FOURTH COMMITTEE CONCLUDES DEBATE ON DECOLONIZATION ISSUES, APPROVING 10 DRAFT TEXTS

11 October 2005
GA/SPD/317

FOURTH COMMITTEE CONCLUDES DEBATE ON DECOLONIZATION ISSUES, APPROVING 10 DRAFT TEXTS

11/10/2005
General Assembly
GA/SPD/317
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixtieth General Assembly

Fourth Committee

6th Meeting (AM)

FOURTH COMMITTEE CONCLUDES DEBATE ON DECOLONIZATION ISSUES,

APPROVING 10 DRAFT TEXTS

Decisions Postponed on Draft Resolutions

Concerning Tokelau, Second Decade on Colonialism

As the Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) concluded its consideration of issues related to decolonization, it approved nine draft resolutions and one draft decision on the topic, deferring two other drafts.

Also this morning, during the general debate on decolonization, Morocco’s representative expressed his county’s wish to overcome the current impasse in Western Sahara and make progress towards a political solution to the dispute.

The Committee approved by a recorded vote of 141 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 3 abstentions (Belgium, Germany, France) a draft resolution on the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, which would have the Assembly call upon the administering Powers to take all necessary steps to enable the people of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to exercise fully, as soon as possible, their right to self-determination.

Through a draft on the economic and other activities which affect the interests of the people of the Non-Self-Governing Territories, approved by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions (France, United Kingdom), the Assembly would reaffirm the right of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to self-determination, as well as their right to enjoy their natural resources and to dispose of them in their best interest.

Among texts approved without a vote this morning was a draft resolution on the question of Western Sahara, by whose terms the Assembly would underline Security Council resolution 1495 (2003) in which the Council expressed its support of the peace plan for self-determination of the people of Western Sahara as an optimum political solution on the basis of agreement between the two parties.

Also approved by consensus was a draft decision on the Question of Gibraltar, a draft resolution on the Question of New Caledonia and a draft resolution on the questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands,

In other action, the Committee approved a draft resolution on Information from Non-Self Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73e of the Charter of the United Nations, in a recorded vote of 130 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions ( France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States). A text on dissemination of information on decolonization was approved by a vote of 142 in favour to 3 against ( Israel, United States, United Kingdom), with 1 abstention ( France).

Also considered was a draft on the implementation of the Declaration of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations, which was approved by a vote of 93 in favour to none against, with 49 abstentions

Acting without a vote, the Committee also approved a draft resolution entitled “Offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-governing Territories”.

Consideration of the drafts pertaining to Tokelau and the Second International Decade on the Eradication of Colonialism were postponed until a later date.

During today’s discussion, the representative of Morocco stated his government’s wish to find a political solution to problem of Western Sahara.  He said negotiations should begin as soon as possible and focus on a common denominator between all the parties.   Morocco was ready to engage faithfully in this process under the auspices of the United Nations and hoped that Algeria could do the same.

Morocco had objected to the second Baker Plan, he said, insofar as it had deviated from the concept of a political solution based on autonomy.  It was common knowledge that a solution which was not mutually acceptable did not have any chance of success, and he did not understand Algeria’s persistence in supporting a plan where one of the conditions of its validity, namely, the agreement of the parties, did not exist.  He expressed Morocco’s wish to start a new era of cooperation and construction which would benefit not only the subregion, but the whole African continent.

The representatives of Indonesia, Namibia, Libya, Uruguay on behalf of MERCOSUR, Mauritius, Angola, Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, Timor-Leste, Bahrain, Burkina Faso, Senegal and Lesotho also spoke.

The representatives of Argentina, Algeria, Morocco, Spain and the United Kingdom spoke in explanation of their vote

The representative of the United Kingdom and Pakistan exercised their right to reply.

The Committee will meet again tomorrow, Wednesday 12 October, at 10 a.m. to begin its consideration of questions relating to information.

Background

The Committee met this morning to conclude its discussion of issues related to decolonization

Statements

IGA WESAKA PUJA ( Indonesia ) said that the decolonization process of the remaining Non-Self-Governing Territories had been very slow.  The exception was the decolonization process in Tokelau, in which New Zealand, the administering Power, and Tokelau, had developed an exemplary working relationship.   Indonesia was encouraged, however, by the innovative approach taken by the Special Committee to make progress towards achievable goals.  By this, he was referring to the Committee’s visiting mission to Bermuda last February, and the Caribbean Regional Seminar in Canouan, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, last May, which had resulted in a productive exchange of views on the challenges facing the Territories and the role the United Nations could play.

At the end of the day, however, it was the administering Powers and the Non-Self-Governing Territories that would have a greater say in the subject, he said.  He called upon the administering Powers to show greater commitment to the speedy and unconditional end of colonialism with regard to the remaining Territories.  This would ensure successful closure to the mandate of the Committee and the entire issue of Non-Self-Governing Territories.

JULIUS ZAYA SHIWEVA ( Namibia), aligning himself with the statement on behalf of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), said the 2005 World Summit had failed to address the important issue of decolonization.  However, the issue of decolonization deserved serious attention, as where colonialism and foreign occupation existed, there could be no development, no security and no freedom to live in dignity.  The people in Non-Self-Governing Territories deserved special attention and looked to the United Nations for assistance and support.  In Africa, the process of decolonization had not yet been completed, as the question of Western Sahara still remained unresolved.  The 1991 Settlement Plan had been accepted by Morocco and the POLISARIO Front.  The United Nations and the African Union had recognized the inalienable rights of the Saharawi people to self-determination and nationhood.

He said he was perturbed that delaying tactics were being used and attempts were being made to legitimize the illegal occupation.  Those activities were directed to undermine the international efforts in granting the inalienable rights of the Saharawi people to self-determination and independence.  A situation that would cause frustration and anger on the part of the Saharawi people should not be allowed to continue.  Hoping that the Settlement Plan would be revived, he called upon Morocco to accept and implement the Peace Plan.

He reiterated his support and solidarity with the Palestinian people in their fight for the inalienable right to self-determination and for the establishment of their national and sovereign Palestinian State.  He said the Plan of Action for the Second International Decade for the eradication of colonialism should be implemented without further delay.  “It is our collective responsibility to urgently rectify the prevailing historic injustice, and the United Nations should take the lead”, he said.

