GENERAL ASSEMBLY APPROPRIATES $53.63 MILLION FOR STRENGTHENED, UNIFIED UN SECURITY, AS IT CONCLUDES MAIN PART OF 59TH SESSION

23 December 2004
GA/10323

GENERAL ASSEMBLY APPROPRIATES $53.63 MILLION FOR STRENGTHENED, UNIFIED UN SECURITY, AS IT CONCLUDES MAIN PART OF 59TH SESSION

23/12/2004
Press ReleaseGA/10323

Fifty-ninth General Assembly

Plenary

76th Meeting (PM)

GENERAL ASSEMBLY APPROPRIATES $53.63 MILLION FOR STRENGTHENED,

UNIFIED UN SECURITY, AS IT CONCLUDES MAIN PART OF 59TH SESSION

Acts on WideRange of Recommendations from Budget Committee;

Texts on Africa’s Development, Anti-Malaria Decade among Others Adopted

The General Assembly this evening approved an additional appropriation of some $53.63 million from the regular budget for a strengthened and unified United Nations security system, as it concluded the main part of its fifty-ninth session.

Acting on what the Secretary-General had called one of the most important proposals -– if not the most important -- of his term, it established the Department of Safety and Security and introduced 383 new security posts, 134 of them on a temporary basis.  When he had presented his unified security management plan earlier in the session, Mr. Annan had said that the United Nations could no longer rely on fragmented security structures, or on a small group of over-extended security advisers who tried valiantly to cope with the dangers.  “In a new security environment, we need a new way of doing business”, he said.

The Assembly also acted on a wide range of other recommendations from its Fifth Committee, on such issues as human resources management, financing for the two international Tribunals, the United Nations contingency fund, the Organization’s first performance report for 2004-2005, reports of United Nations oversight bodies, and the United Nations common system.

The 16-part draft resolution on human resources management, adopted without a vote, addresses such important issues as recruitment of personnel, national competitive and “G to P” examinations, measures to improve equitable geographic distribution, post structure, gender parity, mobility, contractual arrangements, the staffing of field missions, the use of consultants and retirees, availability of skills in local markets, measures to prevent discrimination, and staff-management consultations.

By the text, the Assembly stressed the need to ensure accountability of programme managers for the implementation of human resources policies, requested the Secretary-General to continue to improve the effectiveness of human resources action plans and stressed the importance of a meaningful dialogue between staff and management on human resources issues, calling upon both parties to intensify efforts to overcome their differences and resume the consultative process.  Among numerous provisions of the text is a request to the Secretary-General to reconstitute the Accountability Panel, ensuring that it has the authority to hold managers accountable for their performance.

By a related text on the United Nations common system, the Assembly took note of the report of the International Civil Service Commission (ICSC), which contains that body’s latest recommendations on the Organization’s pay and benefits system, contractual arrangements and conditions of service of international staff.  Among the recommendations of the ICSC endorsed by the Assembly were decisions to increase the level of hazard pay to locally recruited staff and to grant paternity leaves throughout the common system.  In respect of the education grant, the Assembly approved increases in the maximum reimbursement levels for 15 countries.

Several resolutions related to the budgetary aspects of the Fifth Committee’s work during the session.  Based on its recommendations, the Assembly adopted a text on the preliminary budget outline for the next biennium, estimating the Organization’s requirements for 2006-2007 at some $3.621 billion.  To reflect inflation and exchange-rate variations, as well as unforeseen expenses and additional mandates approved after the adoption of the 2004-2005 budget, it also revised the amount required for the current biennium, bringing the total to some $3.608 billion.

Based on the Budgetary Committee’s recommendations, the Assembly also decided on a revised appropriation for 2004-2005 of $329.32 million gross for the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, and $255.91 million for the Rwanda Tribunal, to reflect changes with respect to exchange rates, currency fluctuations and provision for the Tribunals’ Investigations Divisions for 2005.  Also approved today were the budgets of 25 special political missions authorized by the Security Council and the General Assembly, totalling some $174.75 million gross for the period up to 31 December 2005.

Adopting a six-part resolution on the pattern of conferences, the Assembly approved a revised United Nations calendar of conferences and meetings for 2005 and addressed the issues of utilization of conference-servicing resources and facilities; the performance of the Department for General Assembly and Conference Management; documentation- and publication-related matters; translation and interpretation; and information technology.

Also adopted today were three texts related to the Office of Internal Oversight Services -- the principal oversight body of the United Nations.  By those resolutions, the Assembly addressed the function and reporting procedures of the Office; follow-up to OIOS recommendations; the activities of the Office; coordination between United Nations oversight bodies; and findings of the Office’s investigations.  Among other drafts adopted today were a nine-part resolution on the United Nations pension system, a text on the scale of assessments for the apportionment of expenses of the United Nations and a resolution on Joint Inspection Unit (JIU) reports.

In other action, the Assembly:

-- Authorized the Secretary-General to enter into commitments in an amount not to exceed $20 million to supplement the financial resources of the Special Court for Sierra Leone in 2005, under the programme budget for the biennium 2004-2005;

-- Requested the Secretary-General to progressively increase regular budget contributions to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, with a view to full implementation of article 20 of its statute, under which

administrative expenditures relating to the functioning of the Office were to be borne by the United Nations;

-- Approved the terms for the Organization’s participation in the arrangements for the construction of additional conference facilities at Vienna International Centre and entrust the Secretary-General to determine potential cost-sharing arrangements in the future;

-- Requested the Secretary-General to submit proposals to support and enhance the United Nations Web site in all official languages within the budget proposal for 2006-2007;

-- Accepted financial reports, audited financial statements and opinions of the Board of Auditors on 15 of the 16 organizations of the United Nations system audited for the 2002-2003 biennium, with the exception of the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), for which the Board was unable to express an opinion;

-- Approved some $21.79 million gross to finance the Organization’s advance team in the Sudan through 10 December 2004; and

-- Took note of several reports, including the document on the administrative arrangements for the International Trade Centre UNCTAD/WTO and the statistical report of the Chief Executives Board for Coordination on the budgetary and financial situation of the United Nations system.

