GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS SIX RESOLUTIONS ON MIDDLE EAST, PALESTINIAN RIGHTS, FOLLOWING TWO-DAY DEBATE ON ISSUES

26 November 2008
GA/10791

GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS SIX RESOLUTIONS ON MIDDLE EAST, PALESTINIAN RIGHTS, FOLLOWING TWO-DAY DEBATE ON ISSUES

26 November 2008
General Assembly
GA/10791
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-third General Assembly

Plenary

60th Meeting (AM)


GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS SIX RESOLUTIONS ON MIDDLE EAST, PALESTINIAN RIGHTS,


FOLLOWING TWO-DAY DEBATE ON ISSUES

 


Also Adopts Texts Addressing ‘Protection of Global Climate’;

Global Health; Cooperation with Caribbean, South-East Asian States


Following two days of sometimes contentious debate on the conflict in the Middle East and the plight of the Palestinian people, the General Assembly today adopted by recorded vote six resolutions meant to promote the Palestinian people’s rights and limit Israel’s actions in Jerusalem and the Syrian Golan.  The votes came on a day that saw action on a total of 10 texts, with the other consensus texts addressing climate change, global health, and global and regional cooperation.


The first three Assembly resolutions zeroed in directly on the Palestinian people’s needs, by backing the work of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, and supporting the Secretariat’s efforts to raise awareness of their difficulties through conferences, training programmes, links with civil society and other activities.  A fourth affirmed the illegality of Israeli actions to change the status of Jerusalem.


Two additional resolutions on the Middle East region expressed the Assembly’s unhappiness with Israeli moves to control Jerusalem, as well as Israel’s activities in the Syrian Golan, including what it views as Israel’s illegal occupation of the Syrian Golan since 1967.


Turning to other issues, the Assembly adopted resolutions that pushed for immediate action on climate change, and urged Member States to consider health issues when shaping foreign policy and stressed the importance of achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals.  Two other texts aimed to reinforce cooperation between the United Nations and the Caribbean, and the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).  A fifth resolution, meant to strengthen ties between the United Nations and the Economic Cooperation Organization, was introduced and postponed for consideration at a later date.


Regarding the question of Palestine, the Assembly adopted by a recorded vote of 107 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 57 in abstentions, its draft resolution on the “Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People” (for voting details see Annex I).  With that text, the Assembly requested the Committee to keep promoting the Palestinians’ realization of their inalienable rights, including their right to self-determination, as it mobilized assistance for them.


By a recorded vote of 106 in favour to 8 against ( Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 57 abstentions (Annex II), the Assembly adopted the resolution on the “Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat”.  By this draft, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to continue providing the Division with the resources needed to carry out its work, which included monitoring developments, organizing international meetings and working with civil society.


By a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 4 abstentions (Cameroon, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Tonga) (Annex III), the Assembly next adopted the resolution on the “Special Information Programme on the Question of Palestine of the Department of Public Information of the Secretariat”, by which it requested the Department to continue its programme for the 2009-2010 biennium.  


This request included the dissemination of information on all United Nations activities relating to the question and the peace process; putting out publications on the various aspects of the question; and organizing fact-finding missions for journalists to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and Israel.


The Assembly also adopted by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 7 against ( Australia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 3 abstentions ( Cameroon, Canada, Tonga) (Annex IV), the resolution on the “Peaceful settlement of the question of Palestine”.


By that text, the Assembly reaffirmed the illegality of Israeli actions meant to change the status of Jerusalem, including the so-called E-1 plan, which aimed to connect Jerusalem to the West Bank settlement of Ma’ale Adumim.  It also reaffirmed the illegality of other unilateral measures that tried to alter the character, status and demographic composition of the city and the Territory as a whole.  This included Israel’s construction of a wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including in and around East Jerusalem.


Speaking before the votes, the representative of the United States said her country could not support the four resolutions since the texts, in combination with 15 other resolutions that came before the Assembly this year, created a clear pattern of institutional bias.  The United States had clearly stated its policy that there should be two States, Israel and Palestine, living side by side in peace, and backed that policy with support for both sides.


