Security Council Extends Mandate of African Union Mission in Somalia until 31 October 2012, Adopting Resolution 2010 (2011)

30 September 2011
SC/10399

Security Council Extends Mandate of African Union Mission in Somalia until 31 October 2012, Adopting Resolution 2010 (2011)

30 September 2011
Security Council
SC/10399
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Security Council

6626th Meeting (AM)

Security Council Extends Mandate of African Union Mission in Somalia

 

until 31 October 2012, Adopting Resolution 2010 (2011)

 

Reiterating its serious concern over continued fighting in Somalia and condemning attacks on both civilians and the Transitional Federal Government, the Security Council today extended its authorization of the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) until 31 October 2012.

Unanimously adopting resolution 2010 (2011) under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Council also requested the African Union to “urgently increase” the Mission’s force strength to its mandated level of 12,000 uniformed personnel, and expressed its intention to consider the possible need to adjust that level when AMISOM reached its maximum troop strength.

The Council encouraged the United Nations, by other terms of the text, to work with the 53-member African bloc to develop a guard force, within the Mission’s mandated troop level, to provide security, escort and protection services to international personnel, including United Nations staff.  It further requested the Secretary-General to continue to provide a logistical support package for AMISOM for a maximum of 12,000 uniformed personnel, including the guard force, comprising equipment and services until 31 October 2012, while ensuring accountability and transparency in the expenditure of United Nations funds.

By related terms, the Council decided — “on an exceptional basis and due to the unique character of the Mission” — to extend the support package to include stoves and other kitchen equipment, advanced communications technology, and general supplies for cleaning and repairs, as described in its exchange of letters (documents S/2011/591 and 602) with the Secretary-General earlier this month, while continuing to ensure the maximum efficiency of relevant bilateral support.

Ensuring Somalia’s long-term security also required the effective development of the national security forces, the Council emphasized, reiterating its call on Member States, as well as regional and international organizations, to contribute to the United Nations Trust Fund for the Somali security institutions and to offer them training, technical assistance and equipment, in coordination with AMISOM.

It called upon all Somali parties to support the Djibouti Peace Agreement and end all hostilities, armed confrontation and efforts to undermine the country’s stability.  Transitional Federal Institutions were called upon to abide by the terms of the road map of key priorities, to be delivered over the next 12 months with clear timelines, benchmarks and compliance mechanisms.

On other issues, the Council expressed grave concern at the dire and worsening humanitarian situation in Somalia, notably the impacts of drought and famine, and called on all parties to allow safe and unhindered access to humanitarian agencies.  It also demanded that all parties and armed groups take appropriate steps to ensure their safety.  The Council called on all parties to end grave abuses committed against children, and urged the Transitional Federal Government to implement a concrete time-bound action plan to halt their recruitment.

Following the resolution’s adoption, Elmi Ahmed Duale ( Somalia) welcomed the text but expressed concerns about gaps in the United Nations critical support package for AMISOM, saying it would have an adverse impact on the Mission’s effectiveness.  Most Security Council members were aware that the Somali security forces were overextended in Mogadishu, he said, emphasizing that the efficiency of both the armed forces and the police must be urgently improved.  To consolidate security gains, it also was essential to enlarge AMISOM, he said, adding that he was pleased with the resolution’s positive reference to that point.

At the same time, he expressed the wish that the Council had acted positively on the request by the African Union Peace and Security Council, in its 13 September 2011 communiqué, which, among other things, called on the 15-member body to take into account the shortcomings identified over the past few months, and the multidimensional nature of AMISOM.  It was time for the Council to look into such issues and not wait another six months or a year, he added.

In closing, he paid tribute to Burundi and Uganda for their sacrifice and steadfast commitment to peace in Somalia, and expressed condolences to families who had lost members there.