Also this afternoon, the Assembly acted on several plenary-generated drafts and outstanding texts contained in the reports of several of its other Main Committees, which had been awaiting the Budgetary Committee’s recommendations on the programme budget implications of the specific proposals contained in those texts.

The Assembly adopted, without vote, resolutions on the following:  the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), implementation of recommendations contained in the Secretary-General’s report on the causes of conflict in Africa; and the Decade to Roll Back Malaria in Developing Countries, particularly in Africa.

It also adopted three texts on enhancing United Nations cooperation with regional and other organizations, respectively, with the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organization, the Latin American Economic System, and the Organization of American States (OAS).

Acting on several texts recommended to it by its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural), the Assembly adopted a resolution on the future operations of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW) by a recorded vote 125 in favour to 10 against (Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Japan, Latvia, New Zealand, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States), with 30 abstentions (see annex I).

It also adopted a resolution on the rights of the child by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 2 against (Marshall Islands, United States), with 1 abstention (India) (see annex V), following separate recorded votes on two operative paragraphs and a phrase in a third operative paragraph.  A text on the International Convention on Migrants’ Rights was adopted without a vote.  Another draft, on the situation of human rights in Myanmar was also adopted without a vote.  Lastly, on the reports of the Third Committee, the Assembly took note of the report on programme planning.

Also outstanding was a Sixth Committee (Legal) report on the International Convention against the reproductive cloning of human beings, which contained a draft decision to establish a Sixth Committee Working Group to finalize the draft United Nations declaration on human cloning.  The Assembly adopted the draft decision without a vote.

In his closing remarks, President of the General Assembly, Jean Ping (Gabon) said that during a busy and productive session, the Assembly had adopted 279 resolutions, 208 of them by consensus.  Among the issues addressed by the Assembly, he singled out the efforts to revitalize the work of the General Assembly, the publication of the report of the High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change and preparation for the high-level meeting of the Assembly next September.  Those items were part of the process of collective reform of the United Nations system.

He added that if the international community wanted to achieve real collective security, eradicate poverty, end pandemics, do away with wars, transnational crime, famine and environmental degradation -- if it wanted to build a model of ideal society for future generations -- it should go beyond the declarations of principle and begin implementing its commitments, especially in the socio-economic areas.

Background

The General Assembly met this afternoon to take action on draft resolutions and decisions recommended in reports submitted by the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary).

Along with the reports of the Fifth Committee, the Assembly had before it a number of plenary-generated draft resolutions, as well as outstanding reports from several of its other Main Committees.

Plenary Drafts

The Assembly will consider a two-part text on the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD):  progress in implementation and international support (document A/59/L.33/Rev.1).  Part I would have it welcome the efforts made by African countries in developing sectoral policy frameworks and implementing specific NEPAD programmes, and encourages further integration of the Plan’s priorities and objectives of the regional structures and organizations, as well as programmes for the African least developed countries.

Part II would have the Assembly welcome the efforts made by development partners to strengthen joint initiatives with the NEPAD, and to urge developed countries to increase official development assistance (ODA) to African countries and to improve the effectiveness of aid.  Further, the Assembly would stress the need to take special measures to address the challenges of poverty and sustainable development in Africa, including through debt cancellation, improved market access, enhanced ODA and increased flows of foreign direct investment, as well as transfer of technology.

Another draft resolution before the Assembly is on implementation of the recommendations in the Secretary-General’s report on the causes of conflict and the promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa (document A/59/L.50/Rev.1), by which it would note with concern the slow progress in implementing many of those recommendations, as well as the emergence of trends that could potentially affect Africa’s peace and stability.  While recognizing the need for support from the international community, the Assembly would stress that Africa bore the responsibility for its peace and security, including the capacity to address the root causes of conflict and conflict resolution.

Further by the text, the Assembly would reaffirm the need to strengthen synergies between Africa’s economic and social development programmes and its peace and security agenda.  It would also welcome the establishment of the African Union peace and Security Council, and encourage the international community to continue to support African countries’ ongoing efforts to develop their capacity and undertake peace-support operations at regional and subregional levels.

The draft would have the Assembly call upon Member States, in particular donor countries, the United Nations system and region and subregional organizations to continue to provide financial and technical assistance to Africa, and call upon the Secretary-General to explore and recommend suitable arrangements and mechanisms through which Member States could more effectively support Africa’s efforts to address the multiple causes of conflict on the continent, and to strengthen, in a coordinated and sustained manner, preventive action, as well as post-conflict peace-building.

By a text on cooperation between the United Nations and the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organization (document A/59/L.57), the Assembly would welcome the activities of the Cooperation Organization aimed at strengthening regional cooperation in various fields, such as trade and economic development, banking and finance, communications, energy, environmental protection, collaboration among customs services, and combating organized crime.  It would further welcome the start-up and financing of the first initiatives by the organization’s Project Development Fund to benefit the sustainable development of the Black Sea region.

A draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Latin American Economic System (document A/59/ L.55) would have the Assembly urge the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) to continue to deepen its coordination and mutual support of the activities of the Latin American Economic System.  It would also urge the specialized agencies and other organizations, funds and programmes of the United Nations system to continue and intensify their support and deepen their ties of cooperation with the Latin American Economic System activities, and to contribute to joint actions to achieve internationally agreed development objectives, including the Millennium Development Goals, in the Latin American and Caribbean Region.

Also before the Assembly was a draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization of American States (OAS) (document A/59/L.41/Rev.1), by which it would recall that one of the common goals of both organizations is to fight against corruption and impunity, and note that the Inter-American Convention against Corruption is a pioneering international instrument in the field.  The Assembly would also note with concern the continuing spread of HIV/AIDS in the Latin American region, which required coordinated action at the domestic, regional and global levels.

The text would have the Assembly call for the prompt mobilization of resources to meet the emergency needs of Haiti and Grenada in the wake of the serious floods and hurricanes that recently affected that region.  The United Nations and the OAS would both be called on to continue to develop their mutual cooperation in accordance with their respective mandates, jurisdiction and composition and to adapt to each specific situation in accordance with the Charter.

The Assembly was also set to consider reports on programme planning for two of its Main Committees:  report of the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) on Programme 3, Disarmament, of the proposed strategic framework for the period 2006-2007 (document A/59/618); and the report of the Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) on Programme 23, public information, of the proposed 2006-2007 strategic framework (document A/59/621).

Among the outstanding reports of the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural), a document on the Advancement of Women (A/59/496), contains a draft resolution (III) on Future operation of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW).  There was an accompanying Fifth Committee report on programme budgetary implications (document A/59/641).

The draft would have the Assembly request INSTRAW actively to participate and contribute to the review and appraisal of the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, and the outcome document of its twenty-third special session in the context of the forty-ninth session of the Commission on the Status of Women.  It would stress the critical importance of voluntary financial contributions to the INSTRAW Trust Fund and urge Member States to make such contributions.  It would also decide to provide full support to the current efforts to revitalize the Institute.

Also before the Assembly were a Third Committee report on the promotion and protection of the rights of children (document A/59/499), and an accompanying Fifth Committee report (document A/59/642).  The Third Committee text contained an omnibus draft on rights of the child, which would have the Assembly urge States that have not yet done so to sign and ratify or accede to the Convention on the Rights of the Child as a matter of priority, and to the Optional Protocols to the Convention on the involvement of children in armed conflict and on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.  It would also express concern about the growing number of reservations to the Convention and urge States parties to withdraw incompatible reservations.

Also by the draft, States would be urged to intensify their efforts to ensure implementation of the right of the child to birth registration, preservation of identity and family relations.  They would be called upon to prevent and combat illegal adoptions and to address cases of international abduction of children.

Calling upon States and the international community to cooperate, support and participate in global efforts for poverty reduction, the Assembly would reaffirm investments in children and realization of their rights as among the most effective ways to eradicate poverty.  States would also be called upon to recognize the right to education on the basis of equal opportunity and non-discrimination.

States would be called upon to take all measures to prevent and protect children from all forms of violence, including by protecting schoolchildren from violence, injury or abuse, as well as sexual abuse and intimidation or maltreatment in schools.  They would also be called upon to take measures specific to the protection of the girl-child, children with disabilities, migrant children, children working and/or living on the street and refugee and internally displaced children.

Under a section on the prevention and eradication of the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, the General Assembly would call upon States to criminalize and effectively penalize all forms of sexual exploitation and sexual abuse of children, including within the family or for commercial purposes, child pornography and child prostitution, child-sex tourism, the sale of children and their organs, and the use of the Internet for those purposes.  In addition, States would be called upon to combat the existence of a market that encouraged such criminal practices against children.

States would also be called upon to take all feasible measures to ensure the demobilization and effective disarmament of children used in armed conflict and implement effective measures for their rehabilitation and reintegration into society.

Finally, States that had not yet done so would be urged to complete national action plans incorporating the goals of “A world fit for children”, while the Secretary-General would be requested to prepare an updated report on progress achieved with regard to those goals.  The Chair of the Committee on the Rights of the Child would be invited to present an oral report on the work of the Committee at the Assembly’s sixtieth session.

Additionally, the Assembly has before it a draft resolution on the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrants Workers and Member of Their Families, contained in the Third Committee’s report on human rights questions:  implementation of human rights instruments (document A/59/503/Add.1).  Again, a relevant Fifth Committee report (document A/59/639) accompanied that document.

That draft resolution would have the Assembly welcome the increasing number of signatures, ratifications or accessions to the Convention and call upon States that have not yet done so to consider signing and ratifying or acceding to the Convention, with the aim of achieving a broader participation by Member States therein.  It would also call upon States parties to submit, in due time, their first periodic report under article 73 of the Convention.

Also, a draft on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, contained in the Third Committee’s report on human rights questions:  reports of special rapporteurs and representatives (document A/59/503/Add.3), was before the Assembly, as was a relevant Fifth Committee report (document A/59/640).

The resolution would have the Assembly express its grave concern at the ongoing systematic violation of human rights, including political, economic, social and cultural rights, of the people of Myanmar; the events of 30 May 2003 and the continuing detention and house arrest of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and members of the National League for Democracy; the fact that the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General and the Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights have not been permitted to visit the country for six and 12 months, respectively.

Among other provisions, the text would have the Assembly call upon the Government of Myanmar to end the systematic violations of human rights, restore democracy and respect the results of the 1990 elections and release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, other members of the National League for Democracy and other prisoners of conscience, as well as all detained or imprisoned political prisoners.  The Government would be called upon to initiate a full and independent inquiry, with international cooperation, into the Depayin incident of 30 May 2003, and to cooperate fully with the Special Envoy and the Special Rapporteur.  It would also be called upon to put an immediate end to the recruitment and use of child soldiers.

