DISARMAMENT COMMITTEE APPROVES TEXT REAFFIRMING URGENCY OF PREVENTING OUTER SPACE ARMS RACE, NEED FOR REINFORCING EXISTING LEGAL REGIME

25 October 2006
GA/DIS/3334

DISARMAMENT COMMITTEE APPROVES TEXT REAFFIRMING URGENCY OF PREVENTING OUTER SPACE ARMS RACE, NEED FOR REINFORCING EXISTING LEGAL REGIME

25 October 2006
General Assembly
GA/DIS/3334
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-first General Assembly

First Committee

20th Meeting (PM)

DISARMAMENT COMMITTEE APPROVES TEXT REAFFIRMING URGENCY OF PREVENTING

OUTER SPACE ARMS RACE, NEED FOR REINFORCING EXISTING LEGAL REGIME

21 Draft Resolutions Recommended to General Assembly;

Multilateralism, Information Security Threats Among Other Issues Addressed

The General Assembly would reaffirm the importance and urgency of preventing an arms race in outer space, under the terms of 1 of 21 draft texts approved today by the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) on a wide range of issues, including the disarmament aspects of outer space, conventional weapons and regional and other disarmament and security measures.

The Assembly would further reaffirm that the existing legal regime applicable to outer space did not guarantee the prevention of such an arms race, and that there was a need to consolidate and reinforce that regime, with the Conference on Disarmament playing the primary role in negotiating a multilateral agreement or agreements on the issue.

The text was approved by a vote of 166 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 2 abstentions ( Côte d’Ivoire, Israel) (for details see Annex I).

The Committee also approved a draft on transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities, which would have the Assembly invite all Member States to submit concrete proposals on such measures to the Secretary-General before the Assembly’s sixty-second session.  It would further request the Secretary-General to submit to the Assembly, at its next session, a report with an annex containing those proposals.

The text was approved by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel) (Annex II).

On the promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation, the Committee approved a draft, which would have Assembly underline the importance of preserving the existing agreements on arms regulation and disarmament, and call once again upon all Member States to renew and fulfil their commitments to multilateral cooperation, as well as refrain from resorting or threatening to resort to unilateral actions or directing unverified non-compliance accusations against one another.

The text was approved by a vote of 117 in favour to 4 against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 50 abstentions (Annex IV).

Addressing developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security, the Committee approved a draft resolution, by which the Assembly would call upon Member States to further promote at multilateral levels the consideration of existing and potential threats in the field of information security, as well as possible measures to limit the threats emerging in that field, consistent with the need to preserve the free flow of information.

The draft was approved by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions (see Annex VII).

The Committee also approved a draft on the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament, by which the Assembly would express its concern about growing proliferation of ad hoc and exclusive export control regimes and arrangements for dual-use goods and technologies, and also emphasize that internationally negotiated guidelines for the transfer of high technology with military applications should take into account the legitimate defence requirements of all States while ensuring that access to high-technology products and services and know-how for peaceful purposes was not denied.

The text was approved by a vote of 107 in favour to 52 against, with 13 abstentions (Annex VIII).

In the area of other disarmament measures and international security, the Committee also approved draft resolutions on the observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control by a vote of 168 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 3 abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom) (Annex V), as well as a draft on the relationship between disarmament and development by a vote of 169 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 2 abstentions (France, Israel) (Annex VI).

The Committee also approved a draft on conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels by a vote of 165 in favour to 1 against ( India), with 1 abstention ( Bhutan) (Annex III).

Acting without a vote, the Committee approved drafts on the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects; information on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms; activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa; strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region; regional disarmament; confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context; verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verification; the United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education; the United Nations Disarmament Information Programme; the United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament; the report of the Disarmament Commission; the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean; and the report of the Conference on Disarmament.

General statements were made today by the representatives of China, United States, New Zealand (also on behalf of Canada and Australia) and Venezuela.

Explanations of vote were delivered by the representatives of Brazil, Japan, Finland (on behalf of the European Union), Cameroon, India, Spain, Cuba, Iran, United Kingdom, Egypt, United States, Pakistan, Turkey.

The Committee will meet again at 3 p.m. Thursday, 26 October, to continue action on all disarmament and security-related draft texts.

Background

The First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) met this afternoon to continue its third and final phase of work, namely, action on all draft resolutions and decisions.

Expected to be acted on under cluster 3, which concerns disarmament aspects of outer space, are drafts on prevention of an arms race in outer space and on transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities.