AHMED H. M. GEBREEL ( Libya) said his country appreciated the role the United Nations could play in achieving self-determination, having gone through a bitter experience under the rule of the Italians.  Five years had passed since resolution 55/146, he continued, yet regrettably the necessary progress in the implementation of the Second Decade of Decolonization had not been achieved.  He hoped the progress made between New Zealand and Tokelau would serve as an incentive to other States.  He called on administering States to stop conducting military manoeuvres in the territories under their control, and also called for compensation to people in Non-Self-Governing States for the plunder of their resources.

The Palestinian people had been rendered homeless for over half a century and were suffering from daily killings, he continued.  The Committee had been unable to put an end to the tragedy and could not implement its own resolutions.  The Palestinians must be able to exercise their inalienable right to self-determination and return to their territories, he said.  Concluding, he reaffirmed the sanctity of the concept of self determination and his country’s support for the elimination of the last pockets of decolonization.

ENRIQUE LOEDEL (Uruguay) speaking on behalf of Southern Common Market (MERCOSUR), referred to a matter of concern to his region -- the dispute over sovereignty between Argentina and the United Kingdom over the Malvinas Islands.  This question had been addressed by both the General Assembly and the Fourth Committee as a special and particular colonial question.  Such particularity resulted from the fact that the United Kingdom had occupied the islands by force, moving away their inhabitants and the Argentinean authorities established in those islands; not allowing their return; and replacing them by people of British descent.  This peculiar situation also found juridical support in resolution 2065, adopted by a large majority of the General Assembly and which had also been recalled in many other resolutions, in which this question was defined as a dispute between Argentina and the United Kingdom over the sovereignty of the Malvinas Islands.

Furthermore, the above mentioned resolution 2065 established that both parties to the dispute must take into account the interests of the inhabitants of the Malvinas Islands, which excluded the implementation of the principle of self-determination.  He said MERCOSUR fully supported the principle of self-determination, however, his subregion believed that such a principle was applicable to subjected peoples as described in resolution 1514 and not to descendents of non-indigenous people.

JAGDISH KOONJUL ( Mauritius) said that while his delegation recognized the progress made in the decolonization process, there were still two million people living in 16 Non-Self-Governing Territories.  The struggle for self-determination by the people of Western Sahara was one of the long standing issues in Africa, and had caused over the years tragic loss of life and family separation.  He urged all parties to continue to exercise restraint and to refrain from taking any actions that could worsen their chances for a peaceful solution and affirmed the need for full respect for the military agreements reached with United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) concerning the ceasefire.  His delegation commended the important role played by MINURSO under difficult circumstances in discharge of its mandate.

He said his delegation considered the release of the 400 Moroccan prisoners by Popular Front for the Liberation of Saguia el-Hamra and Rio de Oro (POLISARIO Front) as an encouraging step and appealed to the Moroccan authorities to release the Saharawi prisoners of war still in detention.  His delegation was comforted that the hunger strike launched by the Saharawi prisoners had ended last week and was hopeful that a joyful end to their plight would soon be found.

ISMAEL ABRAÃO GASPAR MARTINS ( Angola), endorsing the statement made on behalf of SADC, said that for a country like Angola, whose long decolonization process had succeeded thanks to the efforts of many delegations present, contribution to the work of the Committee was a matter of moral obligation.  Decolonization remained an issue of central importance, to which the international community should continue to pay special attention.  The main conclusion to be drawn from the reports on Western Sahara was that no progress had been registered in the political field since the adoption of Security Council resolutions 1495 (2003) and 1541 (2004) which expressed support for the plan for self-determination.  The non-acceptance by one of the parties had resulted in a deadlock, a situation that could be changed only with political will and commitment of the parties and the international community.

He called upon the parties to cooperate with the United Nations, in particular the Security Council, the Secretary-General and his Personal Envoy and Representative.  The appointment of a Personal Envoy and a Personal Representative constituted an important step, and an opportunity that should be fully explored by the parties.   The presence of MINURSO continued to be a stabilizing factor and a guarantee for the respect for the ceasefire.  It was also a vital tool for confidence-building.  A reduction in the Mission’s size would not be advisable.  However, the presence of MINURSO could only be productive if concrete and positive changes were brought about in the political process.  While welcoming the liberation of former Moroccan prisoners by the POLISARIO Front, he drew attention to the issue of the liberation of Saharawi political prisoners. 

He said that on 7 October, one of the petitioners, Tany Warburg of “Freedom for All”, had made reference to a “so-called deportation” by the POLISARIO Front of Saharawi children to Angola, Cuba, Mozambique and Libya.  His delegation had learned about that with great surprise.  It was information which, he said, the petitioner could only have fabricated.  Such imagination was not acceptable and a clear sign of lack of respect for the Committee.  The Committee dealt only with facts, not with fiction.  The statement therefore constituted an insult to the Government and people of Angola.  He said he fully supported the draft resolution submitted by Algeria, and appealed to other delegations to join consensus.

ALPHA IBRAHIMA SOW ( Guinea) said the United Nations needed to redouble its efforts to achieve the objectives that had been set for the Second Decade of Decolonization.   He noted the Secretary-General’s midterm review, and said his delegation supported proposals whereby the Special Committee must take the opportunity to develop decolonization plans on a case-by-case basis.  His country was carefully following decolonization events, with particular attention to the situation in Western Sahara.

In spite of the successes achieved in the region, such as the recent release of Moroccan prisoners, he remained concerned.  The consensus that had always characterized discussions on resolutions relating to this matter had been broken during the last session, he said.  This breakdown made the efforts of the international community more fragile.  He urged the international community to work with the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General to come to a mutually acceptable end to the dispute.

ONANGA NDIAYE ( Gabon) said his country was committed to the principle of multilateralism and the central role played therein by the United Nations.  He welcomed the historic success made by the United Nations in decolonization, even though the process was a slow one.  However, it was crucial for the United Nations and the international community to focus more attention on a better implementation of resolutions adopted on the subject, otherwise a Third Decade would have to be declared.  Halfway through the Second Decade, efforts to close the gaps in information and training for the Non-Self-governing Territories should be emphasized, as well as assistance in economic and social progress. 

