General Assembly Adopts More Than 60 Resolutions Recommended by Third Committee, Including Text Condemning Grave, Systematic Human Rights Violations in Syria

19 December 2011
GA/11198

General Assembly Adopts More Than 60 Resolutions Recommended by Third Committee, Including Text Condemning Grave, Systematic Human Rights Violations in Syria

19 December 2011
General Assembly
GA/11198
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-sixth General Assembly

Plenary

89thMeeting (AM)

General Assembly Adopts More Than 60 Resolutions Recommended by Third Committee,

Including Text Condemning Grave, Systematic Human Rights Violations in Syria

 

Also Adopts New Protocol to Child Rights Convention; Wide Range of Resolutions

On Social, Humanitarian Issues; Texts on Iran, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

The General Assembly today adopted 63 resolutions and 9 decisions recommended by its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural), including a text that strongly condemned “continued grave and systematic” human rights violations in Syria and called for an immediate end to all violence in that country.

The resolution on Syria — which was tabled late in the session, in the Committee — was adopted by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 11 against, with 43 abstentions.  (See Annex XV)

By its terms, the Assembly called on the Syrian authorities to immediately put an end to all such violations, to protect their population and to fully comply with their obligations under international human rights law.  It also called on them to implement the Plan of Action of the League of Arab States in its entirety without further delay and to comply with Human Rights Council resolutions S-16/1 and S-17/1, including by cooperating fully and effectively with the independent international commission of inquiry.

The representative of Germany, the text’s main co-sponsor, noted that despite repeated calls from the international community, Syria’s crackdown against widespread civil protests continued unabated, with evidence of ongoing attacks on victims, including a “shoot to kill” policy and the widespread use of torture.  According to the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), the number of people killed likely exceeded 5,000 to date, including many children.  Syrian officials continued to refuse access to the United Nations commission of inquiry and had not implemented Arab League’s Plan of Action.  The resolution, with significant backing from Arab States, “supports the voice of the Arab region.”

Syria’s representative rejected the text as part of the part of a “political, diplomatic and media war” being waged against his country and denounced its selective approach, suggesting that some of the text’s co-authors were attempting to destroy his Government via military intervention on the basis of civilian protection.  Syria had affirmed — and reaffirmed today — that the only solution to the current crisis was national dialogue, reform and meeting the legitimate aspirations of its people.

Arguing that that dialogue should be undertaken with an honest investigation of the events taking place, he called on United Nations Member States to support an inclusive national Syrian dialogue.  He also noted that his delegation had submitted to a number of United Nations officials and agencies fully documented information on confessions made by armed terrorists that confirmed the violence committed against civilians.  Despite that transparency, however, the draft reflected none of that information.

Acting today without a vote, the Assembly also adopted a third Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on a communications procedure, which would allow the Committee overseeing the Convention’s implementation to receive and examine individual complaints from children and to organize country visits to investigate cases of grave and systematic violations of children’s rights.  Recommending that it be opened for ratification in 2012, the Assembly stipulated that the Optional Protocol would enter into force following its tenth ratification.

Forty-nine other texts also enjoyed consensus, including all those dealing with social development, women's advancement, children's rights, indigenous peoples, crime prevention and criminal justice and international drug control.  Among them were resolutions designating 21 March as World Down Syndrome Day, and 11 October as the International Day of the Girl Child.  Both days will be observed beginning in 2012.

By consensus, the Assembly also decided to convene a one-day High-level Meeting, at the level of Heads of State and Government, on 23 September 2013, the day before its sixty-eighth session, with the overarching theme “The way forward:  promoting a disability-inclusive development agenda towards 2015 and beyond.”

It also adopted the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Education and Training, which was adopted by the Human Rights Council by resolution 16/1 of 23 March 2011.  Reaffirming the call of the 1993 World Conference on Human Rights, which was held in Vienna, for all States and institutions to include human rights, humanitarian law, democracy and rule of law in the curricula of all learning institutions, the Declaration says that everyone has the right to know, seek and receive information about all human rights and fundamental freedoms.

The Assembly also adopted a new text on combating intolerance, negative stereotyping, stigmatization, discrimination, and incitement to violence against persons, based on religion or belief, which was tabled by the United Arab Emirates, on behalf of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC).  By that text, it strongly deplored all acts of violence against persons on the basis of their religion or belief, as well as all attacks on and in religious places, sites and shrines in violation of international law.

Two other country-specific texts — on the human rights situations in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and Iran — were also adopted, while a similar text on Myanmar was postponed pending endorsement of its statement of budget implications by the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary).  The resolution on the Democratic People's Republic of Korea was adopted by a vote of 123 in favour to 16 against, with 51 abstentions (Annex XII).  Following the defeat of a no-action motion on the Iran text by a recorded vote of 35 in favour to 100 against, with 42 abstentions (Annex XIII), the resolution was adopted by a vote of 89 in favour to 30 against, with 64 abstentions (Annex XIV).

Recorded votes were also required on resolutions concerning the report of the Human Rights Council (122-3-59) (Annex I); practices fuelling racism (134-24-32) (Annex II); efforts to eliminate racism (138-6-46) (Annex III); Palestinian self-determination (182-7-3) (Annex IV); use of mercenaries (130-53-6) (Annex V); membership of human rights treaty bodies (135-54-1) (Annex VI); cultural diversity (136-53-2) (Annex VII); right to development (154-6-29) (Annex VIII); unilateral coercive measures (137-54-0) (Annex IX); an equitable international order (130-54-6) (Annex X); and globalization (137-54-0) (Annex XI).

The representatives of Iran, Venezuela, Cuba, Canada and Iceland also spoke during action today.

A representative of the observer mission of the Holy See spoke on a point of order.

Background

The General Assembly met today to consider the reports of its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural).

Social Development

The Committee’s report on social development (document A/66/454 (Part II)) contains seven draft resolutions and one draft decision.

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution on the Tenth Anniversary of the International Year of Volunteers contained in the first part of the social development report (document A/66/454 (Part I)) on 5 December.  (See Press Release GA/11184)

Draft resolution I on policies and programmes involving youth, approved without a vote on 8 November, would have the Assembly affirm that investment in youth development and education was crucial for sustainable, social and economic development.  The Assembly would also urge Member States to specifically address youth development in their economic and financial recovery measures by emphasizing youth employment and promoting entrepreneurship, volunteerism and the development of formal, informal and non-formal educational and training systems.  It would also urge Member States to promote the full and effective participation of young people and youth-led organizations in relevant decision-making processes, at all times, especially in times of crisis. (Press Release GA/SHC/4027)

Draft resolution II on promoting social integration through social inclusion, approved without a vote on 18 November, would have the Assembly stress that States, which bear the main responsibility for social integration and social inclusion, should prioritize the creation of a “society for all” based on respect for all human rights and the principles of equality among individuals, the access to basic social services and the promotion of the active participation of every member of society, particularly those in vulnerable or marginalized situations, in all aspects of life, including decision-making processes.  It would also call upon States to promote a more equitable participation in, and access to, economic gains through, among other things, policies that ensure inclusive labour markets, social inclusion strategies, and the promotion and protection of social and economic rights. (Press Release GA/SHC/4031)

Draft resolution III on cooperatives in social development, approved without a vote on approved on 13 October, would have the Assembly welcome the proclamation of 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives, which launched on 31 October 2011.  It would also invite Governments to consider developing a road map or plan of action for the promotion of cooperatives for sustainable socio-economic development beyond the Year, while further urging them, with relevant partners, to consider the role and contribution of cooperatives in implementing the outcomes to other significant meetings.  Governments would also be urged to facilitate the establishment and development of cooperatives, including by enabling people living in poverty or belonging to vulnerable groups to fully participate in those ventures.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4011)

Draft resolution IV on the High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the realization of the Millennium Development Goals and other internationally agreed development goals for persons with disabilities, approved without a vote on 22 November, would have the Assembly decide to convene a one-day High-level Meeting, at the level of Heads of State and Government on 23 September 2013, the Monday before the start of the general debate of the sixty-eighth session, with the overarching theme “The way forward:  promoting a disability-inclusive development agenda towards 2015 and beyond”.  The event, which shall be funded within existing resources, would aim to strengthen efforts to ensure accessibility for, and inclusion of, persons with disabilities in all aspects of development efforts and result in a concise, action-oriented outcome document supporting the aims of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the realization of the Millennium Development Goals and other internationally agreed development goals for persons with disabilities.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