Also outstanding was a Sixth Committee (Legal) report on the international convention against the reproductive cloning of human beings (document A/59/516), which outlines the Committee’s consideration of the issue of cloning during its substantive session.  It includes the texts of three relevant draft resolutions that had been presented to the Committee, as well as an annex containing the draft United Nations declaration on human cloning, and a proposal to establish a Sixth Committee Working Group to finalize the declaration.

The Committee recommends that the Assembly take note of its decision to establish the Working Group, whose work would be based on a draft resolution on an international convention against the reproductive cloning of human beings.  It also recommends that the Group would meet on 14, 15 and 18 February 2005.  The Committee would meet in the afternoon of 18 February to consider and take action on the Group’s report. The Group would be headed by the Chairman of the Sixth Committee, with members of the Committee’s Bureau serving as “Friends of the Chairman”.  The body would be open to all MemberStates or members of specialized agencies or of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Fifth Committee Reports

The Fifth Committee’s report on financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors (document A/59/588), contained a draft resolution by the terms of which the Assembly would accept financial reports, audited financial statements and opinions of the Board on 15 of the 16 organizations of the United Nations system audited for the biennium ended 31 December 2003, with the exception of the financial statements of the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), for which the Board was unable to express an opinion.

Noting that situation with concern, the Assembly would acknowledge the comprehensive steps taken by the Office to address the issues raised by the Board.  It would also note the view of the Board that it would be premature to conduct an audit of UNOPS’ financial statements for 2004 next year, for time is needed to address the critical issues raised by the auditors.  It would decide to revert to the issue in the context of the Board of Auditors’ report on the implementation of its recommendations at its sixtieth session.

Further by the text, the Assembly would approve the recommendations and conclusions of the Board and the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), with the provision that, should the need arise, those recommendations, including those on the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, the capital master plan and the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund, would be considered under their respective agenda items.

Commending the Board of Auditors for the superior quality of its reports, the Assembly would note with concern their late issuance, despite the timely submission by the Board, and request the Secretary-General to ensure sufficient priority in completing their editing and translation, so that they can be submitted to the Assembly in accordance with the six-week rule.

Also by the text, the Assembly would take note of the reports on the implementation of the Board of Auditors’ recommendations and invite the Board, in consultation with the Secretary-General and executive heads of the funds and programmes, to categorize the recommendations according to their priority.  The Secretary-General and heads of funds and programmes would be requested to indicate an expected time frame for the implementation and officials to be held accountable; examine governance principles; and consider strengthening the internal control framework, harmonizing administrative mechanisms that would systematically act upon findings and recommendations of oversight bodies.

The Committee’s report on administrative and budgetary coordination of the United Nations with the specialized agencies and the International Atomic Energy Agency (document A/59/605) contained a draft decision by the terms of which it took note of the report, transmitted in a note by the Secretary-General (document A/59/315).

The Committee’s report on scale of assessments for the apportionment of the expenses of the United Nations (document A/59/421/Add.1) contained one draft resolution, by the terms of which the Assembly would urge all Member States to pay their contributions to the Organization in full, on time and without conditions.  It would also take note of the Committee on Contributions and the Secretary-General’s report on multi-year payment plans, reaffirming paragraph one of its resolution 57/4B, by which it endorsed the conclusions of the Committee on Contributions in that regard.

[The Committee on Contributions had agreed that Member States should be encouraged to submit plans as a useful tool for reducing their unpaid assessments; recognized that not all Member States might be in a position to submit plans; and recommended that plans should remain voluntary and should not be linked to other measures.  For those States that were in a position to submit a plan, its submission and the status of implementation should be taken into account as one factor in considering requests for exemption under Article 19.]

Also by the text, the Assembly would defer until the first part of its resumed session consideration of the question of outstanding contributions of the former Yugoslavia.

The Committee’s report on United Nations pension system (document A/59/606) contained a draft resolution addressing the actuarial matters of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund; the pension adjustment system; the financial statements of the Pension Fund and a related report of the Board of Auditors; administrative arrangements of the Fund; size and composition of the Pension Board and the Standing Committee; investments of the Pension Fund; diversification of investments of the Pension Fund; and implementation of the recommendations of the Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) on the Investment Management service of the Pension Fund.

With a view to securing continuity of pension rights, the Assembly would concur with the revised transfer agreements of the Fund with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and the World Trade Organization (WTO), as approved by the Board, as well as the new transfer agreements with the Universal Postal Union and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization.  It would also decide that the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) would be admitted as a new member organization of the Fund, effective 1 January, 2005.

Also by the text, the Assembly would approve the changes in the pension adjustment system, which would introduce a phased approach to the elimination of the 1.5 per cent reduction in the first consumer price index adjustments and add a new provision under the two-track pension adjustment system for an adjustable minimum guarantee at 80 per cent of the United States dollar-track amount.  The latter would be done with the understanding that, under the two-track system, benefits are subject to a maximum of 110 or 120 per cent of the local currency track, depending on the date of separation from service.  The Board would be requested to review the benefit of the two-track system vis-à-vis the dollar track for the beneficiaries of the Fund.  The Assembly would take note of the Board’s intention to address in 2006, subject to a favourable actuarial valuation at the end of 2005, possible total elimination of the balance of the 1.5 per cent reduction, as well as possible elimination of the limitation of the right to restoration based on the length of prior service.