Regarding Western Sahara he reaffirmed his relations of friendship with all countries in the Maghreb and in particular with Morocco.  His country’s position supported the maintenance of the territorial integrity and sovereignty of Morocco.  He welcomed efforts of the Secretary-General to find a political solution to the question of the Western Sahara and the appointment of the new Special Envoy, Mr. Van Walsum.  It was hoped that Mr. Van Walsum’s appointment would lead to a mutually acceptable resolution of the situation.  In order to end the current impasse, the full and sincere cooperation of all parties was indispensable. 

AMINU B. WALI ( Nigeria) said that regrettably there still remained a few territories that had not completed the decolonization process.  The commitment to decolonization remained strong, but that support should be translated into action, so that the 16 remaining Non-Self-Governing Territories attained independence by 2010.  The international community should not allow the yearnings of people under colonial tutelage to remain a mirage.

Nigeria could not support or condone any policy that either perpetuated subjugation or sought to thwart the enjoyment of sovereign independence, he said, hence his country’s concern with the slow pace of the resolution of the question of Western Sahara.  Any reduction in the size of MINURSO would have a negative impact on the effective implementation of the mandate of the Mission, as well as send a wrong message concerning the resolve of the international community in support of self-determination.  There was no excuse for postponing action.  Time was urgent and the demand for a resolution insistent, he said.

JOSE LUIS GUTERRES (Timor-Leste) thanked the Angolan representative for rejecting the statements of some of the petitioners.  He said he welcomed the progress made in various territories administered by the United Kingdom, as well as the achievements in Tokelau, administered by New Zealand, and in New Caledonia.  He encouraged the continuation of bilateral or multilateral negotiations in some territories, such as on Gibraltar and the Falkland Islands (Malvinas). 

He welcomed the continuing commitment by the Government of Morocco and the leaders of POLISARIO Front to the ceasefire.  He commended the Government of the Saharawi Republic for the release of the remaining Moroccan war prisoners, and appealed to the government of Morocco to reciprocate.  He concurred with the Secretary-General that downsizing MINURSO was not recommendable.  The Baker Plan continued to be the best possible option available, he said.  It was time for the international community to redouble its efforts in bringing the suffering of the Saharawi people to an end.

He said the majority of the 16 remaining Non-Self-Governing Territories were small territories in the Caribbean and in the Pacific.  The information on their situation and the challenges they faced were not always available.  He therefore welcomed the 2005 regional Caribbean Seminar organized by the Special Committee and proposed that next year’s seminar would take place in Timor-Leste.

Mr. AL ZAYANI ( Bahrain) said that the General Assembly had clearly stated that continued colonization was a violation of the United Nations Charter and the principles of international law.  The Millennium Declaration also reinforced this view.  The measures that the General Assembly had adopted on the matter had prompted intensive efforts towards the achievement of independence by many countries and peoples thanks to the solidarity exhibited in implementing those accords.

The subjugation of peoples to a foreign population was a violation of human rights, he said.  Over the past few decades, the United Nations had continued diligently in its quest to end colonization and had spared no effort in that regard.  The Assembly had reaffirmed its determination to end colonization.  The Second International Decade to eradicate colonialism was almost halfway through, and his country was full of hope that this decade would achieve its final and ultimate objective.

MICHEL KAFANDO ( Burkina Faso) said the question of decolonization and self-determination of peoples remained an urgent one.  Since its inception, the United Nations had stood on the principle of ending colonization and the Special Committee remained the most ideal avenue for implementing decolonization policies.  He hoped that by the end of the Second International Decade to eradicate colonialism, the efforts would have come to fruit.  It should be recognized, however, that most of the progress made had resulted mainly from the cooperation between the administering Powers and the Non-Self-Governing Territories in the Pacific. 

He said the situation in the Western Sahara remained alarming.  There was an absolute impasse.  Everyone must try to put an end to the three-decades-long dispute.  Many initiatives had been taken by the United Nations.  In recent reports, the Secretary-General had called for a final and mutually acceptable solution for all parties.  The Security Council had called on parties and States to put an end to the impasse and to make progress towards a political solution.  He called for a political negotiation of the dispute, in which the recent release of prisoners could help.  He hoped the appointment of the new Special Envoy would be an opportunity to find a final solution according to the United Nations Peace Plan.

DUNCAN MUHUMUZA LAKI ( Uganda) said that since the inception of the United Nations, decolonization had been one of its main objectives.  Many States owed their membership of the Organization to the work of the Committee.  The African continent was almost entirely free from the degrading phenomenon of colonialism, yet there were many people still living under the dominion of other powers.  To them, every passing day that they continued to live under dependency was a day too many.  He hoped that soon the last colonial State would gain freedom.  He said he supported the idea of United Nations reform including the elimination of the Decolonization Committee.  With the decolonization process complete, the existence of the Committee would be difficult to justify. 

He called for the accelerated settlement of the Western Sahara question, saying the people of Western Sahara must not be denied the realization of their aspirations of absolute political equality and the full measure of self-government.   He applauded the release of the remaining Moroccan prisoners of war by POLISARIO Front, a positive gesture that needed to be reciprocated by Morocco to further international peace and security, as part of the overall process of promoting self-government.

PAUL BADJI ( Senegal) said the question of Western Sahara was of particular significance to his country because it bordered with Morocco and Algeria, and had centuries long relations with those countries.  Senegal remained faithful and deeply committed to the excellent relations of friendship and cooperation which it needed to maintain and build upon, and was satisfied with the tremendous efforts displayed by the Secretary-General to help those countries achieve a just, lasting and mutually acceptable resolution.

He encouraged all parties to pursue negotiations in order to find an appropriate settlement; to promote a climate of trust that would help dissipate incomprehension and misunderstandings; to maintain the status quo by maintaining mutual respect of the ceasefire; and to deal with humanitarian questions with the help of the international community, although these issues must in no way obscure any future settlement plan.