Draft resolution V on implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly, approved without a vote on 22 November, would have the Assembly express deep concern that the ongoing adverse impact of the world financial and economic crisis, the volatile food and energy prices, and food insecurity and the challenges posed by climate change, as well as the lack of results so far in the multilateral trade negotiations, have negative implications for social development.  It would call upon international financial institutions and donors to support developing countries in achieving their social development, in line with their national priorities and strategies by, among other things, providing debt relief.  It would further stress that, while economic growth is essential, entrenched inequality and marginalization are an obstacle to the broad-based and sustained growth required for sustainable, inclusive and people-centred development.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

Draft resolution VI on preparations for and observance of the twentieth anniversary of the International Year of the Family, approved without a vote on 10 November, would have the Assembly urge Member States to view 2014 as a target year by which concrete efforts will be made to improve family well-being through the implementation of effective national policies, strategies and programmes.  It would further urge them to create a conducive environment to strengthen and support all families, recognizing that equality between women and men and respect for all the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all family members are essential to family well-being and to society at large.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4028)

Draft resolution VII on follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm the Political Declaration and the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing, 2002 and designate 15 June as the World Elder Abuse Awareness Day.  It would also encourage Governments to pay greater attention to building capacity to eradicate poverty among older persons, particularly older women.  Governments would be called on to ensure, as appropriate, conditions that enable families and communities to provide care and protection to persons as they age.  States would be further called on to address the well-being and adequate health care of older persons, as well as any cases of neglect, abuse and violence against older persons, by designing and implementing more effective prevention strategies and stronger laws and policies to address these problems and their underlying factors.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

By the related draft decision, the Assembly would take note of the Secretary-General’s reports on the implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly and on the world social situation 2011:  the global social crisis, submitted under the item entitled “Social development.”

Advancement of Women

The Committee’s report on advancement of women (document A/66/455) contains five draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I on violence against women migrant workers, approved without a vote on 21 November, would have the Assembly call on Governments to incorporate a human rights, gender-sensitive, and people-centred perspective in legislation, policies and programmes on international migration and on labour and employment, consistent with their human rights obligations and commitments under human rights instruments, for the prevention of and protection of migrant women against violence and discrimination, exploitation and abuse.  Governments would also be urged to strongly encourage all stakeholders, especially the private sector, to strengthen the focus on, and funding for, the prevention of such violence.  States — particularly countries of origin and destination — would be called on to put in place penal and criminal sanctions to punish perpetrators of violence against women migrant workers and intermediaries, alongside gender-sensitive redress and justice mechanisms for victims’ effective access. (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution II on improvement of the situation of women in rural areas, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly urge States, with the organizations of the United Nations and civil society, as appropriate, to attach greater importance to the improvement of the situation of rural women, including indigenous women, in their national, regional and global development.  Governments and international organizations would be encouraged to integrate the perspective of women in rural areas, including indigenous women, into the preparations for and outcome of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, to be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 20 to 22 June 2012.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution III on women and political participation, approved without a vote on 18 November, would have the Assembly call upon all States to eliminate laws, regulations and practices that, in a discriminatory manner, prevent or restrict women’s participation in the political process.  It would also call upon them to enhance women's political participation, accelerate the achievement of equality between men and women and, in all situations, including in situations of political transition, to promote and protect women's human rights.  States in situations of political transition would be further called on to take effective steps to ensure the participation of women on equal terms with men in all phases of political reform, from decisions on whether to call for reforms in existing institutions to decisions regarding transitional Governments, to the formulation of Government policy, to the means of electing new democratic Governments.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4031)

Draft resolution IV on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, approved without a vote on 3 November, would have the Assembly welcome the report of the Secretary-General on the status of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, as well as the reports of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women on its forty-fourth and forty-fifth, and forty-sixth to forty-eighth sessions.  It would also invite the Chair of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women to address and engage in an interactive dialogue at the Assembly’s sixty-seventh and sixty-eighth sessions and request the Secretary-General to submit at its sixty-eighth session a report on the status of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4026)

Draft resolution V on follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, approved without a vote on 8 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm its commitment to the full, effective and accelerated implementation of the Declaration and its Platform for Action.  It would also call upon the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women)to continue to support gender mainstreaming across the United Nations system as an integral part of its work.  States would also be urged to increase funding for the budget of UN-Women by providing, when legislative and budgetary provisions allow, core, multi-year, predictable, stable and sustainable voluntary contributions, in recognition of the importance of adequate funding in enabling UN-Women to implement its strategic plan promptly and effectively.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4027)

In the related draft decision, Assembly would decide to take note of the note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences1 submitted under the item entitled “Advancement of women.”

Refugees

The Committee’s report on the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/66/456) contains three draft resolutions.

Draft resolution I on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, approved without a vote on 8 November, would have the Assembly strongly condemn attacks on refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced persons, as well as acts that pose a threat to their personal security and well-being.  It would call upon all States concerned and, where applicable, parties involved in an armed conflict, to take all measures necessary to ensure respect for human rights and international humanitarian law. It would also call upon the Office to further explore ways and means to broaden its donor base, so as to achieve greater burden-sharing by reinforcing cooperation with governmental donors, non-governmental donors and the private sector.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4027)

Draft resolution II on enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, approved without a vote on 10 November, would have the Assembly decide to increase the number of members of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 85 States to 87 States and request the Economic and Social Council to elect the additional two members at its resumed organizational session for 2012.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4028)

Draft resolution III on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, approved without a vote on 21 November, would have the Assembly call upon States and other parties to armed conflict to observe scrupulously the letter and spirit of international humanitarian law, bearing in mind that armed conflict is one of the principal causes of forced displacement in Africa.  It would further call on States of refuge, in cooperation with international organizations, where appropriate, to take all measures necessary to ensure respect for the principles of refugee protection. It would also deplore the continuing violence and insecurity which constitutes an ongoing threat to the safety and security of staff members of the Office of the High Commissioner and other humanitarian organizations and an obstacle to the effective fulfilment of their mandates, urging States, parties to conflict and all other relevant actors to take all measures necessary to protect activities related to humanitarian assistance.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Report of the Human Rights Council

The Committee’s report on the Report of the Human Rights Council (document A/66/457) contains three draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I on the Report of the Human Rights Council, approved by a recorded vote of 95 in favour to 4 against (Belarus, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and Syria), with 60 abstentions, on 15 November, would have the Assembly note that report, as well as its addendum and its recommendations.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution II on the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Education and Training, approved without a vote on 17 November, would have the Assembly adopt that Declaration, which was annexed to the present resolution.  Inviting Governments, agencies and organizations of the United Nations system, and intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to intensify their efforts to disseminate the Declaration and to promote universal respect and understanding thereof, the Assembly would also request the Secretary-General to include the text of the Declaration in the next edition of Human Rights:  A Compilation of International Instruments.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4030)

Draft resolution III on the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on a communications procedure, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly adopt that Optional Protocol as contained in the text's annex.  Further recommending that the Optional Protocol be opened for signature at a signing ceremony to be held in 2012, it would request the Secretary-General and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to provide the necessary assistance.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

By the related draft decision, the Assembly would decide to take note of the report of the Secretary-General on the observance of the International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims.

Promotion, Protection of Children’s Rights

The Committee’s report on the rights of children (document A/66/458) contains three draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I on strengthening collaboration on child protection within the United Nations system, approved without a vote on 21 November, would have the Assembly reiterate the importance of all relevant actors of the United Nations on child protection to continue to exercise their functions in a fully independent manner and to act in full observance of their respective mandates.  It would further underline the importance of sustained, adequate resources and support for the work of the United Nations system on the promotion and protection of the rights of the child, including child protection, and strongly encourage enhanced voluntary contributions to support technical assistance and capacity-building in the area of child protection.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution II on the girl child, approved without a vote on 22 November, would have the Assembly stress the need for full and urgent implementation of the rights of the girl child as provided to her under human rights instruments.  States would be called on to take appropriate measures, with the support of international organizations and civil society, to address the root factors of child and forced marriages, including by undertaking educational activities to raise awareness regarding the negative aspects of such practices.  States would be further urged to enact and enforce legislation to protect girls from all forms of violence and exploitation.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

Draft resolution III on the rights of the child was approved without a vote on 22 November, following the defeat of two oral amendments.  The first proposed amendment, which would have the Assembly decide “that all mandate holders should exercise their functions independently and in full observance of their respective mandates”, was rejected by a recorded vote of 48 in favour to 78 against, with 21 abstentions.  The second proposed amendment, which would add the phrase “and all Geneva Conventions of 1949” to the end of the third preambular paragraph, was rejected by a recorded vote of 26 in favour to 78 against, with 27 abstentions.