She was distressed that each year the Assembly devoted a disproportionate number of resolutions to the Middle East, with disproportionate criticism of Israel.  Those resolutions, along with others on the Middle East, were repetitive and unbalanced, and at odds with the Assembly’s action on any other State.  They placed demands on the Israeli side, while failing to see that both sides must take steps towards peace.


Turning next to the situation in the Middle East, the Assembly adopted two resolutions.


By a recorded vote of 163 in favour to 6 against ( Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions ( Australia, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Fiji, Haiti, Tonga) (Annex V), the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on Jerusalem.  In that text, it stressed that a comprehensive and just solution to the question of the city should incorporate Palestinian and Israeli concerns.


By a recorded vote of 116 in favour to 6 against ( Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 52 abstentions (Annex VI), the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on the Syrian Golan.  In this text, it expressed concern at the illegal occupation, settlement, construction, and other activities of Israel in the Syrian Golan since 1967.  It also requested that all parties concerned, the co-sponsors of the peace process and the entire international community work to resume the peace process by implementing Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973).


Speaking after the vote, the observer for Palestine said he looked forward to not having to bother with discussions or resolutions, on what was balanced or not balanced.  He wanted to relieve the United Nations of all those resolutions.  He hoped that next year, if all the parties moved towards peace, the Palestinian flag would join the other 192 flags at the United Nations.  The Palestinian people wanted to live with all their neighbours, including Israel, in peace and security.


In other action, the Assembly adopted by consensus a draft resolution entitled “Protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind”, contained in a report by the Second Committee (Economic and Financial).  With that text, the Assembly stressed the seriousness of climate change and called on States to implement the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.  It also strongly urged those States that had not yet done so to ratify the Kyoto Protocol to the Convention in a timely way.


As part of an agenda item that focused on integrated and coordinated implementation of and follow-up to the outcomes of major United Nations conferences and summits in the economic, social and related fields, the Assembly adopted by consensus a draft resolution on “Global health and foreign policy”.  This stressed the importance of achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals.


In final action, the Assembly adopted by consensus two draft resolutions under its agenda item on cooperation between the United Nations and other organizations.


Introducing the draft resolution on “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Caribbean Community”, the representative of Guyana, speaking on behalf of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), said the most important elements of the text involved sensitive issues in which the need for cooperation was greatest.  This included illicit narcotic drugs and weapons and the region’s vulnerability to natural disasters.


With its resolution on “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations”, introduced by the representative of Thailand, the Assembly encouraged the United Nations and the Association to regularly convene summits and cooperate in the delivery of operational development activities.


Also speaking after the vote on the resolutions related to Palestine were the representatives of Iran, France (on behalf of the European Union), and Belize.


Speaking before adoption of the resolutions on the situation in the Middle East was the representative of Iran.


Speaking after adoption of the resolution on the Middle East were the representatives of Brazil (also on behalf of Argentina), Iran and Syria.


Speaking before adoption of the resolution on “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Caribbean Community” was the representative of Venezuela.


The representative of Afghanistan introduced a resolution on “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Economic Cooperation Organization”.  The resolution will be considered at a later date.


Speaking after the adoption of the resolution on “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations” was the representative of the United States.


The General Assembly will reconvene at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, 2 December, to take up the reports of the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security).


Background


The General Assembly met today to take action on draft resolutions relating to the question of Palestine and the situation in the Middle East (Please see Press Releases GA/10789 and GA/10790).  It is also expected to take action on several draft texts under agenda items 44 and 114.


Under its agenda item 44 on the “integrated and coordinated implementation of and follow-up to the outcomes of major United Nations conferences and summits in the economic, social and related fields”, the Assembly is to take action on a draft resolution entitled Global health and foreign policy (document A/63/L.28).  


By that text, the Assembly would urge Member States to consider health issues in the formulation of foreign policy and stress the importance of achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals.  It would request the Secretary-General, in close collaboration with the Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), to submit to the Assembly, at its sixty-fourth session, a report on the challenges and activities related to foreign policy and global health.  Further by the text, the Assembly would decide to include in its provisional agenda of that session an item entitled “Global health and foreign policy”.