Action is also expected on two drafts from cluster 4, which deals with conventional weapons, one on the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons and one on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms.

From cluster 5, which concerns regional disarmament and security, action is expected on five drafts.  Those drafts concern the activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on security questions in Central Africa; strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region; regional disarmament; confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context; and conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels.

From cluster 6, which concerns other disarmament measures and international security, action is expected on eight drafts.  Those are promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation; observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control; the relationship between disarmament and development; a decision on verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verifications; the United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education, the United Nations Disarmament Information Programme; developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security; and the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament.

Expected to be acted on under cluster 7, which deals with disarmament machinery, are drafts on:  convening the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament; United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament; the report of the Disarmament Commission; United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean; and the report of the Conference on Disarmament.

Draft Summaries

Cluster 3

According to a draft on the prevention of an arms race in outer space (document A/C.1/61/L.10/Rev.1), the Assembly would reaffirm the importance and urgency of preventing such an arms race and the readiness of all States to contribute to that common objective, in conformity with the 1967 Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and other Celestial Bodies.

The Assembly would also reaffirm that the legal regime applicable to outer space does not, in and or itself, guarantee the prevention of such an arms race and that there is a need to consolidate and reinforce that regime and enhance its effectiveness.  To that end, the Assembly would reiterate that the Conference on Disarmament has the primary role in the negotiation of a multilateral agreement or agreements on the prevention of such an arms race and would invite the Conference to establish an ad hoc committee on the issue, with an appropriate mandate, as early as possible during its 2007 session. 

A draft on transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities (document A/C.1/61/L.36) would have the Assembly invite all Member States to submit to the Secretary-General before the Assembly’s sixty-second session concrete proposals on international outer space transparency and confidence-building measures.  It would further request the Secretary-General to submit to the Assembly, at its sixty-second session, a report with an annex containing those proposals.

Cluster 4

A draft resolution on the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects (document A/C.1/61/L.18), would have the Assembly call upon all States to take all measures to become parties to the Convention and the Protocols thereto, in order to achieve the widest possible adherence at an early date.  The draft would further call upon all State parties to the Convention that have not yet done so, to express their consent to be bound by the Protocols to the Convention and the amendment extending the scope of the Convention and the Protocols to include armed conflicts of a non-international character.

A draft resolution on information on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms (document A/C.1/61/L.40) would have the Assembly encourage Member States to continue adopting confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms and to provide information in that regard.  The text would further welcome the establishment of an electronic database containing information provided by Member States.

Cluster 5

A draft on regional confidence-building measures:  activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on security questions in Central Africa (document A/C.1/61/L.33) would have the Assembly strongly appeal to the international community to provide all necessary support for the smooth functioning of the electoral process in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and to support the efforts undertaken by the States concerned to implement disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programmes.  It would further emphasize the need to make the early warning mechanism in Central Africa operational and request the Secretary-General to support the establishment of a network of parliamentarians with a view to the creation of a subregional parliament in Central Africa.

A draft on the strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region (document A/C.1/61/L.34) would have the Assembly call upon all States of the Mediterranean region that had not yet done so to adhere to all multilaterally negotiated legal instruments related to the field of disarmament and non-proliferation.  It would also encourage those States to favour the necessary conditions for strengthening confidence-building measures, including by promoting genuine openness and transparency on all military matters by, among other things, participating in the United Nations system for the standardized reporting of military expenditures and by providing accurate data and information to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms.  It would also encourage them to strengthen further their cooperation in combating terrorism, international crime, illicit arms transfers, and illicit drug production, consumption and trafficking.

A draft on regional disarmament (document A/C.1/61/L.41) would have the Assembly stress that sustained efforts were needed within the framework of the Conference on Disarmament and under the umbrella of the United Nations to make progress on the entire range of disarmament issues and call upon States to conclude agreements, wherever possible, for nuclear non-proliferation, disarmament and confidence-building measures at the regional and subregional levels.

A draft on confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context (document A/C.1/61/L.42) would have the Assembly call upon Member States to refrain from the use or threat of use of force in accordance with the United Nations Charter.  It would further call upon Member States to pursue the ways and means regarding confidence- and security-building measures set out in the report of the Disarmament Commission’s 1993 session through sustained consultations and dialogue while avoiding actions which might hinder or impair such a dialogue.  Further, it would urge States to comply strictly with all bilateral, regional and international agreements to which they were party.