The Assembly would also take note with satisfaction of the approval by the Pension Board of an internal audit charter, which recognized and incorporated policy changes for the OIOS of the Secretariat.  While approving some $5.34 million in additional resources for the current biennium for the Fund’s administrative expenses, the Assembly would take note of an upward trend in that respect and the intention of the ACABQ to further consider the matter in the context of the Fund’s budget proposals for 2006-2007.

On the Fund’s investments, the Assembly would take note of the significant increase in the market value of the Fund’s assets and positive returns achieved during the previous biennium.  It would note that a comprehensive review would be carried out of the investment policies and practices of the Investment Management Service with a view to addressing the findings of the audit reports of the OIOS and the Board of Auditors.  Taking note of the increase of the Fund’s investments in developing countries, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to report at its sixty-first session on the steps undertaken to increase such investments to the maximum extent possible.  It would also reaffirm the policy of diversification of the investments of the Fund across geographical areas, wherever that served the interests of the participants and beneficiaries of the Fund, in accordance with the criteria of safety, profitability, liquidity and convertibility.

The Committee’s report on financing of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (document A/59/603) contained one draft resolution by which the Assembly would decide on a revised appropriation to the Special Account for the Tribunal for a total amount of $255.91 million gross ($231.51 million net) for the biennium 2004-2005.  The Assembly would further approve the proposed post and non–post resources for the Investigations Division for 2005.

The first performance report for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (document A/59/549) reflected a requirement of additional appropriations of $26.8 million, net of staff assessment, over the initial appropriation for the biennium 2004-2005.  The requirement included changes with respect to exchange rates as a result of the weakening of the United States dollar vis-à-vis the euro and provision for the Investigations Division for 2005.

Noting with concern the precarious financial situation of the Tribunal, the levels of unpaid assessed contributions and the resulting freeze imposed by the Secretariat on the Tribunal, which was having a negative impact on the completion strategy, the Assembly would urge Member States to pay their assessed contributions on time, and request the Secretary-General to make every effort to ensure that areas critical to the successful completion of the mandate of the Tribunal were exempt from any freezes.

Also, the Assembly would request the Tribunal to develop and implement outreach programmes that are proactive and contribute to the reconciliation process by effectively developing an increased understanding of its work among Rwandans, optimally utilizing available resources.

The Committee’s report on financing of the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (document A/59/604) contained one draft resolution by which the Assembly would decide on a revised appropriation to the special Account for the Tribunal of a total amount of $329.32 million gross ($298.44 million net) for the biennium 2004-2005.  The Assembly would also decide to approve the proposed post and non-post resources for the Investigations Division.

The first performance report of the biennium 2004-2005 for the former Yugoslavia Tribunal (document A/59/547) reflects a requirement of additional appropriations of $26.8 million, net of staff assessment, over the initial appropriation for 2004-2005.  The requirement includes changes with respect to exchange rates as a result of the weakening of the United States dollar vis-à-vis the euro and provision for the Investigations Division for 2005.

Noting with concern the precarious financial situation of the Tribunal, the levels of unpaid assessed contributions and the resulting freeze imposed by the Secretariat on the Tribunal, which was having a negative impact on the completion strategy, the Assembly would urge Member States to pay their assessed contributions on time, and request the Secretary-General to make every effort to ensure that areas critical to the successful completion of the mandate of the Tribunal were exempt from any freezes.

For summaries of the draft resolutions and decisions contained in the Committee’s reports on:  Pattern of conferences (document A/59/644); Human resources management (document A/59/650); Joint Inspection Unit (document A/59/646); United Nations common system (document A/59/647); Report of the Secretary-General on the activities of the Office of Internal Oversight Services (document A/59/648); Review of the implementation of General Assembly resolutions 48/218 B and 54/244 (document A/59/649); Programme planning (documents A/59/651 and A/59/643); Programme budget for the biennium 2004-2005 (document A/59/448/Add.2); and Review of the efficiency of the administrative and financial functioning of the United Nations (document A/59/652), see Press Release GA/AB/3658 of 22 December.

Action on Drafts

The Assembly began its work by taking action on a number of plenary-generated draft resolutions, as well as outstanding texts contained in the reports of several of its other Main Committees.

Plenary Drafts

The representative of Qatar, speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, introduced a two-part text on the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD):  progress in implementation and international support (document A/59/L.33/Rev.1).  He said that Africa faced serious challenges, which required focused action.  The adoption of NEPAD by the African Union in 2001 demonstrated the resolve to address the daunting challenges facing the continent.  The main aim of the resolution was to keep the spotlight on the efforts of African countries and to highlight the continuing need for international support for those efforts.

He also introduced the draft resolution on implementation of the recommendations in the Secretary-General’s report on the causes of conflict and the promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa (document A/59/L.50/Rev.1), thanking all colleagues for their support and cooperation.

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution on the NEPAD, as orally corrected, as well as the draft resolution on the Secretary-General’s report.

The Assembly then decided to defer consideration of item 41 entitled “The role of the United Nations in promoting a new global human order” and to include it in the provisional agenda of the sixty-first session.

Another draft resolution, on the 2001-2010 Decade to Roll Back Malaria in Developing Countries, Particularly in Africa (document A/59/L.56), was introduced by the representative of the United Republic of Tanzania, on behalf of the African Union.  She said that malaria was the leading cause of under-five mortality in Africa and accounted for over 40 per cent of public health expenditures.  It was to combat malaria and implement Millennium Development Goal 6 that the African Union presented the resolution.

The draft resolution was adopted by the Assembly without a vote.

Following that, the representative of Panama introduced the draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Latin American Economic System (document A/59/L.55) and the draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization of American States (OAS) (document A/59/L.41/Rev.1).  He said that, in operative paragraph 1 of draft resolution L.55, “welcomes” should be replaced with “takes note of”.  In operative paragraph 4, the phrase “including the Millennium Goals” should read “including the contents of the Millennium Declaration”.

