Effects of Global Crises on Poor Countries, Sustainable Development Conference Feature as General Assembly Considers Reports of Second Committee

22 December 2011
GA/11200

Effects of Global Crises on Poor Countries, Sustainable Development Conference Feature as General Assembly Considers Reports of Second Committee

22 December 2011
General Assembly
GA/11200
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-sixth General Assembly

Plenary

91stMeeting (PM)


Effects of Global Crises on Poor Countries, Sustainable Development Conference


Feature as General Assembly Considers Reports of Second Committee

 


Four Recorded Votes Requested as Delegates Adopt 46 Texts in Total


The developing world’s vulnerability to the prevailing multiple global crises and preparations for the June 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development were prominent among the concerns of the Second Committee (Economic and Financial) as the 42 draft resolutions and 4 draft decisions it had recommended for action by the General Assembly were adopted today.


Among the texts adopted — all but four without a vote — were two brand new texts, the first titled “Towards global partnerships”, which called on the international community to continue promoting multistakeholder approaches to development.  The second, “People’s empowerment and a peace-centric development model”, noted theproposal by the Prime Minister of Bangladesh to host an international conference on the subject during the first half of 2012.


However, the focus fell on sustainable development ahead of the upcoming Conference on Sustainable Development, known as “Rio+20”, with the Assembly adopting 16 draft resolutions and 2 draft decisions on the subject.  One new text dealt with international cooperation and coordination for the rehabilitation and economic development of the Semipalatinsk region of Kazakhstan.  Another noted the failure of donors to meet their commitments on official development assistance (ODA), stressing the vital importance of aid to financing for development, and of greater South-South cooperation.


Another adopted text stressed the challenges posed by desertification, land degradation and drought, including to food security in developing countries, and emphasized the need for financial resources, technology transfer and capacity-building to meet them.


Recorded votes were requested before action on two draft resolutions dealing with sustainable development.  By the terms of one text, the Assembly requested for the sixth consecutive year that Israel compensate Lebanon and Syria for the pollution of their shores that followed the destruction of oil storage tanks near Lebanon’s El-Jiyeh power plant.  Compensation was expected promptly and to be adequate to restore the marine environment and repair the environmental damage.  The Assembly adopted that draft by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, Central African Republic, Colombia, Gabon, Panama, Tonga).  (See Annex II for voting details)


Adopted by a recorded vote of 141 in favour to 2 against (South Africa, Venezuela), with 33 abstentions was a text on agricultural technology for development.  By its terms, the Assembly urged the strengthening of international efforts to develop sustainable agricultural technologies, and their transfer to developing countries under fair terms.  It also requested that the United Nations promote, support and facilitate the exchange of experiences among Member States on ways to augment sustainable agriculture and management practices.  (Annex III)


On the subject of the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution that expressed deep concern over the number and scale of disasters and their impact on sustainable development, especially in developing countries.


Anothertext looked specifically at the adverse impact of disasters on sustainable mountain development, urging the international community to take concrete steps in support of national and regional efforts to ensure the sustainable development of mountain regions.


The Assembly also adopted a text urging States to take practical steps to protect coral reefs and calling for international support for the efforts of developing countries in that regard.  Another text emphasized that sustainable tourism in Central America was fundamental to regional integration, and an engine of social and economic development.  A third draft resolution invited the United Nations to work with partners to better measure the environmental degradation resulting from human activity.


Two annual texts stressed, respectively, the need for continued substantive consideration of the promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, and the issue of biological diversity.


Also under the sustainable development cluster, the Assembly adopted drafts on follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States; implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development; and the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on its twenty-sixth session.


The Assembly also passed three draft resolutions on the protection of global climate for present and future generations of humankind; the Convention on Biological Diversity; and the contribution of the ninth session of the United Nations Forum on Forests to the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development; as well as a draft decision on accreditation arrangements for participation by major groups in the preparatory process for the Conference.


Turning to macroeconomic policy questions, the Assembly adopted a draft resolution urging the international community to eliminate unilateral coercive economic measures against developing countries and calling upon the international community to condemn and reject their imposition.  That passed by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 53 abstentions).  (Annex I)


With most of the consideration of macroeconomic policy questions informed by the adverse global economic situation, particularly its negative impact on vulnerable developing countries, and especially least developed ones, the Assembly reiterated in one draft the need for effective, inclusive multilateral surveillance to prevent future crises and encouraged enhanced regional and subregional cooperation.


Another text emphasized the need to resist protectionist tendencies and to rectify any trade-distorting measures already taken that were inconsistent with World Trade Organization (WTO) rules.  Expressing serious concern over the lack of progress in the Doha Round of WTO negotiations, it called for a balanced and development-oriented outcome of the Doha Development Agenda and stressed the need to remove restrictions and taxes on food exports.