A draft resolution conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels (document A/C.1/61/L.43) would have the Assembly decide to give urgent consideration to the issues involved in conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels.  It would also have the Assembly request that the Conference on Disarmament consider the formulation of principles that could serve as a framework for regional agreements on conventional arms control.

Cluster 6

A draft on the promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (document A/C.1/61/L.6) would have the Assembly underline the importance of preserving the existing agreements on arms regulation and disarmament.  It would call once again upon all Member States to renew and fulfil their individual and collective commitments to multilateral cooperation and request that State parties to the relevant instruments on weapons of mass destruction consult and cooperate among themselves in resolving their concerns on cases of non-compliance and implementation.  It would also call once again on Member States to refrain from resorting or threatening to resort to unilateral actions or directing unverified non-compliance accusations against one another.

A draft resolution on the observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (document A/C.1/61/L.7) would have the Assembly reaffirm that international disarmament forums should take fully into account the relevant environmental norms in negotiating treaties and agreements on disarmament and arms limitations.  It would also call upon States to adopt unilateral, bilateral, regional and multilateral measures to contribute to ensuring the application of scientific and technological progress within the framework of international security, disarmament and other related spheres, without detriment to the environment or to its effective contribution to attaining sustainable development.

A draft resolution on the relationship between disarmament and development (document A/C.1/61/L.8) would have the Assembly stress the central role of the United Nations in the disarmament-development relationship and request the Secretary-General to further strengthen the role of the Organization in that field, in particular the high-level Steering Group on Disarmament and Development.  It would also request that the Secretary-General continue to take action for the implementation of the action programme adopted at the 1987 International Conference on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development.

A draft on verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verification (document A/C.1/61/L.22) would have the Assembly encourage the Panel of Government Experts on Verification to bring its work to an agreed conclusion as soon as possible.

The draft resolution on United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education (document A/C.1/61/L.30) would have the Assembly encourage Member States to continue applying the study’s recommendations and reporting to the Secretary-General on steps taken to implement them.

The draft on the United Nations Disarmament Information Programme (document A/C.1/61/L.31) would have the Assembly stress the importance of the Programme as a significant instrument in enabling all Member States to participate fully in the deliberations and negotiations on disarmament in the various United Nations bodies, in assisting them in complying with treaties and in contributing to agreed mechanisms.  It would further recommend that the Programme continue to inform, educate and generate public understanding of the importance of multilateral action and support for it, including action by the United Nations and the Conference on Disarmament, in the field of arms limitation and disarmament, in a balanced and objective manner.

The draft resolution on developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security (document A/C.1/61/L.35) would have the Assembly call upon Member States to promote further at multilateral levels the consideration of existing and potential threats in the field of information security, as well as possible measures to limit the threats emerging in this field, consistent with the need to preserve the free flow of information.

Expressing its concern about growing proliferation of ad hoc and exclusive export control regimes and arrangements for dual-use goods and technologies and also emphasizing that internationally negotiated guidelines for the transfer of high technology with military applications should take into account the legitimate defence requirements of all States while ensuring that access to high-technology products and services and know-how for peaceful purposes was not denied, the draft on the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (document A/C.1/61/L.50) would have the Assembly invite Member States to undertake additional efforts to apply science and technology for disarmament-related purposes and to make disarmament-related technologies available to interested States.  The draft would also urge Member States to undertake multilateral negotiations to establish universally acceptable, non-discriminatory guidelines for international transfers of dual-use goods and technologies and high technology with military applications.

Cluster 7

A draft resolution on United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament (document A/C.1/61/L.9) would have the Assembly appeal to Member States in each region and those able to do so, as well as to international governmental and non-governmental organizations and foundations, to make voluntary contributions to the regional centres in their respective regions to strengthen their initiatives and activities.  The text would further reiterate the importance of the United Nations activities at the regional level to increase the stability and security of its Member States, which could be promoted in a substantive manner by the maintenance and revitalization of three regional centres for peace and disarmament.

A draft resolution on the report of the Disarmament Commission (document A/C.1/61/L.11) would have the Assembly decide to adopt additional measures for improving the effectiveness of the Commission’s methods of work, including that the Chairpersons and Vice-Chairpersons of the Commission and its subsidiary bodies be elected at an organizational session, if possible at least three months before the beginning of the substantive session.  Also, the Assembly would encourage Member States to adopt the draft agenda of the substantive session as early as possible at the organizational meetings of the Commission and encourage the Commission to invite experts on disarmament for discussions at its plenary meetings.  Further to the text, the Assembly would request the Commission to meet for a period not exceeding three weeks during 2007 and recommend that it continue the consideration of recommendations for both achieving the objective of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation of weapons and practical confidence-building measures in the field of conventional weapons.

