Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations Recommends Upgrade to General Status of Two Entities, 19 for First-Time Consultative Status

29 May 2012
ECOSOC/6517-NGO/757

Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations Recommends Upgrade to General Status of Two Entities, 19 for First-Time Consultative Status

29 May 2012
Economic and Social Council
ECOSOC/6517 NGO/757
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Committee on NGOs

28th & 29th Meetings (AM & PM)

Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations Recommends Upgrade to General Status

of Two Entities, 19 for First-Time Consultative Status

 

Defers Consideration of 37, Including Israel-based Volunteer Emergency Medical

Services Organization, after Questions Arise about Location of Its Headquarters

Continuing its resumed 2012 session, the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations today recommended the reclassification of two national organizations — from Pakistan and the United States, dealing, respectively, with poverty eradication and health care — from special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council to general consultative status, meaning they not only can attend meetings of the Council, but they can also address them.

The Committee would send its recommendation to the Council for the upgrades of Family Health International, a United States-based non-governmental organization (NGO) that aims at helping countries make measurable progress against disease, poverty, and inequity; and Geriatrics Care Foundation of Pakistan, an organization that aims at creating awareness about the issues facing the elderly and other indigenous people regarding health care and socio-economic problems, for reclassification from special to general consultative status.

A request was recommended for deferral for reclassification from roster to general status by the International Federation of Consular Corps and Associations, a Belgium-based international organization that aims at enhancing the performance of the consular service on behalf of sending States and receiving States.  Roster-status NGOs can only attend meetings.  

The decision followed a recommendation by the representative of the United States that the organization be requested to further elaborate on how it intended to contribute to the Economic and Social Council’s work.  The representative of India had said earlier that he saw no need to change the organization’s status.  The Belgian delegate felt that special consultative status would be more appropriate.

The Committee concluded consideration of the reclassification request from roster to special consultative status by the World Council for Curriculum and Instruction, a United States-based global organization that aims at collaborating in curriculum and instruction projects, as the representative of China said that the NGO’s field of interest was very limited and that more information was needed for the Committee to give further consideration to its request.

In other actions, the Committee recommended 19 entities for special consultative status among new and previously deferred applications and postponed consideration of 37 more.

Questions arose when the previously deferred application from United Hatzalah (NP), a national volunteer emergency medical services organization based in Israel came up for consideration.  The representative of Sudan accused it of failing to include the location of its headquarters in its application, while a representative of the Permanent Observer Mission of Palestine said that the NGO was operating out of an illegal settlement in Jerusalem in the Occupied Palestinian Territory.  He also stated that the organization was not registered with the proper authorities in the Palestinian Territory and recommended that the Committee dismiss its application.

The representative of Israel, however, decried the attempt to use the Committee for political purposes and said that the application showed that the permanent headquarters of the organization was in Jerusalem.  Describing the organization as a good one that worked in saving peoples’ lives for Jews and Arabs alike, she urged the Committee members to look at its work and judge it accordingly.  The representative of the United States said that the Committee did not dismiss NGOs even if such NGOs had registration issues.  In light of remaining questions, a decision was again deferred.

Another application that elicited debate was that of Scholars at Risk Network, an international organization based in the United States that works as a global network of universities and colleges dedicated to defending threatened scholars and scholarly communities.  The representative of the Russian Federation said that two Russians mentioned on the NGO’s website had been accused of espionage, but that information had not been reflected on the website.  The representative of China also requested the organization to clarify the truthfulness of articles on its website, in which it referred to the human rights situation in other countries.  The representative of Belgium said, however, that the organization was a leading one in promoting and defending the rights of scholars and had answered more than 50 questions since it first submitted its application to the Committee.  It, too, was again postponed.

On the application by the International Federation of Liberal Youth, a Belgium-based umbrella NGO self-described as being for liberal and student youth organizations worldwide, the representative of Pakistan sought clarification on what was meant by “radical” youth organizations since its website described it as an international organization of liberal and radical youth organizations.  The representative of Cuba asked if the organization shared the declarations made by its member organizations at the international level, while the representative of Venezuela requested clarification of its procedure for recruiting other NGOs.

When the Committee took up the application of the Second Amendment Foundation, a national United States-based organization that undertakes innovative defence of the right to keep and bear arms, the representative of Venezuela said that its goal was not in line with the work of the Economic and Social Council.  She wanted to know what meetings it would attend and what contributions it would make to the Council if it were to receive the status it was requesting.