By the terms of a draft resolution dealing with the issue of debt sustainability, the Assembly stressed the importance of responsible international lending and borrowing, emphasizing also the shared responsibility of creditors and debtors for preventing unsustainable debt situations.  It also stressed the important role that debt relief could play in liberating resources for use in the fight to eradicate poverty and promote sustainable development.


The Assembly also adopted a draft that stressed the need to improve the commodity-export competitiveness of producers, especially those in Africa, through technical and capacity-building assistance, also stressing the importance of managing excessive price volatility through improved transparency in the international market.


Another draft stressed the need for active measures to reduce excessive food-price volatility, and the importance of more research to improve understanding of its causes.


The issue of food security was also considered under other agenda items, particularly “agriculture for development”, with the Assembly adopting a related draft resolution that stressed the need to remove restrictions on food exports.  It also stressed the need for strengthened capacity of smallholder and women farmers as a strategy to enhance agriculture development and food security.


Two other drafts saw the Assembly proclaim 2013 the International Year of Quinoa, and 2014 the International Year of Family Farming.


Agriculture also featured prominently in other drafts, including one on the eradication of poverty, which called for recognition of the critical role of rural women in enhancing agricultural and rural development, improving food security and eradicating rural poverty.  It stressed the need to promote gender equality and the empowerment of women at all levels.


By terms of another text, the Assembly considered the role of women in development vital to improving the human resource base, while another draft called on Member States to make human resources development central to their economic and social development strategies, stressing the need to enhance national human resources in order to boost job-rich recovery from recession.


Employment was a key aspect of a draft resolution on the Second United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2008-2017), by which the Assembly called for a global strategy on youth unemployment and urged implementation of the outcome documents relating to the United Nations Conference on the World Financial and Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Development.


Considering the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence, the Assembly adopted a draft that reaffirmed the Organization’s fundamental role in promoting international cooperation for development.  Another draft stressed the need for continued and intensified cooperation with the International Organization of Supreme Audit Institutions.


Out of three more texts in the globalization and interdependence cluster, one emphasized the important contribution of culture to realizing sustainable development and national development objectives, while another reaffirmed the Assembly’s commitment to strengthening and enhancing existing mechanisms and support for research-and-development initiatives.  The third text stressed the importance of continued consideration of development cooperation with middle-income countries.


As part of its consideration of operational activities for development, the Assembly adopted a draft reaffirming the importance of the comprehensive policy review of United Nations operational activities for development.  By the terms of two other drafts, the Assembly decided to hold a United Nations Day on South-South Cooperation, and to rename the Pérez-Guerrero Trust Fund for Economic and Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries as the “Pérez-Guerrero Trust Fund for South-South Cooperation”.


The Assembly also adopted a draft on follow-up to the International Conference on Financing for Development and the Review Conference, which stressed the essential role of ODA in financing for development, and the need for strengthened South-South cooperation as a complement to North-South cooperation.


Anannual draft resolution on implementing the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat) recalled the importance of the Programme’s timely action in response to disasters, particularly in addressing post-disaster and post-conflict housing and infrastructure needs.  By its terms, the Assembly decided to convene a third United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development in 2016.


By a final recorded vote, the Assembly again adopted a text demanding that Israel stop exploiting, damaging, depleting and endangering natural resources in occupied Arab lands, recognizing the right of the Palestinian and other Arab peoples to claim restitution for such illegal actions.  The text — adopted by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 7 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, El Salvador, Côte d’Ivoire, Panama, Tonga) — also called on Israel to stop harming the environment and infrastructure systems in territories under its occupation.  (Annex IV)


Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a resolution on follow-up to the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries, as part of its consideration of groups of countries in special situations.  It stressed the need for coordinated implementation of the Istanbul Programme of Action, expressing concern about theeconomic growth and social well-being of landlocked developing countries, which remained highly vulnerable to external shocks.


Emphasizing the need to bridge the digital divide, the Assembly then adopted a draft that stressed the unfulfilled development potential of science and communications technology, as well as the role of Governments in designing national public policies and providing public services through the effective use of information and communications technology.


In other business today, the Assembly decided to adopt the Second Committee’s programme of work for the sixty-seventh session, and a draft decision on improving the Committee’s working methods.


Assembly President Nassir Abdulaziz al-Nasser (Qatar) recalled in closing that the resolution on implementation of the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries requested him to establish an ad hoc working group to further study and strengthen implementation.  He said he had undertaken extensive consultations with Member States, in particular the major groups closely involved in the matter — the Group of Least Developed Countries, the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, the European Union and the Friends of the Least Developed Countries.


