Disarmament Committee Sends 25 Texts to General Assembly, Seeking to Avert Outer Space Arms Race, Unilateral Actions, Unverified Non-Compliance Accusations

28 October 2009
GA/DIS/3400

Disarmament Committee Sends 25 Texts to General Assembly, Seeking to Avert Outer Space Arms Race, Unilateral Actions, Unverified Non-Compliance Accusations

28 October 2009
General Assembly
GA/DIS/3400
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-four General Assembly

First Committee

20th Meeting (PM)

Disarmament Committee Sends 25 Texts to General Assembly, Seeking to Avert Outer

Space Arms Race, Unilateral Actions, Unverified Non-Compliance Accusations

Acting without Vote on All but Four Drafts, Committee Passes Texts on Surplus

Munition Stocks, Verification, Chemical, Biological Weapons, Regional Disarmament

Recognizing that preventing an arms race in outer space would avert a grave danger for international peace and security, the General Assembly would call uponall States, particularly those with major space capabilities, to contribute actively to the objective of the peaceful use of outer space, according to the terms of one of 25 draft resolutions and decisions approved this afternoon by the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security).

By further terms of that draft resolution, the Assembly would reaffirmthe importance and urgency of preventing an arms race in outer space and call upon those States to contribute to the prevention of an arms race in outer space and to refrain from actions contrary to that objective and to the relevant existing treaties in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation.

That draft resolution was approved by a recorded vote of 176 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions ( Israel, United States).  (For details of the vote, see Annex I.)

By the terms of yet another draft resolution approved today by the Committee, the General Assembly, recognizing that the proliferation and development of weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear weapons, are among the most immediate threats to international peace and security, which need to be dealt with, with the highest priority, would underline the importance of preserving existing agreements on arms regulation and disarmament.

The Assembly would call onall Member States to renew and fulfil their individual and collective commitments to multilateral cooperation as an important means of pursuing and achieving their common objectives in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation and requestthe States parties to the relevant instruments on weapons of mass destruction to consult and cooperate among themselves in resolving their concerns with regard to cases of non-compliance, as well as on implementation, in accordance with the procedures defined in those instruments.

The States parties should refrain from resorting or threatening to resort to unilateral actions or directing unverified non-compliance accusations against one another to resolve their concerns, according to the draft resolution approved by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 5 against (Israel, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United Kingdom, United States), with 49 abstentions (Annex IV).

Under another draft resolution approved by a recorded vote, the Assembly, recognizingthe crucial role of conventional arms control in promoting regional and international peace and security, would decideto give urgent consideration to the issues involved in conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels.  It would requestthe Conference on Disarmament to consider the formulation of principles that can serve as a framework for regional agreements on conventional arms control, according to the draft resolution approved by a vote of 173 in favour to 1 against (India), with 2 abstentions (Bhutan, Russian Federation) (Annex III).

Also today, the Committee approved a draft resolution by which the Assembly would reiterate its conviction that the participation of all permanent members of the Security Council and the major maritime users of the Indian Ocean in the work of the Ad Hoc Committee on the Indian Ocean would greatly facilitate the development of a mutually beneficial dialogue to advance peace, security and stability in the Indian Ocean region.  That draft resolution was approved by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 3 against ( France, United Kingdom, United States), with 44 abstentions (Annex II).

Acting without a vote, the Committee approved resolutions on the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction (Biological Weapons Convention) (L.15); measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction (L19); implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction (Chemical Weapons Convention) (L.35); and verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verification (L.2).

The Committee also approved the following additional resolutions and decisions without a vote:  assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them(L.5); Convention on Cluster Munitions (L.16); problems arising from the accumulation of conventional ammunition stockpiles in surplus (L.44); regional disarmament (L.28); confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context (L.30); strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region (L.49); review of the implementation of the Declaration on Strengthening of International Security (L.7); relationship between disarmament and development (L.10); and observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (L.12).

Also:  role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (L.21); national legislation on transfer of arms, military equipment and dual-use goods and technology (L.26); objective information on military matters, including transparency of military expenditures (L.43); convening of the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament (L.9); United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament (L.11); United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (L.22); United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific (L.45); and report of the Disarmament Commission (L.52).

An introduction of a draft resolution on Cluster 4, on conventional weapons, was made by the representative of Mali, on behalf of Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS).  General statements on Cluster 5, on regional disarmament and security, or introductions of related draft texts, were made by the representatives of Pakistan and Indonesia.  General statements on Cluster 6, on other disarmament measures and international security, or introductions of related draft texts, were made by the representatives of Cuba and Indonesia.  General statements on Cluster 7, disarmament machinery, or introductions of related draft texts, were made by the representatives of Austria, Indonesia and Cuba.