The appointment of a personal envoy for Western Sahara would fill a vacuum and represented an essential element for strengthening confidence and managing the conflict there, he continued.  His delegation renewed its unstinting support for any initiative that would help achieve a just and lasting settlement to the question of Western Sahara.

LEBOHANG FINE MAEMA ( Lesotho) said that the progress achieved by the United Nations in the area of decolonization was commendable; however it was disturbing to note that, in 2005, the issue of decolonization was still on the agenda.  It was a hard fact that, while the Special Committee continued to seek to find a suitable means for the implementation of the Declaration, people in Non-Self-Governing Territories continued to suffer.  In his delegation’s view, the United Nations had to ask itself whether there was enough political will to complete the decolonization agenda.

The question of Western Sahara was of great concern to his delegation, he said.  The denial of the right to self-determination of the Saharawi people had to be addressed urgently and truthfully.  The voices of fellow Africans who continued to proclaim that Africa’s liberation would only be complete when Western Sahara became independent, must be heard.  The United Nations had to redouble its efforts to break the current deadlock.

MOHAMED BENNOUNA ( Morocco) said his country had expressed its wish to overcome the current impasse and to progress towards a political solution to the regional dispute.  Unfortunately, the persistence of the dispute had not allowed, until now, the Maghreb countries to launch and promote their cooperation and their integration with the Maghreb Arab Union.  Such a negotiation should begin as soon as possible and focus on a common denominator between all the parties, namely the elaboration of a stature of autonomy which allows all populations of the region to directly manage their own affairs, in full respect of the prerogatives of the sovereignty of the kingdom.  Morocco was ready to engage faithfully in this process under the auspices of the United Nations and hoped that Algeria could do the same.

Morocco had accepted the first plan proposed by Mr Baker, he said -- a framework agreement proposing autonomy of the Sahara -- but the plan had been categorically rejected by Algeria.  However, his Government could not, for obvious reasons, accept the partition of the territory proposed by Algeria to Mr Baker in 2001.  Morocco had objected to the second Baker Plan insofar as it had deviated from the concept of a political solution based on autonomy.  It was common knowledge that a solution which was not mutually acceptable did not have any chance of success, and Morocco did not understand, therefore, the stubbornness of Algeria to support a plan that was regarded as stillborn, since one of the conditions of its validity, namely, the agreement of the parties, did not exist.

Morocco was relieved by the recent release of the Moroccan prisoners detained in Tindouf, he said, and would continue to ask that justice be done.  He expressed Morocco’s wish to start, together with her Algerian brothers, a new era of cooperation and construction which would benefit not only the subregion, but the whole African continent, which aspired to reinforce and enhance its unity.

Action on Draft Proposals

The Committee then turned its attention to draft resolutions contained in the report of the Special committee (document A/60/23).  First it took up consideration of draft resolution I on Information from Non-Self Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73e of the Charter of the United Nations.

In a recorded vote of 130 in favour to none against, with four abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom and United States), the Committee approved the draft resolution, by which the Assembly would request the administering Powers concerned to transmit or continue to transmit to the Secretary-General the information prescribed in Article 73 e of the Charter, as well as the fullest possible information on political and constitutional developments in the Territories concerned.  It would request the Secretary-General to continue to ensure that adequate information is drawn from all available published sources in connection with the preparation of the working papers relating to the Territories concerned.  (See Annex I.)

In explanation of the vote after the vote, the representative of the United Kingdom said his delegation had abstained not because it objected to the main purpose of the draft.  Noting that his country was meeting its obligations regarding the Non-Self-Governing Territories under its administration, he said the decision whether the Territory was in a position to send information remained with the government of the Territory concerned.

The Committee then took up draft resolution II on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the people of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/60/23).  By its terms, the Assembly would reaffirm the right of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to self-determination in conformity with the United Nations Charter and with General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV), containing the Declaration on Decolonization, as well as their right to enjoy their natural resources and to dispose of them in their best interest.

Affirming the value of foreign economic investment in collaboration with the people of the Territories, the Assembly would also reaffirm the responsibility of the administering Powers to promote the political, economic, social and educational advancement of the Non-Self-Governing Territories, reaffirming also the legitimate right of their peoples over their natural resources.  It would reaffirm its concern about any activities aimed at exploiting the natural resources that are the heritage of the peoples of the Territories, including the indigenous populations, in the Caribbean, the Pacific and other regions, and of their human resources, to the detriment of their interests, and in such a way as to deprive them of their right to dispose of those resources.

By further provisions of the text, the Assembly would call upon all governments that have not yet done so to take, in accordance with relevant provisions of Assembly resolution 2621 of 1970, legislative, administrative or other measures in respect of their nationals and the bodies corporate under their jurisdiction that own and operate enterprises in the Territories that are detrimental to the interests of the inhabitants in order to end such enterprises.  The Assembly would also reiterate that damaging exploitation and plundering of the marine and other natural resources of the Territories, in violation of the relevant United Nations resolutions, are a threat to the integrity and prosperity of those Territories.

Also according to the text, the Assembly would urge the administering Powers concerned to take effective measures to safeguard and guarantee the inalienable right of the people of the Territories to their natural resources, and to establish and maintain control over the future development of the resources.  The administering Powers would also be requested to take all necessary steps to protect the property rights of the peoples in accordance with relevant United Nations resolutions.

The Assembly would, by further provisions, call upon the administering Powers concerned to ensure that no discriminatory working conditions prevail in the Territories under their administration and to promote in each Territory a fair system of wages applicable to all the inhabitants without any discrimination.  It would request the Secretary-General to continue, through all means at his disposal, to inform world public opinion of any activity that affects the exercise of the right of the peoples of the Territories to self-determination in conformity with the Charter and Assembly resolution 1514 (XV).

By yet further provisions, the Assembly would appeal to trade unions and non-governmental organizations, as well as individuals, to continue their efforts to promote the economic well-being of the peoples of the Territories, and also appeal to the media to disseminate information about the developments in that regard.  It would also decide to follow the situation in the remaining 16 Non-Self-Governing Territories so as to ensure that all economic activities in those Territories are aimed at strengthening and diversifying their economies in the interest of their peoples, including the indigenous populations, and at promoting the economic and financial viability of those Territories.