The draft text as a whole would have the Assembly call upon States to ensure the enjoyment by all children of all their civil, political, cultural, economic and social rights without discrimination of any kind.  It would also urge States to take or strengthen, as appropriate, legislative and other measures to effectively prevent, prohibit and eliminate all forms of violence against children, in all settings.  It would also stress the importance of international cooperation in building national capacity for improving the living conditions of children with disabilities in every country, in particular in developing countries and call upon all States to include, within the overall context of policies and programmes for the realization of the rights of the child, relevant provisions for the realization of these rights for children with disabilities.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

The related draft decision would have the Assembly decide to take note of two reports submitted under the item entitled “Promotion and protection of the rights of children”:  the report of the Special Rapporteur on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography and the Secretary-General’s report on the girl child.

Indigenous Peoples

The Committee’s report on the rights of indigenous peoples (document A/66/459) contains one draft resolution on the rights of indigenous peoples, which was approved without a vote on 18 November.  By its terms, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to convene, in coordination with the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, within existing resources, a high-level event during the Forum’s eleventh session to commemorate the fifth anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.  The Assembly would further stress that the event’s result could serve as an input for the preparation of its 2014 high-level plenary meeting, to be known as the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4031)

Elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination

The Committee’s report on elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination (document A/66/460) contains two draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I on the inadmissibility of certain practices that contribute to fuelling contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance was approved by a recorded vote of 120 in favour to 22 against, with 31 abstentions, on 17 November.  By its provisions, the Assembly emphasize the need to end contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance that contribute to the spread of various extremist political parties, movements and groups, including neo-Nazis and skinhead groups.  It would call upon States to take more effective measures in accordance with international human rights law to combat those phenomena, which pose a real threat to democratic values.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4031)

Draft resolution II on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action was approved by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 5 against ( Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands and United States) with 43 abstentions, on 22 November.  The Assembly would, by that text, express its unequivocal condemnation of all forms of racism and racial discrimination.  It would also express deep concern at inadequate responses to emerging and resurgent forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and call on all States, in accordance with the commitments undertaken in the Durban Programme of Action, to take all measures necessary to combat incitement to violence motivated by racial hatred, including through the misuse of print, audio-visual and electronic media and new communications technologies.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

By the related draft decision, the Assembly would take note of the report of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on its seventy-eighth and seventy-ninth sessions and the report of the Secretary-General on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, and the comprehensive implementation of, and follow-up to, the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action.

Rights of Peoples to Self-Determination

The Committee’s report on the right of peoples to self-determination (document A/66/461) contains three draft resolutions and one decision.

Draft resolution I on universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination, approved without a vote on 8 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm that the universal realization of the right of all peoples, including those under colonial, foreign and alien domination, to self-determination is a fundamental condition for the effective guarantee and observance of human rights and for the preservation and promotion of such rights.  It would also declare its firm opposition to acts of foreign military intervention, aggression and occupation, since these have resulted in the suppression of the right of peoples to self-determination and other human rights in certain parts of the world.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4027)

Draft resolution II on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, approved by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 5 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia and the United States), with 4 abstentions (Cameroon, Haiti, Togo and Venezuela), on 22 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, including the right to their independent State of Palestine.  It would also urge all States, as well as the specialized agencies and organizations of the United Nations system, to continue to support and assist the Palestinian people in the early realization of their right to self-determination.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

Draft resolution III on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination, approved by a recorded vote of 118 in favour to 52 against, with 5 abstentions (Chile, Colombia, Fiji, Mexico and Switzerland), on 17 November, would have the Assembly condemn recent mercenary activities in developing countries, as well as any form of impunity granted to perpetrators of mercenary activities and to those responsible for the use, recruitment, financing and training of mercenaries.  States would be urged, in accordance with their obligations under international law, to bring them, without distinction, to justice.  The Working Group on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination would be requested to continue the work already done by the previous Special Rapporteurs.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4030)

The related draft decision would have the Assembly decide to take note of the report of the Secretary-General on the right of peoples to self-determination.

Promotion and Protection of Human Rights

The Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/66/462) contains one draft decision that would have the Assembly take note of a number of documents considered in connection with the question of human rights.

Addendum 1 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/66/462/Add.1) contains four draft resolutions on implementation of human rights instruments.

Draft resolution I on the International Covenants on Human Rights, approved without a vote on 17 November, would have the Assembly welcome the annual report of the Human Rights Committee submitted at its sixty-fifth session, as well as the report of the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights on its forty-second and forty-third sessions and on its forty-fourth and forty-fifth sessions.  The Assembly would also invite the Chairs of the Committees to address and engage in an interactive dialogue at the General Assembly at its sixty-seventh and sixty-eighth sessions.  The Secretary-General would be requested to keep the Assembly informed of the status of the International Covenants on Human Rights and the Optional Protocols thereto, including all reservations and declarations.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4030)

Draft resolution II on World Down Syndrome Day, approved without a vote on 10 November, would have the Assembly designate 21 March as World Down Syndrome Day, to be observed every year beginning in 2012 and invite all States, relevant organizations of the United Nations system and other international organizations, as well as civil society, to observe that Day in an appropriate manner to raise public awareness of Down syndrome.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4028)

Draft resolution III on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, approved without a vote on 10 November, would have the Assembly emphasize the importance of properly interpreting and implementing the obligations of States with respect to torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment and of abiding strictly by the definition of torture contained in article 1 of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.  It would call upon all States to implement fully the absolute and non-derogable prohibition of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment and condemn any action or attempt by States or public officials to legalize, authorize or acquiesce in torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment under any circumstances, including on grounds of national security or through judicial decisions.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4028)

Draft resolution IV on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Optional Protocol thereto, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly decide to authorize for the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities an additional week of meeting time per year, to be used consecutive to an existing regular session, bearing in mind the requirements of the Committee for reasonable accommodation, and without prejudice to the ongoing process of reform aimed at strengthening the treaty body system.

A text on the draft’s programme budget implications states that additional resources would be required in the total amount of $2.993 million, including $213,600 under section 24, Human rights; $2.770 million under section 2, General Assembly and Economic and Social Council affairs and conference management; and $8,800 under section 29E, Administration, Geneva, of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 2012-2013.  That would represent a charge against the contingency fund and, as such, would require additional appropriation for the biennium 2012-2013 to be approved by the Assembly.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Addendum 2 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/66/462/Add.2) contains 23 draft resolutions on human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Draft resolution I on the universal, indivisible, interrelated, interdependent and mutually reinforcing nature of all human rights and fundamental freedoms, approved without a vote on 17 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm that all human rights are universal, indivisible, interrelated, interdependent and mutually reinforcing, and that all human rights — civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights — must be treated in a fair and equal manner, on the same footing and with the same emphasis.  It would also reaffirm that States should take steps to eliminate obstacles to development resulting from failure to observe all rights.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4030)

Draft resolution II on enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, approved without a vote on 18 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm that it is one of the purposes of the United Nations and the responsibility of all Member States to promote, protect and encourage respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms through, among other things, international cooperation.  It would urge all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on inclusion, justice, equality and equity, human dignity, mutual understanding and promotion of, and respect for, cultural diversity and universal human rights, and to reject all doctrines of exclusion based on racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4031)