Explanations of vote on Cluster 1, on nuclear weapons, were made by the representatives of New Zealand, Switzerland, Syria and Australia.  Explanations of vote on Cluster 2, on other weapons of mass destruction, were made by the representatives of Pakistan and Iran.  Explanations of vote on Cluster 4 were made by the representatives of Egypt, Venezuela, India, Russian Federation, Israel, Singapore and the Republic of Korea.  Explanations of vote on Cluster 5 were made by the representatives of Iran, India, Russian Federation and Afghanistan.

Explanations of vote on Cluster 6 were made by the representatives of the United Kingdom, United States (on behalf of the United Kingdom, France and the United States), France and Australia.  Explanations of vote on Cluster 7 were made by the representative of the United States.

Representatives of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Pakistan and Afghanistan spoke on procedural matters.

The Committee will meet again at 3 p.m. on Thursday, 29 October, to continue to take action on all disarmament and security-related draft resolutions.

Background

The First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) met this afternoon to continue to take action on all draft texts submitted under the disarmament and international security agenda items.

Action on Texts

Speaking after approval of nuclear weapons-related drafts from Cluster 1, on which action had been taken yesterday, the representative of New Zealand said her country had voted yes on the draft on the risk of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East (document A/C.1/64/L.4), because it was consistent with the goal of a nuclear-weapon-free world.  She also considered that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) had a crucial role to play in verifying such a zone.  She was concerned about the absence of references in the draft to other States and hoped that the lack of balance would be addressed in future years.

The representative of Switzerland said he had voted in favour of L.4 because the draft promoted the universalization of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) in the region of the Middle East.  However, he noted that the draft only mentioned part of the risk of nuclear proliferation.  By voting in favour of the text, Switzerland had showed its support for the need for full cooperation by States with the IAEA and the Security Council, as well as the full implementation of resolutions and decisions adopted by those bodies.  To prevent the risk of nuclear proliferation, it was essential for States to bear in mind all the issues that affected countries of the region.

The representative of Syria said he had voted in favour of L.4 proceeding from the belief in peace and security in his region and of the importance of establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the Middle East.  Syria had been among the first countries to have called for freeing the Middle East of all weapons of mass destruction.  Since Syria’s accession to the NPT, his country had contributed to efforts towards achieving those lofty goals.  In 2003, Syria had presented to the Security Council a proposal to free the region of all weapons of mass destruction to enhance the role of the multilateral disarmament conventions.

He said that Israel had misguided this Committee by expressing false and unfounded claims to distract attention from the risks of Israeli nuclear weapons and its non-compliance with non-proliferation treaties, as well as the fact that it had not placed its nuclear programme under IAEA control.  Israel had a huge arsenal of nuclear weapons, which exceeded that of the British and French arsenals.  Israel had a policy of nuclear ambiguity.  He called on the international community to bring pressure to bear on Israel to accede to the NPT.  Canada’s intervention yesterday had amplified Syria’s concerns.  He urged the Canadian delegate to read the IAEA relevant documents.

The representative of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea said that he had voted in favour of the draft on the establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the region of the Middle East (document A/C.1/64/L.3), but it had been recorded that his delegation had been absent from the voting.

The CHAIR said that the Committee would look into the matter.

The representative of Australia explained its vote on two drafts.  On L.4, Australia was committed to preventing the spread of nuclear weapons and to the goal of a nuclear-weapon-free world.  Her strong advocacy for a universal NPT and IAEA safeguards was a matter of record.  However, a draft that singled out one State was an unbalanced resolution and Australia, therefore, had to abstain.

Regarding the draft on a convention on the prohibition of the use of nuclear weapons (document A/C.1/64/L.20), Australia did not support the draft, but she reiterated her country’s commitment to working towards a nuclear-weapon-free world.  She noted that the draft called on the Conference on Disarmament to commence negotiations on a fissile material cut-off treaty, a call which Australia strongly supported.

The representative of Pakistan said that it had intended to abstain in the vote on the draft as a whole on the follow-up to nuclear disarmament obligations agreed to at the 1995 and 2000 Review Conferences of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (document A/C.1/64/L.6) and on its preambular paragraph 6.  The record should reflect that.

Turning to Cluster 2, on other weapons of mass destruction, the Committee first took up a draft resolution on the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction (document A/C.1/64/L.15), approving it without a vote.