The meeting began at 10:10 a.m. and ended at 10:24 a.m.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 2010 (2011) reads as follows:

The Security Council,

Recalling all its previous resolutions and statements of its President concerning the situation in Somalia, protection of civilians in armed conflict, women and peace and security, and children and armed conflict,

Reaffirming its respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia,

Reiterating its commitment to a comprehensive and lasting settlement of the situation in Somalia,

Reiterating its full support for the Djibouti Peace Process and the Transitional Federal Charter which provide the framework for reaching a lasting political solution in Somalia, recognizing the need to promote reconciliation and dialogue among the Somali population, and stressing the importance of broad-based and representative institutions reached through a political process ultimately inclusive of all,

Reaffirming its support for the Transitional Federal Government in its role as part of the Djibouti Peace Process, stressing the primary responsibility of the Transitional Federal Institutions to work in a cohesive and united manner and to intensify their efforts to complete the transitional tasks set out by the Djibouti Agreement and the Transitional Charter, and calling on the Transitional Federal Institutions to coordinate closely with other Somali groups, including local and regional administrations,

Reiterating its emphasis on the need for a comprehensive strategy to encourage the establishment of peace and security in Somalia through the collaborative effort of all stakeholders,

Commending the Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Dr. Augustine Mahiga, as well as that of the Special Representative of the Chairperson of the African Union Commission for Somalia, Ambassador Boubacar Gaoussou Diarra, and reaffirming its strong support for their efforts,

Welcoming the work of former President Jerry Rawlings as the African Union High Representative for Somalia,

Recalling the signing of the Kampala Accord on 9 June 2011, noting the decision to defer elections of the President and Speaker and his deputies for 12 months until 20 August 2012 under the terms of the Accord and strongly urging the signatories to honour their obligations,

Welcoming the agreement of a Roadmap, facilitated by Special Representative Mahiga, at the Consultative Meeting held in Mogadishu on 6 September, that sets out key tasks and priorities to be delivered by the Transitional Federal Institutions over the next 12 months, with clear timelines, benchmarks and compliance mechanisms, urging the Transitional Federal Institutions as holding the primary responsibility for implementing the Roadmap, and the other signatories, to adhere to their commitments in the Roadmap, and noting that future support for the Transitional Federal Institutions will be contingent upon completion of these tasks,

Recognizing that peace and stability in Somalia depend on reconciliation and effective governance across the whole of Somalia and urging all Somali parties to renounce violence and to work together to build peace and stability,

Urging the Transitional Federal Institutions to increase their transparency and combat corruption to increase their legitimacy and credibility, and to enable continued support from the international community,

Expressing grave concern at the dire and worsening humanitarian situation in Somalia and the impact of the drought and famine on the people of Somalia, in particular women and children, calling on all parties in accordance with international humanitarian law to allow for safe and unhindered access to humanitarian agencies at this critical time, and underscoring the importance of upholding the principles of neutrality, impartiality, humanity and independence in the provision of humanitarian assistance,

Strongly condemning the targeting, obstruction or prevention of the delivery of humanitarian aid in Somalia by any parties, especially armed groups, and deploring any attacks on humanitarian personnel,

Expressing serious concern that the United Nations consolidated appeal for Somalia is not fully funded, stressing the need for urgent mobilisation of resources to those in need and calling on all Member States to contribute to current and future consolidated humanitarian appeals,

Commending the contribution of the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) to lasting peace and stability in Somalia, recognizing the significant sacrifices made by these forces, expressing its appreciation for the continued commitment of troops and equipment to AMISOM by the Governments of Uganda and Burundi, and calling on other African Union member States to consider contributing troops to AMISOM,

Reiterating its serious concern at the continued fighting in Somalia and its impact on the civilian population, condemning all attacks, including terrorist attacks on the Transitional Federal Government, AMISOM and the civilian population by armed opposition groups, and foreign fighters, particularly Al-Shabaab, and stressing the terrorist threat that Somali armed opposition groups, and foreign fighters, particularly Al-Shabaab, constitute for Somalia and for the international community,

Welcoming recent improvements in the security situation in Mogadishu, commending the efforts of AMISOM and the Somali security forces, encouraging them to consolidate these gains and urging the Transitional Federal Institutions to capitalize upon the improved security situation by promptly facilitating agreement on and the implementation of a stabilisation plan for Mogadishu and by facilitating the delivery of basic services and providing good governance to all of its citizens,

Calling on the Transitional Federal Government to remain united and redouble its efforts to complete the priority tasks and goals agreed on in the Roadmap paving the ground for a better future for Somalis, including their economic and social development and the realization of their human rights, while recognizing the need for the cooperation and support of the international community to the Transitional Federal Government, local and regional administrations in this regard,