The proposed ad hoc working group would undertake an important responsibility with a view to achieving one of the key objectives of the Istanbul Programme of Action, he said.  In order to complete its work and report back to the General Assembly at its next session, the working group needed to commence its work very early in 2012, he stressed, proposing, therefore, that it convene its first meeting in mid-January.  Calling for “whole-hearted engagement” by the United Nations system and its leadership, Member States and all other development partners in the full and effective implementation of the Programme of Action, he strongly recommended that groups representing small island developing States and landlocked developing countries participate regularly in the working group.  Finally, he announced that he had appointed Jan Grauls (Belgium) and Brian Bowler (Malawi) as its Co-Chairs.


Also speaking today were representatives of Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Turkey and Bangladesh.


Raymond Landveld (Suriname), Rapporteur of the Second Committee, introduced its reports.


The General Assembly is expected to reconvene at 3 p.m., 23 December, to take up the reports of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary).


Action on Second Committee Reports


The Assembly observed a minute’s silence in tribute to Kim Jong Il, fallen leader of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.


RAYMOND LANDVELD(Suriname), Rapporteur of the Second Committee (Economic and Financial), then introduced theCommittee’sreports.


The Assembly first took up the report on information and communications technologies for development (document A/66/437),adopting the related draft resolution without a vote.


Turning to the report on macroeconomic policy questions(document A/66/438), it took up its first addendum (document A/66/438/Add.1), adopting a draft resolution on international trade and development without a vote.


Following a request for a recorded vote for the draft resolution on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries, the Assembly adopted that text by 122 votes in favour to 2 against, (Israel, United States), with 53 abstentions.  (See Annex I for details of the vote.)


It then took up the report on the international financial system and development (document A/66/438/Add.2), adopting without a vote a draft resolution on addressing excessive price volatility of food and related commodity markets.


The representative of the Dominican Republic, speaking in explanation of position, said the resolution was new and addressed an issue raised by that country’s President.  Its four objectives were to recognize the disruptive phenomenon of futures markets, especially their volatility; contend that the phenomenon had a detrimental impact on producers and net-food importers; establish a mechanism to ensure in-depth discussion of the matter at the United Nations; and recommend the pursuit of analysis and research into excessive price volatility in futures markets.  Although negotiations on the draft had sometimes been fraught, flexibility and cooperation had eventually won the day, he noted.


Acting again without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolutions on external debt sustainability and development (document A/66/438/Add.3) and on commodities (document A/66/438/Add.4).


It then turned to the report on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the 2002 International Conference on Financing for Development and the 2008 Review Conference (document A/66/439) and adopted the related draft resolution by consensus.


The Assembly then took up the Committee’s report on sustainable development (document A/66/440), containing five draft resolutions.


Following a request for a recorded vote, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on the oil slick on Lebanese shores by 165 votes in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, Central African Republic, Colombia, Gabon, Panama, Tonga).  (Annex II)


The Assembly then adopted two draft resolutions, both by consensus, the first on international cooperation and coordination for the human and ecological rehabilitation and economic development of the Semipalatinsk region of Kazakhstan, and the second on the protection of coral reefs for sustainable livelihoods and development.


As it took up the draft on agricultural technology for development, a recorded vote was requested and the Assembly went on to adopt it by 141 votes in favour to 2 against (South Africa, Venezuela), with 33 abstentions.  (Annex III)


It then adopted, by consensus, a text on sustainable tourism and sustainable development in Central America.


The representative of Venezuela registered a reservation regarding the text on protection of coral reefs, explaining that the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea was not binding on his country, which was not a party to it.


The Assembly then took up the text on sustainable development: implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development.  It went on to adopt the related draft resolution without a vote.


It then adopted, also without a vote, two draft decisions, the first on the contribution of the ninth session of the United Nations Forum on Forests to the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, and the other on arrangements for accreditation and participation in the preparatory process and in the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development of relevant non-governmental organizations and other major groups.


Taking up addenda 2, 3 and 4 of the report (documents A/66/440/Add.2, Add.3, and Add.4),it then adopted, without a vote, three texts — on follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States; the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction; and protection of global climate for present and future generations on humankind.


The Assembly then took up addenda 5, 6 and 7 of the same report (documents A/66/440/Add.5, Add.6 and Add.7),adopting without a vote the relevant texts on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa; the Convention on Biological Diversity; and the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on its eleventh special session.


From the same report, the Assembly went on to adopt, by consensus, texts on harmony with nature(document A/66/440/Add.8), sustainable mountain development (document A/66/440/Add.9) and promotion of new and renewable sources of energy (document A/66/440/Add.10).


Turning to the Committee’s report on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) (document A/66/441), the Assembly adopted the synonymous draft resolution by consensus.


The representative of Turkey made a statement reiterating his country’s commitment to hosting the Third United Nations Conference on Human Settlements in Istanbul in 2016.


Turning next to the Committee’s report on globalization and interdependence (document A/66/442), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, two related draft resolutions, the first on culture and development, and the other on promoting the efficiency, transparency and accountability of public administration by strengthening supreme audit institutions.