By its terms, the General Assembly, recalling the decisions reached at the Sixth Review Conference, would call upon States parties to the Convention to participate in their implementation.  The draft text would also have the Assembly urge States parties to continue to work closely with the implementation support unit in fulfilling its mandate.

Also acting without a vote, the Committee approved a draft resolution on measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction (document A/C.1/64/L.19).

That draft would have the Assembly call upon Member States to support international efforts and appeal to States to consider early accession and ratification of the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism.  The Assembly would also urge Member States to take and strengthen national measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction, their means of delivery and materials and technologies related to their manufacture.

The Committee next took up a draft resolution on implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction (document A/C.1/64/L.35), approving it without a vote.

Under its terms, the Assembly would stress the importance to the Convention that all possessors of chemical weapons, chemical weapons production facilities or chemical weapons development facilities, including previously declared possessor States, should be among the States parties to the Convention, and welcome progress to that end.  It would stress that the full and effective implementation of all provisions of the Convention, including those on national implementation (article VII) and assistance and protection (article X), constituted an important contribution to the efforts of the United Nations in the global fight against terrorism in all its forms and manifestations.

The Assembly would further stress the importance of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in verifying compliance with the provisions of the Convention, as well as in promoting the timely and efficient accomplishment of all its objectives, and would urge all States parties to meet in full and on time their obligations under the Convention and to support the OPCW in its implementation activities.  It would reaffirm that the provisions of the Convention should be implemented in a manner that avoided hampering the economic or technological development of States parties and international cooperation in the field of chemical activities for purposes not prohibited under the Convention, including the international exchange of scientific and technical information, and chemicals and equipment for the production, processing or use of chemicals for purposes not prohibited under the Convention.

Regarding L.19, the representative of Pakistan said that his country supported the objective of the draft resolution, but that those objectives could have been better explained in view of current realities.  The acquisition and use of nuclear weapons by non-State actors was less likely and that reason should not be used to place restrictions on State’s access.

He agreed that it was necessary to enact and enhance actions to prevent weapons of mass destruction from falling into wrong hands.  Interim measures, such as the Security Council’s 1540 Committee, were now being looked upon with great expectation, and Pakistan hoped that they would continue to serve their purposes.  Faithful implementation of international instruments, like the Chemical Weapons Convention, would also serve the purpose.

However, as long as huge quantities of chemical weapons existed, the risk of those falling into wrong hands would continue to exist, he said.   Pakistan was convinced that a comprehensive strategy should be evolved to prevent terrorist organizations from acquiring weapons of mass destruction, including by addressing the causes of terrorism.

The representative of Iran said that his country had joined the consensus on L.35, but that all State parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention should fully comply with their obligations under that Convention, in order to uphold its credibility.  A major possessor had not destroyed its stock within the deadline.  That major possessor should make every effort to meet its final extended deadline for the destruction.

Turning to the draft resolutions in Cluster 3, disarmament aspects of outer space, the Committee then took up a draft resolution on prevention of an arms race in outer space (document A/C.1/64/L.25).

By its provisions, the Assembly would call upon all States, in particular those with major space capabilities, to contribute actively to the objective of the peaceful use of outer space and of the prevention of an arms race in outer space and to refrain from actions contrary to that objective and to the relevant existing treaties in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation.

The Assembly would reiterate that the Conference on Disarmament, as the sole multilateral disarmament negotiating forum, has the primary role in the negotiation of a multilateral agreement or agreements, as appropriate, on the prevention of an arms race in outer space in all its aspects.  It would invite the Conference on Disarmament to establish a working group under its agenda item, Prevention of an arms race in outer space, as early as possible during its 2010 session.

In a related provision, the Assembly would urge States conducting activities in outer space, as well as States interested in conducting such activities, to keep the Conference on Disarmament informed of the progress of bilateral and multilateral negotiations on the matter, if any, so as to facilitate its work.

The draft resolution was approved by a vote of 176 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions ( Israel, United States).  (For details of the vote, see Annex I.)

General Statements, Draft Introductions

When the Committee turned to Cluster 4, on conventional weapons, OUMAR DAOU (Mali), on behalf of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), introduced a draft resolution on assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them (document A/C.1/64/L.5), which he said represented the political will of ECOWAS member States.  Beyond the African subregion, the draft represented the determination of many countries to curb the illicit trafficking in small arms and boost their collection.  The draft had always been adopted without a vote, and he hoped it would enjoy consensus again this year.

He pointed out that the text urged the international community to strengthen the capacity of civil society organizations to combat the illicit trafficking in and to collect small arms and light weapons.  The ECOWAS thanked the Committee for the support given to the draft over the last several years.  There were more co-sponsors this year, which showed the heightened interest in the issues.  The adoption of the draft was an important step towards peace and security, he added.