A draft on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (document A/C.1/61/L.14) would have the Assembly appeal to Member States, in particular those within the Latin American and Caribbean region, and to international governmental and non-governmental organizations and foundations to make and increase voluntary contributions to strengthen the Regional Centre and its programme of activities.  It would invite all States of the region to continue to take part in the Centre’s activities and encourage the Centre to further develop activities in the area of disarmament and development.  It would request the Secretary-General to provide the Centre with all necessary support so that it might carry out its programme of activities in accordance with its mandate. 

A draft on the report of the Conference on Disarmament (document A/C.1/61/L.29) would have the Assembly call upon the Conference to further intensify consultations and explore possibilities with a view to reaching an agreement on a programme of work.  It would also request all State members of the Conference to cooperate with the current President and successive Presidents in their efforts to guide the Conference to the early commencement of substantive work in its 2007 session.

Action on Texts

CHENG JINGYE ( China) said that his country had joined the co-sponsors of the measure on transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities.  Outer space was the common heritage of all mankind.  A world without weapons in outer space was just as important as a world without weapons of mass destruction.  A new instrument to address shortcomings in the outer space legal regime was the only way to meet the challenge of the weaponization of outer space.  Transparency and confidence-building measures were only the first step.  As soon as possible, the Conference on Disarmament should establish the ad hoc committee to prevent the weaponization of outer space.

CHRISTINA ROCCA (United States), referring to the draft resolutions on an outer space arms race, L.10/Rev.1, and confidence building, L.36, said that there was neither an arms race in outer space nor the prospect of one and, thus, no arms control programme was needed.  The arms control regime adequately dealt with the non-weaponization of space.  Her Government remained committed to the peaceful exploration of space.  Its activities were both in accordance with international law and in the interest of promoting international peace.  Furthermore, the United States already had efforts underway to safeguard the peaceful uses of space, including assisting other nations by offering help in collision avoidance.

The Committee then approved the draft on the prevention of an arms race in outer space (A/C.1/61/L.10/Rev.1) by a vote of 166 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 2 abstentions (Côte d’Ivoire, Israel)(Annex I).

The Committee then approved a draft on transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities (document A/C.1/61/L.36) by a vote of 167 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel) (Annex II).

After the vote, JOSE ARTUR DENOT MEDEIROS ( Brazil) said that there were several basic areas of concern, including negative security assurances on nuclear disarmament and the prevention of an arms race in outer space.  On L.10, he said that, in order to restore credibility, the Conference on Disarmament would need to start concrete negotiations as soon as possible after its paralysis.  His Government supported the establishment of an ad hoc committee on the prevention of arms in outer space. 

YOSHIKI MINE (Japan), on L.10/Rev.1, said that his Government was in support of it and thought that the issue of outer space needed to be dealt with without prejudice and based on the results of the ongoing Conference on Disarmament.

The Secretary read out an oral statement on the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects (document A/C.1/61/L.18), indicating that adoption of the draft would not give rise to financial implications under the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007.

The Committee then approved the draft without a vote.

The Committee then approved a text on information on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms (document A/C.1/61/L.40) without a vote.

KARI KAHILUOTO (Finland), speaking on behalf of the European Union, on the draft resolution on strengthening security in the Mediterranean, L.34, said that his delegation attached great importance to the issues of security, non-proliferation and disarmament in the Mediterranean region.  Security in Europe was closely linked to security and stability in the Mediterranean.  The Union had welcomed Libya’s decision to eliminate all material, equipment and programmes which led to the production of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery.  Furthermore, the Union attached particular importance to the wide goal of transforming the Mediterranean into a sea of peace, security, stability, cooperation and development.

FERDINAND NGOH NGOH ( Cameroon), referring to the resolutions on regional disarmament and security, said that his Government had made great regional efforts and believed that those contributed to international peace and security.  Confidence-building measures, with the participation of all States and taking into account the particular characteristics of each region, were important.  Furthermore, he highlighted the important role played by the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on security questions in Central Africa, in promoting confidence-building and limiting armaments. 

The Secretary read out an oral statement on the draft on regional confidence-building measures:  activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on security questions in Central Africa (document A/C.1/61/L.33), indicating that adoption of the draft would not give rise to financial implications under the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007.

