GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS LANDMARK RESOLUTION CONCERNING UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM, AS IT TAKES ACTION ON 32 TEXTS APPROVED BY SECOND COMMITTEE

19 December 2007
GA/10683

GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS LANDMARK RESOLUTION CONCERNING UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM, AS IT TAKES ACTION ON 32 TEXTS APPROVED BY SECOND COMMITTEE

19 December 2007
General Assembly
GA/10683
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-second General Assembly

Plenary

78th Meeting (PM)

GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS LANDMARK RESOLUTION CONCERNING UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT

SYSTEM, AS IT TAKES ACTION ON 32 TEXTS APPROVED BY SECOND COMMITTEE

Acting on Plenary-Generated Texts, Delegates Decide

To Convene Meetings for Review of HIV/AIDS Commitments, Africa’s Development

In an attempt to interlink poverty eradication, sustainable and economic development, and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals, the General Assembly set in motion two major initiatives today by unanimously adopting -– among 32 development-related actions put forward by its Second Committee (Economic and Financial) -– a series of groundbreaking resolutions, including a landmark text on the United Nations development system.

After two and a half weeks of intense debate in the Committee, the Assembly’s adoption, by consensus, of a resolution on the triennial comprehensive policy review would shape United Nations development activities over the next three years, specifically on funding, national-capacity development and development effectiveness.  By that text, the Assembly underscored that there was no “one-size-fits-all” approach to development, and that the Organization’s development assistance should respond to the varying development needs of programme countries, in line with their national development plans and strategies.

By further terms of the text, the Assembly noted with concern the overall decline in official development assistance (ODA) in 2006, and called on developed countries to devote the targeted 0.7 per cent of gross domestic product to aid by 2015, at least 0.5 per cent by 2010 and between 0.15 per cent and 0.2 per cent to least developed countries.  It also noted with concern the decline in recent years of the share of core contributions -- the bedrock of United Nations operational activities for development -- to the Organization’s funds and programmes, while urging donor countries and others to increase substantially their voluntary contributions to core or regular budgets of those entities.

Of the key initiatives adopted by consensus, one resolution set the modalities for the Review Conference on Financing for Development, to be held in Doha, Qatar, next year, and another proclaimed the Second United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2008-2017), urging all Governments, as well as the international community, to continue seriously to pursue poverty eradication.

Under the poverty-eradication umbrella, the Assembly adopted two resolutions, one on women and development, by which the Assembly urged all Member States, non-governmental organizations and the United Nations to increase the number of women in decision-making, and empower them to participate effectively in developing and implementing poverty eradication policies and programmes.

By the terms of the second resolution, on human resources development, the Assembly called upon the international community to support developing countries’ efforts to address the adverse effects of HIV and AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and other infectious diseases on human resources, and stressed the importance of investment in research and development, particularly in developing countries, to create a technological base, and of knowledge and innovation relevant to local needs.  The Assembly encouraged Member States to make technological knowledge and learning a priority of their human resources development strategies, and the international community to transfer technology and scientific and technical knowledge to developing countries under fair, transparent and mutually agreed terms.

Science and technology gained increased attention within the development realm under some of the resolutions adopted during the present session.  In a consensus action, the Assembly adopted a text on science and technologies for development, reaffirming its commitment to strengthen mechanisms and initiatives for research and development in addressing developing countries’ special needs.  That text encouraged the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), with relevant partners, to assist developing countries in their efforts to integrate science, technology and innovation policies into national development strategies.

In another consensus action, the Assembly adopted a resolution on information and communication technologies for development, urging the full implementation of the strong development-oriented outcomes of the Geneva and Tunis phases of the World Summit on the Information Society.  The Assembly also adopted, again without a vote, a resolution declaring 2009 the International Year of Astronomy.

Showing its support for the use of local know-how and technology, and the promotion of research and technology to increase agricultural productivity and food security in poor rural areas, the Assembly adopted a resolution on agricultural technology for development.  It took that action by a recorded vote of 147 in favour to none against, with 30 abstentions.  (See annex V for voting details)

The series of adopted resolutions reflected the breadth of the Committee’s agenda during its 10-week session.  It considered the widespread economic development ramifications of climate change; development economics, including the need for a more equitable international financial system, representing equally the voices of developing countries; the shared responsibility of creditors and debtors to prevent unsustainable debt; and trade barriers and inequitable market access that hampered sustainable economic growth.

While trade issues in particular continued to be a divisive topic during the Committee’s session, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a resolution on the international financial system and development, by which it stressed the importance of reaching early agreement on a credible and time-bound package of quota and voice reforms in the International Monetary Fund (IMF).  It reiterated the need to effectively enhance the voice and participation of developing countries in the Bretton Woods institutions.  The Assembly underscored the importance of promoting international financial stability, sustainable growth, and national efforts to bolster developing countries’ resilience to financial risk.