Draft resolution III on promotion of equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies was approved by a recorded vote of 118 in favour to 52 against, with 2 abstentions (Chile, Nigeria), on 15 November.  By the text, the Assembly would express concern at the regional imbalance in the current composition of the membership of some of the human rights treaty bodies, and note, in particular, that the status quo tends to be detrimental to the election of experts from some regional groups, in particular the African, Asian, Latin American and Caribbean and Eastern European groups.  It would request the chairs of the human rights treaty bodies to consider at their next meeting the content of the resolution and to submit, through the High Commissioner for Human Rights, specific recommendations for the achieving the goal of equitable geographical distribution in the membership.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution IV on human rights and cultural diversity was approved by a recorded vote of 118 in favour to 52 against, with 2 abstentions ( Armenia, Serbia), on 22 November.  By its terms, the Assembly would recognize that all cultures and civilizations contribute to the enrichment of humankind, and, in order to promote international peace and security, would commit itself to advancing human welfare, freedom and progress everywhere, as well as to encouraging tolerance, respect, dialogue and cooperation among different cultures, civilizations and peoples.  It would also call upon States, international organizations and United Nations agencies, and invite civil society to recognize and promote respect for cultural diversity for the purpose of advancing the objectives of peace, development and universally accepted human rights. (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

Draft resolution V on the right to development was approved by a recorded vote of 140 in favour to 5 against ( Canada, Israel, Netherlands, United Kingdom and the United States), with 28 abstentions, on 22 November.  By its provisions, the Assembly would express deep concern over the lack of progress in the World Trade Organization (WTO) trade negotiations, and would reaffirm the need for a successful outcome of the Doha Development Round in key areas.  It would also stress poverty eradication as one of the critical elements in the promotion and realization of the right to development and that poverty is a multifaceted problem that requires a multifaceted and integrated approach to address its economic, political, social, environmental and institutional dimensions at all levels.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

Draft resolution VI on human rights and unilateral coercive measures was approved by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 52 against, with 1 abstention ( Democratic Republic of the Congo) on 15 November.  By that text, the Assembly would stress that unilateral coercive measures and legislation are contrary to international law, international humanitarian law, the United Nations Charter and the norms and principles governing peaceful relations among States.  It would condemn the continuing unilateral application and enforcement by certain Powers of unilateral coercive measures, and reject those measures as tools for political or economic pressure against any country, in particular against developing countries.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution VII on strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity, approved without a vote on 18 November, would have the Assembly express its conviction that an unbiased and fair approach to human rights issues contributes to the promotion of international cooperation, as well as to the effective promotion, protection and realization of human rights and fundamental freedoms.  It would also invite States to consider adopting, as appropriate, within the framework of their respective legal systems and in accordance with their obligations under international law, especially the Charter and international human rights instruments, the measures they deem appropriate to achieve further progress in international cooperation to promote and encourage respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4031)

Draft resolution VIII on the right to food, approved without a vote on 22 November, would have the Assembly recognize that the complex character of the global food crisis, in which the right to adequate food is threatened to be violated on a massive scale, is a combination of several major factors, such as the global financial and economic crisis, environmental degradation, desertification and the impacts of global climate change, as well as natural disasters and the lack in many countries of the appropriate technology, investment and capacity-building necessary to confront its impact, particularly in developing countries, least developed countries and small island developing States.  It would urge States to give adequate priority in their development strategies and expenditures to the realization of the right to food.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

Draft resolution IX on promotion of a democratic and equitable international order was approved by a recorded vote of 117 in favour to 52 against, with 6 abstentions (Argentina, Armenia, Chile, Costa Rica, Mexico and Peru), on 17 November.  The text would have the Assembly affirm that everyone is entitled to a democratic and equitable international order and such an order fosters the full realization of all human rights for all.  It would welcome the decision of the Human Rights Council, in resolution 18/6, to establish a new special procedures mandate of Independent Expert on the promotion of a democratic and equitable order and request that the Secretary-General and the High Commissioner for Human Rights provide all the human and financial resources necessary for the effective fulfilment of the Independent Expert’s mandate. (Press Release GA/SHC/4030)

Draft resolution X on the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly welcome the entry into force of the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance on 23 December 2010, as well as the first meeting of the States parties to the Convention on 31 May 2011, the election of the members of the Committee on Enforced Disappearances on that occasion, and the commencement of that Committee’s work.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution XI on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights was approved by a recorded vote 125 in favour to 52 against, with no abstentions, on 15 November.  By that text, the Assembly would reaffirm that narrowing the gap between rich and poor, both within and between countries, is an explicit goal at the national and international levels, as part of the effort to create an enabling environment for the full enjoyment of all human rights.  It would call upon all States and the international community to alleviate, in an inclusive and development oriented manner, any negative impacts of the current crises on the realization and the effective enjoyment of all human rights.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution XII on the Subregional Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Central Africa, approved without a vote on 10 November, would have the Assembly note with satisfaction the celebration of the tenth anniversary of the Centre and encourage it to strengthen its cooperation and invest in relations with subregional organizations and bodies.  It would request the Secretary-General and the High Commissioner for Human Rights to continue to provide additional funds and human resources within the existing resources of the High Commissioner’s Office to enable the Centre to respond to the growing needs in promoting and protecting human rights and in developing a culture of democracy and the rule of law in the Central African subregion.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4028)

Draft resolution XIII on strengthening the role of the United Nations in enhancing periodic and genuine elections and the promotion of democratization, approved without a vote on 18 November, would have the Assembly commend the electoral assistance provided upon request to Member States by the United Nations and request that such assistance continue on a case-by-case basis in accordance with the evolving needs and legislation of requesting countries to develop, improve and refine their electoral institutions and processes.  It would reaffirm that the electoral assistance provided by the United Nations should continue to be carried out in an objective, impartial, neutral and independent manner. It would also express appreciation for the Declaration of Principles for International Election Observation and the Code of Conduct for International Election Observers, which elaborate guidelines for international electoral observation.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4031)

Draft resolution XIV on promotion and implementation of the Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, approved without a vote on 21 November, would have the Assembly call upon all States to promote and give full effect to the Declaration.  States would be further called on to ensure that human rights defenders can perform their important role in the context of peaceful protests, in accordance with national legislation consistent with the Charter of the United Nations and international human rights law.  They would also be called on to ensure that no one is subject to excessive and indiscriminate use of force, arbitrary arrest and detention, torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, enforced disappearance, abuse of criminal and civil proceedings or threats of such acts.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution XV on protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons, approved without a vote on 18 November, would have the Assembly call upon States to provide durable solutions, and encourage strengthened international cooperation, including through the provision of resources and expertise to assist affected countries, and in particular developing countries, in their national efforts and policies related to assistance, protection and rehabilitation for internally displaced persons.  It would express particular concern at the grave problems faced by many internally displaced women and children, and encourage the continued commitment of the Special Rapporteur to promote action to address their particular assistance, protection and development needs, as well as those of other groups with special needs.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4031)

Draft resolution XVI on effective promotion of the Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly urge States and the international community to promote and protect the rights of persons belonging to those minorities, as set out in the Declaration.  It would call on States to give special attention to situations and the specific needs of women and children belonging to minorities, while promoting and protecting the rights of persons belonging to national or ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities.  It would also take note with appreciation of the report of the Independent Expert on minority issues and its special focus on the role of the protection of minority rights in conflict prevention.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution XVII on combating intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly strongly deplore all acts of violence against persons on the basis of their religion or belief, as well as all attacks on and in religious places, sites and shrines in violation of international law, in particular human rights law and international humanitarian law, including any deliberate destruction of relics and monuments.  It would welcome all international, regional and national initiatives aimed at promoting interreligious, intercultural and interfaith harmony, and combating discrimination against individuals on the basis of religion or belief.  It would also condemn any advocacy of religious hatred that constituted incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution XVIII on elimination of all forms of intolerance and of discrimination based on religion or belief, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly recognize that further intensified efforts were needed to promote and protect the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion or belief and to eliminate all forms of hatred, intolerance and discrimination based on religion or belief, as also noted at the 2001 World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance, held in Durban, South Africa, as well as at the 2009 Durban Review Conference.  It would strongly condemn any advocacy of religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence, whether it involves the use of print, audio-visual or electronic media or any other means.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution XIX on national institutions for the promotion and protection of human rights, approved without a vote on 21 November, would have the Assembly welcome the growing number of States establishing or considering the establishment of national institutions for the promotion and protection of human rights.  It would particularly welcome the growing number of States that have accepted recommendations to establish national institutions compliant with the Paris Principles made through the Universal Periodic Review and, where relevant, by treaty bodies and special procedures.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution XX on the International Day of the Girl Child, approved without a vote on 21 November, would have the Assembly decide to designate 11 October as the International Day of the Girl Child, to be observed every year beginning in 2012.  It would invite all Member States, relevant organizations of the United Nations system and other international organizations, as well as civil society, to observe the International Day and to raise awareness of the situation of girls around the world.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution XXI on protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, approved without a vote on 21 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm that States must ensure that any measure taken to combat terrorism complies with their obligations under international law, in particular international human rights, refugee and humanitarian law.  It would welcome the entry into force of the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance, the implementation of which will make a significant contribution in support of the rule of law in countering terrorism, including by prohibiting places of secret detention, and encourages all States that have not done so to consider signing, ratifying or acceding to the Convention.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution XXII on protection of migrants, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly call upon States to promote and protect effectively the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all migrants, regardless of their migration status, especially those of women and children, and to address international migration through international, regional or bilateral cooperation and dialogue and through a comprehensive and balanced approach.  It would express concern about legislation adopted by some States that results in measures and practices that may restrict the human rights and fundamental freedoms of migrants and call upon States to ensure that their laws and policies, including in the areas of counter-terrorism and combating transnational organized crime, fully respect the human rights of migrants.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Draft resolution XXIII on follow-up to the International Year of Human Rights Learning, approved without a vote on 15 November, would have the Assembly welcome the adoption by the Human Rights Council of the Declaration on Human Rights Education and Training, stressing the complementarity of human rights learning and the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Education and Training.  It would also invite relevant treaty bodies to take human rights learning into account in their interaction with states parties.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4029)