The Assembly adopted both drafts without a vote.

The Assembly also adopted the draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organization (document A/59/L.57) without a vote.

Committee Texts

The Assembly then turned to the reports on programme planning for two of its Main Committees:  report of the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) on Programme 3, disarmament, of the proposed strategic framework for the period 2006-2007 (document A/59/618); and the report of the Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) on Programme 23, public information, of the proposed 2006-2007 strategic framework (document A/59/621).

The Assembly took note of the report of the First Committee (document A/59/618), as well as the report of the Fourth Committee (document A/59/621).

Next, the Assembly turned to the report of the Third Committee on advancement of women (document A/59/496) and a draft resolution contained therein on “Future operation of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW).

The draft resolution was adopted by a vote of 125 in favour to 10 against (Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Japan, Latvia, New Zealand, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States), with 30 abstentions (see annex I).

The Assembly next took up the omnibus draft on rights of the child, contained in the report of the Third Committee on promotion and protection of the rights of the child (document A/59/499).

Speaking in explanation before the vote, the representative of the United States said he wanted to bring to the Assembly’s attention the amendments tabled by the United States during the Committee’s consideration of the text.  His delegation’s position had not changed.  He also underscored concern with the inclusion of references to the International Criminal Court, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the juvenile death penalty, as well as other provisions.

The Committee was then informed that separate recorded votes had been requested on operative paragraphs 9, 23(b) and the words “corporal punishment” in operative paragraph 38(b).

The Assembly, therefore, decided to retain operative paragraph 9 by a recorded vote of 110 in favour to 26 against, with 12 abstentions.  (See annex II.)

Operative paragraph 23(b) was retained by a recorded vote of 116 in favour to 4 against (Malaysia, Singapore, United Republic of Tanzania, United States), with 33 abstentions (see annex III).

The words “corporal punishment” in operative paragraph 38(b) was retained by a recorded vote of 115 in favour to 3 against (Malaysia, Singapore, United Republic of Tanzania), with 34 abstentions.  (See annex IV.)

The draft was subsequently adopted, as a whole, as amended, by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 2 against (Marshall Islands, United States), with 1 abstention (India).  (See annex V.)

Next, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on International Convention on the protection of the Rights of all Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (contained in document A/59/503/Add.1) without a vote.

Another draft, on the situation of human rights in Myanmar (contained in document A/59/503) was adopted without a vote.

Following that action, the representative of Myanmar said that, for reasons his delegation had explained extensively in the Third Committee, it would dissociate itself from the resolution.

Lastly, on the reports of the Third Committee, the Assembly took note of the report on programme planning (document A/59/609).

Also outstanding was a Sixth Committee (Legal) report on the International Convention against the reproductive cloning of human beings (document A/59/516), which contained a draft decision to establish a Sixth Committee Working Group to finalize the draft United Nations declaration on human cloning.

The Assembly adopted the draft decision without a vote.

Fifth Committee Reports

The Rapporteur of the Fifth Committee, DENISA HUTANOVA (Slovakia), introduced the reports before the Assembly.

The Assembly then turned to the recommendations contained in the reports of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), first taking up a draft resolution on financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors contained in document A/59/588.  It adopted that text without a vote.

The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft decision on administrative and budgetary coordination of the United Nations with the specialized agencies and the International Atomic Energy Agency contained in document A/59/605.

Turning to the Committee’s report on pattern of conferences (document A/59/644), the Assembly adopted the recommended draft resolution without a vote.

Also without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on scale of assessments for the apportionment of the expenses of the United Nations in (document A/59/421/Add.1).

The Assembly adopted likewise the draft resolution contained in document A/59/650 on human resources management.

The Assembly also adopted without a vote the draft resolution on the Joint Inspection Unit in document A/59/646.

Turning to the Committee’s report on United Nations common system (document A/59/647), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution on the United Nations common system:  report of the International Civil Service Commission.

The Assembly then adopted, also without a vote, the draft resolution contained in document A/56/606 on the United Nations pension system.

Taking up the Committee’s report on the report of the Secretary-General on the activities of the Office of Internal Oversight Services (document A/59/648), the Assembly adopted without a vote the two draft resolutions.

The Assembly went on to adopt the draft resolution on review of the implementation of General Assembly resolutions 48/218 B and 54/244 contained in document A/59/646.

Explaining the vote after the vote, the representative of Cuba said she attached great importance to the work of the Office, responsible for accounting, monitoring, accounting and inspections.  Its work must be in accordance with the mandate given to it.  She affirmed the prerogative of the Assembly regarding reports submitted to it.  That did, however, not restrict the role of the OIOS, but reinforced it.  While issuing recommendations, the Office must fully respect the prerogatives of the Assembly.  Cuba had participated in the negotiating process in good faith.  It was not accustomed to double standards and, in every opportunity, it had respected member delegations.  She, therefore, rejected statements made in the Committee criticizing the Cuban delegations.

The representative of the Netherlands, speaking on behalf of the European Union and associated States, said that, yesterday, the Union had expressed disappointment at the background of adoption of the resolution I contained in document A/59/648.  The European Union did not accept that OIOS recommendations should be endorsed by the Assembly.  The way he saw it, the resolution did not change the current practice in any way.

The representative of the United States said that his delegation strongly associated with the European Union and Switzerland.

Turning to the financing of International Tribunals, the Assembly first adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution on financing of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in document a/59/603.