Yet voting on two texts on macroeconomic policy questions concerning international trade and development reflected a growing rift that mirrored the stalemate in the Doha Development Round over a range of trade issues.  The Assembly adopted one of those texts, titled “Unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries”, by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 51 abstentions.  By that text, the Assembly urged the international community to adopt urgent and effective measures to eliminate, condemn and reject unilateral measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries that were not authorized by relevant United Nations organs, or were inconsistent with the principles of international law set forth in the United Nations Charter.  (See annex II for voting details)

On the second text, the Assembly expressed serious concern over the lack of progress in the Doha talks, and called upon developed countries to demonstrate the flexibility and political will to break the current impasse.  By that text, the Assembly called upon World Trade Organization members to adhere to the Doha Ministerial Declaration’s development mandate, and stressed that the talks should conclude with the establishment of rules and discipline in agriculture as well as non-agricultural market access.

But voting results on that text signalled several concerns, with some delegates expressing dissatisfaction with “unbalanced language” that did not accurately portray the Round’s positive advances.  The draft was adopted by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 48 against, with 7 abstentions ( Marshall Islands, Mexico, Norway, Palau, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia).  (Annex III)

The Assembly found consensus on a resolution concerning the external debt crisis and development, by which it emphasized the importance of timely, comprehensive solutions to developing countries’ debt problems, the shared responsibility of creditors and debtors to prevent unsustainable debt situations, and the fact that debt relief did not replace other sources of financing.

By the terms of that text, the Assembly also noted with concern that some countries had reached the completion point of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Debt Initiative, but had yet to achieve lasting debt sustainability, and that the current debt sustainability framework for middle-income countries inadequately addressed solvency issues.

Climate change issues were an underlying theme in much of the Committee’s work, especially with respect to sustainable development issues.  The Assembly took action on 11 resolutions contained in the Committee’s report on sustainable development, some of them precedent-setting, including a non-legally binding instrument on all types of forests, which stressed the need to strengthen political commitment and collective efforts concerning forestry issues.  The instrument, the first of its kind, was adopted by consensus, in a culmination of more than a decade of negotiations.

Acting again without a vote, the Assembly adopted a resolution on the promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, including the implementation of the World Solar Programme.  By that text, the Assembly called upon Governments and relevant stakeholders to combine the use of renewable energy resources and advanced energy technologies with that of traditional energy resources to achieve sustainable development.  It also adopted, again by consensus, a resolution on sustainable mountain development, noting with concern the key challenges to achieving sustainable development, eradicating poverty in mountain regions and protecting mountain ecosystems, and underlining the importance of sustainable forest management.

The Assembly’s strong support of the resolution titled “Protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind” reflected a marked shift from the Assembly’s sixty-first session, when a vote on that topic led to abstentions by one third of the delegations.

By another text, relating to the oil slick on Lebanese shores, the Assembly requested that Israel promptly and adequately compensate Lebanon and other countries directly affected for the costs of repairing the environmental damage caused by the destruction, including the restoration of the marine environment.  It also called for the creation of an eastern Mediterranean oil spill restoration fund to support the integrated, environmentally sound management of the disaster resulting from the destruction by the Israeli Air Force of oil storage tanks at Lebanon’s Jiyah electric power plant.  The Assembly approved that text by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 3 abstentions (Cameroon, Colombia, Cote d’Ivoire).  (Annex IV)

A resolution on the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction was adopted by consensus, as the Assembly called upon the international community to step up efforts to implement fully the commitments of the Hyogo Declaration and the Hyogo Framework for Action, and to support the development and strengthening of institutions, mechanisms and capacities at all levels that could systematically help build resilience to natural hazards.  It stressed also the need to review the current financing methods of the International Strategy’s secretariat, in light of growing demands.

The Assembly also adopted by consensus a text on the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twenty-fourth special session, thereby declaring the decade 2010-2020 as the United Nations Decade for Deserts and the Fight against Desertification.  It stressed the need to further advance and to implement fully the Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity-Building.  Also by that text, the Assembly called upon Governments to better mobilize financial resources, technology transfer, capacity-building and environmentally sound technologies for developing countries and those with economies in transition.

In a recorded vote, the Assembly adopted a resolution that reaffirmed the permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people and the Arab population of the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources.  The Assembly took that action by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Fiji, Nauru, Tonga, Vanuatu).  (Annex I)

The Assembly also sought to bolster the United Nations development agenda through numerous multilateral frameworks, such as the Monterrey Consensus, by adopting, without a vote, a text on the follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development.

Other texts adopted by consensus concerned the implementation of Agenda 21 and the World Summit on Sustainable Development; the Mauritius Strategy for the implementation of the Programme of Action for Small Island Developing States; the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa; the Convention on Biological Diversity; and implementation of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT).

In other action, the Assembly decided to adopt the programme of work for the Second Committee’s next session.

The Rapporteur of the Second Committee introduced that body’s reports.

At the outset of the meeting, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a number of plenary-generated resolutions, including a text on organizing the comprehensive review of the progress achieved in realizing the 2001 Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS and the Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS.