Reaffirming the importance of the re-establishment, training, equipping and retention of Somali security forces, which is vital for the long-term stability and security of Somalia, expressing support for the ongoing European Union Training Mission Somalia, emphasizing the importance of coordinated, timely and sustained support from the international community, and encouraging the Somali security forces to demonstrate their effectiveness by working with AMISOM to consolidate security throughout Mogadishu,

Commending Member States and organizations which have made contributions in support of AMISOM and Somalia, encouraging the international community to mobilize additional funding as appropriate, recognizing the importance of timely and predictable funding, and stressing the need for effective coordination among donors, the United Nations and the African Union,

Recalling its resolutions 1950 (2010) and 1976 (2011), expressing its grave concern at the threat posed by piracy and armed robbery off the coast of Somalia, recognizing that the ongoing instability in Somalia contributes to the problem of piracy and armed robbery at sea off the coast of Somalia, and hostage-taking, stressing the need for a comprehensive response to tackle piracy, including the need to investigate and prosecute those who illicitly finance, plan, organize, or unlawfully profit from pirate attacks, and its underlying causes by the international community and the Transitional Federal Institutions and welcoming the efforts of the Contact Group for Piracy Off the Coast of Somalia, States and international and regional organizations,

Welcoming the Secretary-General’s report dated 30 August 2011 (S/2011/549), and its recommendations for continued action on the political, security and recovery tracks by the Transitional Federal Institutions with the support of the international community,

Determining that the situation in Somalia continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security in the region,

Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

“1.   Decides to authorize the member States of the African Union to maintain the deployment until 31 October 2012 of AMISOM, which shall be authorized to take all necessary measures to carry out its existing mandate as set out in paragraph 9 of resolution 1772 (2007), and requests the African Union to urgently increase its force strength to its mandated level of 12,000 uniformed personnel, thereby enhancing its ability to carry out its mandate;

“2.   Calls upon the Transitional Federal Institutions to abide by the terms of the Roadmap of key tasks and priorities to be delivered by the Transitional Federal Institutions over the next 12 months, with clear timelines, benchmarks and compliance mechanisms, notes the Security Council’s future support to the Transitional Federal Institutions will be contingent upon the completion of these tasks, and requests the Secretary-General to provide an update on progress made by the Transitional Federal Institutions against the Roadmap in his reports to the Security Council;

“3.   Notes the recommendations on Somalia by the African Union Peace and Security Council of 13 September 2011 and underlines its intention to keep the situation on the ground under review and to take into account in its future decisions on AMISOM, progress by the Transitional Federal Institutions in completing the key tasks as set out in the Roadmap referred to in paragraph 2 above;

“4.   Welcomes the steps taken by the United Nations Political Office in Somalia (UNPOS) and other United Nations offices and agencies, including the United Nations Support Office for AMISOM (UNSOA), to increase the presence of the United Nations organizations and their staff in Somalia as an important element of the effective fulfilment of their mandate, and urges the establishment of a more permanent and increasing presence by the United Nations to Somalia, in particular in Mogadishu, consistent with the security conditions, as outlined in the Secretary-General’s reports (S/2010/447) and (S/2009/210);

“5.   Recalling the African Union’s Chairperson’s report of 13 September 2011 and the Secretary-General’s report of 30 August 2011 (S/2011/549), agrees that an increase in United Nations organizations and their staff, and other official international visitors in Mogadishu is placing additional pressure on AMISOM to provide security, escort and protection services, encourages the United Nations to work with the African Union to develop a guard force of an appropriate size, within AMISOM’s mandated troop levels, to provide security, escort and protection services to personnel from the international community, including the United Nations, and expresses its intention to review and consider thoroughly the possible need to adjust the mandated troop levels of AMISOM when the Mission reaches its current mandated level of 12,000 troops;

“6.   Requests the Secretary-General to continue to provide technical and expert advice to the African Union in the planning and deployment of AMISOM, through the United Nations Office to the African Union, including on AMISOM Concept of Operations;

“7.   Welcomes the progress made by AMISOM in reducing civilian casualties during its operations, urges AMISOM to continue to undertake its efforts to prevent civilian casualties and to develop an effective approach to the protection of civilians as requested by the African Union Peace and Security Council;