Also without a vote, it then adopted the draft resolution on financing of the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia contained in document A/59/604.

The Assembly adopted without a vote the draft resolution on programme planning as contained in document A/59/651.

Before action, the representative of Cuba said in explanation of the vote that a serious debate on the issue had not taken place in the context of human rights.  A group of delegations had refused to alter even a comma in the document.  The biennial programmes did not derive from an extended mandate.  It should be based on the group of documents produced by different bodies.  Concerning the programme on human rights, he said his delegation would follow it closely.  The programme on human rights must not be used to interfere in the affairs of sovereign States.

He said the debate on issues related to human rights affirmed the trend whereby developed countries were high-jacking the Organization’s work in an attempt to serve their own political interests.  That fuelled further confrontation between developed and developing countries.  The United Nations was pronouncing itself as a judge on human rights issues and was, thereby, following countries that had not paid attention to their own human rights situations.

The Assembly then turned to the Committee’s report on the programme budget for the biennium 2004-2005 (document A/59/448/Add.2).  The Fifth Committee had approved that report during its meeting yesterday as A/C.5/59/L.33.  That document recommended that the Assembly adopt two draft resolutions and two draft decisions.

Draft resolution I, on questions relating to the programme budget for the biennium 2004-2005, contained 13 texts approved by the Fifth Committee during the current session, including:

-- Administrative arrangements for the International Trade Centre UNCTAD/WTO;

-- Revised estimates resulting from resolutions and decisions of the Economic and Social Council at its substantive session and resumed substantive sessions of 2004;

-- Progressive implementation of article 20 of the statute of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees;

-- Unforeseen and extraordinary expenses;

-- Request for a subvention of the United nations Institute for Disarmament Research resulting from the recommendations of the Board of Trustees of the Institute on the programme of work of the Institute for 2005;

-- Construction of additional conference facilities at Vienna International Centre;

-- Estimates in respect of special political missions, good offices and other political initiatives authorized by the General Assembly and/or the Security Council;

-- First performance report on the programme budget for the biennium 2004-2005;

-- Strengthening the Department of Public Information, within existing capacity, in order to support and enhance the United Nations Web site in all official languages of the Organization:  status of implementation;

-- Financial viability of the United Nations Institute for Training and Research;

-- Strengthened and unified security management system for the United Nations;

-- Administrative and financial implications of decisions and recommendations of the International Civil Service Commission for 2004; and

-- Contingency Fund:  consolidated statement of programme budget implications and related estimates.

The Assembly adopted that draft without a vote.

Draft resolution II, on the programme budget for the biennium 2004-2005, consisted of three parts.  By part A of the text, on “Revised budget appropriations for the biennium 2004-2005”, the Assembly would resolve that, for that biennium, the amount of $3.18 billion appropriated in resolutions 58/271 of 23 December 2003 and 58/295 of 18 June shall be adjusted by $428.98 million.  The revised grand total of expenditure estimates would then come to $3.61 billion.

By part B of the text, on “Revised income estimates for the biennium 2004-2005”, the Assembly would resolve that the estimates of income of $415.34 million approved in resolutions 58/271 A of 23 December 2003 and 58/295 of 18 June, would be increased by $28.51 million.  The revised grand total would, thus, come to $443.85 million.

Part C of the text addressed the financing of the appropriations for 2005.

The Assembly adopted draft resolution II without a vote.

The Assembly then adopted draft decision I, on the programme budget implications of recommendations contained in the report of the Committee for Programme and Coordination, and draft decision II, on revised estimates and programme budget implication:  effects of changes in rates of exchange and inflation, both without a vote.

Speaking in explanation of vote, the representative of Cuba commented on the special political missions text.  Her delegation attached great importance to the draft and underscored the importance of the paragraphs intended to ensure that the Security Council, when taking decisions on special political missions, took full account of the prerogatives of the Assembly.  It was of fundamental importance for the Council to refrain from interfering in matters in the competence of the Assembly.  That would facilitate decision-making in the Assembly.  She was eagerly anticipating the presentation of the next report on requirements for special political missions and review and revision of the structure of the Counter-Terrorism Committee.  More needed to be done to streamline and restructure that body.

The Committee’s report on the review of the efficiency of the administrative and financial functioning of the United Nations (document A/59/652) recommended that the Assembly adopt a draft resolution on the proposed programme budget outline for the biennium 2006-2007.  The Assembly did so without a vote.

The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution contained in the report, by which the Assembly would defer to its resumed session consideration of 10 items under “Programme budget for the biennium 2004-2005” and 11 items under “Administration of justice at the United Nations”.

Concluding Remarks

The representative of Qatar, speaking on behalf of the Group of 77 developing countries and China, stressed that the Secretary-General should present the proposed programme budget for 2006-2007, fully reflecting the priorities just approved by the Assembly.  Particular attention should be given to programmes and activities related to social and economic development.  In that context, the Group emphasized the crucial importance of the implementation of the right to development and reaffirmed the validity of the Declaration on the Right to Development.

The Group hoped that the implementation of any efficiency measures would not impact negatively on mandated programmes and activities, he continued.  The Group looked forward to full implementation of the human resources management resolution, in particular, the results and findings of the Board of Auditors on the audit of the implementation of the principle of equitable geographical representation at all levels.  It was also necessary to ensure that women from developing countries were accorded equal opportunity in the recruitment process, and he looked forward to full implementation of relevant paragraphs of the text.

On the programme budget implications, the Group did not approve, at this stage, either a subvention, or a payment for the rental and maintenance costs of UNITAR.  The Group would address the issue comprehensively during the next session of the Assembly in the context of the budget proposal for 2006-2007.  Concerning OIOS, he reiterated the Group’s full support to the role of the Office and said that the Group recognized the primary role of the Assembly in the consideration and action on the reports submitted to it, as reflected in paragraph 4 of draft resolution A/C.5/59/L.28.