Addendum 3 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/66/462/Add.3) contains four draft resolutions on human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives.

Draft resolution I on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was approved by a recorded vote of 112 in favour to 16 against, with 55 abstentions, on 21 November.  It would have the Assembly express its very serious concern at the persistence of continuing reports of systematic, widespread and grave violations of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights in the that country.  It would express further serious concern at the Government's continued refusal to recognize the mandate of the Special Rapporteur or to extend cooperation to him.  Expressing deep concern at the precarious humanitarian situation, it would urge the Government to take preventive and remedial action, cooperating where necessary with international donor agencies and in accordance with international standards for monitoring humanitarian assistance.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution II on the situation of human rights in Myanmar was approved by a recorded vote of 98 in favour to 25 against, with 63 abstentions, on 21 November.  By its terms, the Assembly would express grave concern about the ongoing systematic violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of the people of Myanmar, while recognizing the commitment made by the Government to implement reforms to address those violations.  Welcoming recent talks between the Government and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and opposition parties, it would encourage the Government to develop the current talks into a substantive and regular dialogue while comprehensively engaging with the democratic opposition and political, ethnic and civil society groups and actors to begin an all-inclusive and democratic reform process leading to national reconciliation and lasting peace.

A text on the programme budget implications of the draft stated that additional requirements amounting to $1.2 million net ($1.36 million gross) would be required for the period from 1 January to 31 December 2012 for the continuation of the efforts of the Secretary-General’s good offices relating to the situation in Myanmar.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution III on the situation of human rights in Iran was approved by a recorded vote of 86 in favour to 32 against, with 59 abstentions, on 21 November.  The text would have the Assembly express particular concern at the Government's failure to conduct any comprehensive investigation or to launch an accountability process for alleged violations in the period following the presidential elections of 12 June 2009.  It would urge the Government to ensure free, fair, transparent and inclusive parliamentary elections in 2012 that reflect the will of the people.  It would also express deep concern that, despite Iran's standing invitation to all thematic special procedures mandate holders, it has not fulfilled any requests from those special mechanisms to visit the country in six years and has left unanswered the vast majority of the numerous and repeated communications from those special mechanisms.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution IV on the situation of human rights in Syria was approved by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 13 against, with 41 abstentions, following the defeat of a “no-action” motion by a recorded vote of 20 in favour to 118 against, with 29 abstentions.  It would have the Assembly strongly condemn the continued grave and systematic human rights violations by the Syrian authorities and call on them to immediately put an end to all such violations, to protect their population and to fully comply with their obligations under international human rights law, and call for an immediate end to all violence in Syria.  It would also call on them to implement the Plan of Action of the League of Arab States in its entirety without further delay.  They would also be called on to comply with Human Rights Council resolutions S-16/1 and S-17/1, including by cooperating fully and effectively with the independent international commission of inquiry.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

Addendum 4 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/66/462/Add.4), on the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, contains no draft proposals.

Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice

The Committee’s report on crime prevention and criminal justice (document A/66/463) contains six draft resolutions.

Draft resolution I on strengthening international cooperation in combating the harmful effects of illicit financial flows resulting from criminal activities, approved without a vote on 13 October, would have the Assembly urge States parties to the Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances of 1988, the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the Convention against Corruption to apply fully the provisions of those treaties, particularly those aimed at preventing and combating money-laundering.  States would also be urged to establish or strengthen national institutions specializing in financial intelligence by allowing them to receive, obtain, analyse and disseminate financial information relevant to preventing, detecting and deterring illicit financial flows resulting from transnational organized crime.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4011)

Draft resolution II on technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to counter-terrorism, approved without a vote on 13 October, would have the Assembly urge States to continue to strengthen international coordination and cooperation in order to prevent and combat terrorism in accordance with international law, and, when appropriate, by entering into bilateral and multilateral treaties on extradition and mutual legal assistance.  It would also request that the Secretary-General provide the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) with sufficient resources to carry out activities aiding States in implementing the relevant elements of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4011)

Draft resolution III on follow-up to the Twelfth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and preparations for the Thirteenth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, approved without a vote on 13 October, would have the Assembly reiterate its invitation to Governments to take into consideration the Salvador Declaration, as well as the recommendations adopted by the Twelfth United Nations Congress, when formulating legislation and policy directives.  It would also invite States to provide suggestions on the overall theme, agenda items and topics for the workshops of the Thirteenth United Nations Congress and request the Secretary-General to report to the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice on those suggestions at its twenty-first session.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4011)

Draft resolution IV on strengthening crime prevention and criminal justice responses to protect cultural property, especially with regard to its trafficking, approved without a vote on 13 October, would have the Assembly encourage States and relevant international organizations to strengthen efforts to protect cultural property and prevent its trafficking in order to provide the widest possible international cooperation to address such crimes, including through extradition, mutual legal assistance and the confiscation and return of stolen cultural property to its rightful owner.  It would request UNODC, through State consultations and in close cooperation with United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and other competent organizations, to explore the development of specific guidelines for preventing and prosecuting trafficking in cultural property.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4011)

Draft resolution V on strengthening the United Nations crime prevention and criminal justice programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity, approved without a vote on 21 November, would have the Assembly call upon States to strengthen their efforts to cooperate, as appropriate, at the bilateral, subregional, regional and international levels to counter effectively transnational organized crime.  It would urge UNODC to continue to provide technical assistance to States to combat money-laundering and the financing of terrorism through the Global Programme against Money-Laundering.  States would be urged to strengthen cooperation to enable the return of assets illicitly acquired from corruption to the countries of origin, upon their request, in accordance with the provisions of the Convention against Corruption for asset recovery. (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Draft resolution VI on the United Nations African Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders, approved without a vote on 17 November, would have the Assembly welcome the decision of the Governing Board of the Institute, at its eleventh ordinary session, held in Nairobi on 27 and 28 April 2011, to carry out a review to ensure that the Institute is facilitated to fulfil its mandate and to assume a more prominent role in dealing with existing crime.  It would also welcome the Institute’s introduction of a cost-sharing initiative in its execution of various programmes with Member States, partners and United Nations entities.  The Secretary-General would be requested to continue his efforts to mobilize the financial resources necessary to maintain the Institute with the core professional staff required for its functioning.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4030)

The related draft decision would have the Assembly decide to take note of two reports submitted under the item entitled “Crime prevention and criminal justice”:  the Secretary-General’s report on follow-up to the Twelfth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and his note transmitting the report of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime on its fifth session.

International Drug Control

The Committee’s report on international drug control (document A/66/464) contains three draft resolutions.

The first two draft resolutions on strengthening international cooperation in combating the harmful effects of illicit financial flows resulting from criminal activities and technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to counter-terrorism are also included in the Committee’s report on crime prevention and criminal justice.