Action on Drafts

The Committee then approved, without a vote, the draft resolution on assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them (document A/C.1/64/L.5).

According to the text, the Assembly, deeply concerned by the magnitude of human casualty and suffering, especially among children, caused by the illicit proliferation and use of small arms and light weapons, would commend the United Nations and international, regional and other organizations for their assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and collecting them.

The Assembly would encourage the Secretary-General to pursue his efforts in the context of the implementation of General Assembly resolution 49/75 G of 15 December 1994 and the recommendations of the United Nations advisory missions aimed at curbing the illicit circulation of small arms and light weapons and collecting them in the affected States that so requested, with the support of the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa and in close cooperation with the African Union.

It would call upon the international community to provide technical and financial support to strengthen the capacity of civil society organizations to take action to help combat the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons.

Also acting without a vote in this cluster, the Committee approved, as orally amended, a draft resolution on the Convention on Cluster Munitions (document A/C.1/64/L.16).  Noting the signature of the Convention on behalf of many States and the growing number of ratifications by signatories, which now approached the number required for its entry into force, the Assembly would welcome the offer of the Government of the Lao People’s Democratic Republic to host the First Meeting of States Parties to the Convention following its entry into force.

The Committee then also approved, also without a vote, a draft resolution on problems arising from the accumulation of conventional ammunition stockpiles in surplus (document A/C.1/64/L.44).  It would have the Assembly encourage all interested States to assess, on a voluntary basis, whether, in conformity with their legitimate security needs, parts of their stockpiles of conventional ammunition should be considered to be in surplus, and recognize that the security of such stockpiles must be taken into consideration and that appropriate controls with regard to the security and safety of stockpiles of conventional ammunition are indispensable at the national level, in order to eliminate the risk of explosion, pollution or diversion.

Also by the draft, the Assembly would further encourage States in a position to do so to assist interested States within a bilateral framework or through international or regional organizations, on a voluntary and transparent basis, in elaborating and implementing programmes to eliminate surplus stockpiles or to improve their management.  It would encourage all Member States to examine the possibility of developing and implementing, within a national, regional or subregional framework, measures to address accordingly the illicit trafficking related to the accumulation of such stockpiles.

The representative of Egypt said he had joined consensus on L.16.  He noted the process by which this Convention bypassed the United Nations system, and said that, while he understood the humanitarian concerns and the positive motivations leading to the Convention, Egypt believed that the precedent set by the Convention on the Prohibition, Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction (Mine Ban Convention) should not be encouraged in light of existing United Nations processes.  He viewed L.16 as a procedural resolution.

The representative of Venezuela said she had joined consensus on L.44, but she nevertheless felt it was up to each State to determine when its “accumulation” was in surplus.  The States where arms producers operated had a responsibility to ensure that marking was done on those weapons.

The representative of India, commenting on L.16, noted that his country was not a signatory to the Convention on Cluster Munitions.  However, India had the deepest admiration for the Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

The representative of the Russian Federation expressed support for L.16, but said he did not agree with a number of approaches contained in that Convention.  The Convention on Prohibitions and Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects (Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons) was a good platform to address issues relating to cluster munitions.

The representative of Israel, explaining his vote on L.16, agreed that the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons remained the most relevant forum for addressing such weapons.  That Convention continued to strike the balance between military and humanitarian considerations.  It encompassed many weapons, including cluster munitions.  Following this year’s negotiation sessions, it was clear that more work needed to be done to address the humanitarian concerns regarding cluster munitions.  Israel trusted and hoped the “CCW” member States would continue to exert their best efforts to achieve an agreement within the Convention.  Israel had joined consensus on L.16, but that should not be construed as support of the Convention on Cluster Munitions.

Also explaining the vote on L.16, the representative of Singapore said that humanitarian concerns should be balanced with each States’ right to defence.

The representative of the Republic of Korea said his country had joined the consensus on L.16, but owing to the situation in the Korean peninsula, had been unable to go along with the Convention on Cluster Munitions.  The country was fully committed to reducing the humanitarian effects of those weapons and would continue to participate constructively in discussions in that regard.

General Statements, Draft Introductions

When the Committee took up texts in Cluster 5, on regional disarmament and security, RAZA BASHIR TARAR (Pakistan) introduced three draft resolutions on:  conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels (document A/C.1/64/L.29); confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context (document A/C.1/64/L.30); and regional disarmament (document A/C.1/64/L.28).

