gibraltar and Gibraltar are represented.

Turning to the report on revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/67/432), the Assembly adopted the draft decision contained therein, thereby approving next session’s proposed programme of work and timetable of the Fourth Committee.

The Assembly then took note of the report on programme planning (document A/67/433).

Role of Diamonds in Fuelling Conflict

GILLIAN MILOVANOVIC (United States) introduced a draft resolution on the role of diamonds in fuelling conflict (A/67/L.42).  As the Chair of the Kimberley Process in 2012, the United States felt that it was an enormous responsibility to lead that process, which had involved Governments, industry and civil society.  Since the establishment of the Process in 2003, much had been achieved.  The Process had helped bring improved governance and transparency to the diamond trade in countries previously marked by conflict, such as Liberia, Sierra Leone and Angola.  It had also helped foster improvements in diamond-sector governance and monitoring in the vast range of producing, trading and consuming countries.  The Process had also directed the collection of detailed statistics on the rough diamond trade that had been simply unobtainable before the launch of the Process.  Those statistics helped everyone understand how the trade worked and could help zero in on anomalies indicating corruption.

She went on to highlight some of the Kimberley Process’ achievements in various countries.  The Process’ participants and its observers from both industry and civil society had together made possible improved registration of miners in Ghana and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.  It had enhanced understanding of diamond valuation and had improved mining techniques in Sierra Leone and Guyana.  It had contributed to the ensuring of land use rights and stable income for artisanal miners in Central African Republic and Liberia, reducing the likelihood of conflict.  Although much remained to be done, the Process helped many people improve their lives.  Yet, “not enough people know these accomplishments”, she said.

As the Chairperson, her mission was to lay the foundation for South Africa, the incoming chair, to launch the Process into its second decade “as a stronger and more effective process”.  During her travels this year, it had become clear that “we need to do everything in our power to keep the Kimberley Process relevant and effective”, she said, adding, “This is essential to ensuring that a diamond remains synonymous with love and commitment, that a robust diamond market continues to help millions of people pursue a better quality of life, and that the Process lives up to the hopes you, the General Assembly member states have placed in it.”

She, however, wondered if enough had been invested in the future of the Kimberley Process.  Her delegation did not feel that accomplishments to date sufficed and that “all is well”.  “The race for excellence has no finish line”, she continued, stressing the need to go to the heart of difficult issues.  Under the chairmanship of the United States, the Process had started demonstrating that willingness.  The discussion on the changes to the core definition of “conflict diamonds” would continue under South Africa’s chairmanship through an inclusive process the United States had started.

She also drew the Assembly’s attention to the Kimberley Process website, connecting those seeking technical assistance with other Process participants and observers offering their expertise, all in a no-fault environment.  She also welcomed the admission of Cameroon in August and of Cambodia, Kazakhstan and Panama in November as full participants in the Process.  Burkina Faso, Kenya and Mali had attended the Process’ plenary meeting in November.  She expressed hope that those countries would join soon.  In closing, she reiterated that the United States had been able to set the stage for South Africa to launch a new decade for the Process. 

AMERICO BEVIGLIA ZAMPETTI, representative of the Delegation of the European Union, welcomed the strengthening of the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme and the approval in the recent Plenary meeting of an Administrative Decision on Selection, Engagement and Operation of a Kimberley Process Administrative Support Mechanism, as well as the selection of the World Diamond Council to host that mechanism.  In addition, the revised guidelines for the Participation Committee were welcomed, among other initiatives on the matter.  As Chair of the Working Group on Monitoring, the European Union had actively contributed to the development of those new tools and it encouraged the participants continued commitment to scrutiny through review visits, as well as the submission of substantive annual reports. 

The Scheme’s engagement with Côte d’Ivoire, he went on to say, illustrated the positive role that it could play in situations where production and trade of diamonds might affect peace and security.  As the new Chair of the Friends of Côte d’Ivoire group, the Union was determined to further support Ivorian efforts to reintegrate the Scheme and ensure that Ivorian diamonds would contribute to recovery and development, rather than to conflict.  The Union’s Joint Research Centre had been helping to develop a common methodology for satellite monitoring of diamond mining in that country, and would provide technical assistance to the artisanal mining sector and toward the reinforcing of its chain of custody.