The draft resolution was approved by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 2 against ( Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions ( France, United Kingdom).  (See Annex II.)

In explanation of the vote, after the vote, the representative of Argentina said the resolution should be interpreted and implemented in accordance with relevant Assembly resolutions 2065 (XX), and 31/49.

The Committee then took up draft resolution III on the implementation of the Declaration of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/60/23).  By the terms of that text, the Assembly would recommend that all States intensify their efforts in the specialized agencies and other United Nations system organizations to ensure the full and effective implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, contained in General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV), and other relevant United Nations resolutions.  It would also reaffirm the recognition by the General Assembly, the Security Council and other United Nations organs that the legitimacy of the aspirations of the peoples of the Territories to exercise their right to self-determination entails, as a corollary, the extension of all appropriate assistance to those peoples.

By further terms, the Assembly would request the specialized agencies and other United Nations and international and regional organizations to review conditions in each Territory, so as to take appropriate measures to accelerate progress in the economic and social sectors of the Territories.  It would urge those specialized agencies and United Nations organizations that have not yet provided assistance to Non-Self-Governing Territories to do so as soon as possible.

By other provisions, the specialized agencies and United Nations system organizations would be requested to provide information on environmental problems facing the Territories; the impact of natural disasters, such as hurricanes and volcanic eruptions, and other environmental problems, such as beach and coastal erosion and droughts, on those Territories; ways and means to assist the Territories to fight drug trafficking, money-laundering and other illegal and criminal activities; and the illegal exploitation of the marine resources of the Territories and the need to utilize those resources for the benefit of the peoples of the Territories.

Also according to the draft, the Assembly would welcome the adoption by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) of its resolution 598 (XXX) of 2 July 2004, in which it welcomed the participation of associate members in the United Nations world conferences and special sessions, and reiterated its earlier request for the establishment of necessary mechanisms for the participation of associate members of regional economic commissions in the work of the Economic and Social Council and its subsidiary bodies.

The Chairman of the Special Committee, in consultation with the President of the Economic and Social Council, would be requested to explore the potential modalities for the implementation of the relevant ECLAC resolutions.  The Department of Public Information, in consultation with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the specialized agencies and the Special Committee, would be requested to prepare and disseminate an information leaflet on assistance programmes available to the Non-Self-Governing Territories.  The Territories would be encouraged to take steps to establish and/or strengthen disaster preparedness and management institutions and policies.

By other terms of the text, the Assembly would request the administering Powers concerned to facilitate, when appropriate, the participation of appointed and elected representatives of Non-Self-Governing Territories in the relevant meetings and conferences of the United Nations specialized agencies and other organizations, so that the Territories may benefit from the related activities.

On a point of order, the representative of Saint Lucia took the floor on behalf of the Special Committee.  She referred to page 83, paragraph 13 of the draft resolution.  In line 4 the word ‘reiterated’ should be replaced with the word ‘noted’.

The draft resolution was then approved by a recorded vote of 93 in favour to none against, with 49 abstentions. (See Annex III.)

The representative of Argentina spoke in explanation of vote after the vote.  His delegation had voted in favour of the resolution because it agreed with its mainstreaming provision.  However paragraphs 12, 13 and 14 should be interpreted in the light of antecedents in this area with regard to ECLAC.

Also speaking in explanation of vote, after the vote, the representative of the United Kingdom, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said that members of European Union wished to renew their support for specialized agencies in the struggle to achieve decolonization, but the statutes of those agencies must be respected.  That was why European Union had abstained in the vote.

Without a vote, the Committee approved a draft resolution contained in document A/C.4/60/L.2, entitled “Offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-governing Territories”.  The General Assembly, expressing its appreciation to those Member States that had made scholarships available to the inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories, would invite all States to make or continue to make generous offers to study and training facilities to the inhabitants of those Territories and, wherever possible, to provide travel funds to prospective students. 

The Assembly would also urge the administering Powers to take effective measures to ensure the widespread and continuous dissemination, in the Territories under their administration, of information relating to such offers and to provide all the necessary facilities to enable students to avail themselves of such offers.

The draft was sponsored by Algeria, Argentina, China, Cuba, Egypt, Ghana, India, Iran, Nigeria, Philippines, Singapore, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, and the United Republic of Tanzania.

The Committee then approved by consensus a draft resolution entitled “Question of Western Sahara ”, contained in document A/C.4/60/L.4.  By its terms, the Assembly would underline Security Council resolution 1495 (2003) in which the Council expressed its support of the peace plan for self-determination of the people of Western Sahara as an optimum political solution on the basis of agreement between the two parties.  It would also underline that the parties reacted differently to this plan and continue to support strongly the efforts of the Secretary-General and his Personal Envoy in order to achieve a mutually acceptable political solution to the dispute over Western Sahara.

Further to the draft, the Assembly would call upon all the parties and the States of the region to cooperate fully with the Secretary-General and his Personal Envoy, and also call upon the parties to cooperate with the international Committee of the Red Cross in its efforts to solve the problem of the fate of the people unaccounted for, and further call upon the parties to abide by their obligations under international humanitarian law to release without further delay all those held since the start of the conflict.

In explanation of the vote, after the vote, the representative of the United Kingdom, speaking on behalf of the European Union and associated States, said the Union welcomed the fact that the draft had been presented as a proposal of the Chairman and had been approved by consensus.  It supported efforts to find a just, lasting and mutually accepted resolution as envisioned by the Security Council.  The European Union continued to encourage the parties to work towards such a solution and to continue to work with the Special Envoy and Special Representative of the Secretary-General. 

He said the European Union paid tribute to MINURSO and to the role it played in the peace process.  The Union remained concerned, however, about the humanitarian aspects of the situation.   The Presidency of the European Union welcomed the release of 404 Moroccan prisoners of war by the POLISARIO Front and urged all parties to resolve the humanitarian issues linked to the conflict.  He called on both parties to continue to operate with the Committee of the Red Cross and Red Crescent to account for all disappeared persons and encouraged both parties to collaborate with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in confidence-building measures. 