For its consideration of “cooperation between the United Nations and regional and other organizations” (agenda item 114), the Assembly had before it a draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) (document A/63/L.40), by which it would continue to encourage the United Nations and the Association to convene summits regularly, and recognize the value of partnership in providing timely responses to global issues of mutual concern.


Further by the text, the Assembly would encourage cooperation between Association member countries and United Nations organizations in the delivery of operational development activities, and request the Secretary-General to submit to the Assembly, at its sixty-fifth session, a report on the implementation of the present resolution.  It would also decide to include, in the provisional agenda of that session, a sub-item on cooperation between the two entities.


A draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) (document A/63/L.38) would note the Assembly’s grave concern at the current international environment, characterized, in part, by crises in food and energy security, and call on the Secretary-General, in association with the Secretary-General of CARICOM, to assist in furthering the maintenance of peace and security in the region.  The Assembly would call for vastly increased efforts by developed countries to strengthen the multilateral development framework to respond more effectively to programme country needs.


Also by the text, the Assembly would urge specialized agencies, among others, to step up cooperation with the Secretaries-General, invite United Nations organizations to increase financial assistance to Caribbean countries for implementing the Caribbean Regional Strategic Framework for HIV/AIDS, and stress the urgent need for reopening the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime in the region.


Further, the Assembly would reaffirm the goal of strengthening the implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States, including through mobilizing financial and technological resources, and request the Secretary-General to submit a report, at the sixty-fifth session, on the implementation of the present resolution.


By a draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Economic Cooperation Organization (document A/63/L.39), the Assembly would call for increasing the technical assistance of the World Trade Organization, among others, to Economic Cooperation Organization States that are at various levels of development, with some pursuing accession to the world trade body.  Welcoming the trilateral agreement among the Economic Cooperation Organization, the Islamic Development Bank, and the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) for projects under the Asian Highway and Trans-Asian Railway network, the Assembly would also appreciate Economic Cooperation Organization efforts to develop energy trade in the region.


Further by the text, the Assembly would call for strengthening technical assistance provided by United Nations bodies, especially the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and call for increased cooperation between the Economic Cooperation Organization and United Nations bodies to combat the production and trafficking of narcotic drugs.  Finally, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to submit a report on the implementation of the present resolution at the sixty-fifth session.


The Assembly also had before it the report of the Second Committee (Economic and Financial) on the protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/63/414/Add.4), which contained a draft resolution on that topic, by which the General Assembly would stress the seriousness of climate change and call on States to work towards achieving the ultimate goal of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.  It would also invite parties to the Kyoto Protocol to continue to make use of the information contained in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.


Further by the text, the Assembly would recognize the need to provide financial, technical and capacity-building resources to developing countries adversely affected by climate change, and call on the international community to fulfil commitments made during the fourth replenishment of the Global Environment Facility Trust Fund.  Finally, it would invite the Secretariat of the Framework Convention to report, through the Secretary-General, at its sixty-fourth session on the work of the Conference of Parties, and include on the provisional agenda of that session a sub-item on the “protection of global climate change for present and future generations”.


Action on Draft Resolutions under Agenda Item 16 on Question of Palestine


Speaking before the vote, the representative of the United States said that the four resolutions, in combination with 15 other resolutions to come before the Assembly this year, form a clear pattern of institutional bias.  The United States had clearly stated its policy that there should be two States, Israel and Palestine, living side by side in peace.  The United States backed that policy with support for both sides, consistent with agreements made at the Annapolis, Maryland conference, and contributed financial support to both the Palestinian Authority and refugees.  There was no contradiction between support for Palestinians and that for Israel, as both sides needed support to achieve a just and lasting peace.


She was distressed that, each year, the General Assembly devoted a disproportionate number of resolutions on the Middle East, with disproportionate criticism of Israel.  These resolutions, along with others on the Middle East, were repetitive and unbalanced, at odds with the General Assembly’s action regarding any other State, and placed demands on the Israeli side, failing to see that both sides must take steps towards peace.  The United States accepted that the General Assembly may look into practices of States but, last year, adopted 14 resolutions criticising Israel.  In that same year, it adopted only six critical of other States.  She supported some and opposed others.  The 21 resolutions on alleged Israeli violations stretched to 61 pages.  The Assembly was on course to repeat that pattern, which represented an unjustified focus on one Member State.  The situation in the Middle East did not merit three quarters of all the time the Assembly devoted to review of its 192 Member States.