The Assembly then took up the report’s first addendum (document A/66/442/Add.1), adopting by consensus the text on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence.  Taking up two more addenda (document A/66/442/Add.2 and Add.3), it adopted, again by consensus, texts on science and technology for development, and development cooperation with middle-income countries.


Taking up the Committee’s report on groups of countries in special situations(document A/66/443), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution on follow-up to the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries, as well as a draft decision on the report of the Secretary-General on the 10‑year appraisal and review of the implementation of the Brussels Programme of Action for the least developed countries for the Decade 2001-2010 (document A/66/443/Add.1).


The Assembly then took up the Committee’s report on specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries: outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation(document A/66/443/Add.2).  It adopted the related draft without a vote.


Taking up the report on eradication of poverty and other development issues (document A/66/444), the Assembly considered the text on the Second United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2008-2017), which it adopted without a vote (document A/66/444/Add.1).  It then adopted, again without a vote, texts on women in development (document A/66/444/Add.2) and human resources development (document A/66/444/Add.3).


The Assembly then took up the report on operational activities for development(document A/66/445),adopting, again without a vote, the draft resolution on operational activities for development of the United Nations system (document A/66/445/Add.1).  It went on to adopt drafts on South-South cooperation for development, and South-South cooperation, both without a vote, before adopting two draft decisions, titled, respectively, “Pérez-Guerrero Trust Fund for South-South Cooperation” and “United Nations Day for South-South Cooperation”, again without a vote (document A/66/445/Add.2).


It then addressed the Committee’s report on agriculture development and food security(document A/66/446), adopting by consensus the synonymous text and two drafts on the International Year of Quinoa, 2013, and the International Year of Family Farming, 2014.


The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution entitled “Towards global partnerships” (document A/66/447), without a vote, before adopting a text on people’s empowerment and a peace-centric development model (document A/66/448), also without a vote.


The representative of Bangladesh said people’s empowerment was essential to sustained political and economic development, adding that he looked ahead to the 2012 conference on the issue.


Moving on to the Committee’s report on the permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/66/449), the Assembly adopted the related draft by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 7 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, El Salvador, Panama, Tonga).  (Annex IV)


After considering the report on the revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/66/450), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a decision on the Committee’s programme of work for the sixty-seventh session of the General Assembly.


It then took note of a report on programme planning (document A/66/451).


The Assembly then resumed its consideration of the draft decision contained in document A/66/L.30, considering it directly in plenary and adopting it as orally revised.


Assembly President NASSIR ABDULAZIZ AL-NASSER (Qatar), recalling that the resolution on implementation of the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries requested him to establish an ad hoc working group to further study and strengthen implementation, said he had undertaken extensive consultations with Member States, in particular the major groups closely involved in the matter — the Group of Least Developed Countries, the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, the European Union and the Friends of the Least Developed Countries.  He also proposed an oral revision of the resolution in order to insert a reference to resolution A/66/213.


He went on to emphasize that the proposed ad hoc working group would undertake an important responsibility with a view to achieving one of the key objectives of the Istanbul Programme of Action.  In order to complete its work and report back to the General Assembly at its next session, the working group needed to commence its work very early in 2012, he stressed, proposing, therefore, that it convene its first meeting in mid-January.


Calling for the “whole-hearted engagement” of the United Nations system and its leadership, of Member States and all other development partners in the full and effective implementation of the Programme of Action, he strongly recommended that groups representing small island developing States and landlocked developing countries participate regularly in the working group.  Finally, he announced that he had appointed Jan Grauls (Belgium) and Brian Bowler (Malawi) as the Co-Chairs of the ad hoc working group.


ANNEX I


Vote on Unilateral Economic Measures


The draft resolution on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries (document A/66/438/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 2 against, with 53 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Ghana, Haiti, Kiribati, Mauritania, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX II


Vote on Oil Slick


The draft resolution on oil slick on Lebanese shores (document A/66/440) was adopted by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 8 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Cameroon, Central African Republic, Colombia, Gabon, Panama, Tonga.


Absent:  Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Ghana, Kiribati, Mauritania, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX III


Vote on Agricultural Technology


The draft resolution on agricultural technology for development (document A/66/440) was adopted by a recorded vote of 141 in favour to 2 against, with 33 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  South Africa, Venezuela.


Abstain:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brunei Darussalam, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, Gabon, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Morocco, Nicaragua, Niger, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.


Absent:  Cambodia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Ghana, Iran, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mauritania, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX IV


Vote on Permanent Sovereignty


The draft resolution on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/66/449) was adopted by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 7 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Australia, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, El Salvador, Panama, Tonga.


Absent:  Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Ghana, Kiribati, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Sudan, Vanuatu.


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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.