The Committee will meet again at 10 a.m. tomorrow, 30 May, to continue consideration of its agenda items, including consideration of applications from organizations that had not responded to requests for information.

Background

The Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations met today to continue its consideration of applications for consultative status and requests for reclassification as it continued its resumed session.

Applications and Requests from Previous Sessions

The Committee first took up applications for consultative status and requests for reclassification from its previous sessions.

Special Consultative Status

The Committee recommended special consultative status for the following non-governmental organizations (NGOs):

International Organization for Victim Assistance — a United States-based international organization to promote policy change for victims; provide training and technical assistance on victim assistance, crisis response and rights, restorative justice, and violence prevention; and promote awareness.

International Senior Lawyers Project — a United States-based national organization, which enlists the resources of highly skilled and experienced attorneys and law firms from around the world to advance the rule of law, human rights and equitable economic development.

KARP — a national organization based in the Republic of Korea that assists and advocates for Koreans aged 50 and above in adapting their lifestyles as they age.

Organisation Technique européenne du Pneumatique et de la Jante ADF — an international Belgium-based organization set up for dealing with technical aspects of tires, solid tires, rims and valves in Europe.

Population Connection — a United States-based national organization that works to ensure that every woman around the world who wants to space or to limit her childbearing has access to the health services and contraceptive supplies she needs in order to do so.

Scalabrini International Migration Network, Inc. — an international organization based in Belgium that serves as a global network of more than 270 organizations involved in helping people on the move around the world.

Sri Swami Madhavananda World Peace Council — an Austria-based international organization formed to direct, coordinate and implement activities for betterment of humanity’s welfare and to advance unity and peace by disseminating the messages of Mahatma Gandhiji, “be the change you want to see”, and Sri Swami Madhavanandaji, “one in all and all in one”.

Stichting Spanda — a Netherlands-based international organization that promotes development and cooperation in the areas of culture, education, health and environment, microfinance and research for the sustainable advancement of peace, knowledge and understanding.

UPR Info — a Switzerland-based national organization that aims at promoting and strengthening the Universal Periodic Review, the new United Nations mechanism that looks into the human rights situation of all United Nations Member States every four years. 

Women Deliver, Inc. – a United States-based international organization that works globally to generate political commitment and financial investment in fulfilling Millennium Development Goal 5 to reduce maternal mortality and achieve universal access to reproductive health, and aims at promoting and advancing the health of girls, women, and mothers as a core element of global development.

Postponed

The Committee postponed consideration of the following previously deferred applications owing to additional questions raised by Committee members:

International Dalit Solidarity Network — a Denmark-based organization, which aims to contribute to the elimination of caste-based discrimination worldwide — as the representative of India requested that the organization respond to the specific query posed to it by the Committee.  The representative of Belgium said that the application was one of oldest on the Committee’s list, having been under consideration since January 2008.  More than 57 questions had been put to it and the answers had been provided.   Belgium hoped that the Committee would soon come to agreement on the application.

International Federation of Liberal Youth — a Belgium-based international umbrella organization for liberal and student youth organizations worldwide, which provides a forum for cooperation, exchange of resources and ideas, and intercultural learning between liberal youth organizations — as the representative of Pakistan requested it to clarify what was meant by radical youth organization, since its website describes it as an international organization of liberal and radical youth organizations.

The representative of Cuba wanted to know if the organization shared the declarations made by its member organizations at the international level.  The representative Venezuela requested clarification of its working procedure so as to understand its method for recruiting other NGOs.  The representative Belgium said that the organization was well-known to the Belgian Government and was in good standing.  Its application was one of the oldest before the Committee and its activities were in line with the Economic and Social Council resolutions.  Belgium hoped that the Committee would soon come to an agreement on the application.

International Partnership for Human Rights — a national organization based in Belgium for promoting human rights worldwide — as the representative of China requested information on its activities in his country, noting that it had failed to answer that question, which he had raised previously.

International Prison Chaplains' Association — an international organization based in Canada, which promotes human rights, especially freedom of religion, for prisoners all worldwide — as the representative of China sought information on the activities it had carried out in his country.

Lawyers for Lawyers — an international organization based in the Netherlands that enables lawyers worldwide to practice in freedom and independence by actively supporting those hindered or threatened — as the representative of China questioned the independence of the organization, noting that although it claimed no direct links with any Governments, it had circulated a pamphlet saying that it had cooperated with the Human Rights Ambassador of the Netherlands.  The delegate, therefore, requested clarification of its links with the Government of the Netherlands.