By that text, the Assembly decided to convene a high-level meeting on 10 and 11 June 2008 to undertake a comprehensive review of those agreements.  The event will comprise plenary meetings, five thematic panel discussions and an informal interactive hearing with civil society.  The opening plenary meeting will feature statements by senior United Nations officials, as well as a person openly living with HIV and an eminent person actively engaged in the response to AIDS.

Further, the Assembly encouraged Member States to include in their national delegations to the high-level meeting parliamentarians and representatives of civil society, including non-governmental organizations and organizations and networks representing people living with HIV and AIDS, women, young people, orphans, community organizations, faith-based organizations and the private sector.

In other action, the Assembly adopted a text on progress in implementing and international support for the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), stressing the need for the international community to stand by all commitments regarding the continent’s economic and social development.

The resolution, introduced by the representative of Pakistan on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, urged continued support of measures to address the challenges of poverty eradication and sustainable development, debt relief, improved market access, support for the private sector and entrepreneurship, enhanced official development assistance (ODA), and increased foreign direct investment (FDI) and technology transfer.

Also by that text, the Assembly welcomed the progress made by African countries in fulfilling their commitments in implementation of NEPAD to deepen democracy, human rights, good governance and sound economic management.  It encouraged African countries, with the participation of stakeholders, including civil society and the private sector, to continue their efforts in that regard by developing and strengthening institutions for governance, creating an environment conducive to involvement of the private sector, including small and medium-sized firms.

By other terms, the Assembly reaffirmed its decision to hold a high-level meeting on “ Africa’s development needs […] and the way forward” during its sixty-third session, and stressed the need for close consultation between the United Nations and the African Union in preparing for that meeting.  [To allow more time for consultations, it postponed action on a text setting out the modalities, format and organization of that meeting.]  The resolution also took note of the fact that the post of Special Adviser on Africa remained vacant and, in that regard, requested the Secretary-General to address that issue as soon as possible.

The Assembly also adopted a resolution on the 2001–2010 Decade to Roll Back Malaria in Developing Countries, particularly in Africa, which was introduced and orally amended by the representative of Botswana, on behalf of the African Group and co-sponsors.  It appealed to the international community to work “in a spirit of cooperation” towards effective, increased and sustained bilateral and multilateral assistance to combat malaria, including support for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and to assist States in implementing sound national health and sanitation plans in a sustained and equitable way.

Also by that text, the Assembly called on the global community to support ways to expand access to and the affordability of key products, such as vector control measures, including indoor residual spraying, long-lasting insecticide-treated nets, and artemisinin-based combination therapy for populations at risk of exposure to resistant strains of falciparum malaria in malaria-endemic countries, particularly in Africa, through additional funds and innovative mechanisms.

In other business, the Assembly President announced that following consultations, he had appointed Chile and the Republic of Korea as members of the Consultative Committee of the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), for three-year terms beginning on 1 January 2008 and ending on 31 December 2010.  The Assembly took note of that decision.

The General Assembly will meet again at 3 p.m. on Friday, 21 December, to take up outstanding plenary items.

Background

The General Assembly met this afternoon to consider the reports of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial) arising from meetings held between 8 October and 18 December.  They concern the permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan, over their natural resources (agenda item 41); information and communication technologies for development (item 51); and macroeconomic policy questions (item 52), which includes sub-items on international trade and development, the international financial system and development, and external debt crisis and development.

Also before the Assembly were the Committee’s reports on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development (item 53).  The report on sustainable development (item 54) includes sub-items on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21, and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development; follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programmes of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States; the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction; the protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind; implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa; the Convention on Biological Diversity; the Report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twenty-fourth session; sustainable mountain development; and the promotion of new and renewable sources of energy.

The Assembly also had before it the Committee’s reports on implementation of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) (item 55); and on globalization and interdependence (item 56), which includes sub-items on globalization and interdependence, science and technology for development,and preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of assets of illicit origin and returning such assets, in particular to the countries of origin, consistent with the United Nations Convention against Corruption.

Other topics considered by the Second Committee include groups of countries in special situations (item 57), which includes sub-items on the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries, and on specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation; and the eradication of poverty and other development issues (item 58), which includes sub-items on implementation of the first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006), women in development, and human resources development.

The Assembly also had before it the Committee’s report on operational activities for development (item 59), which includes sub-items on operational activities for development of the United Nations system; the triennial comprehensive review of operational activities for development of the United Nations system; and South-South cooperation for development.

Also before the Assembly were the Committee’s reports on training and research:  United Nations Institute for Training and Research (item 60); a report titled “Towards global partnerships” (item 61); the revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (item 121); and programme planning (item 129).