Draft resolution III on international cooperation against the world drug problem, approved without a vote on 21 November, would have the Assembly note with grave concern the increased abuse of certain drugs and the proliferation of new substances globally, as well as the increasing sophistication of the transnational organized criminal groups engaged in their manufacture and distribution.  It would reaffirm that the world drug problem remains a common and shared responsibility that requires effective and increased international cooperation, as well as the commitment of all Member States to tackling those problems in the context of comprehensive, complementary and multisectoral drug demand reduction strategies.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4032)

Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly

The Committee’s report on the revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/66/465) contains one draft decision on the programme of work for the Third Committee for the Assembly’s sixty-seventh session.  Approved without a vote on 22 November, it would have the Committee take up 11 agenda items during that session.  (Press Release GA/SHC/4033)

Programme Planning

The Committee’s report on programme planning (document A/66/466) requires no action.

Action on Third Committee Texts

The Assembly moved to take action on the Committee’s reports, which were introduced by Rapporteur Kadra Ahmed Hassan ( Djibouti).

The Assembly first took up the Committee’s report on social development (document A/66/454 (Part II)), which contains seven draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I on policies and programmes involving youth was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution II on promoting social integration through social inclusion was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution III on cooperatives in social developmentwas adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution IV on the High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the realization of the Millennium Development Goals and other internationally agreed development goals for persons with disabilities was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution V on implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution VI on preparations for and observance of the twentieth anniversary of the International Year of the Family was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution VII on follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then took note of the Secretary-General’s reports on the implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly and on the world social situation 2011:  the global social crisis, submitted under the item entitled “Social development”.

Speaking on a point of order after adopted of draft resolution IV on preparations for and observance of the twentieth anniversary of the International Year of the Family, the representative of the observer mission of the Holy See reaffirmed the central role of the family in the life of every human person, community and society.  The family — founded on the marriage of one man and one woman — was the “natural and fundamental group unit of society”, and was, therefore, entitled to protection by the State, he said, citing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights.

He further underlined that, with the family increasingly under attack in many societies, the Holy See’s affirmation of that institution’s indispensable role.  Each family was called to be a “living cell” of society, a “wellspring of virtues”, and an instrument of harmony.  In that regard, the delegation also underscored the role of parents, and, in particular, their primary responsibility, prior to the State, for the upbringing and development of their children.

Next, the Assembly turned to the Committee’s report on advancement of women (document A/66/455), which contains five draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I on violence against women migrant workers was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution II on improvement of the situation of women in rural areas was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution III on women and political participation was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution IV on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution V on follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then took note of the Secretary-General’s note transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences submitted under the item entitled “Advancement of women”.

It then turned to the Committee’s report on the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/66/456), which contains three draft resolutions.

Draft resolution I on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution II on enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution III on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa was adopted without a vote.

Next, the Assembly took up the Committee’s report on the Report of the Human Rights Council (document A/66/457), which contains three draft resolutions and one draft decision.

It first took up draft resolution I on the Report of the Human Rights Council, for which a recorded vote was called.

Speaking in explanation of vote before the vote, the representative of the United Republic of Tanzania, speaking on behalf of the African Group of States, addressed the topic of the Report of the Human Rights Council.  She said that the group had presented the related resolution, despite the fact that it observed with deep concern that the work of the Council had become more “politicized and selective”.  It was alarmed at the adoption by the Council of several resolutions, including on an undefined notion that had no legal foundation in international law.  The Group reaffirmed that human rights and fundamental freedoms were universally recognized and should be enjoyed by all people without discrimination on the basis of any particular individual conduct or sexual preference.  The Group was alarmed, however, at systematic attempts to misinterpret the Universal Declaration, as well as international treaties, to include undefined notions.  Finally, the Group regretted that the Council continued to adopt a “confrontational”, rather than a cooperative and consensus-building approach in its work, resulting in an increasing number of resolutions being adopted by a vote.  Despite those serious concerns, she concluded, the African Group would vote in favour of the resolution.

Draft resolution I on the Report of the Human Rights Council was then adopted by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 3 against (Belarus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and Syria), with 59 abstentions.  (See Annex I for further details.)

Draft resolution II on the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Education and Training was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution III on the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on a communications procedure was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then decided to take note of the report of the Secretary-General on the observance of the International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims.

Speaking after adoption on a point of order regarding draft resolution I on the Report of the Human Rights Council, the representative of the Observer Mission of the Holy See said the report had included a definition of the terms “sexual orientation” and “gender identity”.  However, no international consensus existed on those terms, which were open to subjective interpretation.  Their inclusion in international treaties and covenants were, therefore, inappropriate and, in any case, were unnecessary; indeed, all people were covered by those conventions.

Next, it took up the Committee’s report on the rights of children (document A/66/458), which contains three draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I on strengthening collaboration on child protection within the United Nations system was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution II on the girl child was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution III on the rights of the child was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then decided to take note of two reports submitted under the item entitled “Promotion and protection of the rights of children”:  the report of the Special Rapporteur on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography and the report of the Secretary-General on the girl child.

It next took up the Committee’s report on the rights of indigenous peoples (document A/66/459), adopting the draft resolution on the rights of indigenous peoples without a vote.

Following that action, the Assembly turned to the Committee’s report on elimination of racism and racial discrimination (document A/65/460), which contains two draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I on the inadmissibility of certain practices that contribute to fuelling contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance was adopted by a recorded vote of 134 in favour to 24 against, with 32 abstentions.  (Annex II)

Draft resolution II on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action was adopted by a recorded vote of 138 in favour to 6 against ( Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau and the United States) with 46 abstentions.  (Annex III)

The Assembly then decided to take note of the report of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on its seventy-eighth and seventy-ninth sessions and the report of the Secretary-General on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action.

Next, it turned to the Third Committee’s report on the right of peoples to self-determination (document A/66/461), which contains three draft resolutions and one decision.

Draft resolution I on universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution II on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, was adopted by a recorded vote of 182 in favour to 7 against ( Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau and the United States), with 3 abstentions ( Cameroon, South Sudan, and Tonga).  (Annex IV)

Draft resolution III on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination was adopted by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to 53 against, with 6 abstentions ( Chile, Colombia, Fiji, Mexico, Switzerland and Tonga).  (Annex V)

The Assembly then decided to take note of the report of the Secretary-General on the right of peoples to self-determination.

Taking up the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/66/462) it adopted the draft decision by which it took note of a number of documents considered in connection with the question of human rights.

Next, it turned to Addendum 1 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/66/462/Add.1), which contains four draft resolutions on implementation of human rights instruments.

Draft resolution I on the International Covenants on Human Rights was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution II on World Down Syndrome Day was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution III on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly postponed action on draft resolution IV on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Optional Protocol thereto to allow time for the review of its programme budget implications by the Fifth Committee.

The Assembly then took up Addendum 2 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/66/462/Add.2), which contains 23 draft resolutions on human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Draft resolution I on the universal, indivisible, interrelated, interdependent and mutually reinforcing nature of all human rights and fundamental freedoms was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution II on enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution III on promotion of equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies was adopted by a recorded vote of 135 in favour to 54 against, with 1 abstention ( Chile).  (Annex VI)

Draft resolution IV on human rights and cultural diversity was adopted by a recorded vote of 136 in favour to 53 against, with 2 abstentions ( Armenia, Serbia).  (Annex VII)

Draft resolution V on the right to development was adopted by a recorded vote of 154 in favour to 6 against ( Canada, Israel, Netherlands, Palau, United Kingdom and United States), with 29 abstentions.  (Annex VIII)

Draft resolution VI on human rights and unilateral coercive measures was adopted by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 54 against, with no abstentions.  (Annex IX)

Draft resolution VII on strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution VIII on the right to food was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution IX on promotion of a democratic and equitable international order was adopted by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to 54 against, with 6 abstentions ( Argentina, Armenia, Chile, Costa Rica, Mexico and Peru).  (Annex X)

Draft resolution X on the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XI on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights was adopted by a recorded vote 137 in favour to 54 against, with no abstentions.  (Annex XI)

Draft resolution XII on the Subregional Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Central Africa was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XIII on strengthening the role of the United Nations in enhancing periodic and genuine elections and the promotion of democratization was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XIV on promotion and implementation of the Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XV on protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XVI on effective promotion of the Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XVII on combating intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XVIII on elimination of all forms of intolerance and of discrimination based on religion or belief was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XIX on national institutions for the promotion and protection of human rights was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XX on the International Day of the Girl Child was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XXI on protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XXII on protection of migrants was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution XXIII on follow-up to the International Year of Human Rights Learning was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then took up Addendum 3 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/66/462/Add.3), which contains four draft resolutions on human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives.