National Secular Society — a United Kingdom-based international organization that specifically supports the principles underlying articles 18 and 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, particularly for greater freedom for religion and belief, and non-discrimination on those bases — as the representative of Sudan wanted clarification of the countries where it worked for the rights of women and the rights it advocated for women.  He also asked it to elaborate on its links with Governments.

Scholars at Risk Network — a United States-based international organization that works as a global network of universities and colleges dedicated to defending threatened scholars and scholarly communities worldwide and to promoting academic freedom and its constituent freedoms — as the representative of China requested it to clarify the truthfulness of articles on its website, as those referenced the human rights situation in other countries.  The representative of Belgium said that the organization was a leading one in promoting and defending the rights of scholars and had answered more than 50 questions since it had submitted its application.  Its activities were in line with the Council’s resolutions, and she hoped that the Committee would soon come to an agreement on its application.  The representative the Russian Federation said that two Russian scholars mentioned on the organization’s website had been accused of espionage, but that that information was not reflected on the website.  The Russian Federation had asked the organization during the last session to pay attention to Russian matters, but no correction had been made on the website.  The NGO should update its website.

Second Amendment Foundation — a United States-based national organization that undertakes innovative defence of the right to keep and bear arms through its publications, public education programmes and legal action projects — as the representative of Venezuela, saying that its goal was not really in line with the Council’s work, asked what meetings it planned to attend and what contributions it would make to the Council if it were to receive the requested status.

Solicitors International Human Rights Group — a national United Kingdom-based organization that promotes awareness of international human rights within the legal profession in Britain — as the representative of Pakistan wanted information on its support to democratic organizations in his country, as well as details on the particular activities it had undertaken there.

Sudanese Mothers for Peace — an international organization based in the United Kingdom, which was formed to advance education, relieve poverty and empower women, and their families — as the representative of Sudan requested clarification regarding wrong information that the organization had included in the answers it had submitted to the Committee.  It had indicated that it was among NGOs expelled from Sudan but, in reality, it was not included among the 13 organizations that had been expelled.  Also, it was registered under another name in Sudan.  The representative sought additional information on the development programmes it carried out and asked if the NGO was arranging activities for the opposition in the United Kingdom.

United Hatzalah (NP) — a national volunteer Emergency Medical Services (EMS) organization based in Israel — as the representative of Sudan wanted to know its exact location.  The representative of Israel said the application showed that the permanent headquarters of the organization was in Jerusalem.  The representative of Venezuela asked for a list of the activities carried out by the organization since 1998, noting that she had been asking that question of the NGO for some time.  The representative of Cuba requested details on the activities carried out by the organization in other developing countries.

A representative of the Permanent Observer Mission of Palestine expressed serious concern with the NGO, saying it was operating out of an illegal settlement in Jerusalem in the Occupied Palestinian Territory.  Those settlements, said the speaker, were illegal under international law and according to the United Nations.  The organization was not registered with the proper authorities in the Palestinian Territory and, as such, the application should be dismissed.

The representative of Israel said that it was sad that the Committee was being used for political purposes.  The organization had stated that its headquarters was in West Jerusalem and it was not relevant to go and check the address of each member of the organization.  It was a good organization that worked for Jews and Arabs alike, saving peoples’ lives.  All Committee members should look at the work the organization was doing and judge it by that standard.  The representative of the United States said that the Committee did not dismiss NGOs even if they had registration issues.  Bringing up debates of registration or where the organization was located did not need to arise.

Virtual Activism Incorporated — a United States-based international organization that aims at strengthening NGOs' effectiveness and outreach through Internet access and presence — as the representative of China asked for clarification about the group’s unclear response to a question on its membership, including those who had received status at the United Nations.

WITNESS — a United States-based international organization that uses video and online technologies to open the eyes of the world to human rights violations and aims to empower people to transform personal stories of abuse into powerful tools for justice, promoting public engagement and policy change — as the representative of China appreciated the clarifications on the group’s position regarding Tibet and Taiwan, but noted that problems of terminology remained.  He said he hoped the group would correct those errors, and asked for clarification of its position on Tibet.  Belgium ’s delegate said the application had been before the Committee since 2008 and that the NGO had provided answers to questions.  She hoped the Committee would soon come to an agreement on the application.