“8.   Requests AMISOM to continue to assist the Transitional Federal Government in the development of the Somali Police Force and the National Security Force, in particular the implementation of an effective chain of command and control of the Somali security forces and to assist the integration of Somali units trained by other Member States or organizations inside and outside Somalia;

“9.   Noting the important role an effective police presence can play in the stabilization of Mogadishu, stresses the need to continue to develop an effective Somali police force and welcomes the desire of the African Union to develop a police component within AMISOM;

“10.  Requests the Secretary-General to continue to provide a logistical support package for AMISOM called for by resolution 1863 (2009) for a maximum of 12,000 AMISOM uniformed personnel, including the Guard Force referred to in paragraph 5 above, comprising equipment and services, including public information support, but not including the transfer of funds, as described in the Secretary-General’s letter (S/2009/60) to the Security Council until 31 October 2012, ensuring the accountability and transparency of expenditure of United Nations funds as set out in paragraph 6 of resolution 1910 (2010);

“11.  Decides on an exceptional basis and due to the unique character of this mission, to extend the logistical support package for AMISOM for a maximum of 12,000 troops as described in the exchange of letters between the Secretary-General of 21 September 2011 and the Security Council of 29 September 2011 (S/2011/591) whilst continuing to ensure maximum efficiency and engagement of relevant bilateral support;

“12.  Considers that counter-improvised explosive device and explosive ordnance disposal activities, as described in the Secretary-General’s letter (S/2009/60) to the Security Council, may be provided through the logistical support package, whilst continuing to ensure maximum efficiency and engagement of relevant bilateral support;

“13.  Recalls its statement of intent regarding the establishment of a United Nations peacekeeping operation as expressed in resolution 1863 (2009), and notes that any decision to deploy such an operation would take into account inter alia the conditions set out in the Secretary-General’s reports dated 16 April 2009 (S/2009/210) and 30 December 2010 (S/2010/675), and requests the Secretary-General to take the steps identified in paragraphs 82‑86 of his report (S/2009/210), subject to the conditions in this report;

“14.  Reiterates its call to Member States and regional and international organizations to support AMISOM through the provision of equipment, technical assistance, and funding without caveats to the United Nations Trust Fund for AMISOM, or to make direct bilateral donations in support of AMISOM, including for the urgent need for the reimbursement of contingent-owned equipment, and for the provision of compassionate flights for AMISOM troops, and encourages donors to work closely with the United Nations and African Union in order to ensure that the appropriate funds and equipment are promptly provided;

“15.  Emphasizes that in order to ensure Somalia’s long-term security effective development of Somali security forces is needed, and reiterates its call to Member States, regional and international organizations to contribute generously and promptly to the United Nations Trust Fund for the Somali security institutions, and to offer assistance to the Somali security forces, including through training, technical assistance and equipment in coordination with AMISOM, consistent with paragraphs 11 (b) and 12 of resolution 1772 (2007);

“16.  Requests the Secretary-General to continue to assist the Transitional Federal Government in developing the transitional security institutions, including the Somali Police Force, and the National Security Force, and to continue to support the Transitional Federal Government in developing a Somali-owned national security strategy, which reflects respect for the rule of law and the protection of human rights, as well as the legal and policy framework for the operation of its security forces including governance, vetting and oversight mechanisms;

“17.  Reaffirms that the measures imposed by paragraph 5 of resolution 733 (1992) and further elaborated upon by paragraphs 1 and 2 of resolution 1425 (2002) shall not apply to supplies and technical assistance provided in accordance with paragraph 11 (b) and 12 of resolution 1772 (2007) to the Transitional Federal Government for the purposes of the development of its security sector institutions, consistent with the Djibouti peace process and subject to the notification procedure set out in paragraph 12 of resolution 1772 (2007);

“18.  Reiterates its call on all Somali parties to support the Djibouti Agreement, and calls for the end of all hostilities, acts of armed confrontation and efforts to undermine stability in Somalia and the Transitional Federal Government;

“19.  Requests the Secretary-General, through his Special Representative, to continue to extend his good offices to facilitate reconciliation amongst all Somalis and the peace process in general, with the support of the international community, including, as appropriate, support to reconciliation and peace efforts at the local level;

