GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS RESOLUTION STRESSING COOPERATION FOR UNIVERSAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AS IT ACTS ON OVER 40 SECOND COMMITTEE REPORTS

20 December 2006
GA/10564

GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS RESOLUTION STRESSING COOPERATION FOR UNIVERSAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AS IT ACTS ON OVER 40 SECOND COMMITTEE REPORTS

20 December 2006
General Assembly
GA/10564
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-first General Assembly

Plenary

83rd Meeting (PM)

GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS RESOLUTION STRESSING COOPERATION FOR UNIVERSAL

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AS IT ACTS ON OVER 40 SECOND COMMITTEE REPORTS

Delegates also Act on Plenary Texts, Including

Protection of Global Climate for Present, Future Generations

In a bid to ensure that globalization remained a positive force for the world’s people, the General Assembly today unanimously adopted -- among more than 40-plus development-related resolutions put forward by its Second Committee (Economic and Financial) -- a resolution stressing the importance of cooperative efforts by all countries to promote economic development for the benefit of all, as expressed in the United Nations Millennium Declaration.

Adopting a text entitled “Role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence”, the Assembly reaffirmed the need for the United Nations to play a fundamental role in the promotion of international cooperation for development, while resolving to strengthen coordination within the Organization in its attempts to facilitate growth, poverty eradication and sustainable development.

The Assembly also, by other terms of that resolution, urged the international community to facilitate adequate diffusion of scientific and technical knowledge, and called for technical and financial assistance to help developing countries acquire the capacity for adapting technology to fit local needs, in recognition of the fact that most knowledge was generated not in developing countries but in the developed world.

The series of resolutions accompanying that text, of which four were approved by recorded vote, reflected the depth of the Second Committee's agenda during its just-concluded 12-week session.  They touched on development economics in its most general aspects -- for example, the need for a more equitable multilateral trading system and the need to meet the large demand among poor people for financial services -– including the specific challenges faced by individual countries in the form of insurmountable Government debt, low commodity prices and other obstacles.

For instance, the Assembly adopted, by consensus, a resolution on the international financial system and development in which it underscored the importance of competitive and inclusive financial markets in mobilizing investments, thus making a vital contribution to national development efforts.  The theme of “inclusive financial sectors” was also seen in another consensus resolution, on the role of microcredit and microfinance in the eradication of poverty, whereby the Assembly called on Member States and the Bretton Woods institutions to support the efforts of developing countries to provide specialized financial services to the poor, leading to their increasing participation in mainstream economic and political processes.

Resolutions relating to international trade and development and commodities referred to the World Trade Organization's Doha Development Round of trade negotiations, and called on developed as well as developing countries with the ability to do so, to work towards that trade body’s objective of duty-free, quota-free market access for all exports from the least developed countries.

Unique to this year’s resolutions on international trade, however, was the concern expressed by Member States as to whether the Doha talks could be revived after their suspension in July due to disagreements over agriculture.  Indeed, nearly half of the delegates present abstained from the vote on this year’s resolution on international trade and development, which was adopted by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 2 against (Republic of Moldova, United States), with 52 abstentions.  (See annex II for voting details.)

Also echoing past texts was a resolution on the external debt crisis and development by which the Assembly stressed the need to continue addressing the debt problems of least developed countries, particularly through the cancellation of the multilateral and bilateral debt they owed to public and private creditors.  Adopted by consensus, that resolution reiterated that debt sustainability depended on a confluence of many factors, both country-specific (relating to a nation’s macroeconomic policies and regulatory frameworks) and external (brought on by natural disasters, conflicts and changes in global growth prospects).

Some countries had been unable to achieve lasting debt sustainability despite completing the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative (HIPC), begun in 1996 by the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, which led the Assembly to stress the importance of responsible borrowing and lending.  It also underscored the importance of a debt sustainability framework for low-income countries, so as to ensure that new borrowing did not undermine long-term debt sustainability.

[One difference emerging during this year’s Second Committee debate on debt was that some developed Member States no longer perceived the world to be in a “debt crisis”, which prompted a rash of statements objecting to the draft resolution’s title, “External debt crisis and development”.  The Committee nevertheless approved the text.]

Differences emerged openly today when the Assembly turned to the topic of climate change.  A recorded vote was requested in relation to a text entitled “Protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind”, which was adopted by a recorded vote of 137 votes in favour to none against, with 47 abstentions.  By that text, the Assembly would strongly urge States that had not yet done so to join the 189 others that had already ratified the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.  (See annex IV.)

In another recorded vote, the Assembly adopted a resolution affirming the inalienable rights of Arab peoples in occupied lands over their natural resources.  By a recorded 164 votes in favour to 6 against (Australia, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 9 abstentions (Cameroon, Canada, Côte d’Ivoire, Dominican Republic, Fiji, Nauru, Tonga, Uganda, Vanuatu), the Assembly called on Israel not to exploit, damage, cause loss or deplete, or endanger natural resources in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and the occupied Syrian Golan.  It also called on Israel to cease the dumping of waste materials in those occupied territories, which gravely threatened their water and land resources, posing an environmental hazard and health threat to civilian populations.  (See annex I.)

The Assembly also adopted a resolution entitled “Oil slick on Lebanese shores” by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 6 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with no abstentions by which it called for financial and technical assistance to the Government of Lebanon in support of clean-up efforts, after the destruction of oil storage tanks near the Lebanese El-Jiyeh electric power plant by the Israeli Air Force.  (See annex III.)