World Future Council Foundation — a Germany-based national organization that works with policymakers, civil society groups and intergovernmental organizations to identify, promote and help implement effective policies, laws and agreements that protect the needs and rights of all people on our planet today and in the future — as the representative of China asked if the group could correct the erroneous terminology on Taiwan, which appeared on its website. 

Yoga in Daily Life USA — a national organization that aims at promoting physical, mental, social and spiritual health of humankind, as well as spiritual development and god realization, world peace, humanitarian aid, human rights, protection of all living beings and of the environment — as the representative of China noted that the organization had carried out activities in the promotion of world peace, however, it did not provide specific ways in which it would contribute to the work of the Economic and Social Council.  He hoped the group could provide that information.

Youth Coalition for Sexual and Reproductive Rights (YCSRR) — a United States-based international organization that aims at ensuring that the sexual and reproductive rights of all young people are respected, guaranteed and promoted, and strives to secure the meaningful participation of young people in decision-making that affects their lives, by advocating, generating knowledge, sharing information, building partnerships and training young activists with a focus on the regional and international levels — as the representative of Sudan sought clarification on the age of “young people” and asked how the NGO could carry out activities in countries that prohibited sexual activity outside marriage.

The Scandinavian Institute for Human Rights (SIHR) Norway — an international organization that disseminates the culture of human rights, especially in the Middle East — as the representative of the United States said the delegation appreciated the organization’s press release offering information, but noted that it had not answered the Committee’s questions.  She also noted that its website had been hacked, and asked if the NGO would fix the problem.  She also sought clarification on the relationship between it and Scandinavian University.

Reclassification

Turning to previously deferred requests for reclassification, the Committee reclassified from special to general consultative status the following NGOs:  Family Health International — a United States-based national organization that aims at helping countries make measurable progress against disease, poverty, and inequity, improving lives for millions; and Geriatrics Care Foundation of Pakistan — a national organization that aims at creating awareness about the issues facing the elderly and other indigenous people regarding health care and socio-economic problems with a view to maximizing their role in the society, enhancing their productivity and providing them with social and individual happiness.

It deferred a request to be upgraded from roster to general status by International Federation of Consular Corps and Associations — a Belgium-based organization that aims at enhancing the performance of consular service on behalf of sending States and receiving States.

India’s representative said there was no need to change the status from roster to general.  Belgium’s delegation agreed that general status would be inappropriate.  The representative of Pakistan said the request should remain on the deferred list.  The representative of the United States asked that the organization be requested to further elaborate on how it intended to contribute to the Council’s work before its request was dismissed altogether.

Consideration of the request from the following organization for reclassification from roster to special consultative status was closed:  World Council for Curriculum and Instruction — a United States-based international organization that aims at collaborating in curriculum and instruction projects, participating in dialogues in global educational and social issues, and exchanging ideas, concerns and solutions — as the representative of China said the field of interest was very limited and more information was needed for the Committee to give further consideration to the request.

New Applications and Requests

The Committee then took up new applications for consultative status and new requests for reclassification.

Special Consultative Status

Centro UNESCO di Firenze — an Italy-based national organization that aims to contribute to the building of peace, the eradication of poverty, sustainable development and intercultural dialogue through education, the sciences, culture, communication and information.

Grassroots Leadership, Inc. — a United States-based national organization that aims at helping community, labour, faith, and campus organizations think critically, work strategically and take direct action to end social and economic oppression, gain power, and achieve justice and equity.

Vienna Economic Forum — an Austria-based national organization that aims at popularizing and promoting investment opportunities in the region from the Adriatic to the Black Sea.

Alzheimers Disease International — The International Federation of Alzheimers Disease and Related Disorders Societies Inc — a United Kingdom-based organization that aims at improving the quality of life for people with dementia and their families throughout the world.

Doctors Worldwide Ltd. — a United Kingdom-based international organization that aims at providing medical relief to all citizens of the earth in need, regardless of their race, religion, ethnicity or nationality.

Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi — an Italy-based national organization that aims at offering assistance, health protection, treatment and functional, social and moral rehabilitation services to disadvantaged individuals with physical, mental or sensory disabilities regardless of age, gender and conditions.

Fondation pour l'étude des relations internationales et du développement — a Switzerland-based national organization that aims at providing independent and rigorous analysis of major contemporary global issues with a view to promoting international cooperation and making an academic contribution to the progress of less-developed societies.