He then turned to the matter of Zimbabwe’s Marange mining area, pointing out that that matter was a testimony to the Scheme’s ability to resolve situations of non-compliance.  The European Union, in its role as Chair of the Working Group on Monitoring played an active role in facilitating the follow-up of the implementation of the special measures put in place under the 2011 Kinshasa Administrative Decision.  He noted the significant efforts made by Zimbabwe’s authorities that had led to the lifting of the measures, as well as the Government’s renewed public commitment to maintain good practices and ensure that the Scheme’s civil society coalition continue to have access to the Marange diamond fields.  Such a monitoring framework would be a useful model for future situations. 

RON PROSOR (Israel) said diamonds had driven some of the world’s most powerful machinery, and had decorated some of the world’s most powerful political figures.  They could symbolize love and devotion, wealth and prosperity or authority and power.  Diamonds could also be used to fund terrorism, war, and ethnic conflict.  The Kimberley Process had been designed to ensure that the diamonds in jewellery store display cases around the world had not been mined by warlords in conflict zones.  Twenty years ago, “conflict diamonds” had accounted for 15 per cent of the global market, but today they represented less than one per cent.  “We can proudly say that the Kimberley Process was instrumental in achieving these very impressive results,” he said.

Israel had been deeply involved in the Process since its inception.  In 2003, Israel had issued the first-ever certificate for a conflict-free diamond.  Two years ago, it had served as the Chair of the Process.  Last year, it had chaired the Process’ participation committee, overseeing the membership process for four new countries.  Israel saw those efforts as an expression of its most fundamental values.  Business ethics were a cornerstone of Judaism.  Israel was committed to making sure that each and every diamond was certified “conflict-free” throughout its entire lifecycle – from the mine to the display case.

As a proud co-sponsor of the draft resolution, he continued, Israel endorsed the Assembly’s decision to introduce more regular review visits, broader expert participation and more stringent requirements for reporting.  It also supported the decision to integrate artisanal and small-scale diamond mining in the Certification Scheme.  Yet, there remained much work to do, he said, stressing the need to keep improving implementation of the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme.  In that regard, the Civil Society Coalition must be fully involved in the Process, particularly in monitoring implementation, country by country.

DMITRY I. MAKSIMYCHEV (Russian Federation) said that, as an active participant in the Kimberley Process since 2000, his country welcomed the Scheme’s further development.  The broadening of the range of participants would contribute further to the entity.  Further, the Scheme’s legitimacy would be strengthened through its involvement with the United Nations and other organizations.  Nevertheless, the Scheme faced challenges, including the establishment of transparency, and he urged that participants not press ahead with hasty reforms, and noted specifically “persistent attempts to redefine ‘conflict diamonds’”. 

Rather, he continued, attention should be focused on perfecting the work of the Scheme in its current form.  The Scheme was of an applied nature and to artificially politicize it would have a negative effect on it achieving its core tasks.  Rather, efforts should be aimed at motivating States to participate in its work.  Sanctions failed to give positive results, and instead, led to gray areas of trade.  He called for the pooling of efforts of States, the industry and civil society with full compliance of international law and with full respect of State sovereignty and non-interference of affairs.  In that regard, he did not see empowering non-governmental organizations with rights in regards to implementing the Scheme.

DOCTOR MASHABANE (South Africa) said that the diamond industry played a major role in driving the economic growth and prosperity in many countries, especially in Africa and the rest of the developing world.  Thus, it was of paramount importance the entire industry lent its unequivocal support towards initiatives that ensured global trade in diamonds was conflict-free.  Such efforts required cooperation among Governments, industry, national and multinational institutions and civil society organizations.  In that regard, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, which entered into force in 2003, offered assurance to the global diamond industry and consumers that those diamonds were not illicit “conflict diamonds”. 