The session had been exceptional with regard to its workload, he said in conclusion.  The Group of 77 delegations had negotiated, under the pressure of time and in very stressful situations, often showing maximum flexibility to take on board the concerns of other delegations.  All negotiations had been held in a very open, transparent and friendly atmosphere, and in good faith.  The Group emphasized the need to further develop confidence-building among all negotiating partners.  It was also important to ensure respect for each other’s positions.  He looked forward to continuing that partnership in the delegations’ future interactions.

The representative of Nigeria, as the coordinator of the draft resolution on the OIOS, said her country had approached that work with seriousness and integrity.  Her delegation had remained totally neutral throughout the negotiations and had truthfully reflected the wishes of the Fifth Committee and its members.  The original draft on the item, in paragraph 10, had contained the word “endorses”.  The Committee had amended “applicable” to “relevant”.  That had been reflected in the final draft text in paragraph 7.  Therefore, she had been taken aback by some delegations who had stated that they did not know how some words had crept into the text.  She regretted that the work on the agenda item was concluded in a most unfortunate manner, despite the cordiality during negotiations, with unwarranted and unfair statements by some delegations.  She hoped that such an incident would not occur again.

The representative of the United States said that, as the session ended, he wanted to thank the Chairman of the Fifth Committee for his efforts and express appreciation to the Committee staff.  He appreciated the support from the Controller’s office.  Since it was going to be the last session in the Fifth Committee for Assistant Secretary-General for Programme Planning, Budget and Accounts and United Nations Controller, Jean-Pierre Halbwachs, his work should also be acknowledged.

In his closing remarks, JEAN PING, President of the General Assembly, said that during a busy and productive session, the Assembly had adopted 279 resolutions, 208 of them by consensus.  Among the issues addressed by the Assembly, he singled out the efforts to revitalize the work of the General Assembly, the publication of the report of the High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change and preparation for the high-level meeting of the Assembly next September.  Those items were part of the process of collective reform of the United Nations system.

In 2005, it was necessary to redouble the efforts to find concrete and appropriate solutions to the problems before the United Nations, he continued.  Upcoming consultations in January on the report of the High-Level Panel would be important in that respect, as well as the Sachs report on the Millennium Project, which was expected to come out on 17 January.  As he had indicated to the Assembly yesterday, the global report of the Secretary-General, coming out next March,

would mark the start of the consultations on the high-level plenary meeting in September.

He said that the Assembly had achieved significant progress in the process of its revitalization.  During the session, it had held formal meetings to examine its working methods, as well as the issues related to its reform and preparation to the High-Level Meeting.  It had also devoted time to the implementation of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), the agenda items of children and armed conflict and humanitarian aid.  All those efforts were contributing to the restoration of the central role of the Assembly as a universal world body.  The General Assembly was a unique forum where all nations of the world could express their legitimate concerns.

If the international community wanted to achieve real collective security, eradicate poverty, end pandemics, do away with wars, transnational crime, famine and environmental degradation -- if it wanted to build a model of ideal society for future generations -- it should go beyond the declarations of principle and begin implementing its commitments, especially in the socio-economic areas.

ANNEX I

Vote on Women’s Institute

The draft resolution on the future operation of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (document A/59/496-III) was adopted by a recorded vote of 125 in favour to 10 against, with 30 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Japan, Latvia, New Zealand, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain:  Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, CzechRepublic, Estonia, France, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Slovenia, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, Uzbekistan.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Angola, Botswana, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Greece, Guinea-Bissau, Jamaica, Kiribati, Malawi, Mauritania, Nauru, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

ANNEX II

Vote on Operative Paragraph 9/Rights of the Child

Operative paragraph 9 of the draft resolution on the rights of the child (document A/59/499-II) was retained by a recorded vote of 110 in favour to 26 against, with 12 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Belgium, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Bahrain, Bangladesh, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Ghana, India, Iran, Japan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Niger, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, United States, Viet Nam, Yemen.

Abstain:  Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belarus, BruneiDarussalam, Jordan, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sierra Leone, Uganda.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jamaica, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nauru, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

ANNEX III

Vote on Operative Paragraph 23(b)/Rights of the Child

Operative paragraph 23(b) of the draft resolution on the rights of the child (document A/59/499-II) was retained by a recorded vote of 116 in favour to 4 against, with 33 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Malaysia, Singapore, United Republic of Tanzania, United States.

Abstain:  Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bhutan, BruneiDarussalam, Comoros, Djibouti, Dominica, Guyana, India, Iran, Israel, Kuwait, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Saint Lucia, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Cape Verde, Chad, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iraq, Jamaica, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Madagascar, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nauru, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

ANNEX IV

Vote on Operative Paragraph 38(b)/Rights of the Child

The words “corporal punishment” in operative paragraph 38(b) of the draft resolution on the rights of the child (document A/59/499-II) was retained by a recorded vote of 115 in favour to 3 against, with 34 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Malaysia, Singapore, United Republic of Tanzania.

Abstain:  Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Comoros, Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Guyana, India, Iran, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Cape Verde, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jamaica, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nauru, Niger, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

ANNEX V

Vote on Rights of the Child

The draft resolution on the Rights of the Child as a whole (document A/59/499-II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 2 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Marshall Islands, United States.

Abstain:  India.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Angola, Botswana, Côte d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Jamaica, Kiribati, Malawi, Mauritania, Nauru, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

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For information media. Not an official record.