Meanwhile, resolutions adopted by consensus this afternoon sought to bolster the numerous multilateral frameworks established under the United Nations development agenda, such as the Monterrey Consensus, through a text on the follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development.

Other texts concerned implementation of Agenda 21 and the World Summit on Sustainable Development; the Mauritius Strategy for the implementation of the Programme of Action for Small Island Developing States; the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification; the Convention on Biological Diversity; the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT); the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); the United Nations Convention against Corruption; and the Almaty Programme of Action for Landlocked Developing Countries.

In a show of support for the Philippines, Liberia and Angola, the Assembly adopted three separate resolutions on humanitarian assistance and reconstruction in those countries.

Other Assembly action included adoption of the Second Committee’s programme of work for its next session.

The Rapporteur of the Second Committee introduced that body’s reports, while the representatives of Japan and Poland spoke in explanation of position as the Assembly took action on the various texts.

Taking up plenary-generated resolutions, the Assembly adopted one text on oceans and the law of the sea by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 1 against (Turkey), with 3 abstentions (Colombia, Libya, Venezuela).  (See annex V.)

The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, a resolution on the promotion of inter-religious and intercultural dialogue, understanding and cooperation for peace, by which it decided to convene in 2007 a high-level dialogue on inter-religious and intercultural cooperation on the promotion of tolerance, understanding and universal respect for religion, belief and cultural diversity.  The text also urged States to comply with international obligations and to combat incitement to violence or actual acts of violence, intimidation and coercion based on hatred or intolerance for culture, religion or belief.

Two other resolutions adopted today dealt with cooperation between the United Nations and other organizations.  The first related to the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries was introduced by Brazil on behalf of those countries and the second to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

Finally, the Assembly adopted a resolution by which it established on 14 November as the United Nations World Diabetes Day.  Introducing that text, South Africa’s delegate said its adoption would raise public awareness of the treatment possibilities.

Introducing the plenary drafts were the representatives of Brazil, Netherlands and South Africa (on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China).

The representatives of Finland (on behalf of the European Union), United States, Venezuela, Turkey and Nigeria spoke in explanation of position, while the representative of Bangladesh made a general statement regarding the diabetes text.

The General Assembly will meet again at 3 p.m. on Friday, 22 December, when it is expected to consider the reports of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), as well as a range of outstanding plenary matters, including the International Decade to Roll Back Malaria and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD).

Background

Meeting this afternoon to consider the reports of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial), the General Assembly was expected also to take action on its own plenary draft resolutions relating to the culture of peace, oceans and the Law of the Sea, cooperation between the United Nations and other organizations, and follow-up to the outcome of the Millennium Summit.

The Second Committee reports are the outcome of meetings held between 9 October and 20 December.  They concern the permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (agenda item 40); the report of the Economic and Social Council (item 42); information and communication technology for development (item 50); and macroeconomic policy questions (item 51), which includes sub-items on international trade and development, the international financial system and development, the external debt system and development and commodities.

Also before the Assembly were the Committee’s reports on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development (item 52) and on sustainable development (item 53).  The latter includes the sub-items implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit for Sustainable Development; follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States; International Strategy for Disaster Reduction; protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind; implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification; Convention on Biological Diversity; and the report of the Governing Council of UNEP on its special session.

The Assembly also had before it the Committee’s reports on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme, or UN-HABITAT, (item 54); and on globalization and interdependence (item 55), which includes the sub-items globalization and interdependence, international migration and development, culture and development, preventing and combating corrupt practices and integration of the economies in transition into the world economy.

Other topics considered by the Second Committee include groups of countries in special situations (item 56), which features sub-items on the Third World Conference on the Least Developed Countries, and specific actions related to the particular needs of landlocked developing countries; eradication of poverty and other development issues (item 57), with sub-items on implementation of the first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006) and industrial development cooperation; and operational activities for development of the United Nations system (item 58).

The Assembly also had before it the Committee’s reports on training and research (item 59), which includes sub-items on the United Nations University and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research; strengthening of the coordination of humanitarian and disaster relief assistance of the United Nations, including special economic assistance (item 69), which includes the sub-items special economic assistance to individual countries or regions and participation of volunteers, “White Helmets”, in the activities of the United Nations in the field of humanitarian relief, rehabilitation and technical cooperation for development.  Other Second Committee reports deal with revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (item 110); and programme planning (item 118).

Committee Reports and Draft Resolutions

The report on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/61/418) contains a draft resolution by which the Assembly would call on Israel not to exploit, damage, cause loss or depletion of, or endanger those natural resources.  The Committee approved that text on 10 November by a recorded vote of 141 in favour to 6 against (Australia, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 6 abstentions (Cameroon, Canada, Côte d’Ivoire, Haiti, Nauru, Uganda).  (See Press Release GA/EF/3167.)

Contained in the report on information and communication technology for development (document A/61/419) is a draft decision on the report of the Secretary-General on information and communication technology for development:  progress in the implementation of General Assembly resolution 57/295 (document A/61/54), which the Committee approved without a vote on 7 November.  By its terms, the Assembly would take note of the Secretary-General’s report.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3165.)