The Committee then approved the draft without a vote.

The Committee then approved the draft on strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region (document A/C.1/61/L.34) without a vote.

The Committee then approved the draft on regional Disarmament (document A/C.1/61/L.41) without a vote.

The Committee then approved the draft on confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context (document A/C.1/61/L.42) without a vote.

The Committee then approved the draft on conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels (document A/C.1/61/L.43) by a vote of 165 in favour to 1 against ( India), with 1 abstention ( Bhutan) (Annex III).

After the vote, JAYANT PRASAD ( India) said that the measure on conventional arms control at the regional and subregional level (L.43) required the Conference on Disarmament to formulate principles for regional arms control.  Since India believed that the Conference, as the single multilateral forum for negotiating arms treaties, had responsibility for instruments with global applicability, he had voted against the draft.  The United Nations Disarmament Commission had already adopted by consensus guidelines and recommendations for regional disarmament.  There was no need for the Conference on Disarmament to engage in formulating principles on the same subject, especially when it already had priority issues on its agenda.  In addition, security of States extended beyond narrowly defined regions.  It was unrealistic and unacceptable to limit such measures.

DAVID CARRIEDO ( Spain), on L.43, said that if his delegation had voted, it would have voted for the resolution.

RODOLFO ELISEO BENITEZ VERSON ( Cuba) said that the three resolutions in cluster 6 (on multilateralism L.6, environmental norms L.7, and disarmament and development L.8) were not only of interest to the Non-Aligned Movement, but to all Member States.  In fact, the relevance of those texts had been covered at the Havana Summit last September.  He appealed to all countries for their support, while asking them to respond to requests for information contained within the resolutions, so that those could be reflected in subsequent reports.

The Committee then approved a draft on the promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (document A/C.1/61/L.6) by a vote of 117 in favour to 4 against (Israel, Federated States of Micronesia, United Kingdom, United States), with 50 abstentions (Annex IV).

The Committee then approved a draft resolution on the observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (document A/C.1/61/L.7) by a vote of 168 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 3 abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom) (Annex V).

The Committee then approved a draft resolution on the relationship between disarmament and development (document A/C.1/61/L.8) by a vote of 169 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 2 abstentions ( France, Israel) (Annex VI).

The Committee then approved a draft decision on verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verification (document A/C.1/61/L.22) without a vote.

The Committee then approved a draft resolution on the United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education (document A/C.1/61/L.30) without a vote.

The Committee then approved a draft resolution on the United Nations Disarmament Information Programme (document A/C.1/61/L.31) without a vote.

The Secretary then read out a statement on the draft resolution on developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security (document A/C.1/61/L.35), noting that the draft envisaged the establishment of a group of Government experts that would meet in 2009 and 2010.  Attendant costs of $238,200 would be considered in the context of the preparation of the proposed programme budgets of 2008-2009 and 2010-2011.  No additional requirements would arise under the programme budget for the biennium of 2006-2007.

The Committee then approved the draft by a vote of 169 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions (Annex VII).

The Committee then approved a draft on the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (document A/C.1/61/L.50) by a vote of 107 in favour to 52 against, with 13 abstentions (Annex VIII).

The representative of New Zealand, speaking on behalf of Australia and Canada (CANZ), said that his delegation’s firm and unwavering commitment in the field of non-proliferation was well-established and consistent.  However, both bilateral and regional efforts in contributing to peacebuilding had been sold short by the draft.  Effective progress on non-proliferation objectives needed all to work in tandem -– multilateralism was not the only sustainable method.

REZA NAJAFI ( Iran), explaining his delegation’s vote on verification L.22, said that it was necessary to take the composition of the panel into account, as it had lacked an appropriate balance.  Some regions and subregions had not been represented on that panel and it was, thus, not reflective of all views.  Further, he voiced concern that no more meetings were scheduled.

FARIDA YAMIN ( Venezuela), on information and telecommunication, L.35, said that in light of recent developments in the field of information and telecommunications, she wanted to stress the need for joint efforts.  She noted that international peace could, indeed, be negatively impacted by the actions of non-State groups or by the aggression of States through hostile policies.

JOHN DUNCAN ( United Kingdom) said he wished to explain his vote on the draft on disarmament and development, L.8.  He welcomed the mainstreaming of disarmament in development policy, which was particularly important in conventional weapons, small arms and light weapons and disarmament and demobilization.  He did not believe there was an automatic link between disarmament and development, but a complex relationship.  The resolution did not fully explain that relationship.  Also, he had some reservations about the group of governmental experts.  Because of the United Kingdom’s broader commitment to development goals and to combating the scourge of small arms, it could continue to support the resolution. 