Concerning L. 28, he said that the regional dimension was unquestionably significant.  Keeping in view the regional approach, the draft resolution took note of disarmament at regional and subregional levels, with due regard for the specific characteristics of each region.  It affirmed that regional approaches complemented each other and it called on States to conclude agreements in that regard.  It also supported and encouraged confidence-building.  The sponsors hoped that it would be adopted unanimously.

He said that draft resolution L.29 was aimed at promoting conventional disarmament at the regional and subregional levels.

Instability bred poverty, despair and anger, he said, and draft resolution L.30 was based on the importance of subregional and regional confidence-building measures.  Such measures had continued to yield dividends and could provide the ambiance for disarmament.  It stressed the need for dialogue to avert conflict and recognized that regions that had already developed confidence-building measures had greatly improved the climate of peace and security in their regions.  It also called upon Member States to refrain from the use or threat of use of force in the resolution of disputes.  He hoped that the draft would be unanimously adopted.

DANIEL TUMPAL SIMANJUNTAK ( Indonesia), speaking on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement, introduced the draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace (document A/C.1/64/L.8).  That draft resolution stressed the need to foster a consensual approach to the pursuit of peace in the Indian Ocean region.  It also stressed the need for mutually beneficial dialogue.  The sponsors hope for support for the text in the Committee.

Action on Texts

The representative of Iran, speaking on L.49, on strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region, said that the text had given a rosy picture of the situation on the Middle East, which did not reflect the situation resulting from the actions of the Zionist regime.  It should have given a more realistic picture.  As a result, his country would not participate in the voting.

When the Committee turned its attention to the draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace (document A/C.1/64/L.8), it approved the text by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 3 against (France, United Kingdom, United States), with 44 abstentions (Annex II).

By its terms, the Assembly would reiterate its conviction that the participation of all permanent members of the Security council and the major maritime users of the Indian Ocean in the work of the Ad Hoc Committee on the Indian Ocean was important, and would greatly facilitate the development of mutually beneficial dialogue to advance peace, security and stability in the Indian Ocean.

Then the Committee approved without a vote the draft resolution on regional disarmament (document A/C.1/64/L.28), which would have the Assembly affirm that global and regional approaches to disarmament complement each other and should be pursued simultaneously to promote regional and international peace and security.

The Assembly would call on States to conclude agreements, wherever possible, for nuclear non-proliferation, disarmament and confidence-building measures at the regional and subregional levels, and it would support and encourage efforts aimed at promoting confidence-building measures at the regional and subregional levels to ease regional tensions and to further disarmament and nuclear non-proliferation measures at the regional and subregional levels.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution on conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels (document A/C.1/64/L.29), which would have the Assembly request the Conference on Disarmament to consider the formulation of principles that could serve as a framework for regional agreements on conventional arms control, and the Secretary-General to seek the views of Member States on the subject.

The draft resolution was approved by a vote of 173 in favour to 1 against ( India), with 2 abstentions ( Bhutan, Russian Federation) (Annex III).

Acting without a vote, the Committee approved the draft resolution on confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context (document A/C.1/64/L.30), by which the Assembly would urge States to comply strictly with all bilateral, regional and international agreements, including arms control and disarmament agreements, to which they are party, and emphasize that the objective of confidence-building measures should be to help strengthen international peace and security and be consistent with the principle of undiminished security at the lowest level of armaments.

The Assembly would encourage the promotion of bilateral and regional confidence-building measures, with the consent and participation of the parties concerned, to avoid conflict and prevent the unintended and accidental outbreak of hostilities.

Also without a vote, the Committee approved the draft resolution on strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region (document A/C.1/64/L.49), which would have the Assembly welcome the entry into force of the Treaty establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Africa (Pelindaba Treaty) as a contribution to the strengthening of peace and security, both regionally and internationally.  The Assembly would reaffirm that security in the Mediterranean is closely linked to European security, as well as to international peace and security, and recognize that the elimination of the economic and social disparities in levels of development and other obstacles, as well as respect and greater understanding among cultures in the Mediterranean area, will contribute to enhancing peace, security and cooperation among Mediterranean countries through the existing forums.

The Assembly would call upon all States of the Mediterranean region that have not yet done so to adhere to all the multilaterally negotiated legal instruments related to disarmament and non-proliferation, thus, creating the necessary conditions for strengthening peace and cooperation in the region.  It would encourage all States of the region to favour the necessary conditions for strengthening the confidence-building measures among them, by promoting genuine openness and transparency on all military matters, by participating, inter alia, in the United Nations system for the standardized reporting of military expenditures, and by providing accurate data and information to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms.