The five-part report on macroeconomic policy questions (document A/61/420 and Add.1-4) contains several draft resolutions, including one on international trade and development, by which the Assembly would express serious concern over the suspension of the Doha Round of trade negotiations and call upon developed countries to demonstrate the flexibility and political will to resume the talks.  It would stress the need for the World Trade Organization to live up to its development imperatives in negotiating non-agricultural market access.  Regarding the agreement on Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs), the Assembly would call for accelerated work in that regard, especially on making intellectual property rules fully supportive of the Convention on Biological Diversity.  The Committee approved that draft on 1 December by a recorded vote of 107 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 52 abstentions.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3171.)

Another draft, on the international financial system and development, would have the Assembly stress the importance of reaching early agreement on a credible and time-bound package of reforms that would ensure an increase in the voice, representation and effective participation of developing countries in the Bretton Woods institutions.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 22 November.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3170.)

By a draft on external debt crisis and development the Assembly would emphasize the need for creditors and debtors to share responsibility for preventing unsustainable debt situations.  To ensure long-term debt sustainability, it would call for various measures, such as increased grant-based financing, the cancellation of 100 per cent of the official multilateral and bilateral debt owed by heavily indebted poor countries and, on a case-by-case basis, significant debt relief or restructuring for low- and middle-income developing countries with an unsustainable debt burden that are not part of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Debt Initiative.  The Committee approved that draft by consensus on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

Meanwhile, a draft resolution on commodities would have the Assembly express the urgent need to improve the functioning of commodity markets through efficient and transparent mechanisms, including commodity exchanges, amid deep concern over supply capacity problems and other difficulties preventing many developing countries from benefiting fully from price increases.  In addition, it would call for capacity-building support from the developed world to enable developing countries to develop the necessary measures to meet market requirements, while encouraging the private sector to provide similar support.  That text was approved without a vote on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

A related draft, on the International Year of Natural Fibres, would have the Assembly proclaim 2009 the International Year of Fibres and invite the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to facilitate observance of the Year.  The Committee approved that text by consensus on 1 December (see Press Release GA/EF/3171.)

The Committee’s report on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development (document A/61/421) contains a draft resolution by which the Assembly would decide to hold the follow-up International Conference on Financing for Development to Review the Implementation of the Monterrey Consensus in the second half of 2008, and welcome Qatar’s offer to host that event.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 10 November.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3167.)

The Committee’s eight-part report on sustainable development (documents A/61/422 and Add.1-7) contains 14 draft resolutions, including one entitled International Year of Sanitation, by which the Assembly would declare 2008 the International Year of Sanitation.  Another text, entitled International Year of Forests, which would have the Assembly declare 2011 the International Year of Forests.  The Committee approved those two drafts by consensus on 1 and 6 December respectively.  (See Press Releases GA/EF/3171 and GA/EF/3172.)

Contained in the report on Implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (document A/61/422/Add.1) is a draft relating to the oil slick on Lebanese shores, by which the Assembly would call on Israel to assume responsibility for compensation to the Lebanese Government for the costs associated with the destruction of oil storage tanks, by the Israeli Air Force, in the direct vicinity of Lebanon’s El-Jiyeh electric power plant.  The Committee approved that text on 22 November by a recorded vote of 138 in favour to 5 against ( Australia, Canada, Israel, Palau, United States), with 1 abstention ( El Salvador).  (See Press Release GA/EF/3170.)

That report also contains a text by which the Assembly would call on Governments, the Economic and Social Council and other United Nations bodies, international financial institutions, the Global Environment Facility and intergovernmental organizations and major groups to ensure follow-up to time-bound targets adopted at the World Summit on Sustainable Development.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 8 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

The report on the follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States (document A/61/422/Add.2) contains a draft by which the Assembly would call for the full implementation of commitments made at the January 2005 International Meeting on the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States.  The Assembly would also urge the Secretary-General to ensure that the Small Island Developing States Unit in the Department of Economic and Social Affairs was sufficiently and sustainably staffed to undertake its broad range of mandated functions.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 17 November.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3169.)

That report also contains a draft resolution entitled towards the sustainable development of the Caribbean Sea for present and future generations, which would have the Assembly call for assistance from the United Nations and the international community to protect the Caribbean Sea from the illegal release of oil and other harmful substances from ships, and from the illegal dumping, or accidental release, of radioactive materials, nuclear waste, dangerous chemicals and other hazardous wastes, in violation of international rules and standards, and pollution from land-based activities.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 8 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

Also in the report are three texts relating to disaster reduction, the first of which is entitled natural disasters and vulnerability.  Approved without a vote on 17 November, it would have the Assembly urge the international community to address the adverse effects of natural disasters, particularly in vulnerable developing countries, such as Africa’s least developed countries.  It would stress the importance of close cooperation among Governments, the United Nations and other partners, such as the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, in developing “people-centred” early warning systems.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3169.)

The second text, on the international strategy for disaster reduction, would have the Assembly call on international financial institutions and regional banks, among others, to support efforts led by disaster-stricken countries for disaster risk reduction, in post-disaster recovery and in rehabilitation processes.  By other terms, the Assembly would note the proposed establishment of a global platform for disaster risk reduction as the successor mechanism to the Inter-Agency Task Force for Disaster Reduction, and, taking into account the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action, decide that the Global Platform shall have the same mandate as the Inter-Agency Task Force.  It would decide that the proposed Global Platform be open to all Member States.  The Committee approved that text by consensus on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

By the terms of the third draft, on international cooperation to reduce the impact of the El Niño phenomenon, the Assembly would call for measures to strengthen the International Centre for the Study of the El Niño Phenomenon, and invite the international community to provide scientific, technical and financial assistance and cooperation for that purpose.  It would underscore the importance of maintaining the El Niño/Southern Oscillation observation system, continuing research into extreme weather events, improving forecasting skills and developing appropriate policies for reducing the impact of El Niño and other extreme weather events.  The text was approved without a vote on 22 November.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3170.)