Committee Reports and Draft Resolutions

The report on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/62/415) contains a draft resolution by which the Assembly would reaffirm the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people and the population of the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources.  The Committee approved that text on 16 November by a recorded vote of 143 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Canada, Federation States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 5 abstentions (Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Haiti, Nauru, Tonga).  (See Press Release GA/EF/3202)

Contained in the report on information and communication technologies for development (document A/62/416) is a draft resolution by which the Assembly would reaffirm the strong development orientation of the outcomes of the Geneva and Tunis phases of the World Summit on the Information Society and urge their full implementation.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 16 November.  (Press Release GA/EF/3202)

The report on macroeconomic policy questions (document A/62/417) contains four draft resolutions, including two on international trade and development (A/62/417/Add.1).  The first, titled “Unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries”, was approved by a recorded vote of 107 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 51 abstentions.  The resolution would have the Assembly urge the international community to adopt urgent and effective measures to eliminate, condemn and reject unilateral measures, as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries, that are not authorized by relevant United Nations organs or are inconsistent with the principles of international law set forth in the United Nations Charter (Press Release GA/EF/3202).  The second text, titled “International trade and development”, was approved by a recorded vote of 109 in favour to 47 against, with 5 abstentions ( Mexico, Norway, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia).  By its terms, the Assembly would call upon World Trade Organization members to adhere to the Doha Ministerial Declaration’s development mandate, and stress that the Doha talks should conclude with the establishment of rules and disciplines in agriculture, as well as non-agricultural market access.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206

Another draft, on the international financial system and development (A/62/417/Add.2), would have the Assembly stress the importance of reaching early agreement on a credible and time-bound package of quota and voice reforms in the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and reiterate the need to effectively enhance the voice and participation of developing countries in the Bretton Woods institutions.  Further, the Assembly would underscore the importance of promoting international financial stability, sustainable growth and national efforts to bolster developing countries’ resilience to financial risk.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 5 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3205)

By a draft on the external debt crisis and development (A/62/417/Add.3), the Assembly would emphasize the importance of timely, comprehensive solutions to developing countries’ debt problems, the shared responsibility of creditors and debtors to prevent unsustainable debt situations, and the fact that debt relief does not replace other sources of financing.  It would also note with concern that some countries have reached the completion point of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Debt Initiative, but have yet to achieve lasting debt sustainability, and that the current debt sustainability framework for middle-income countries inadequately addresses solvency issues.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

Contained in the Committee’s report on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development (document A/62/418) is a draft resolution that would have the Assembly decide to hold the Follow-up International Conference on Financing for Development to Review the Implementation of the Monterrey Consensus from 29 November to 2 December 2008 in Doha, Qatar, at the highest possible level.  It would stress the importance of fully involving all relevant stakeholders in the implementation of the Consensus and the follow-up process, and would call upon the regional commissions, with the support of regional development banks and other relevant entities, to hold consultations during the first half of 2008 to serve as inputs for the preparation of the Review Conference.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

The Committee’s report on sustainable development (documents A/62/419 Part I and Part II) contains 11 draft resolutions.  One text would have the Assembly decide to adopt the non-legally binding instrument on all types of forests, which stresses the need to strengthen political commitment and collective efforts concerning forestry issues, and to review its effectiveness.  That text was approved without a vote on 28 November.  (Press Release GA/EF/3203)

Another text, relating to the oil slick on Lebanese shores, would have the Assembly request that Israel promptly and adequately compensate Lebanon and other countries directly affected for the costs of repairing the environmental damage caused by the destruction, including the restoration of the marine environment.  It would also call for the creation of an eastern Mediterranean oil spill restoration fund to support the integrated, environmentally sound management of the environmental disaster resulting from the destruction by the Israeli Air Force of oil storage tanks at Lebanon’s Jiyah electric power plant.  The Committee approved that draft by a recorded vote of 153 in favour to 7 against ( Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 2 abstentions ( Colombia, Côte d’Ivoire), on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

By a draft on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (document A/62/419/Add.1), the Assembly would call upon Member States and relevant United Nations organizations to step up efforts to promote technology development and transfer to developing countries under fair, transparent and mutually agreed terms.  It would also support the use of local know-how and technology, and the promotion of research and technology to increase agricultural productivity and food security in poor, rural areas.  The Committee approved that text on 11 December by a recorded vote of 118 in favour to none against, with 29 abstentions.  (Press Release GA/EF/3207)

Another draft would have the Assembly call upon stakeholders to take action to ensure the effective implementation of and follow-up to the commitments, programmes and targets adopted at the World Summit on Sustainable Development.  The Committee approved it without a vote on 30 November.  (Press Release GA/EF/3204)

By a text on the follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States (document A/62/419/Add.2), the Assembly would urge all Governments and relevant international and regional stakeholders to take timely action for the effective implementation of and follow-up to the Mauritius Declaration and the implementation strategy.  The Assembly would also call for new and additional voluntary resources to revitalize the Small Island Developing States Information Network.  The Committee approved that draft without a vote on 30 November.  (Press Release GA/EF/3204)