During the Scheme’s recent plenary session in Washington, D.C., significant progress had been made in strengthening controls on the global trade of rough diamonds.  In particular, he said, the decision to lift the special monitoring measures that had been placed on the Marange diamond fields was highly commendable.  He applauded the Zimbabwean authorities, industry and civil society coalition that had complied with those measures’ requirements.  “It is our fervent hope that this development will pave the way for the lifting of sanctions imposed by the [United States] Government on the trade of diamonds from the Marange area,” he said.

The lifting of the 2009 Swakopmund Administrative Decision on Guinea, he continued, was also welcome, as it would enhance Guinea’s efforts to attract investments and to fully harness the economic potential of its diamond sector.  In that regard, the efforts of the Côte d’Ivoire Government to put in place the Scheme’s minimum standards were also welcomed. 

Concluding, he said that as South Africa prepared to take the “leadership baton” from the United States as Chair of the Scheme, the country recognized the challenges ahead in driving the reform agenda.  Echoing his country’s Minister of Mineral Resources who had said that South Africa would like to see the Scheme evolve not just in goals and objectives, but in effectiveness and efficiency, he stressed that it was also important to ensure the Scheme’s core mandate be maintained and its implementation measures strengthened to deal with the evolving challenges of the day.

CARLOS AMADO RUIZ HERNANDEZ (Panama), expressing his delegation’s support for the Scheme, said that it had a positive effect on the role of diamonds fuelling conflict, and would support legitimate trade instead.  He congratulated Cambodia and Kazakhstan, which joined his country in being admitted as full participants into the Kimberley Process during the recent meeting in Washington, D.C., and he thanked the United States in its role as Chair for such an inclusion.  Panama looked forward to strengthening the efforts of the Scheme and working towards a world free of conflict diamonds.  He offered congratulations to the delegation of South Africa in its role as the new Chair, stating that its leadership would strengthen the Process and the Certification Scheme.

Turning to the draft resolution on the role of diamonds fuelling conflict, the Assembly then adopted the text without a vote.  By it, the Assembly recognized the devastating impact the trade in conflict diamonds had on the peace, safety and security of people in affected countries, and noted that continued action to curb that trade was imperative.

With that in mind, the text welcomed the important contribution of the Kimberley Process, which was initiated by African diamond-producing countries.  It noted with satisfaction that implementation of the Certification Scheme continued to have a positive impact in reducing the opportunity for conflict diamonds to play a role in fuelling armed conflict and would help to protect legitimate trade and ensure the effective implementation of the relevant resolutions on trade in conflict diamonds.  It also acknowledged that lessons learned from the Kimberley Process might be useful for the work of the Peacebuilding Commission in its consideration of the countries on its agenda.

Report of the Economic and Social Council

MACHARIA KAMAU (Kenya) introduced a draft resolution on inclusion of South Sudan in the list of least developed countries (A/67/L.43).  He said South Sudan had become a United Nations member state on 14 July, 2011, following its independence referendum.  It was the world’s newest State.  It faced many socioeconomic challenges, he said, calling for consensus adoption of the text, which had been welcomed with enthusiasm.

The draft resolution was then adopted by consensus.

Cooperation between United Nations and Regional Organizations

As the Assembly took up the final item on its agenda today, NELSON MESSONE (Gabon) introduced a draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the International Organization of la Francophonie (document A/67/L.30/Rev.2).  He said the organization included some 74 United Nations Member States, representing more than one third of the General Assembly’s membership.  It aimed to promote multilateral cooperation in areas of common interest.

He went on to highlight some of that organization’s accomplishments, including the strengthening of ties with the United Nations entities, such as the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women).

The draft resolution was then adopted without a vote. 

Following that action, FILIPPE SAVADOGO, Permanent Observer of the International Organization of La Francoph onie, thanked the President of the General Assembly and Secretary-General for the attention given to La Francophonie and commended the positive working relationship it had with United Nations bodies.  That allowed La Francophonie to contribute to the many challenges facing French speaking countries and to support actions that would bring about sustainable development, among others, and broaden participation of those States in the Organization.