The Assembly would also encourage the Mediterranean countries to strengthen further their cooperation in combating terrorism in all its forms and manifestations, including the possible resort by terrorists to weapons of mass destruction.

Concerning L.29, the representative of India said the delegation had opposed the text because the United Nations Disarmament Commission had adopted similar principles; there was no need for the Conference on Disarmament to adopt the same ones.  Moreover, the notion of a preservation of balance in the regional and subregional context was unreasonable and unacceptable to India.

The representative of the Russian Federation abstained in the vote on L.29.  Regional control measures must ensure equal security for all participants.  Preambular paragraph 6 noted the relevance of the Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty.  The Russian Federation had already said that Treaty was hopelessly out of date.  The draft did not indicate that a new treaty for Europe was needed.

The representative of Afghanistan said his country had voted in favour of L.8, and requested the Chair to have his vote reflected in the record.

The Chair duly noted that.

General Statements, Draft Introductions

Turning to Cluster 6, on other disarmament measures and international security, IVONNE SANCHEZ QUINTERO ( Cuba) said that the 118 members of the Non-Aligned Movement had introduced draft texts that were important for the world as a whole.  The draft texts L.10 (relationship between disarmament and development), L.12 (observance of environmental norms in drafting disarmament, arms control agreements) and L.13 (promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation) reflected those important issues.

She said that Cuba had proposed the creation of a fund, with half of the current military expenditures going towards development assistance for countries in need.  In the international forums for disarmament, there should be full awareness of environmental norms.  That was enshrined in L.12.  The need to face the pressing problems together confirmed the importance of L.13.  Cuba urged all delegations to support those drafts texts, which were certain to garner wide support.

Mr. SIMANJUNTAK ( Indonesia), on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement, introduced two draft resolutions and one draft decision.  The first was the draft on promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (document A/C.1/64/L.13), by which the Assembly, stressing that international cooperation, the peaceful settlement of disputes, dialogue and confidence-building measures would contribute to the creation of multilateral and bilateral friendly relations among peoples and nations, would reaffirm multilateralism as the core principle in negotiations in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation.

The draft text would also have the Assembly urge the participation of all interested States in multilateral negotiations on arms regulation, non-proliferation and disarmament in a non-discriminatory and transparent manner, and call upon all Member States to renew and fulfil their individual and collective commitments to multilateral cooperation as an important means of pursuing and achieving their common objectives in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation.

The Assembly would request the States parties to the relevant instruments on weapons of mass destruction to consult and cooperate among themselves in resolving their concerns regarding cases of non-compliance and on implementation, as well as to refrain from resorting or threatening to resort to unilateral actions or directing unverified non-compliance accusations against one another to resolve their concerns.

He then introduced the draft resolution on the relationship between disarmament and development (document A/C.1/64/L.10), which would have the Assembly request the Secretary-General to continue to take action, through appropriate organs and within available resources, for the implementation of the action programme adopted at the 1987 International Conference on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development.  It would urge the international community to devote part of the resources made available by the implementation of disarmament and arms limitation agreements to economic and social development, with a view to reducing the ever-widening gap between developed and developing countries.

The Assembly would encourage the international community to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and to make reference to the contribution that disarmament could provide in meeting them when it reviewed its progress towards that purpose in 2010, as well as to make greater efforts to integrate disarmament, humanitarian and development activities.

He then tabled a draft decision on the review of the implementation of the Declaration on Strengthening of International Security (document A/C.1/64/L.7), which would have the Assembly decide to include an item of the same title in the provisional agenda of its sixty-fifth session.

Action on Texts

The representative of the United States said he would not participate in action on L.10.

The representative of France said he would not take part in the vote on L.10.

Next, the Committee, acting without a vote, approved a draft decision on the verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verification (document A/C.1/64/L.2), which would have the Assembly include the item in its sixty-sixth session provisional agenda.

Also by consensus, the Committee approved a draft decision on review of the implementation of the Declaration on Strengthening of International Security (document A/C.1/64/L.7), which would have the Assembly decide to include an item of the same title in the provisional agenda for its sixty-fifth session.

The Committee then approved, as orally amended, the draft resolution on relationship between disarmament and development (document A/C.1/64/L.10), which would have the Assembly request the Secretary-General to continue to take action, through appropriate organs and within available resources, for the implementation of the action programme adopted at the 1987 International Conference on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development.  It would urge the international community to devote part of the resources made available by the implementation of disarmament and arms limitation agreements to economic and social development, with a view to reducing the ever-widening gap between developed and developing countries.