A text on the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (document A/62/419/Add.3) would have the Assembly call upon the international community to step up efforts to implement fully the commitments of the Hyogo Declaration and the Hyogo Framework for Action.  It would call upon the international community to support the development and strengthening of institutions, mechanisms and capacities at all levels that could systematically help build resilience to natural hazards.  It would also stress the importance of disaster risk reduction and subsequent growing demands on the International Strategy’s secretariat, as well as the need to review current methods of financing the secretariat, in order to stabilize its financial base.  That draft was approved without a vote on 5 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3205

By the terms of a draft resolution on protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/62/419/Add.4), the Assembly would stress the seriousness of climate change, and strongly urge States that have not yet ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to do so in a timely manner.  By other terms, the Assembly would recognize the serious risks and challenges posed by climate change, and call upon States urgently to take global action to address the phenomenon, in line with the Convention’s principles.  The Committee first approved operative paragraph 11 of the text, concerning the Convention’s budget, by a recorded vote of 160 in favour to 2 against (Japan, United States), with no abstentions, before approving the resolution as a whole, without a vote, on 30 November.  (Press Release GA/EF/3204

According to a draft resolution on the implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa (document A/62/419/Add.5), the Assembly would reiterate its call upon Governments, in collaboration with relevant multilateral organizations, including implementation agencies of the Global Environment Facility (GEF), to integrate desertification into their sustainable development plans and strategies.  It would also invite Governments, multilateral organizations, the private sector and other relevant groups to make resources available to desert-affected developing countries for the 10-year strategic plan and framework to implement the Convention.  The Committee approved that draft without a vote on 5 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3205)

A text on the Convention on Biological Diversity (document A/62/419/Add.6) would have the Assembly urge all Member States to fulfil their commitments to significantly reduce the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010, while emphasizing the need for an appropriate focus on biodiversity loss in their relevant policies and programmes.  The Assembly would also stress the importance of private-sector engagement in technology transfer and invite businesses to align their policies and practices more explicitly with the Convention’s objectives.  That draft was approved without a vote on 5 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3205)

By a text on the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twenty-fourth special session (document A/62/419/Add.7), the Assembly would decide to declare the decade 2010-2020 as the United Nations Decade for Deserts and the Fight against Desertification, to and stress the need to further advance and fully implement the Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity-Building.  The Committee approved that draft without a vote on 30 November.  (Press Release GA/EF/3204

By a draft on sustainable mountain development (document A/62/419/Add.8), the Assembly would note with concern the key challenges to achieving sustainable development, eradicating poverty in mountain regions, and protecting mountain ecosystems.  It would underline the importance of sustainable forest management, the avoidance of deforestation, and the restoration of lost and degraded forest ecosystems.  Further, the Assembly would express its deep concern over the number and scale of recent disasters, and their increasing impact, particularly in mountain regions, especially those in developing countries.  That text was approved without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

A text on promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, including the implementation of the World Solar Programme (document A/62/419/Add.9), would have the Assembly call upon Governments and relevant stakeholders to combine the use of renewable energy resources and advanced energy technologies with that of traditional energy resources to achieve sustainable development.  It would also call upon Governments to better mobilize financial resources, technology transfer, capacity-building and environmentally sound technologies for developing countries and those with economies in transition.  The Assembly would stress that the wider use and exploration of renewable energy requires technology transfer and diffusion on a global scale, including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation.  The text was approved without a vote on 5 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3205)

Contained in the report on implementation of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) (document A/62/420) is a draft resolution by which the Assembly would call for continued financial support to the Programme, through increased voluntary contributions, and invite Governments in a position to do so to provide predictable multi-year funding and increased non-earmarked contributions to support programme implementation.  The Committee approved the text without a vote on 5 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3205)

The report on globalization and interdependence (document A/62/421) contains four draft resolutions, beginning with one on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence (document A/62/421/Add.1).  By its terms, the Assembly would underline that developing countries, particularly least developed countries, landlocked developing countries, small island developing States and African countries, have great difficulty in balancing international obligations, processes and rules with their national development strategies.  It would stress the right of all countries to pursue policies based on their social, political, economic and environmental conditions.  The text was adopted without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

Addendum 2 of that report (document A/62/421/Add.2), contains two texts.  The first, on science and technologies for development, would have the Assembly reaffirm its commitment to strengthen mechanisms and initiatives for research and development in addressing developing countries’ special needs.  It would encourage the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), with relevant partners, to assist developing countries in their efforts to integrate science, technology and innovation policies into national development strategies.  The Committee adopted the text without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

The second draft, which would have the Assembly decide to declare 2009 the International Year of Astronomy, was approved without a vote on 16 November.  (Press Release GA/EF/3202)

Also before the Assembly was a text on preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of assets of illicit origin and returning such assets, in particular to the countries of origin, consistent with the United Nations Convention against Corruption (document A/62/421/Add.3).  By its terms, the Assembly would condemn corruption in all its forms, including bribery, money-laundering and the transfer of assets of illicit origin.  It would stress the importance of mutual legal assistance; encourage Member States to enhance international cooperation, consistent with the Convention; and urge all Member States to abide by the principles of proper management of public affairs and public property, fairness, responsibility and equality before the law.  They would also be encouraged to safeguard integrity and foster a culture of transparency, accountability and rejection of corruption.  The Committee approved the text without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