Also in explanation of the vote, after the vote, the representative of Algeria said he was pleased that the draft had been approved without a vote and that the international community had reiterated the fact that the question of Western Sahara was a decolonization issue, the settlement of which must come through the people of the Western Sahara exercising their right of self-determination.  He also welcomed the fact that there was unanimous support for the Settlement Plan and the Peace Plan, the optimum political solution.  In noting that parties had reacted differently to the plan, the international community had also noted that the POLISARIO Front had accepted the plan, whereas Morocco had rejected it, thereby assuming responsibility for the current deadlock. 

He further welcomed the fact that the Assembly would reaffirm its responsibility for the people of Western Sahara and that it had called on Morocco to release hundreds of prisoners and Saharawi political detainees.  He said the POLISARIO Front had liberated all Moroccan prisoners, and the international community expected that Morocco would now live up to its obligations under international law and that it would accept and implement the Peace Plan.  The visit to the region of the Secretary-General’s Special Representative would offer an opportunity for a solution through the holding a referendum on self-determination. 

In explanation of vote, after the vote, the representative of Morocco said that there were always different ways to interpret a text.  Clear texts did not require interpretation as there was no ambiguity. This was precisely the case of this text, paragraph three of which emphasized that the parties had reacted differently to the Baker Plan.  This paragraph had enabled Morocco to update what had been requested in 2003.

The Committee then adopted, by consensus, a draft decision on the Question of Gibraltar, contained in document A/C.4/60/L.3, by which the Assembly would urge the Governments of Spain and the United Kingdom, while listening to the interests and aspirations of Gibraltar, to reach a definitive solution to that question, in light of the relevant Assembly resolutions and in the spirit of the Charter of the United Nations.  It welcomed the establishment of a new tripartite forum for dialogue on Gibraltar, under the statement made jointly by the Governments of Spain, United Kingdom and Gibraltar of 16 December 2004, noting that the tripartite forum was separate from the Brussels Process.

The Committee approved by consensus draft resolution IV on the “Question of New Caledonia” by the terms of which the General Assembly would welcome the significant developments that have taken place in New Caledonia as exemplified by the signing of the Noumea Accord in May 1998, and urge all parties involved to maintain, in the framework of the Accord, their dialogue in the spirit of harmony.

Further, by the text, the Assembly would note the relevant provisions of the Accord aimed at taking more broadly into account the Kanak identity in the political and social organization of New Caledonia, and also those provisions of the Accord relating to control of immigration and protection of local employment.  It would also note the relevant provisions of the Accord to the effect that New Caledonia may become a member or associate member of certain international organizations, such as international organizations in the Pacific region and the United Nations.

The Assembly would further welcome the fact that the administering Power invited to New Caledonia, at the time the new institutions were established, a mission of information which comprised representatives of countries of the Pacific region.  It would call upon the administering Power to continue to transmit to the Secretary-General information as required under article 73e of the Charter.

Further, the Assembly would invite all the parties involved to continue promoting a framework for the peaceful progress of the Territory towards an act of self-determination in which all options are open, and which would safeguard the rights of all sectors of the population, according to the letter and the spirit of the Noumea Accord.  The Assembly would also decide to keep under continuous review the process unfolding in New Caledonia as a result of the signing of the Accord and request the Special Committee to continue examining the question of New Caledonia and to report thereon to the General Assembly at its sixty-first session.

Action on draft resolution V on the “Question of Tokelau” was postponed.

Also before the Committee was draft resolution VI on the questions of American Samoa , Anguilla , Bermuda , the British Virgin Islands , the Cayman Islands , Guam , Montserrat , Pitcairn, Saint Helena , the Turks and Caicos Islands , and the United States Virgin Islands, contained in the report of the Special Committee.

The draft’s general section, Part A, would have the Assembly -- expressing its concern that more than 44 years after the adoption of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples -- reaffirm that, in the decolonization process, there was no alternative to the principle of self-determination, which was also a fundamental human right.

The Assembly would urge Member States to contribute to United Nations effort to usher in a world free of colonialism within the Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism, and call on them to continue to give their full support to the Special Committee “in its endeavours towards that noble goal”.

In a related provision, the Assembly would stress the importance of implementing the Decade’s action plan, particularly by expediting the application of the work programme for the decolonization of each Non-Self-Governing Territory, on a case-by-case basis and by completing the periodic analyses of the progress and extent of implementation of the Declaration. 

The Assembly would also reaffirm that it was ultimately for the peoples of the Territories themselves to determine freely their future political status and, in that connection, would reiterate its long-standing call for the administering Powers, in cooperation with the territorial governments, to promote political education in the Territories, in order to foster an awareness among the people of their right to self-determination.

The Assembly would stress the importance of the Special Committee being kept apprised of the views and wishes of the peoples of the Territories, enhancing its understanding of their conditions including the nature and scope of the existing political and constitutional arrangements between the Non-Self-Governing Territories and their respective administering Powers.

By a further provision, the Assembly would reaffirm the responsibility of the administering Powers to promote the economic and social development and to preserve the cultural identity of the Territories.  It would recommend that priority continue to be given, in consultation with the territorial Governments concerned, to strengthening and diversifying their respective economies.

Part B of the text takes up the question of the specific Territories.  On American Samoa, the Assembly would, among other things, call on the administering Power to assist the territorial Government in the Territory’s economic and social development, including measures to rebuild financial management capabilities and strengthen other governmental functions of the Government of the Territory, and welcome the assistance from the administering Power in its recovery efforts following the recent floods.

On Anguilla, the Assembly would welcome the constitutional review process led by the Government in cooperation with the administering Power.  It would note that the staging of the Caribbean regional seminar for the first time in a Non-Self-Governing Territory -- Anguilla -- in 2003, as well as a town hall meeting between the people of Anguilla and the Special Committee during the seminar, had contributed to the success of the event.

With respect to Bermuda, the Assembly would welcome the 2002 agreement between the United States, the United Kingdom and the Territory, formally transferring the former military base lands to the territorial Government, and also the provision of financial resources to address some of the environmental problems.

Further to that text, the Assembly would decide to follow closely the public consultations on the future political status of Bermuda under way in the Territory, and request the relevant United Nations organizations to provide assistance to the Territory, if requested, in the context of its public education programme.