The report on protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/61/422/Add.4) contains a draft resolution by which the Assembly would call on States to work cooperatively towards achieving the objective of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and to endorse the continuation of the institutional linkage of that Convention’s secretariat to the United Nations.  The draft would have the Assembly welcome the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol on 16 February 2005 and urge States that have not yet done so, to ratify it in a timely manner.

By other terms, the Assembly would take note of the offer by the Government of Indonesia to host the thirteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and the third session of the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol, in Bali from 3 to 14 December 2007.  The Committee approved the text on 8 December by a recorded vote of 114 in favour to none against, with 49 abstentions.

[By a separate action on a provision of that text, the Assembly would endorse a link between the Convention’s secretariat to the United Nations.  That vote was approved by a recorded 108 votes in favour to 2 against ( Japan, United States), with 48 abstentions.]  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

A draft resolution on the implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa would have the Assembly reaffirm its resolve to address the causes of desertification and land degradation -- and the poverty resulting from them -- through adequate and predictable financing, technology transfer and capacity-building.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

Two texts relating to biodiversity include a draft resolution on the International Year of Biodiversity, 2010, by which 2010 would be declared the International Year, and on the Convention on Biological Diversity, by which the Assembly would urge Member States to fulfil their commitments to significantly reduce the rate of loss of biodiversity by 2010, emphasizing the need for the provision of new and additional resources to developing countries, including through the Global Environment Facility.  Both texts were approved by consensus on 8 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

A draft resolution on the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its ninth special session would have the Assembly decide to consider the important, but complex, issue of establishing universal membership of the Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum of UNEP at its sixty-fourth session.  The Assembly would take note of the report of UNEP’S Governing Council of UNEP at its ninth special session and of the Secretary-General’s report on universal membership of UNEP’s Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum.  The Committee approved that text by consensus on 8 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

The Committee’s report on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and the strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (document A/61/423) contains a draft resolution, by which the Assembly would reiterate the need for the Programme (UN-HABITAT) to continue to work with the World Bank, regional development banks and other relevant partners to field-test innovative policies, practices and pilot projects so as to increase the supply of affordable credit for slum upgrading and other pro-poor human settlements development in developing countries.  The Governing Council of UN-HABITAT would be requested to address any issues relating to the United Nations Habitat and Human Settlements Foundation at its twenty-first session, bearing in mind the need to effectively mobilize resources for that Foundation.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

The Committee’s six-part report on globalization and interdependence (documents A/61/424 and Add. 1-5) contains four draft resolutions, beginning with a text on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence, by which the Assembly -- recognizing that many countries, especially the least developed countries, have remained marginalized in the globalizing world economy -- would affirm the need for the United Nations to play a fundamental role in promoting international cooperation for development, and resolve to strengthen coordination within the United Nations system, in close cooperation with all other multilateral financial, trade and development institutions, in support of sustained economic growth, poverty eradication and sustainable development.

Recognizing also that countries diverge greatly in terms of their abilities to access, diffuse and use scientific and technological knowledge, most of which is generated in developed countries, the Assembly would urge the international community to work together to ensure that development dimensions are mainstreamed into global intellectual property rights regimes, guaranteeing an adequate diffusion of scientific and technical knowledge, and avoiding excessively high costs of proprietary technology.  The text was approved without a vote on 8 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

By a draft resolution on international migration and development, the Assembly would -- in acknowledgement of the important contribution made by migrants to development, as well as the complex interrelationship between migration and development -– call on all related United Nations entities and other intergovernmental organizations to continue addressing the issue of international migration and development within their respective mandates, with a view to integrating migration issues, including a gender perspective and cultural diversity, into a more coherent way within the context of the Millennium Development Goals and respect for human rights.  That text was approved without a vote on 1 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3171.)

A draft resolution entitled preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of assets of illicit origin and returning such assets, in particular to the countries of origin, consistent with the United Nations Convention against Corruption would have the Assembly take note of the Secretary-General’s report on that issue (document A/61/177) as well as the Government of Indonesia’s offer to host the second session of the Conference of States Parties.  It would urge Member States and regional economic integration organizations to consider ratifying or acceding to that Convention, while calling on States parties to quickly implement its provisions.  The Committee approved that text by consensus on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

By a draft on integration of the economies in transition into the world economy the Assembly would call on the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions and relevant multilateral and regional institutions to continue providing policy advice, as well as targeted and substantial technical assistance, to transitional economies.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 7 November.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3165.)

Contained in the three-part report on group of countries in special situations (documents A/61/425 and Add.1 and 2) are two draft resolutions, including one on the Third United Nations Conference of the Least Developed Countries, which would have the Assembly acknowledge that the precarious socio-economic situation of the least developed countries means many are unlikely to achieve their development goals.  It would urge least developed countries to strengthen national implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010 through poverty reduction strategy papers, the common country assessment and the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF).  The Committee approved that draft without a vote on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

The second draft in that report is entitled groups of countries in special situations:  specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation.  By its terms, the Assembly would reaffirm the right of landlocked countries to have access to and from the sea, and to have freedom of transit through the territory of transit countries by all means of transport, in accordance with the applicable rules of international law.  At the same time, it would reaffirm that transit countries, in the exercise of their full sovereignty over their territory, have the right to ensure that the rights and facilities provided for landlocked countries in no way infringe upon their legitimate interests.