Contained in the report on groups of countries in special situations (document A/62/422) are two draft resolutions, including one on the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries (document A/62/422/Add.1), by which the Assembly would reaffirm its commitment to the Istanbul Declaration on the Least Developed Countries:  Time for Action.  It would remain concerned about insufficient, uneven progress thus far in implementing the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010.  It would also urge least developed countries to strengthen implementation through their respective national development frameworks, including poverty reduction strategy papers, common country assessments, and the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF).  Development partners would be urged to continue to support the efforts of countries graduating from the list of least developed countries to better promote their further integration into the world economy, as well as sustainable development.  The Committee approved the text without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

The second draft, titled “Specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation” (document A/62/422/Add.2), would have the Assembly decide to hold, from existing resources, on 2 and 3 October 2008, a midterm high-level plenary review of the Almaty Programme of Action.  It would request that the Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States, in consultation with relevant United Nations bodies, prepare a draft outline of an outcome document for the review.  It would also encourage donor countries, as well as multilateral and regional financial and development institutions, to provide landlocked and transit developing countries with appropriate technical and financial assistance, such as grants or concessionary loans, to implement the action programme, and to make voluntary contributions to the trust fund set up by the Secretary-General in support of the follow-up to Almaty.  The Committee approved the text without a vote on 5 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3205)

Contained in the report on eradication of poverty and other development issues (document A/62/423) are three draft resolutions, including one on the Second United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2008-2017) (document A/62/423/Add.1), by which the Assembly would proclaim the Decade; urge all Governments and the international community to continue seriously to pursue poverty eradication; and call upon donor countries to continue giving priority, on a bilateral or multilateral basis, to poverty eradication in assistance programmes and budgets.  The draft was approved without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

The second draft in that report is on women in development (document A/62/423/Add.2).  By its terms,the Assembly would call for full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the twenty-third special session.  It would urge Member States, non-governmental organizations and the United Nations to increase the number of women in decision-making, and empower them effectively to participate in developing and implementing poverty eradication policies and programmes.  The Assembly would urge all Member States to work to eliminate discrimination against women, particularly poor, uneducated women, through better and equal access to financial credit, legal assistance, training and education, and by enacting laws ensuring their full and equal rights to own land, housing and other property.  They should also make better efforts to achieve universal access to HIV prevention programmes, treatment, care and support by 2010.  The Committee approved the text without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

According to the third draft, on human resources development (document A/62/423/Add.3), the Assembly would encourage Member States to make technological knowledge and learning a priority of their human resources development strategies, and encourage the international community to facilitate an adequate diffusion of scientific and technical knowledge and technology transfer for developing countries, under fair, transparent and mutually agreed terms, and in a manner conducive to human resources development.  It would call upon the international community to support developing countries’ efforts to address the adverse effects of HIV and AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and other infectious diseases on their human resources.  The Assembly would stress the importance of investment in research and development in all countries, particularly developing countries, to develop a technological base and create knowledge and innovation relevant to local needs.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

The Committee’s report on operational activities for development (document A/62/424) contains three draft resolutions, including one on proposed amendments to the General Regulations of the World Food Programme (document A/62/424/Add.1).  It would have the Assembly revise the general rules section of that document, which would enter into force on 1 January 2008.  The Committee adopted the text without a vote on 28 November.  (Press Release GA/EF/3203)

The second draft resolution, on the triennial comprehensive policy review of operational activities for development of the United Nations system (document A/62/424/Add.2), would have the Assemblyunderscore that there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach to development, and that United Nations development assistance should respond to programme countries’ varying development needs and be in line with national development plans and strategies.  The Assembly would also note with concern the overall decline in official development assistance (ODA) in 2006, and would call on developed countries in particular to achieve the target of giving 0.7 per cent of gross domestic product in ODA by 2015, and at least 0.5 per cent of GDP by 2010, as well as the target of 0.15 per cent to 0.2 percent for least developed countries.  It would also note with concern the decline in recent years of the share of core contributions to United Nations funds and programmes, and would urge donor countries, and others in a position to do so, substantially to increase their voluntary contributions to core or regular budgets of the United Nations system, and contribute on a multi-year basis in a sustained and predictable way.  That text was approved without a vote on 18 December.  (Press ReleaseGA/EF/3208)

According to the third draft resolution, onSouth-South cooperation for development (document A/62/424/Add.3),the Assembly would stress that South-South cooperation offers viable opportunities for developing countries in their individual and collective pursuit of sustained economic growth and sustainable development.  South-South cooperation should complement, rather than substitute for, North-South cooperation.  The Assembly would invite the High-Level Committee on South-South Cooperation and the Executive Boards of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) to consider measures to strengthen UNDP’s Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, as a separate entity and a focal point for South-South cooperation.  The Committee approved the text without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