It would also encourage the international community to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and to make reference to the contribution that disarmament could provide in meeting them when it reviewed its progress towards that purpose in 2009, as well as to make greater efforts to integrate disarmament, humanitarian and development activities.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution on the observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (document A/C.1/64/L.12).

That text would have the Assembly reaffirm that international disarmament forums should take fully into account the relevant environmental norms in negotiating treaties and agreements on disarmament and arms limitation, and that all States, through their actions, should contribute fully to ensuring compliance with those norms in the implementation of treaties and conventions to which they were parties.  It would call on States to adopt unilateral, bilateral, regional and multilateral measures so as to contribute to ensuring the application of scientific and technological progress within the framework of international security, disarmament and other related spheres, without detriment to the environment or its effective contribution to attaining sustainable development.

The draft resolution was approved without a vote.

The Committee next took up the draft resolution on the promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (document A/C.1/64/L.13), approving it by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 5 against (Israel, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United Kingdom, United States), with 49 abstentions (Annex IV).

The Committee then took up a draft decision on the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (document A/C.1/64/L.21), which would have the Assembly decide to include this item in its provisional agenda of its sixty-fifth session.

The draft decision was approved without a vote.

Also acting without a vote, the Committee approved a draft resolution on the national legislation on transfer of arms, military equipment and dual-use goods and technology(document A/C.1/64/L.26).

By its terms, the Assembly would invite Member States to enact or improve national legislation to exercise control over the transfer of arms, military equipment and dual-use goods and technology.  It would encourage Member States to provide, on a voluntary basis, information to the Secretary-General on their national legislation, regulations and procedures on this issue, and would request the Secretary-General to make that information accessible to Member States.

The Committee then took up a draft resolution on the objective information on military matters, including transparency of military expenditures (document A/C.1/64/L.43), approving it without a vote.

According to that text, the Assembly would callupon Member States to report annually, by 30 April, to the Secretary-General their military expenditures for the latest fiscal year for which data are available, using, preferably and to the extent possible, the reporting instrument as recommended in its resolution 35/142 B or, as appropriate, any other format developed in conjunction with similar reporting on military expenditures to other international or regional organizations, and, in the same context, encourages Member States to submit nil returns, if appropriate.

The representative of the United Kingdom, speaking on L.10, welcomed the mainstreaming of disarmament issues in development policy and said that that was particularly important in the field of conventional weapons, small arms and light weapons and disarmament, demobilization and reintegration.  His country did not believe, however, that there was an automatic link between disarmament and development.  Rather, a complex relationship existed between the two.  Unfortunately, the draft resolution did not explain fully the complexity of that relationship.

As explained previously, he said his country considered that the report of the group of governmental experts did not give sufficient credit to unilateral, bilateral and multilateral actions in disarmament and non-proliferation.  The United Kingdom noted that, while it was desirable to share information about resources made available for development through the implementation of disarmament and arms control agreements, in practice, it was not possible to identify a direct relationship between different sources of funding.  The country, however, would continue to make available information on its increasing levels of development assistance through relevant forums.

The representative of the United States, on behalf of France, the United States and the United Kingdom, on L.12, said that those countries joined the consensus on that draft resolution, but that they operated under stringent domestic environments.  They saw no connection between general environmental standards and multilateral arms controls.

Also regarding L.10, the representative of France said that financing for development was a sensitive topic, and his country had continued to vote against that draft.  While recognizing the relationship between disarmament and development, France did not agree with the notion that the link was “symbiotic”, as noted in preambular paragraph 7.  Indeed, disarmament had an impact on development, but the reverse was more uncertain.  The same paragraph mentioned that increasing military spending could be spent on development needs.  That idea was simplistic.  Disarmament had a cost that could not be overlooked.  Investments in defence might be used for resources that enhanced stability or capacities for peacekeeping, or coping with disasters.

He reiterated his request to note that France had not participated in the vote on that draft.  France also had not participated in the vote on L.12, as explained by the representative of the United States, who was speaking on behalf of France, United Kingdom and the United States.

The representative of Australia said the delegation had abstained from voting on L.13.  She could not agree that multilateral approaches were not the only ways to address disarmament.  Preambular paragraph 8 recognized the complementarity of regional, national and other approaches, which she said her country fully supported.

General Statements, Draft Introductions

When the Committee took up Cluster 7, on disarmament machinery, CHRISTIAN STROHAL ( Austria) said there was an oral revision to L.41, which was the deletion of two words from preambular paragraph 7, namely, the words “with appreciation”.  He said that the co-sponsors had agreed to that, and he hoped the draft would now be approved without a vote.