Also by that text, the Assembly would request the Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States to accelerate its work on developing indicators to measure progress in implementing the Almaty Programme.  It would also decide to hold a midterm review of the Programme in 2008.  That text was approved without a vote on 8 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

The Committee’s three-part report on eradication of poverty (documents A/61/426 and adds.1-2) contains three resolutions, including one on the role of microcredit and microfinance in the eradication of poverty, by which the Assembly would call on Member States, the United Nations system and other stakeholders to maximize the use of microcredit and microfinance as tools to eradicate poverty and disseminate best practices in the microfinance sector.  It would call on those actors, as well as the Bretton Woods institutions, to support developing countries in improving the policy and regulatory framework of their microfinance and microcredit institutions.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

A draft on implementation of the first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006) would have the Assembly recognize the contribution made by the first United Nations Decade to poverty eradication, and note the interest expressed in the proclamation of a second decade.  The Committee approved that text by consensus on 8 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

By a draft resolution on industrial development cooperation, the Assembly would call on donors and recipients to achieve greater efficiency in using official development assistance for industrial development in developing countries and those with economies in transition.  It would call on the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) to coordinate field activities through the common country assessment process and UNDAF.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 8 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

The Committee’s three-part report on training and research (documents A/61/428 and Add.1 and 2) contains two draft resolutions, the first on the United Nations University, by which the Assembly would welcome the diversification of that institution’s budgetary resources and encourage the international community to provide voluntary contributions to ensure a sound funding base.  That text was approved without a vote on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

A second text, a draft decision on the United Nations Institute for Training and Research, would have the Assembly take note of the report by the Institute’s Executive Director at its sixty-second session and decide to consider harmonizing the submission of that report with that of the Secretary-General.  The text was approved without a vote on 22 November.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3170.)

The Committee’s report on strengthening of the coordination of humanitarian and disaster relief assistance of the United Nations, including special economic assistance (documents A/61/429, Add.1 and Add.2) contains four draft resolutions, including one on special economic assistance for the Philippines.  Approved without a vote on 8 November, that text would have the Assembly express its solidarity with, and support to, the Government and people of the Philippines on the event of the oil spill from the oil tanker that sank 13 nautical miles off the south-western coast of the Province of Guimaras, central Philippines on 11 August.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3166.)

By the second draft resolution, entitled humanitarian assistance and reconstruction of Liberia, the Assembly would invite all States, as well as intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, to assist Liberia in creating an enabling environment for the promotion of peace, socio-economic development and regional security, and to ensure that such efforts contribute to the development of an economy characterized by a predictable investment climate, conducive to entrepreneurship, as well as good governance and the rule of law.  The Committee approved that text by consensus on 7 November.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3165.)

The third draft, on international assistance for the economic rehabilitation of Angola, would have the Assembly take note of the report of the Secretary-General [on humanitarian assistance and rehabilitation for selected countries and regions (document A/61/209)].  It would express appreciation to the international community, the United Nations system, governmental and nongovernmental organizations participating in humanitarian assistance programmes in Angola, including mine-action activities, and appeal for their continued contribution to humanitarian mine-action activities in a manner complementary to those of the Government.  That text was approved without a vote on 1 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3171.)

A draft on participation of volunteers, “White Helmets”, in the activities of the United Nations in the field of humanitarian relief, rehabilitation and technical cooperation for development (document A/61/429/Add.2) would have the Assembly recognize that the White Helmets initiative can play an important role in the promotion, diffusion and implementation of decisions adopted in the United Nations Millennium Declaration, and make financial resources available to the Special Voluntary Fund of the United Nations Volunteers.  That text was approved without a vote on 7 November.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3165.)

The report on revitalization of work of the General Assembly (document A/61/430) contains the draft programme of work for the Second Committee for the sixty-second session of the General Assembly, which the Committee approved without a vote on 8 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3173.)

Contained in the report on programme planning (document A/61/431), which the Committee approved without a vote on 6 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3172.)

The report of the Economic and Social Council (document A/61/432) contains a draft resolution on the proclamation of international years, by which the Assembly would stress the need to apply the criteria and procedures contained in the guidelines for future international years, as contained in the annex to Economic and Social Council resolution 1980/67, in considering future proposals for international years.  The Committee approved that text without a vote on 1 December.  (See Press Release GA/EF/3171.)

Plenary Drafts

By a draft resolution on the culture of peace (document A/61/L.11/rev.2), the Assembly would urge States to combat incitement to violence, intimidation or coercion motivated by hatred and intolerance based on culture, religion or belief, which may cause discord and disharmony within and among societies.  It would also urge States to take measures to prevent and eliminate discrimination on the grounds of religion or belief in the recognition, exercise and enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms in all fields of civil, economic, political, social and cultural life, making all efforts to enact or rescind legislation to prohibit such discrimination.

Further by that draft, the Assembly would support relevant regional and national initiatives, encouraging media from all cultures and civilizations to promote dialogue and emphasizing the right to freedom of speech.  It would affirm that the relevant United Nations bodies would undertake measures to promote universal respect in matters of freedom of religion or belief and cultural diversity, deciding to convene in 2007 a high-level dialogue on the matter and to declare one of the coming years as the Year of Dialogue among Religions and Cultures.