International Risk Governance Council (IRGC) — a Switzerland-based international organization that aims at to facilitate a better understanding of risks and their scientific, political, social, and economic contexts and of how to manage them.

Stichting Global Reporting Initiative — an Austria-based international organization that aims at making sustainability reporting standard practice by providing guidance and support to organizations.

Deferred Applications

American Library Association — a United States-based national organization that aims at promoting library service and librarianship and at assisting and promoting libraries in helping children and adults develop the skills they need —the ability to read and use computers — understanding that the ability to seek and effectively utilize information resources is essential in a global information society — as the representative of China said he was still awaiting a reply from the organization.

Asociación Española para el Derecho Internacional de los Derechos Humanos (AEDIDH) — a Spain-based international organization that aims at promoting teaching, training, research, development and implementation of international human rights law — as the representative of China asked for further clarification since the organization had described its activities taking place in only Spanish-speaking countries, when its resources came from countries in Asia, and its website featured comments on Tibet and China, deviating from the position it claimed to hold.

Educació per a l'Acció Crítica (EPAC) — a Spain-based national organization that aims at promoting education for development as an instrument of change — as the representative of Cuba asked for additional information.

F N Forbundet — a Denmark-based national organization that takes a critical and constructive stance to questions relating to the United Nations and aims at influencing the political decision-making processes to enable Denmark to act responsible internationally, strengthening cooperation amongst NGOs on multilateral issues, and educating, informing and mobilizing the Danish public on United Nations-related issues — as the representative of Cuba wanted further details on the membership, specifically if there were trade organizations.

European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights — a Germany-based international organization that aims at protecting civil and human rights throughout Europe — as the representative of the Russian Federation asked for clarification on how the organization could take part in the work of the Human Rights Council without accreditation with the Economic and Social Council.

Fondation Alkarama — a Switzerland-based international organization that aims at promoting and protecting human rights in the Arab world — as Pakistan’s representative asked for further clarification of the organization’s participation in the universal periodic review.  The representative of Sudan said the organization did not provide all the requested information, and requested additional details on its activities in the Arab world. 

Friends of ISTAR — a United States-based international organization that aims at addressing a wide array of issues of strategy and security including, but not limited to, problems in the biological and health sciences, political violence, educational program development for national policy makers and the intelligence community, infrastructure protection, economic impacts of security threats and cyber-physical systems — as the representative of China was awaiting further clarification because the organization’s application and registration contained different names.

Geneva Institute for Human Rights (GIHR) — a Switzerland-based international organization that aims at training Arabs in the field of human rights and the laws as well as mechanisms of human rights and giving certificates to those trained at the Institute making them eligible to train others in the field — as the representative of Cuba wanted further details about the organization, which stated that it had no relationship with any Government.  The representative of Venezuela asked for further information on the organization’s decision-making process.  Pakistan’s representative asked for details on proposed future work.

Human Rights Foundation Inc. — a United States-based national organization that aims at promoting and safeguarding human rights worldwide, with a specialized focus on the Americas, and investigating and reporting on human rights abuses, with a special focus on fundamental rights and freedoms — as the representative of the Russian Federation asked if the organization protected rights in the United States, and whether it intended to cooperate with organizations working within the United Nations, including Veterans for Peace, an active anti-war group working with the Department of Public Information in Bonn in 2011, and similar organizations.  He also asked about some apparent double-standards, particularly the organization’s cooperation with certain individuals, including Garry Kasparov, a political opposition leader, in Russia, and he wanted to know if the partners selected were really human rights figures. 

The representative of China asked if the organization could provide information on the relationship with other organizations it was cooperating with and groups it had received funds from.  Cuba’s representative asked for additional details to the organization’s latest responses.  She also wanted to know if the organization received funds from Governments and details of projects, including in Latin America.  The representative of Venezuela said the points she wanted to raise had been asked by the other delegates and that she was concerned about the organization’s projects.

Institute for Human Rights & Business Limited — a United Kingdom-based international organization that aims at raising corporate standards and strengthening public policy to ensure that the activities of companies do not contribute to human rights abuses, and, in fact, lead to positive outcomes — as the representative of China wanted further information from the organization on its functions.

Institute for Practical Idealism — a United States-based international organization that aims at promoting peace by strengthening civil society and fostering a culture of participation worldwide, and training and mentoring community leaders, youth, professionals, and governmental and non-governmental administrators, helping them to develop and implement practical, community-based solutions to critical issues — as Cuba’s delegate asked for further information. 