CHRISTINA ROCCA ( United States), on L.8, relationship between disarmament and development, said that those two were distinct issues and they were not linked.  Her delegation would, thus, not consider itself bound by the final document of that conference.

JOSE ARTUR DENOT MEDEIROS (Brazil), referring to L.50 on the role of science and technology, said that he recognized that technology and science could have both civilian and military implications and it was necessary to regulate those.  However, he could not support preambular paragraph 6, as the guidelines of those export control regimes were consistent with legally-binding instruments such as the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and nuclear-weapon-free- zones.  His delegation had abstained for that reason.

KHALIL HASHMI ( Pakistan), on L.22, verification in all its aspects, said that the inconclusive report of the Panel confirmed his delegation’s concern on verification.  When verification was involved, there needed to be greater legitimacy and that called for the adequate representation of countries.

KHALED SHAMAA ( Egypt) said that the draft decision on verification, L.22, encouraged a group of governmental experts to complete their work as soon as possible, despite the fact that member countries had not received all the information they wanted regarding discussions and the work of experts for the three sessions that had each lasted more than three weeks.  Many stumbling blocks had prevented consensus.  Government experts that did not reach agreement at the end of their working sessions should receive encouragement from the General Assembly to complete the work and arrive at consensus results as soon as possible.

CHRISTINA ROCCA ( United States), on L.11, report on the Disarmament Commission, noted that her delegation would not participate.

CAGATAY ERCIYES ( Turkey), explaining his delegation’s vote on L.29, Report of the Conference on Disarmament, said that the resolution included a new reference to the question of expansion of the Conference on Disarmament’s membership.  Turkey maintained that expansion was not a current priority.  Furthermore, membership needed to be addressed on a case by case basis -- with due consideration to the contributions of candidates to international peace and security.

The Secretary then read out a statement on a draft resolution on United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament (document A/C.1/61/L.9), noting that if it were adopted, no additional requirements would arise under the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007.

The Committee then adopted the draft without a vote.

The Committee then adopted a draft resolution on the report of the Disarmament Commission (document A/C.1/61/L.11) without a vote.

The Secretary then read out a statement on the draft on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (document A/C.1/61/L.14), noting that no additional requirements would arise under the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007 if it were adopted.

The Committee then adopted the draft without a vote.

The Committee then adopted a draft on the report of the Conference on Disarmament (document A/C.1/61/L.29) without a vote.

ANNEX I

Vote on Outer Space Arms Race

The draft resolution on prevention of an arms race in outer space (document A/C.1/61/L.10/Rev.1) was approved by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 1 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:  

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  United States.

Abstain:  Côte d’Ivoire, Israel.

Absent:  Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gambia, Kiribati, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Montenegro, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

ANNEX II

Vote on Confidence-Building in Outer Space

The draft resolution on transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities (document A/C.1/61/L.36) was approved by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 1 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  United States.

Abstain:  Israel.

Absent:  Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gambia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

ANNEX III

Vote on Regional Conventional Arms Control

The draft resolution on conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels (document A/C.1/61/L.43) was approved by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 1 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  India.

Abstain:  Bhutan.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gambia, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Spain, Tajikistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.

ANNEX IV

Vote on Multilateralism

The draft resolution on the promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (document A/C.1/61/L.6) was approved by a recorded vote of 117 in favour to 4 against, with 50 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gambia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

ANNEX V

Vote on Environmental Norms

The draft resolution on the observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (document A/C.1/61/L.7) was approved by a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 1 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  United States.

Abstain:  France, Israel, United Kingdom.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gambia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

ANNEX VI

Vote on Disarmament and Development

The draft resolution on the relationship between disarmament and development (document A/C.1/61/L.8) was approved by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 1 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  United States.

Abstain:  France, Israel.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gambia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

ANNEX VII

Vote on Telecommunications and International Security

The draft resolution on developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security (document A/C.1/61/L.35) was adopted by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 1 against, with no abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  United States.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gambia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

ANNEX VIII

Vote on Science and Technology

The draft resolution on the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (document A/C.1/61/L.50) was approved by a recorded vote of 107 in favour to 52 against, with 13 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Brazil, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russian Federation, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Tonga, Uruguay, Uzbekistan.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gambia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.