Of notable concern were drafts on the Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat and the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, as well as the work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices.  They perpetuated the perception of an inherent United Nations bias and failed to properly demand action from both sides.  The millions of dollars spent could be better utilized towards direct aid, including that to needy Palestinians.


The international Quartet must be seen as an honest broker, she continued, and she expressed concern that those resolutions could not only have a corrosive effect on negotiations, but also added nothing to the Security Council’s monthly discussions.  They presupposed the outcome of permanent status issues that belonged to bilateral negotiations.  In the 9 November briefings to the Quartet, both sides attested that the negotiating structure was effective, and noted that third parties should not intervene in the joint negotiations [absent their request].


The United States would continue to be at the forefront of addressing the underlying causes of the conflict.  For such reasons, the United States could not support the resolutions.


The General Assembly then adopted by a recorded vote of 107 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 57 abstentions, its draft resolution on the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People (document A/63/L.32).  (For details on voting, see Annex I.)


The Assembly then adopted by a recorded vote of 106 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 57 abstentions (Annex II), the resolution on the Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat (document A/63/L.33).


The resolution on the Special Information Programme on the Question of Palestine of the Department of Public Information of the Secretariat (document A/63/L.34) was adopted by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 4 abstentions (Cameroon, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Tonga) (Annex III).


The Assembly then adopted by a vote of 164 in favour to 7 against ( Australia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 3 abstentions ( Cameroon, Canada, Tonga) (Annex IV), the resolution on the peaceful settlement of the question of Palestine (document A/63/L.35).


Speaking after the vote was the representative of Iran, who stated its votes in favour of the resolutions were in solidarity with the Palestinian people.


The representative of France, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said he had voted in favour of A/63/L.34.  The European Union welcomed the new elements introduced in the resolution, in the spirit of cooperation on the Palestinian mission.  These improvements would encourage the parties involved to improve the programme between the Palestinian Authority and Israel.  The European Union was prepared to work with the Department of Public Information and all parties involved to meet the objectives of the resolution.


The representative of Belize requested that their vote in favour of those resolutions be on record.


Action on Draft Resolutions under Agenda Item 15 on Situation in Middle East


Speaking before the vote, the representative of Iran referred to the unfounded allegations by Australia against Iran and rejected the distortions that were made under agenda item 15.   Iran had condemned terrorism in all its forms and manifestations.   Iran was a victim of terrorism.  With its history and unqualified support of Israel, Australia should be the last judge of others in that area.   Iran had fully cooperated with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and its nuclear programme was absolutely peaceful.  If Australia was concerned about the Middle East, it should cease its complicity with the Israeli regime in war crimes and join with the international community in stability on the question of Palestine.


The General Assembly then adopted by a recorded vote of 163 in favour to 6 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Fiji, Haiti, Tonga) (Annex V), the draft resolution on Jerusalem (document A/63/L.36).


The General Assembly then adopted by a recorded vote of 116 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 52 abstentions, the draft resolution on the Syrian Golan (document A/63/L.37).


Speaking after the vote, on behalf of Brazil and Argentina, the representative of Brazil said he had voted in favour of the draft resolution on Jerusalem, and the two countries had understood that the central aspect of the resolution was linked to the illegal acquisition of land by force.  That use of force violated international law.  He urged Israel and Syria to renew negotiations and find a definite solution under the principal of land for peace.


The representative of Iran said he voted in favour of all the resolutions just adopted in a spirit of solidarity with the Palestinian people and Arab people under occupation.


The representative of Syria thanked the Assembly for its adoption, once again, with no interruption since 1981, of the resolution contained in document A/63/L.37 and other resolutions related to Palestine and the Middle East.  He supported the international community’s continued positive response to upholding those objectives of the United Nations Charter and the backing of its right to restore its land, occupied by Israel and supported by a superpower for more than 40 years.  There was no doubt that voting for those resolutions sent an international message to Israel and those who supported it.  The policies of aggression and annexation of land were practices that were rejected and repudiated by the entire international community.