By a 17-part draft resolution on oceans and the law of the sea (document A/61/L.30) would have the Assembly call upon States to become parties to the Convention, the Agreement on implementing part XI of the Convention related to marine science and the Agreement relating to the Conservation and Management of Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks.  States would also be called upon to deposit with the Secretary-General their charts or lists of geographical coordinates as called for by the Convention.  States would be urged to cooperate by protecting and preserving objects found at sea that are of an archaeological or historical nature.  They would be called upon to work together on diverse challenges and opportunities, including the relationship between salvage law and scientific management of underwater cultural heritage, increasing abilities to access underwater sites, looting and the growing area of underwater tourism.

With regard to capacity-building, the Assembly would call upon States and international financial institutions to continue strengthening capacity-building activities, particularly in developing countries, in the field of marine scientific research.  Those activities include training of personnel, provision of equipment, facilities and vessels, and transfer of environmentally sound technology.  States would be encouraged to assist developing countries in preparing submissions to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf regarding the establishment of the outer limits of the shelf beyond 200 nautical miles.  The Assembly would note with appreciation the first regional workshop of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, held in Dakar, Senegal, from 31 October to 2 November, on the Tribunal’s role in the settlement of disputes relating to the law of the sea in West Africa.

Action on Second Committee Reports

VANESSA GOMES ( Portugal), Rapporteur of the Second Committee, introduced that body’s reports.

Taking up the first report, on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/61/418), the Assembly adopted the related draft resolution by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 6 against (Australia, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 9 abstentions (Cameroon, Canada, Côte d’Ivoire, Dominican Republic, Fiji, Nauru, Tonga, Uganda, Vanuatu).  (See annex I.)

The Assembly then turned to the report on the report of the Economic and Social Council (document A/61/432) and adopted, by consensus, a draft resolution on proclamation of international years.

The Assembly then took up the report on information and communication technology for development (document A/61/419), adopting, also by consensus, a draft decision by which it took note of the Secretary-General’s report on progress in the implementation of General Assembly resolution 57/295.

Turning next to the report on macroeconomic policy questions (document A/61/420), the Assembly decided to take note of it and to consider its addenda.

As it took up addendum 1, the draft resolution on international trade and development (document A/61/420/Add.1), a recorded vote was requested.

The Assembly then adopted that text by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 2 against ( Republic of Moldova, United States), with 52 abstentions.  (See annex II.)

It then adopted, by consensus and as orally amended, draft resolutions on the international financial system and development (document A/61/420/Add.2) and external debt crisis and development (document A/61/420/Add.3).

Taking up addendum 4 of the report (document A/61/420/Add.4), the Assembly then adopted draft resolutions I, International Year of Natural Fibres, and II, commodities, without a vote, as orally amended.

Acting again without a vote, it then adopted the draft resolution contained in the report on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development (document A/60/421).

The Assembly then took up the report on sustainable development (document A/60/422), taking note of it and adopting, by consensus, draft resolutions I and II, on the International Year of Sanitation 2008 and the International Year of Forests, 2011, respectively.

A recorded vote was requested in connection with draft resolution III, entitled oil slick on Lebanese shores (document A/61/422/Add.1), which the Assembly then adopted, as orally amended, by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 6 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with no abstentions.  (See annex III.)

Turning to draft resolution IV of the same report, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development.

The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft on follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States and the related text entitled towards the sustainable development of the Caribbean Sea for present and future generations.

Taking up the draft resolution on the international strategy for disaster reduction (document A/61/422/Add.3), the Assembly adopted it without a vote.

The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the texts on international cooperation to reduce the impact of the El Niño phenomenon and natural disasters and vulnerability.

As the Assembly turned to the draft resolution on protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/61/422/Add.4), the Assembly President informed delegates that a separate vote had been taken on operative paragraph 10 during the Committee’s action on the text, but no vote would be requested today.

However, a recorded vote was requested on the draft resolution as a whole, whereupon the Assembly adopted it by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to none against, with 47 abstentions.  (See annex IV.)

The representative of Japan, expressing reservations about operative paragraph 10, said the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change was an independent treaty body with its own budget and a secretariat comprising more than 200 staff.  Japan had consistently maintained that the United Nations should not be called upon to shoulder the Convention’s expenses.  Starting with the 2008-2009 biannual budget, the Convention should assume full responsibility for its own conference service-related costs.

Taking up the draft resolution on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa (document A/61/422/Add.5), the Assembly adopted that text without a vote.

It then adopted, also by consensus and as orally amended, the text on the International Year of Biodiversity, before adopting the draft on the Convention on Biological Diversity (document A/61/422/Add.6), again without a vote.

The Assembly then took note of the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme, through its adoption of the draft resolution entitled the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on its twenty-third session (document A/61/422/Add.7).

Turning to the report contained in document A/61/423, on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and the strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme, the Assembly adopted a similarly entitled draft resolution without a vote.

It then took up the report on globalization and interdependence (document A/61/424) and adopted, by consensus, texts on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence (document A/61/424/Add.1) and on international migration and development (document A/61/424/Add.2).

The Assembly then took note of addendum 3 to that report, entitled culture and development (document A/61/424/Add.3).

Following that action, the Assembly adopted, without a vote and as orally amended, a draft resolution entitled preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of assets of illicit origin and returning such assets, in particular to the countries of origin, consistent with the United Nations Convention against Corruption (document A/61/424/Add.4).  It then adopted, also without a vote, a text on integration of the economies in transition into the world economy (document A/61/424/Add.5).