Speaking in explanation of vote before the vote, the representative of Iran said the creation of the Human Rights Council had inspired new hopes and desires for sound and decent solutions to the maladies of its predecessor, the Commission on Human Rights.  That was especially true relating to the Commission’s selective approach to human rights situations in different countries.  Likewise, Iran considered the current Council to be a focal point for human rights situations around the world devoid of confrontation and selectivity.

In that context, he reaffirmed that the rationale behind creating the Universal Periodic Review was to ensure universality and non-selectively in the Council’s work.  Its performance would allow the United Nations human rights machinery to function beyond the manipulation of a few States.  However, it was deplorable that a handful of States still did so through the submission of country-specific resolutions.

Stressing that Iran had always manifested its sincere commitment to the promotion and protection human rights at all levels, he said its activities in that regard emanated from its religious obligation, the provisions of its Constitution and its obligations under international human rights instruments.  Accordingly, Iran was cooperating with the Universal Periodic Review mechanism.  Its third periodic report was considered by the Human Rights Committee on 17 and 18 October 2011 with the active participation of a high-ranking delegation dispatched from Iran.  Further, Iran was a member of a number of core human rights treaties, and among other things, had submitted and defended two reports and was at the last stage of preparing its third report for the Committee on the Rights of the Child.

He reiterated his Government’s position that, if Canada was really concerned about human rights, it was certainly on the very wrong track.  He would not accuse them by raising the situation of minority groups in that country, as well as racial profiling as a systematic practice and excessive use of force by Canadian authorities.  Nor did he choose to refer to the human rights situation in the United States, including the reaction of Government authorities to recent peaceful protests around the country or the cruel practices regarding detainees held in Guantanamo.

Rather, he stressed that all countries should work together to promote human rights since “naming and shaming” tactics, the adoption of country-specific resolutions and the manipulation of United Nations human rights mechanisms would not lead to mutually beneficial situations.  Against the backdrop, Iran requested all delegations to vote in favour the no-action motion his country was proposing.

Syria’s representative said all distinguished diplomats knew that the international framework was based on non-interference in the internal affairs of any country.  That principle was enshrined in Article 2, paragraph 7 of the United Nations Charter, among other cornerstone documents.  While firmly convinced of the importance of protecting of human rights, his Government was highly surprised by the authors and proponents of the draft resolution, who were claiming to promote and protect human rights in Syria, since they themselves had argued against protecting the rights of those Syrians living under Israeli occupation in the Syrian Golan.

Clearly, those States exploited human rights issues to conspire against the territorial integrity and independence of some countries and the text on Syria was part of the political, diplomatic and media war being conducted against it.  Among other things, that war sought to promote the Israeli theory of “Judaization”, which was being waged to deny the rights of the Palestinian people.  The striking proof of that political manoeuvring and duplicity was that those States themselves had imposed economic sanctions against Syria, as well as its media and television channels.  Why? Clearly it was because those television channels were systematically broadcasting confessions made by terrorist groups and elements belonging to armed groups.  Those confessions testified to the transfer of arms across international borders and that armed groups were receiving arms and funds from neighbouring countries and using them to commit terrible crimes.  Could the authors of the resolution explain the link between the promotion and protection of human rights, on one hand, and the bombings of pipelines and railways and other acts, including attacks against civilians, in Syria, on the other?

Today, Syria was all the more indignant about the selective approach because the text’s main authors had a sad history regarding human rights, he said.  The United States continued to threaten people and countries through the imposition of sanctions.  He also asked how other countries could support the draft resolution at a time when their authorities were depriving their own people of a minimum guarantee of human rights, including the right to elections, freedom of religion, as well as women’s rights.  Some of those States did not even have a constitutional guarantee for basic human rights, he noted.

Syria had submitted to a number of United Nations officials and agencies fully documented information on the confessions made by armed terrorists that confirmed the violence committed against civilians.  It had also conveyed information on the reforms being undertaken by Syria.  But, despite that transparency, the draft reflected none of that information.  It seemed that some of the text’s co-authors were attempting to destroy Syria via military intervention on the grounds of civilian protection.  Last week’s briefing of the Security Council by the High Commissioner for Human Rights had been sentimental, individual and non-professional.  The High Commissioner had attributed full responsibility for the events unfolding in Syria to its Government.  Going beyond its mandate, her Office went so far as to call for the transfer of the Syria dossier to the International Criminal Court.  But, it had closed its eyes to the actions of terrorist groups and the billions of dollars transferred for the State’s destabilization.

He noted that Syria had affirmed — and reaffirmed today — that the only solution to the current crisis was national dialogue, reform and meeting the legitimate aspirations of its people.  That dialogue should be undertaken with an honest investigation of the events taking place.  Thus, he called on United Nations Member States to support an inclusive national Syrian dialogue and to abstain from considering non-professional reports, which harmed the integrity and credibility of the Organization.

He also asked where the Security Council and the High Commissioner were when the rights of Syrians in the occupied Syrian Golan were being violated.  For decades, the Council had failed to carry out its duty to act against expansionist policies by Israel.  Moreover, he asked why members of Salafist groups were being held in Guantanamo, while others were being encouraged to become active in Syria.  His Government, therefore, called for a recorded vote on the draft resolutions related to Syria and called on all States to vote against it.

The representative of Germany recalled that the Third Committee had adopted the resolution before the Assembly by a vote of 122 in favour to 13 against with 41 abstentions.  Those “unprecedented and clear results” were meant to send a strong signal to Syria that it must immediately stop the violence and the systematic human rights violations being perpetrated against its own people.  Despite that message, the crackdown had continued unabated, he said.  There was evidence of ongoing attacks on victims, including a “shoot to kill” policy and the widespread use of torture.  According to the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the number of people killed likely exceeded 5,000 to date, including many children.

Despite the repeated calls of the international community, the Syrian officials continued to refuse access to the United Nations commission of inquiry and had not implemented the plan of action of the League of Arab States.

The draft resolution before the Assembly, of which Germany was a main co-sponsor and which enjoyed significant support from the Arab States in the region, was a “unique and ad hoc response to events taking place on the ground in [Syria] as we speak”, he said.  It called, among other things, for the immediate and full implementation of the plan of action, which “supports the voice of the Arab region”.  It was also important to note that the resolution did not establish any new mechanisms.  As the situation in Syria continued to deteriorate, he concluded, the General Assembly — as the main and universal body of the United Nations — should reaffirm the message sent by its Third Committee.

Draft resolution I on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was adopted by a recorded vote of 123 in favour to 16 against, with 51 abstentions.  (Annex XII)

The Assembly postponed action on draft resolution II on the situation of human rights in Myanmar to allow review of its programme budget implications by the Fifth Committee.

When the Assembly took up draft resolution III on the situation of human rights in Iran, the President of the General Assembly noted that the representative of Iran had called for a no-action motion.

Speaking in support of the no-action motion, the representative of Venezuela rejected the continuing practice to condemn individually and selectively certain States using as justification their human rights situations.  The draft resolutions had become instruments to promote particular interests and trigger strategic confrontation.  That practice had no genuine purpose, and no country submitting draft resolutions had sufficient moral standing to stand as a court for the world.  It was an offense for anyone who read the press everyday, including yesterday’s report in The New York Times on the Libyan victims from countless NATO bombings.

She underlined the value of the Universal Periodic Review mechanism and stressed that the focus of human rights mechanisms should never exclusively be on developing countries.  Dialogue, mutual respect and cooperation that were transparent and consistent with the United Nations Charter were needed, and that was why her delegation would vote in favour of the no-action motion, to avoid using human rights as a tool to wield political pressure against certain States.

Cuba’s delegate said her delegations would vote for the no-action motion, citing her Government’s opposition to all country-specific resolutions.  Harmful double standards in considering human rights situations should be eliminated within the United Nations.  The Universal Periodic Review was, and must continue to be, the ideal mechanism for considering the human rights situation in every country.  For that reason, Cuba would vote for the no-action motion.