Key among the provisions of the text on the British Virgin Islands was the taking note of the statement by the representative of the Legislative Council of the Territory at the regional seminar in May, who presented an analysis of the internal constitutional review process.

In addition, the Assembly would welcome the establishment of the Inter-Virgin Islands Council between the elected Governments of the British and United States Virgin Islands as a mechanism for functional cooperation between the two neighbouring Territories and the subsequent creation of 11 standing committees on natural resources management, mutual disaster preparedness and assistance and constitutional development, among other subjects.

Concerning the Cayman Islands, the Assembly would welcome the continuing constitutional review process led by the Government there, in cooperation with the administering Power.  The Assembly would take note of the statement by the representative of the Non-Governmental Organizations Constitutional Working Group of the Cayman Islands Chamber of Commerce at the Caribbean regional seminar, which called for a comprehensive educational programme, to be defined by the Special Committee, on the issue of self-determination, as well as a visiting mission to the Territory.

Pronouncing itself on Guam, the Assembly would call on the administering Powers to take into consideration the expressed will of the Chamorro people as supported by Guam voters in the plebiscite of 1987 and as provided for in Guam law, and it would encourage the administering Power and Guam’s territorial Government to enter into negotiations on the matter.  It would request the administering Power, in cooperation with the territorial Government, to continue to transfer land to the original landowners of the Territory.

On Montserrat, the Assembly would call on the administering Power, the specialized agencies and others in the United Nations system, as well as regional and other organizations, to continue to assist the Territory in alleviating the consequences of the volcanic eruption.

Taking into account the unique nature of Pitcairn in terms of population and area, the Assembly would request the administering Power to continue its assistance for the improvement of the economic, social, educational and other conditions of the population of the Territory and to continue its discussions with the representatives of Pitcairn on how best to support their economic security.

Concerning Saint Helena, the Assembly would welcome the continuing constitutional review process and the recent consultative poll led by the Government in cooperation with the administering Power, whose decision to provide funding for the construction of an international airport at Saint Helena to become operational in 2010 it would also welcome.  It would also ask the administering Power and relevant international organizations to continue to support the Territorial Government’s efforts to address the socio-economic development challenges, including the high unemployment and the problem of limited transport and communications, as well as to support the additional infrastructure required for the airport project.

The Assembly, noting the results of the April 2003 general election in Turks and Caicos Islands, would welcome the continuing constitutional review process.  It would take note of the statement made by the Chief Minister of the Territory at the 2005 Caribbean regional seminar that his Government was in favour of a reasonable period of full internal self-government before moving to independence.

On the United States Virgin Islands, the Assembly would ask the administering Power to continue to assist the territorial Government in achieving its political, economic and social goals, once again requesting it to facilitate the participation of the Territory in various organizations, particularly the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) and the Association of Caribbean State.

Similarly, it would call for the Territory’s inclusion in regional programmes of the United Nations Development Programme.  It would also call on the administering Power to refrain from enacting any legislative or other measures that would reduce the authority of the elected Government of the Territory to control its own financial affairs.

The Committee approved the draft without a vote.

Speaking in explanation of the position after the vote, the representative of Argentina said that in accordance with the Plan of Action for the Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonization, decolonization seminars could only be held in the Pacific, Caribbean and the United Nations.  The words “and others” were therefore incorrect.  Regarding operative paragraph 2, he said the scope of reference in that paragraph was restricted to those Territories referred to in the draft resolution.  The Assembly had recognized that there were Territories to which the principle was not the only one that applied, due to territorial disputes.  Regarding Malvinas ( Falkland Islands), he said the principle of territorial integrity, that of Argentina, should be applied according to several Assembly resolutions.

Also in explanation of the vote, the representative of Spain said that country had joined in the consensus as it supported the principle of self-determination to the Territories included in the draft.  There were other Territories, such as Gibraltar, where other principles, expressed in General Assembly resolutions, should be applied.

The representative of the United Kingdom speaking in explanation of vote after the vote said that his delegation supported the consensus on this resolution fully supporting the right to self-determination.  However, the language used in this resolution, in particular that referring to the United Kingdom’s overseas territories, had become increasingly inaccurate over the years.  The United Kingdom had made many proposals to modify the language used but none had been included.  Therefore his delegation would have to consider whether they could continue to support the resolution in future years

The Committee then approved draft resolution VII on Dissemination of information on decolonization (document A/AC.109/2005/L.4/ Rev.1), by whose terms the Assembly would approve the activities of the Department of Public Information and the Department of Political Affairs in the dissemination of information on decolonization.  It would consider it important to continue and expand the Special Committee’s efforts to ensure the widest possible dissemination of information on decolonization, with particular emphasis on the options of self-determination available for the peoples of Non-Self-Governing Territories.

The Assembly would request both departments to implement the recommendations of the Special Committee to continue their efforts to take measures through all the available media, including publications, radio and television, as well as the Internet, to publicize the work of the United Nations in the decolonization field.

Among other things, the two Departments would be requested:  to develop procedures to collect, prepare and disseminate, particularly to the Territories, basic material on the issue of self-determination; to seek the full cooperation of the administering Powers in the discharge of the above tasks; to develop a working relationship with the appropriate regional and intergovernmental organizations, particularly in the Pacific and Caribbean regions, by holding periodic consultations and exchanging information; and to encourage the involvement of non-governmental organizations, as well as the Non-Self-Governing Territories in the dissemination of information on decolonization.

The draft resolution was approved by a recorded vote of 142 in favour to 3 against ( Israel, United States, United Kingdom), with 1 abstention ( France).  (See Annex IV.)

In explanation of the vote after the vote, the representative of the United Kingdom said that he had voted against this resolution because the obligation that this text placed on the Secretariat to publicize decolonization issues would be too much of a strain on the Secretariat’s resources.

The Committee approved by a recorded vote of 141 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 3 abstentions (Belgium, Germany, France) draft resolution VIII contained in the report on the “Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples” (document A/60/23).  (See Annex V.)