The report on training and research:  United Nations Institute for Training and Research (document A/62/425) would have the Assembly urge the Board of Trustees expeditiously to implement the remaining recommendations made by the Board of Auditors for the 2002-2003 period.  It would renew its appeal to all Governments, particularly those of developed countries, and to private institutions that have not yet contributed financially or otherwise to the Institute, to give it their generous financial and other support.  It would urge States that have interrupted their voluntary contributions to consider resuming them in view of the strategic reforms.  The Committee approved the text without a vote on 7 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3206)

Contained in the report titled “Towards global partnerships” (document A/62/426), the Assembly would stress that partnerships should be consistent with national laws and development strategies, and would call upon the international community to continue promoting multi-stakeholder approaches to development challenges in the context of globalization.  It would encourage the Global Compact, as an innovative public-private partnership, to advance United Nations values and responsible business practices, within the Organization and among the global business community.  It would request that the Secretary-General, in consultation with Member States, promote mechanisms to assess the impact of partnerships, taking into account the best tools available, so as to enable effective management, ensure accountability and facilitate effective learning from both successes and failures.  That text was approved without a vote on 5 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3205)

The report on the revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/62/427) contains the draft programme of work for the Second Committee for the sixty-third session of the General Assembly, which the Committee approved without a vote on 18 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3208)

Also before the Assembly was a report on programme planning (document A/62/428), which the Committee also approved without a vote on 18 December.  (Press Release GA/EF/3208)

Action on Plenary-Generated Texts

The Assembly began its work by adopting, without a vote, three draft resolutions, respectively on implementation of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS and the Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS (document A/62/L.40); the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (document A/62/L.10/Rev.1); and 2001-2010:  Decade to Roll Back Malaria in Developing Countries, Particularly in Africa (document A/62/L.39).  It postponed action on a second text concerning NEPAD (New Partnership for Africa’s Development) (document A/62/L.29).

Speaking after the adoption of the text on Roll Back Malaria, the Observer for the Holy See said it recognized that the disease could be eliminated by educating and sensitizing the public, as well as committing resources.  There was an ongoing need to ensure greater distribution of resources for research and treatment.  Malaria was a threat to health security that would be addressed if the global family committed itself to affordable, action-oriented programmes involving research, vaccination, treatment and preventative education.  The resolution was a step in the right direction.

On a point of order, the representative of Egypt said his country’s name had been added to the list of co-sponsors, but it was actually part of the African Group.

Action on Second Committee Reports

TAMAR TCHITANAVA ( Georgia), Rapporteur of the Second Committee, introduced that body’s reports.

Taking up the first report, on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/62/415), the Assembly adopted the related draft resolution by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Fiji, Nauru, Tonga, Vanuatu).  (See annex I)

The Assembly then took up the report on information and communication technologies for development (document A/62/416), adopting the related text without a vote.

Turning to the four-part report on macroeconomic policy questions (document A/62/417), the Assembly decided to take note of it and consider its addenda.

As it took up Addendum 1, which contained two drafts on international trade and development (document A/62/417/Add.1), a recorded vote was requested. 

The Assembly then adopted the first draft, titled “Unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries”, by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 51 abstentions.  (Annex II)

Following that action, the representative of the United States said every State had the right to cut off trade when it served values about which the nation felt strongly.  The idea of an international prohibition on that was not realistic.  Sanctions should not be used in all cases, but the resolution was aimed at undermining the ability of the international community to act effectively.  Economic sanctions could be and had been legitimate means, and the resolution would do nothing to change that view.

The second draft, titled “International trade and development”, was then adopted by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 48 against, with 7 abstentions ( Marshall Islands, Mexico, Norway, Palau, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia).  (Annex III)

Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted two drafts, on the international financial system and development (document A/62/417/Add.2) and the external debt crisis and development (document A/62/417/Add.3), respectively.

The Assembly then adopted, once again without a vote, a draft resolution contained in the report on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development (document A/62/418).

Taking up the 11-part report on sustainable development (documents A/62/419 (Part 1) and (Part II)), the Assembly took note of it and adopted, by consensus, the draft on the non-legally binding instrument on all types of forests contained in Part 1 of the report.

A recorded vote was requested in connection with the draft on the oil slick on Lebanese shores, contained in Part II of the report, which the Assembly then adopted by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 3 abstentions (Cameroon, Colombia, Cote d’Ivoire).  (Annex IV)

The Assembly then took up the draft titled “Implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development” (document A/62/419/Add.1), adopting it without a vote.

Taking up a text on agricultural technology for development, it then adopted that text by a recorded vote of 147 in favour to none against, with 30 abstentions.  (Annex V)

After that action, the representative of Israel said the resolution was solely of social concern, and expressed regret that certain delegations had injected a political element.  It was a non-political resolution that would bolster development and benefit humanity.  The Israeli delegation was disappointed that it could not be adopted by consensus.  While respecting the decision of some Arab delegations to vote as they had done, such a decision was the outcome of a political decision.  However, the Israeli delegation was pleased with the Assembly’s support.  There was a need to improve agriculture to help achieve the Millennium Development Goals, and the implementation process was greatly anticipated.