The representative of Poland said his country wished to join the statement made by the Czech Republic at the Second Committee’s meeting on 7 November, in that Poland had successfully transformed itself from a centrally planned economy into a market-oriented one, and should no longer be considered among the countries with economies in transition.

Taking up the report on groups of countries in special situations (document A/61/425), the Assembly adopted, by consensus, the draft resolutions on the Third United Nations Conference of the Least Developed Countries (document A/61/425/Add.1).

It then adopted, also by consensus, the text on specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation (document A/61/425/Add.2).

Turning to the report on eradication of poverty and other development issues (document A/61/426), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, the text on implementation of the first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006) (document A/61/426/Add.1), as orally amended.

It then adopted, by consensus and as orally amended, the draft on the role of microcredit and microfinance in the eradication of poverty, before going on to adopt, again without a vote, the text on industrial development cooperation (document A/61/426/Add.2).

Upon conclusion of that item, the President recalled that the General Assembly had considered the Committee’s next report, entitled operational activities for development:  operational activities for development of the United Nations system (document A/61/427) on 28 November.

The Assembly then took up the report on training and research (document A/61/428), adopting the draft resolutions on the United Nations University (A/61/428/Add.1) and on the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (document A/61/428/Add.2) without a vote and as orally amended.

The Assembly then turned to the report on strengthening of the coordination of humanitarian and disaster relief assistance of the United Nations, including special economic assistance (document A/61/429), taking up the draft resolutions contained in it.

It then adopted, without a vote, texts on special economic assistance to individual countries and regions (document A/61/429/Add.1), concerning special economic assistance for the Philippines, the humanitarian assistance and reconstruction of Liberia and international assistance for the economic rehabilitation of Angola.

Acting again without a vote, the Assembly then adopted a draft resolution on participation of volunteers, “White Helmets”, in the activities of the United Nations in the field of humanitarian relief, rehabilitation and technical cooperation for development (document A/61/429/Add.2).

The Assembly then adopted the Committee’s programme of work for the sixty-second session, as contained in its report, revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/61/430).

It also took note of the Committee’s report on programme planning (document A/61/431), approving a draft decision relating Economic and Social Council support and coordination and the proposed strategic framework for the period 2008-2009, as proposed by the Committee for Programme and Coordination.

Action on Plenary Drafts

The Assembly then took up a number of plenary-generated texts.

The representative of Pakistan introduced an oral revision to the draft resolution on promotion of inter-religious and intercultural dialogue, understanding and cooperation for peace (document A/61/L.11/Rev.2), including changes to operative paragraph 12, which would now read:

Encourages the promotion of dialogue among media from all cultures and civilizations, emphasizes that everyone has the right to freedom of expression, and reaffirms that the exercise of this right carries with it special duties and responsibilities and may therefore be subject to certain restrictions, but these shall only be such as are provided by law and necessary for respect of the rights or reputations of others, protection of national security or of public order, or of public health or morals;”

Operative paragraph 14 would now read:  “Decides to convene in 2007 a high-level dialogue on inter-religious and intercultural cooperation for the promotion of tolerance, understanding and universal respect on matters of freedom of religion or belief and cultural diversity, in coordination with other similar initiatives in this area.”

A representative of the Secretariat then read out a statement on the programme budgetary implications arising from the Assembly’s adoption of that text, noting that, since the exact requirements of holding a high-level dialogue on inter-religious cooperation had yet to be specified, any additional conference-servicing requirements for related activities, such as parallel meetings, round tables, or hearings, would be submitted to the Assembly at a later stage.

The Assembly then adopted the draft without a vote, as orally revised.

The representative of Finland, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said she had been able to join the consensus on the text just adopted, but the European Union would nevertheless stress that a fruitful and genuine dialogue could not be guided by Government authorities, but must be rooted in free and spontaneous participation in public debate, reflecting a variety of opinions.

She went on to say that her delegation attached great importance to the various United Nations initiatives aimed at enhancing dialogue and mutual understanding.  When it came to the concrete organization of the Secretariat’s work in the field, the European Union trusted that the Secretary-General would propose the most appropriate way forward, within the existing institutional framework.

In that same spirit, she said, the European Union welcomed the decision reflected in operative paragraph 14 of the text, to closely coordinate the planned high-level dialogue with other comparable initiatives so as to ensure the visibility and centrality of that debate.  The need for an international year for inter-religious dialogue must be carefully assessed against the background of other ongoing activities, such as the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-violence for the Children of the World, and the Global Agenda for Dialogue among Civilizations.

The representative of the United States said the text had much to recommend in that, among other things, it recognized the importance of education and of promoting and ensuring vibrant and open media.  Still, the United States was disappointed that the text highlighted limitations on freedom of expression, particularly in paragraphs concerning the media.  Such limitations had the possibility of creating a chilling effect.

The United States had joined the consensus regarding operative paragraph 12 under the understanding that it was fully in line with article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, he said.  It had joined the consensus on operative paragraph 14 under the understanding that it would not give rise to any financial implications.

The representative of Venezuela said her country had always been a stakeholder in the promotion of a culture of peace and in fostering understanding and cooperation among cultures.  However, preambular paragraph 4 of the draft did not constitute a mandate for the Government of Venezuela.