By the terms of the draft, the General Assembly would reaffirm, once again, that the existence of colonialism in any form or manifestation, including economic exploitation, is incompatible with the United Nations Charter, the Declaration on Decolonization and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  It would call upon the administering Powers to take all necessary steps to enable the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to exercise fully as soon as possible their right to self-determination, including independence.

The Assembly would also affirm, once again, its support for the aspirations of the peoples under colonial rule to exercise their right to self-determination, including independence.  It would call upon the administering Powers to cooperate fully with the Special Committee to finalize, before the end of 2005, a constructive programme of work on a case-by-case basis for the Territories to facilitate the implementation of the Special Committee’s mandate and the relevant decolonization resolutions, including ones on specific Territories.

By further terms of the text, the Assembly would welcome progress made in the ongoing consultations between the Special Committee and New Zealand, as administering Power for Tokelau, with the participation of representatives of the people of Tokelau, as evidenced by the decision of the General Fono of Tokelau, in November 2003, to actively explore with New Zealand the option of self-government in free association.

Further, the Assembly would welcome the dispatch of the United Nations special mission to Bermuda, at the request of the territorial Government and with the concurrence of the administering Power, which provided information to the people of the Territory on the United Nations role in the process of self-determination, on the legitimate political status options, as clearly defined in resolution 1541 (XV) of 15 December 1960, and on the experiences of other small States which have achieved a full measure of self-government.

The Assembly would request the Special Committee, by further terms, to continue to seek suitable means for the immediate and full implementation of the Declaration and to carry out the actions approved by the Assembly regarding the International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism and the Second Decade in all Territories that have not yet exercised their right to self-determination, including independence.   In particular, it would be asked to formulate specific proposals to end colonialism; examine the implementation by Member States of resolution 1514 (XV) and other relevant resolutions; finalize, before the end of 2006, a constructive programme of work on a case-by-case basis for the Territories to facilitate the implementation of the Committee’s mandate. 

The Special Committee, among other things, would also be requested to continue dispatching visiting missions to the Territories, to conduct seminars for the purpose of receiving and disseminating information on the Committee’s work, to take all necessary steps to enlist worldwide support among governments, as well as national and international organizations, for achieving the objectives of the Declaration.

By other terms of the draft, the Assembly would call upon all States, in particular the administering Powers, as well as United Nations specialized agencies, to give effect within their respective spheres of competence to the Special Committee’s recommendations for the implementation of the Declaration and other relevant United Nations resolutions.  It would call upon the administering Powers to ensure that the economic activities in the Territories under their administration do not adversely affect the interests of the peoples but instead promote development, and to assist them in the exercise of their right to self-determination.

The Assembly would urge the administering Powers to take effective measures to safeguard and guarantee the inalienable rights of the peoples of the Territories to their natural resources, including land, and to establish and maintain control over the future development of those resources.  They would also be requested to take all necessary steps to protect the rights of the people.  It would also urge all States, directly and through their action in the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system, to provide moral and material assistance to the peoples of the Territories and request the administering Powers to take steps to enlist and make effective use of all possible assistance, on both a bilateral and multilateral basis, in the strengthening of the economies of the Territories.

Also by the terms of the text, the Assembly would reaffirm that United Nations visiting missions to the Territories are an effective means of ascertaining the situation in the Territories and call upon the administering Powers to cooperate with the Special Committee in the discharge of its mandate and to facilitate visiting missions.  It would call upon administering Powers that have not formally participated in the Special Committee’s work to do so at its 2006 session.  It would request the Secretary-General, the specialized agencies and other United Nations system organizations to provide economic, social and other assistance to the Territories and continue to do so after they exercise their right to self-determination, including independence. 

The Assembly would also approve the Special Committee’s report covering its 2005 session, including the programme of work for 2006.

In explanation of the vote after the vote, the representative of United Kingdom said it considered some elements of the resolution unacceptable and had therefore voted against it. 

Regarding draft resolution XI, on the “Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism” (document A/60/23), the Committee was informed that there might be programme budget implications and that action would be postponed to a later date. 

Statements in Right of Reply

The representative of the United Kingdom exercised his right of reply regarding comments made by the representative of Uruguay in today’s meeting and those made yesterday by the representative of Venezuela.  The United Kingdom’s position on the Falkland Islands was well known.  His Government had no doubts concerning its sovereignty over the islands, and there could be no negotiation on this until the residents of the islands so wished. 

The representative of Pakistan expressed his thanks and deep appreciation to the Member States who had expressed kind words of sympathy and compassion for the great loss that had been caused by the recent earthquake in his country.  These words of support and offers of assistance strengthened the resolve and fortitude of the people of Pakistan to brave this great national tragedy, he said.

ANNEX I

Vote on Transmission of Decolonization Information

The draft resolution on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories under Article 73E (document A/60/23, P.76) was approved by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  None.

Abstain:  France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Iceland, Kenya, Kiribati, Lesotho, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Monaco, Mongolia, Nauru, Niger, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

ANNEX II

Vote on Economic Activities

The draft resolution on economic activities affecting Non-Self Governing Territories (document A/60/23, P.77) was approved by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 2 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, United States.

Abstain:  France, United Kingdom.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Iceland, Kenya, Kiribati, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Mongolia, Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

ANNEX III

Vote on Implementation of Decolonization Declaration

The draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration on Decolonization by United Nations bodies (document A/60/23, P.80) was approved by a recorded vote of 93 in favour to none against, with 49 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  None.

Abstain:  Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mongolia, Nauru, Niger, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

ANNEX IV

Vote on Dissemination of Information on Decolonization

The draft resolution on dissemination of information on decolonization (document A/60/23, P.102) was approved by a recorded vote of 142 in favour to 3 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia.

Against:  Israel, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  France.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Bahamas, Barbados, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kenya, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mongolia, Nauru, Niger, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.

ANNEX V

Vote on Implementation of Decolonization Declaration

The draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration on Decolonization (document A/60/23, P.104) was adopted by a recorded vote of 141 in favour to 3 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia.

Against:  Israel, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Belgium, France, Germany.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Bahamas, Barbados, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kenya, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Nauru, Niger, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zimbabwe.

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For information media • not an official record
For information media. Not an official record.