He went on to say that the work of La Francophonie’s latest summit had highlighted the differing views of French-speaking countries and multiple approaches towards sustainable development in the Member States of the two organizations, as well as encouraging the deepening of their solidarity to the United Nations.  The in-depth investigation underscored shared concerns in the promotion of peace, democracy, cultural diversity, as well as linguistic diversity.  Further, such partnership with the United Nations would also lead to specific action, which was due to cooperative efforts on the ground world-wide. 

In that respect, he said that whether he was in Geneva, Brussels, Addis Ababa or New York, he could rely on French-speaking ambassadors to reinforce multilateral action.  Thus, the resolution represented the actions of his organization in such a manner that shared concerns were reflected, and it encouraged a movement forward towards that considered new ways of cooperation.  La Francophonie was fully prepared to work to that end.

ANNEX I

Vote on Palestine Refugee Assistance

Draft resolution I on assistance to Palestine refugees (document A/67/423) was adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 1 against, with 8 abstentions, as follows: 

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel.

Abstain:  Cameroon, Canada, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, United States.

Absent:  Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Ghana, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania.

ANNEX II

Vote on Displaced Persons from 1967 and Other Hostilities

Draft resolution II on persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities (document A/67/423) was adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 6 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon, Honduras, Panama, Papua New Guinea.

Absent:  Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Ghana, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Sudan.

ANNEX III

Vote on UNRWA’s Operations

Draft resolution III on the operations of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) (document A/67/423) was adopted by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 6 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Ghana, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Sudan.

ANNEX IV

Vote on Palestine Refugees’ Properties, Revenues

Draft resolution IV on Palestine refugees’ properties and revenues (document A/67/423) was adopted by a recorded vote of 173 in favour to 6 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon, Papua New Guinea.

Absent:  Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Sudan.

ANNEX V

Vote on Special Committee on Israeli Practices

Draft resolution I on work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories (document A/67/424) was adopted by a recorded vote of 98 in favour to 8 against, with 72 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, Panama, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cameroon, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Ukraine, Uruguay, Vanuatu.

Absent:  Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Sudan.

ANNEX VI

Vote on Applicability of Geneva Convention

Draft resolution II on applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the protection of civilian persons in time of war, of 12 August 1949, to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the other occupied Arab territories (document A/67/424), was adopted by a recorded vote of 171 in favour to 6 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan.

ANNEX VII

Vote on Israeli Settlements

Draft resolution III on Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the occupied Syrian Golan (document A/67/424), was adopted by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 6 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon, Honduras, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan, Tonga.

ANNEX VIII

Vote on Israeli Practices

Draft resolution IV on Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian People in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem (document A/67/424), was adopted by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 8 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, Panama, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon, El Salvador, Honduras, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Vanuatu.

Absent:  Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan, Tonga.

ANNEX IX

Vote on Occupied Syrian Golan

Draft resolution V on the occupied Syrian Golan (document A/67/424) was adopted by a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 1 against, with 11 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel.

Abstain:  Cameroon, Canada, Honduras, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Tonga, United States, Vanuatu.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Panama, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan.

ANNEX X

Vote on Information from Non-Self-Governing Territories

Draft resolution I on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations (document A/67/427) was adopted by a recorded vote of 175 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  None.

Abstain:  France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Georgia, Kiribati, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan.

ANNEX XI

Vote on Economic Activities of Non-Self-Governing Territories

Draft resolution I on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/67/428) was adopted by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 2 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, United States.

Abstain:  France, United Kingdom.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan.

ANNEX XII

Vote on Implementation of Decolonization Declaration by Specialized Agencies

Draft resolution III on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/67/429) was adopted by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to none against, with 54 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  None.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, United Kingdom, United States.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Sudan.

ANNEX XIII

Vote on Dissemination of Information on Decolonization

Draft resolution V on dissemination of information on decolonization (document A/67/431) was adopted by a recorded vote of 174 in favour to 3 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  France.

Absent:  Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan.

ANNEX XIV

Vote on Decolonization Declaration

Draft resolution VI on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (document A/67/431) was adopted by a recorded vote of 175 in favour to 3 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Belgium, France.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.