The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution titled “Follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States” (document A/62/419/Add.2).

Following that action, the representative of Venezuela said he opposed the resolution because his country participated actively in being useful to small island States.  However, Venezuela wished to issue reservations with respect to two paragraphs because it was not a party to the Convention on the Law of the Sea.

The Assembly then took up the draft on the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (document A/62/419/Add.3), adopting it without a vote.

It then adopted the draft on protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/62/419/Add.4).

Taking up the text titled “Implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa” (document A/62/419/Add.5), the Assembly adopted operative paragraph 17 of that text by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 2 against (Japan, United States), with 1 abstention (Israel).  (Annex VI)

Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted the text as whole.

It then adopted, again by consensus, a text on the Convention on Biological Diversity (document A/62/419/Add.6).

The Assembly then took up the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), adopting without a vote the related text titled “Report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twenty-fourth special session” (document A/62/419/Add.7).

It then adopted, also without a vote, a draft on sustainable mountain development (document A/62/419/Add.8).

The Assembly then adopted, in another consensus action, a text on promotion of new and renewable sources of energy including the implementation of the World Solar Programme (document A/62/419/Add.9).

Taking up the report titled “Implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat)” (document A/62/420), the Assembly adopted without a vote the eponymous draft resolution.

Turning to the report on globalization and interdependence (document A/62/421), the Assembly adopted, again by consensus, texts on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence (document A/62/421/Add.1), and on science and technologies for development, as orally corrected, and the International Year of Astronomy, 2009 (document A/62/421/Add.2).

Following those actions, the Assembly adopted, once again without a vote, a draft titled “Preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of assets of illicit origin and returning such assets, in particular to the countries of origin, consistent with the United Nations Convention against Corruption” (document A/62/421/Add.3).

It then took up the report on groups of countries in special situations (document A/62/422), adopting by consensus the draft resolution on the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries (document A/62/422/Add.1).

Acting again by consensus, the Assembly then adopted the text titled “Specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation (document A/62/422/Add.2).

Turning to the report on eradication of poverty and other development issues (document A/62/423), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, the text on the Second United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2008-2017), contained in document A/62/423/Add.1.

It then adopted, without a vote, drafts on women in development (document A/62/423/Add.2) and on human resources development (document A/62/423/Add.3).

The Assembly then took up the four-part report on operational activities for development (document A/62/424), adopting, again without a vote, the draft on proposed amendments to the General Regulations of the World Food Programme.

It then adopted, also by consensus, a draft decision titled “Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report on the activities of the United Nations Development Fund for Women” (document A/62/424/Add.1); a draft titled “Triennial comprehensive policy review of operational activities for development of the United Nations system” (document A/62/424/Add.2); and a text on South-South cooperation for development (document A/62/424/Add.3).

Acting again without a vote, the Assembly then adopted a draft titled “Training and research:  United Nations Institute for Training and Research”, contained in an eponymous report (document A/62/425).

In another consensus action, it adopted a text titled “Towards global partnerships”, contained in a report by the same name (document A/62/426).

The Assembly then adopted the programme of work for the Second Committee’s sixty-third session, as contained in its report on the revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/62/427).

Finally, it took note of the Committee’s report on programme planning (document A/62/428), adopting a draft decision relating to Economic and Social Council support and coordination, and the proposed strategic framework for the period 2009-2010, as proposed by the Committee for Programme and Coordination.

ANNEX I

Vote on Permanent Sovereignty

The draft resolution on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/62/415) was adopted by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 7 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Fiji, Nauru, Tonga, Vanuatu.

Absent:  Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Liberia, Madagascar, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tuvalu.

ANNEX II

Vote on Coercive Measures

The draft resolution on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries (document A/62/417/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 2 against, with 51 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Burundi, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

Absent:  El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Papua New Guinea, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tuvalu.

ANNEX III

Vote on International Trade

The draft resolution on international trade and development (document A/62/417/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 48 against, with 7 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Marshall Islands, Mexico, Norway, Palau, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia.

Absent:  Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Tuvalu, United Republic of Tanzania.

ANNEX IV

Vote on Oil Slick

The draft resolution on the oil slick on Lebanese shores (document A/62/419 (PART II)) was adopted by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 8 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon, Colombia, Côte d’Ivoire.

Absent:  Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu.

ANNEX V

Vote on Agricultural Technology

The draft resolution on agricultural technology for development (document A/62/419/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 147 in favour to none against, with 30 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam.

Against:  None.

Abstain:  Algeria, Bahrain, Brunei Darussalam, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Cuba, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Iran, Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu.

ANNEX VI

Vote on Operative Paragraph 17

Operative paragraph 17 of the draft resolution on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa (document A/62/419/Add.5) was adopted by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 2 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Japan, United States.

Abstain:  Israel.

Absent:  Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Grenada, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Namibia, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.