The Secretariat said a name-change was made, but he could not explain why.  The United States’ representative had she hoped she could clarify the misunderstanding, and noted that the organization had responded that it currently operated as Legacy International, a common occurrence in the United States. 

Cuba’s representative said all documents should be under the same name, and that was the first time the Committee had seen such a case.  She asked the organization to explain what the difference was between the Institute for Practical Idealism and Legacy International.

Jewish Voice Ministries International — a United States-based international organization that aims at helping Jewish communities worldwide through collaborative efforts with local authorities and organizations, in order to positively impact physical, emotional and spiritual well-being — as the representative of Pakistan asked for clarification of its new areas of work, including work in Africa and India, and if the organization could explain which communities would benefit. 

Negev Coexistence Forum — an Israel-based national organization that aims at promoting mutual respect and understanding among the diverse communities in the Negev and bringing an end to Israel's policy of discrimination against its Bedouin citizens in both the unrecognized villages and government-planned towns — as the representative of Israel asked for more details on whether or not the organization had other NGO members.

Réseau International des Droits Humains (RIDH) — a Switzerland-based international organization that aims at promoting the respect, defense, establishment and application of international and national human rights standards through dialogue, mediation and teaching for and among government and non-governmental stakeholders — as Venezuela’s representative requested information on the criteria used by the organization to select countries for projects, and that the answers were provided in English to facilitate the process. 

The Chair said she was not sure any organization could be required to respond in English.  The representative of Belgium agreed, saying that French was an official United Nations language.  Venezuela’s representative suggested bringing up language in the working methods segment.  Cuba’s representative asked in which countries the NGO carried out projects and how the location of projects were decided.  The representative of Sudan asked if the organization could provide information on future initiatives in Africa.

Rokpa International — a Switzerland-based international organization that aims at helping where help is needed, mostly to children from the poorest backgrounds, and giving them a safe environment and the opportunity of an education and training for a profession which will lead them to independence from charity — as the representative of China requested further information, including the project name and precise location, on the organization’s cooperation with local government in Tibet.

The Equal Rights Trust — a United Kingdom-based national organization that aims at combating discrimination, promoting equality as a fundamental human right and a basic principle of social justice, and developing strategies for translating the principles of equality into practice — as the representative of China asked for details on the organization’s response indicating that it received government funding, as well as how the organization maintained NGO status if it received government funding.

The International Coalition of Historic Site Museums of Conscience — a United States-based international organization that is dedicated to remembering past struggles for justice and addressing their contemporary legacies through providing entry points for new audiences to use history and memory to explore, connect and get involved in human rights and social justice issues — as the representative of the Russian Federation asked for clarification on why large historic sites, including Nagasaki and Auschwitz, were not included in the organization’s projects, and were there criteria for establishing contact with such sites to ask them to be included in its projects.  He said he had never heard of the organization, even though his country had many historic sites.  Until the organization had worked with significant museums and sites, he wanted clarification of the principles of its work, and how it established contacts for cooperation.  The representative of China noted that the purpose of the organization’s website was to inform people of historic sites, yet, he said, its web article on human rights in Tibet was not related and was not in line with United Nations terminology.

The Simons Foundation — a Canada-based national organization that aims at advancing positive change through education in peace, disarmament, international law and human security – as the representative of Turkey asked how the executive board was appointed.  India’s representative asked for details on what actual work the foundation was doing, as much of their resources were granted to other NGOs.

Un Ponte Per… — an Italy-based national organization that aims at promoting solidarity initiatives in favour of Iraqi people who suffered from war and working in close cooperation with the local civil society organizations in order to prevent conflicts, especially in the Near East and Serbia, by setting up advocacy campaigns, cultural exchanges and international cooperation programmes — as Turkey’s representative asked for clarification of the organization’s membership.  The representative of India asked for clarification of expenditures on “extraordinary proceeds”, as listed in the organization’s application.  The representative of Belgium noted that the organization’s financial documents already included certain details, such as expenditures for “positive contingents” and “rounding”.  India’s representative said it would be best if the organization explained itself in detail.

Postponed

Sisters Inside, Inc. — an Australia-based international organization that aims at challenging and changing the context in which women live— as Pakistan’s representative requested a more pointed answer to the question on how the organization would contribute to the Council’s work.  He also sought clarification of the organization’s explanation of its work, including a view presented of a global society that was inherently unjust and controlled by a few dominant groups.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.