He thanked all States that sponsored and voted for the resolution, and urged those whom abstained to lend their ears to the voice of international law that should govern their actions.   Syria wanted to achieve comprehensive and durable peace, and to liberate the Syrian Golan from Israeli occupation.  He urged the international community to help prevent the eruption of war by pressuring the party that impeded peace, Israel, and those who protected it.


The observer for Palestine expressed gratitude and appreciation to all the countries that played a very important role in introducing the draft resolutions and to all the countries who voted in favour.  He also thanked all the political blocs, specifically the Arab Group, the League of Arab States, the African Union, the Non-Aligned Movement and the European Union, that collaborated to ensure the resolutions were drafted in responsible and balanced language that reflected the sentiment of the international community. 


Bringing Israel into compliance with international law, and to uphold international law so that peace and justice could be achieved was a challenge to the international community.  It was essential to end the occupation that started in 1967, and giving Israel preferential treatment was not in service of the United Nations or the international community, as it did not move the process forward to a peaceful solution.  Those resolutions were balanced, and the majority votes in favour reflected their just and balanced approach, he stated.


“It has been too long… and it’s been too long because Israel has not been compliant,” he said.  He recalled the 50 countries and organizations that convened in Annapolis to help the parties towards a solution.  He had hoped that there would be a peace treaty by now that would allow for the birth of the Palestinian State.  But, until that peace treaty was accomplished, it was “the duty of the international community to remain engaged in this issue until it was resolved in all its aspects,” and to that end, he pledged that he would continue to work until it was resolved.


He then offered hope that next year, if all parties involved moved towards peace, the Palestinian flag would join the other 192 flags at the United Nations, and he pledged that the Palestinian people would “reflect the essence of that peace treaty that will be the birth of our state.”  He concluded by saying that he looked forward to not having to bother in discussion or resolutions of what was balanced or not balanced.  He wanted to relieve the United Nations of all these resolutions.  What the Palestinian people wanted was to live with all their neighbours in peace and security, including Israel.


The Assembly then took up the report of the Second Committee on the protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind, issued as document A/63/414/Add.4.  There was no discussion of the report.


The Assembly adopted by consensus a draft resolution, entitled protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind, recommended by the Second Committee in paragraph 8 of the report.


Turning to agenda item 44, Integrated and coordinated implementation of and follow-up to the outcomes of the major United Nations conferences and summits in the economic, social and related fields, the Committee then adopted by consensus draft resolution Global health and foreign policy (document A/63/L.28).


In other business, the Assembly then resumed its consideration of sub-items (c), (e) and (i) of agenda item 114, Cooperation between the United Nations and other organizations.


Speaking on behalf of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), George Talbot (Guyana) introduced the draft resolution, entitled cooperation between the United Nations and the Caribbean Community, (document A/63/L.38).  He said the preambular section of the draft would have the Assembly recall previous United Nations commitments to cooperate with CARICOM.  After that, the draft would have the Assembly give due recognition to what the Community considered particular landmarks in the development of that cooperation.


The most important items related to very sensitive areas or issues in which the need for cooperation was greatest, he said.  That included illicit narcotic drugs and weapons; the challenges of sustainable development for small island developing States, as highlighted in the World Summit on Sustainable Development; the region’s vulnerability to natural disasters; and the ravaging effects of HIV/AIDS on their societies.


Threats to the region’s security led the group to stress the urgent need to reopen the office of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime in the region, in order to reinforce its efforts to combat drugs, violent crimes and the illicit trade in small arms and weapons.


Speaking before the vote, on the draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Caribbean Community, the representative of Venezuela said he supported CARICOM in its efforts to lift the region out of poverty and its social difficulties.  He reiterated its position for sustainable development and support for the small island developing States.


MOHAMMAD ERFANI AYOOB ( Afghanistan), introducing the resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Economic Cooperation Organization (document A/63/L.39), pointed out that, despite its young age and the lack of appropriate infrastructure and institutions in its region, the Economic Cooperation Organization had developed into a successful regional organization.  Today, it sought to develop its infrastructure and institutions, on a prioritized basis, that made full use of the available resources in the region.