Mr. SIMANJUNTAK (Indonesia), speaking on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement, introduced L.11, on United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament (document A/C.1/64/L.11).  The text would have the Assembly reaffirm that, in order to achieve positive results, it was useful for the three regional centres to carry out dissemination and educational programmes that promoted regional peace and security that were aimed at changing basic attitudes with respect to peace and security and disarmament, so as to support the achievement of the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

He also introduced a draft decision on convening of the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament (document A/C.1/64/L.9), which would have the Assembly decide to include an item of the same title in the provisional agenda for its sixty-fifth session.

Ms. SANCHEZ QUINTERO ( Cuba) said her delegation had co-sponsored L.9, emphasizing the need for the Assembly to undertake a substantive review of the matter and the establishment of a preparatory conference.  She hoped the draft would be approved by consensus.  Cuba also supported L.52 and was satisfied with operative paragraph 7 for the Disarmament Commission to continue its consideration of recommendations for achieving nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons.  Cuba also supported L.41, welcoming the adoption of a programme of work in the Conference on Disarmament.  A committee on disarmament should lead to the gradual elimination of nuclear weapons within a certain timetable.

Action on Texts

The representative of the United States said the delegation would not participate in the vote on L.52.

The Committee approved without a vote the draft decision on convening of the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament (document A/C.1/64/L.9), which would have the Assembly decide to include an item of the same title in the provisional agenda for its sixty-fifth session.

Next, the Committee approved the draft resolution on United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament (document A/C.1/64/L.11), also without a vote.

By its terms, the Assembly would reaffirm that, in order to achieve positive results, it was useful for the three regional centres to carry out dissemination and educational programmes that promoted regional peace and security that were aimed at changing basic attitudes with respect to peace and security and disarmament, so as to support the achievement of the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

The Assembly would appeal to Member States in each region and those that were able to do so, as well as to international governmental and non-governmental organizations and foundations, to make voluntary contributions to the regional centres in their respective regions to strengthen their activities and initiatives.  It would request the Secretary-General to provide all necessary support, within existing resources, to the regional centres in carrying out their programmes and activities.

Also by consensus, the Committee approved the draft resolution on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (document A/C.1/64/L.22), which would have the Assembly, expressing its satisfaction for the Centre’s activities carried out this year, appeal to Member States and international governmental and non-governmental organizations and foundations to make and to increase voluntary contributions to strengthen the Centre, its activities programme and the implementation thereof.

The Committee then took up a draft resolution on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific (document A/C.1/64/L.45), which would have the Assemblywelcome the physical operation of the Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific from Kathmandu in close cooperation with Member States and appeal to Member States, in particular those within the Asia-Pacific region, as well as to international governmental and non-governmental organizations and foundations, to make voluntary contributions, the only resources of the Regional Centre, to strengthen the programme of activities of the Centre and the implementation thereof.

The draft resolution was approved without a vote.

It next approved the draft resolution on the report of the Disarmament Commission (document A/C.1/64/L.52), also without a vote.

According to that text, the Assembly would recommend that the Disarmament Commission continue the consideration of recommendations for achieving the objective of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, of the elements of a draft declaration of the 2010s as the fourth disarmament decade, and the practical confidence-building measures in the field of conventional weapons.

The draft would also have the Assembly request that the Commission meet for a period not exceeding three weeks during 2010, namely, from 29 March to 16 April, and to submit a substantive report to the Assembly during its sixty-fifth session.

ANNEX I

Vote on Prevention of Outer Space Arms Race

The draft resolution, on prevention of an arms race in outer space (document A/C.1/64/L.25), was approved by a recorded vote of 176 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  None.

Abstain:  Israel, United States.

Absent:  Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Nauru, Palau, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Uganda.

ANNEX II

Vote on Indian Ocean as Zone of Peace

The draft resolution, on implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace (document A/C.1/64/L.8), was approved by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 3 against, with 44 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  France, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Nauru, Palau, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda.

ANNEX III

Vote on Conventional Arms Control at Regional, Subregional Levels

The draft resolution, on conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels (document A/C.1/64/L.29), was approved by a recorded vote of 173 in favour to 1 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  India.

Abstain:  Bhutan, Russian Federation.

Absent:  Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Cuba, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Uganda, Viet Nam.

ANNEX IV

Vote on Promotion of Multilateralism in Disarmament and Non-Proliferation

The draft resolution, on promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (document A/C.1/64/L.13), was approved by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 5 against, with 49 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine.

Absent:  Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.