Turning next to the omnibus draft resolution on oceans and the Law of the Sea (document A/61/L.30), which was accompanied by a report of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) containing the programme budgetary implications of the main text (document A/61/L.30), the Assembly adopted that text by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 1 against (Turkey), with 3 abstentions (Colombia, Libya, Venezuela).  (See annex V.)

The representative of Turkey said he had voted against because the reasons that had prevented his country from becoming a party to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea remained valid.  While Turkey supported international efforts to establish a regime of the sea based on the principle of equity, and which would be acceptable to all States, the Convention did not make adequate provision for special geographical situations, and, as a result, was not able to establish an acceptable balance between conflicting interests.  Further, the Convention made no provisions for the registering of reservations on specific clauses.

The representative of Venezuela reiterated his delegation’s commitment to promoting coordination on matters of oceans and the Law of the Sea.  The reasons preventing the Government of Venezuela from becoming a party to the Convention remained valid.  Venezuela was not a party to the Convention on the Law of the Sea, which accounted for its abstention today.  However, it supported the reference to chapter 10 of the Convention.  Indeed, the Convention on Biological Diversity was the framework instrument on matters of conservation.

The representative of Nigeria said the vital treaty had gone a long way towards harmonizing biological and environmental safety concerns as well as navigational imperatives.  The Convention had been instrumental in solving disputes over water rights and involving rights of safe passage.  Nigeria could not support interpretations of the Convention that contravened or undermined in any way its letter and spirit, and it also rejected unilateral interpretations of the text on the Convention.

PIRAGIBE DOS SANTOS TARRAGÔ ( Brazil) introduced the draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Community of Portuguese-speaking Countries (CPLP) (document A/61/L.43), saying the Community brought together 240 million people in eight countries and on four continents.  One of its objectives was to expand cooperation among its members as a means of promoting concerted political and diplomatic actions, including in the context of international organizations.

The Community had been actively involved in many worldwide initiatives, including the fight against HIV/AIDS in its five African member States and in creating a Centre of Official Languages in Timor-Leste, he said.  The draft before the Assembly invited the Secretary-General to continue to undertake consultations with the Community’s Executive Secretary with a view to promoting further cooperation, as well as to start talks on establishing a formal cooperation agreement.

FRANK MAJOOR (Netherlands) then introduced a draft on cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) (document A/6/L.49), saying the primary objective of the biannually submitted text was to highlight the importance of continued cooperation between the United Nations and the OPCW, an organization with 180 member States -– a universality nearly equal to that of the world body.  The draft included a reference to the celebration of the upcoming tenth anniversary of the Chemical Weapons Convention and the establishment of the OPCW.  That important event would be held in The Hague on 9 May 2007 and would feature a sombre highlight -- the unveiling of a permanent memorial to all victims of chemical weapons.

The Assembly then adopted both resolutions without a vote.

LAOURA LAZOURAS ( South Africa) then introduced a draft resolution on World Diabetes Day (document A/61/L.39/Rev.1) on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, saying the disease was a silent epidemic which killed more than 3.5 million people a year.  Further, 7 million new cases were diagnosed every year and, with 240 million people living with the disease, its social, economic and human costs were immense.  The World Health Organization (WHO) projected that without remedial action, diabetes death rates would increase by more than 50 per cent over the next 10 years.  Diabetes deaths were expected to increase by some 80 per cent in upper-middle-income countries by 2015.

She said the text would strengthen awareness and facilitate global action against the epidemic.  Diabetes was incurable, but its management was within human reach and a United Nations “day” would significantly contribute to awareness-raising and draw the international community’s attention to the need for more effective measures for diabetes management, treatment and care.

The Assembly then adopted the text without a vote, as orally amended.

The representative of Bangladesh, noting that non-communicable diseases continued to afflict vast segments of humanity, said they were the largest and fastest growing global health threat in the world, particularly for those living in developing and least developed countries.  Diabetes, a silent killer, did not attract global media headlines, but it was nevertheless beginning to threaten development in many countries and regions.

Bangladesh was dedicated to the fight against diabetes, he said, calling strongly on the United Nations to join his country and others in attempting to raise public awareness about diabetes and its complications.  Bangladesh called also on the international community to devote more energy and resources to ensuring prevention, treatment and care.

ANNEX I

Vote on Sovereignty over Natural Resources

The draft resolution on permanent sovereignty of the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/61/418) was adopted by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 6 against, with 9 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, United States.

Abstain:  Cameroon, Canada, Côte d’Ivoire, Dominican Republic, Fiji, Nauru, Tonga, Uganda, Vanuatu.

Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Madagascar, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tuvalu.

ANNEX II

Vote on trade and Development

The draft resolution on international trade and development (document A/61/420/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 2 against, with 52 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Moldova, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Tuvalu.

ANNEX III

Vote on Oil Slick

The draft resolution on the oil slick on Lebanese shores (document A/61/422/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 6 against, with no abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.

Abstain:  None.

Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Kenya, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Rwanda, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu.

ANNEX IV

Vote on Climate Protection

The draft resolution on protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/61/422/add.4) was adopted by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to none against, with 47 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  None.

Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Rwanda, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Tuvalu.

ANNEX V

Vote on Law of the Sea

The draft resolution on oceans and the Law of the Sea (document A/61/L.30) was adopted by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 1 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Turkey.

Abstain:  Colombia, Libya, Venezuela.

Absent:  Azerbaijan, Barbados, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Montenegro, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Somalia, Syria, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.