Specifically, the Economic Cooperation Organization had embarked on several projects in priority sectors, including energy, trade, transportation, agriculture and drug control, he said.  Additionally, the Economic Cooperation Organization had established relations, and signed a memoranda of understanding, with regional and international organizations, including the United Nations specialized agencies and international financial institutions.  Consequently, the Economic Cooperation Organization’s international stature had continued to grow.


He said the draft resolution he was introducing stressed the importance of continuation and the expansion of the areas of cooperation between the United Nations and the Economic Cooperation Organization; expressed appreciation for the technical and financial assistance the United Nations and its specialized agencies had extended; and called for a further increase of that assistance to the Member States of the Economic Cooperation Organization.


DON PRAMUDWINAI (Thailand), introducing the resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) (document A/63/L.40), said it was the aim of ASEAN leaders that the regional grouping’s Charter provided a legal and institutional framework to make it more rules-based, people-centred, effective and efficient. 


He said all ASEAN members aspired to move ahead towards closer integration, with a goal of transforming South-East Asia into a single market and production base, with free movement of goods, services, skilled labour and freer movement of capital.  Through that process of community-building and integration, ASEAN would emerge as a stronger partner for the United Nations in the pursuit of the shared purposes and principles enshrined in the United Nations Charter.  At the same time, partnership between ASEAN and the United Nations had also been undergoing what he said was an exciting period during the past two years.  ASEAN had also worked closely with the Organization in responding to humanitarian needs in the wake of the devastating Cyclone Nargis in May this year.


Continuing, he noted that, next month, the third ASEAN-United Nations Summit is slated for Thailand.  That Summit was expected to provide ASEAN leaders and the United Nations Secretary-General an opportunity to exchange views about issues of common interest and to develop effective partnership in response to those critical issues.


The Assembly postponed a vote on its draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Economic Cooperation Organization (document A/63/L.39).


The Assembly then adopted by consensus its draft resolution on Cooperation between the United Nations and the Caribbean Community (document A/63/L.38).


The Assembly also adopted by consensus its draft resolution on Cooperation between the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (document A/63/L.40).


Speaking in explanation after the vote, the representative of the United States said he was pleased to join in favour of the adoption, and welcomed cooperation between the United States and CARICOM.  The need of Member States in the region to fight illicit trafficking of drugs was very important, and to that end, he recognized the work of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.  He said, however, that, in light of budgetary concerns, any field office should be sustainable, and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime should consider those concerns in decisions to reopen any offices in the field.


ANNEX I


Vote on Palestinian Rights Committee


The draft resolution on the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People (document A/63/L.32) was adopted by a recorded vote of 107 in favour to 8 against, with 57 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Colombia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay.


Absent:  Belize, Burundi, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Mongolia, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu.


ANNEX II


Vote on Palestinian Rights Division


The draft resolution on the Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat (document A/63/L.33) was adopted by a recorded vote of 106 in favour to 8 against, with 57 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Colombia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Belize, Burundi, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Mongolia, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu.


ANNEX III


Vote on Special Information Programme


The draft resolution on the Special Information Programme on the Question of Palestine of the Department of Public Information (document A/63/L.34) was adopted by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 8 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Cameroon, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Tonga.


Absent:  Belize, Burundi, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu.


ANNEX IV


Vote on Peaceful Settlement of Palestine Question


The draft resolution on the peaceful settlement of the question of Palestine (document A/63/L.35) was adopted by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 7 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Cameroon, Canada, Tonga.


Absent:  Belize, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu.


ANNEX V


Vote on Jerusalem


The draft resolution on Jerusalem (document A/63/L.36) was adopted by a recorded vote of 163 in favour to 6 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Australia, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Fiji, Haiti, Tonga.


Absent:  Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu.


ANNEX VI


Vote on Syrian Golan

The draft resolution on the Syrian Golan (document A/63/L.37) was adopted by a recorded vote of 116 in favour to 6 against, with 52 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu.


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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.