Canada’s delegate expressed deep disappointment that a no-action motion was presented in the plenary on the human rights situation in Iran.  That was an extraordinary step taken to stifle debate and undermine the Assembly’s authority. The resolution was adopted in the Third Committee by a large margin — 54 votes.  The international community was clear in its message that the human rights situation in Iran was of serious concern and deserved the Assembly’s attention.

He stressed that calling for a no-action motion in the Assembly after the resolution was considered on its merits in the Third Committee signified a complete disregard for the work of the Member States in the Committee.  While there were differing views on the resolution’s substance, it was critical to agree on the work the Assembly.  In the past, delegations had consistently rejected such motions, and he urged them to do so again.

The representative of Iceland, speaking on behalf of seven other countries, against the no-action motion, said the Assembly had entrusted its Third Committee to debate and act on human rights issues.  Today’s no-action motion would prevent the Assembly from fulfilling its mandate and acting on the recommendations of that Committee.  Moreover, the current discussion in no way impacted the Universal Periodic Review.  She stressed that the Assembly and its Third Committee enriched the international human rights dialogue through, among other things, discussion with the Special Rapporteurs.  Thus, Iceland would vote against the no–action motion and encouraged all delegations to do the same.

The Assembly then rejected the no-action motion by a vote of 35 in favour to 100 against, with 42 abstentions.  (Annex XIII)

Draft resolution III on the situation of human rights in Iran was then adopted by a recorded vote of 89 in favour to 30 against, with 64 abstentions.  (Annex XIV)

Draft resolution IV on the situation of human rights in Syria was adopted by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 11 against, with 43 abstentions.  (Annex XV)

The representative of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, speaking in explanation of vote following the vote, said that his delegation totally rejected the resolution, as its contents were “totally fabricated”.  Over the past 60 years, in fact, it was the main co-sponsors of the resolution who had exerted inappropriate political pressure; indeed, they should accept that the political system of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was different from theirs, and that their choice of Government was up to them.  Moreover, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea could not compromise with an approach as “confrontational” and “selective” as the one adopted in the resolution.  The delegation could also not overlook the fact that some of the co-sponsors had been pressuring small developing countries to vote in favour of the resolution.  It would not accept a vote that had been forcibly adopted.

The Assembly then took note of the Committee’s report on the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, which contained no draft proposals.

Next, it took up the Committee’s report on crime prevention and criminal justice (document A/66/463), which contains six draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I on strengthening international cooperation in combating the harmful effects of illicit financial flows resulting from criminal activities was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution II on technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to counter-terrorism was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution III on follow-up to the Twelfth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and preparations for the Thirteenth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution IV on strengthening crime prevention and criminal justice responses to protect cultural property, especially with regard to its trafficking was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution V on strengthening the United Nations crime prevention and criminal justice programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution VI on the United Nations African Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then decided to take note of two reports submitted under the item entitled “Crime prevention and criminal justice”:  the Secretary-General’s report on follow-up to the Twelfth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and his note transmitting the report of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime on its fifth session.

Turning to the Committee’s report on international drug control (document A/66/464), the Assembly adopted draft resolution III on international cooperation against the world drug problem without a vote.

Finally, the Assembly took up the Committee’s report on the revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/66/465), adopting the draft decision on the programme of work for the Third Committee for the Assembly’s sixty-seventh session, without a vote.

It also took note of the Committee’s report on programme planning (document A/66/466).

ANNEX I

Vote on Human Rights Council Report

The draft resolution on the report of the Human Rights Council (document A/66/457) was adopted by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 3 against, with 59 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Belarus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Syria.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Absent:  Burundi, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Rwanda, Somalia, Turkmenistan.

ANNEX II

Vote on Practices Fuelling Racism

The draft resolution on the inadmissibility of certain practices that fuel racism (document A/66/460) was adopted by a recorded vote of 134 in favour to 24 against, with 32 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Georgia, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, Palau, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Andorra, Australia, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Cyprus, Fiji, Finland, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Montenegro, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Slovenia, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Ukraine.

Absent:  Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru.

ANNEX III

Vote on Follow-up to Durban Declaration

The draft resolution on global efforts for total elimination of racism and follow-up to Durban Declaration and Programme of Action (document A/66/460) was adopted by a recorded vote of 138 in favour to 6 against, with 46 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

Absent:  Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru.

ANNEX IV

Vote on Palestinian Self-Determination

The draft resolution on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination (document A/66/461) was adopted by a recorded vote of 182 in favour to 7 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon, South Sudan, Tonga.

Absent:  Kiribati.

ANNEX V

Vote on Mercenaries

The draft resolution on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights (document A/66/461) was adopted by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to 53 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Chile, Colombia, Fiji, Mexico, Switzerland, Tonga.

Absent:  Kiribati, Nauru, South Sudan, Turkmenistan.

ANNEX VI

Vote on Equitable Geographic Distribution in Treaty Bodies

The draft resolution on promotion of equitable geographical distribution in membership of human rights treaty (document A/66/462/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 135 in favour to 54 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Chile.

Absent:  Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru.

ANNEX VII

Vote on Cultural Diversity

The draft resolution on human rights and cultural diversity (document A/66/462/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 136 in favour to 53 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Armenia, Serbia.

Absent:  Kiribati, Nauru.

ANNEX VIII

Vote on Right to Development

The draft resolution on the right to development (document A/66/462/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 154 in favour to 6 against, with 29 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, France, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Canada, Israel, Netherlands, Palau, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Australia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Sweden, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Ukraine.

Absent:  Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru.

ANNEX IX

Vote on Unilateral Coercive Measures

The draft resolution on human rights and unilateral coercive measures (document A/66/462/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 54 against, with no abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  None.

Absent:  Kiribati, Nauru.

ANNEX X

Vote on Equitable International Order

The draft resolution on promoting a democratic and equitable international order (document A/66/462/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to 54 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Chile, Costa Rica, Mexico, Peru.

Absent:  Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru.

ANNEX XI

Vote on Globalization

The draft resolution on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of human rights (document A/66/462/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 54 against, with no abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  None.

Absent:  Kiribati, Nauru.

ANNEX XII

Vote on Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

The draft resolution on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (document A/66/462/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 123 in favour to 16 against, with 51 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Morocco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu.

Against:  Algeria, Belarus, China, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, Iran, Myanmar, Oman, Russian Federation, Sudan, Syria, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.

Abstain:  Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Qatar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Senegal, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Yemen, Zambia.

Absent:  Equatorial Guinea, Lebanon, Mongolia.

ANNEX XIII

Vote on Iran No-Action Motion

The motion of no action on the draft resolution on the situation of human rights in Iran (document A/66/462/Add.3) was rejected by a recorded vote of 35 in favour to 100 against, with 42 abstentions, as follows:

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Latvia, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Sudan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu.

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Ecuador, India, Iran, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Mali, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.

Abstain:  Angola, Bahrain, Benin, Bhutan, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Malaysia, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Philippines, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Somalia, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, Zambia.

Absent:  Armenia, Azerbaijan, Brunei Darussalam, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Georgia, Iraq, Kiribati, Namibia, Sierra Leone, Togo, Turkey, Yemen.

ANNEX XIV

Vote on Iran

The draft resolution on the situation of human rights in Iran (document A/66/462/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 89 in favour to 30 against, with 64 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Gambia, Germany, Greece, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kiribati, Latvia, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Vanuatu.

Against:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Armenia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia, Brunei Darussalam, China, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Ecuador, India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.

Abstain:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahrain, Benin, Bhutan, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Indonesia, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Paraguay, Philippines, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Zambia.

Absent:  Azerbaijan, Burundi, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Georgia, Iraq, Madagascar, Namibia, Turkey, Yemen.

ANNEX XV

Vote on Syria

The draft resolution on the situation of human rights in Syria (document A/66/462/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 11 against, with 43 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Spain, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu.

Against:  Belarus, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Ecuador, Iran, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Syria, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Zimbabwe.

Abstain:  Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brunei Darussalam, Cameroon, Chad, China, Djibouti, Dominica, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, India, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Pakistan, Philippines, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia.

Absent:  Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gabon, Namibia, Suriname.

* *** *

For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.