“20.  Notes the important role regional administrations and civil society can play in the political process and encourages intensified dialogue and political outreach with these groups by the Transitional Federal Institutions;

“21.  Encourages the international community to provide, as part of the continuing support to Somalia, further support to peacebuilding, capacity-building and good governance efforts in areas of relative stability within Somalia, including, but not limited to, Somaliland and Puntland;

“22.  Condemns all attacks against civilians in Somalia, calls for the immediate cessation of all acts of violence, including sexual and gender-based violence, or abuses committed against civilians, including women and children, and humanitarian personnel in violation of international humanitarian law and human rights law and stresses the responsibility of all parties in Somalia to comply with their obligations to protect the civilian population from the effects of hostilities, in particular by avoiding any indiscriminate attacks or excessive use of force;

“23.  Expresses serious concern about the reports of continuing human rights violations in Somalia and stresses the importance to investigate these alleged human rights violations and to bring those responsible to justice;

“24.  Recalls the conclusions endorsed by the Security Council Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict in Somalia (S/AC.51/2011/2), calls on all parties to end grave violations and abuses committed against children in Somalia, urges the Transitional Federal Government to develop and implement a concrete time-bound action plan to halt the recruitment and use of children, requests the Secretary-General to continue his dialogue with the Transitional Federal Government in this regard, and reiterates its request to the Secretary-General to strengthen the child-protection component of UNPOS and to ensure continued monitoring and reporting of the situation of children in Somalia;

“25.  Expresses serious concern about increasing reports of conflict-related sexual violence in Somalia, calls on all parties to cease such violations and abuses, and requests the Secretary-General to implement the relevant provisions of resolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010), including the strengthening of the women’s protection component of UNPOS;

“26.  Demands all parties and armed groups to take appropriate steps to ensure the safety and security of humanitarian personnel and supplies, and further demands that all parties ensure full, safe and unhindered access for the timely delivery of humanitarian aid to persons in need of assistance across Somalia;

“27.  Requests the Secretary-General, through his Special Representative for Somalia and UNPOS to redouble their efforts to coordinate effectively and develop an integrated approach to all activities of the United Nations system in Somalia, to provide good offices and political support for the efforts to establish lasting peace and stability in Somalia, and to mobilise resources and support from the international community for both the immediate recovery and long-term economic development of Somalia taking into account the recommendations contained in his report (S/2009/684), and stresses the importance that UNPOS and other United Nations offices and agencies work transparently and coordinate with the international community;

“28.  Requests the strengthening of cooperation among the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), the African Union and the United Nations to allow for an appropriate division of responsibilities in Somalia in an effort to reduce duplication of effort and ensure proper utilization of resources, and to include updates on this topic in the Secretary-General’s regular reports on Somalia;

“29.  Requests the Secretary-General to report on all aspects of this resolution every four months and expresses its intention to review the situation, as part of his reporting obligations, as specified in the statement of the President of the Security Council of 31 October 2001 (S/PRST/2001/30) and Security Council resolutions 1863 (2009), 1872 (2009), 1910 (2010) and 1964 (2010);

“30.  Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.”

Background

The Security Council had before it the Report of the Secretary-General on Somalia (document S/2011/549) dated 30 August 2011, which provides an update on major developments in the country since his report of 28 April 2011.

According to the report, the Secretary-General observes that it is imperative to provide access to aid agencies and to seize opportunities created by the Kampala Accord, the political road map and the forced withdrawal of Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu.  “The hard-won gains on the security and political tracks must not be reversed,” he stresses, urging assistance for the Transitional Federal Government in consolidating its authority over the capital, Mogadishu, and engagement in a comprehensive national reconciliation process.

Emphasizing the commitment of the United Nations to supporting Somali leaders, the Secretary-General says nevertheless that it is their responsibility to deliver for the sake of their people.  The continued presence of AMISOM is essential and its deployment at its authorized strength of 12,000 troops is urgently needed to fill the security vacuum created by Al-Shabaab’s withdrawal from Mogadishu.  In that context, he appeals to Member States to expand their support for the Mission in such a manner as to enable it to operate within a predictable budget commensurate with its mandate.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.