GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS 61 RESOLUTIONS ON HUMAN RIGHTS, SOCIAL, HUMANITARIAN ISSUES

20 December 2004
GA/10321

GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS 61 RESOLUTIONS ON HUMAN RIGHTS, SOCIAL, HUMANITARIAN ISSUES

20/12/2004
Press Release
GA/10321

Fifty-ninth General Assembly

Plenary

74th Meeting (PM)


GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS 61 RESOLUTIONS ON HUMAN RIGHTS,

 

SOCIAL, HUMANITARIAN ISSUES

 


Approves Texts on Human Rights Situations

In Iran, Democratic Republic of Congo, Turkmenistan


Acting on the recommendations of the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural), the General Assembly this afternoon adopted 61 resolutions and seven decisions, including closely contested texts on the human rights situations in Iran, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Turkmenistan, which prompted an unprecedented call for “no action” on a text already approved by one of its Main Committees.


Taking the floor to request a motion for no action, the representative of Turkmenistan alluded to the “very serious signal” that had been sent to proponents of country-specific resolutions during the Third Committee’s consideration of such matters.  Recalling the dismissal of three resolutions –- namely, on the situations in Belarus, Sudan and Zimbabwe –- she argued that the failure to gain support for those texts did not mean that some members accorded low priority to human rights issues, only that they had disagreed with the way in which the sponsors had chosen selectively to target some States.


Those sponsors should ask themselves whether they had chosen the correct path in their approach to the issue of country-specific situations, she continued.  Countries that made progress in development and practiced openness and constructive dialogue, should not be condemned.  None could claim their country had a perfect human rights record -- the double standard demonstrated had resulted in much resentment.  The sponsors of country-specific resolutions should contemplate alternate ways to achieve human rights goals, rather than through the biased and selective use of resolutions.


Following statements by China and Pakistan in its favour, and by the United States and the Netherlands (on behalf of the European Union) in opposition –- who decried the grave implications of the plenary consciously choosing to ignore its Committee’s recommendation -- the no-action motion was rejected by the Assembly by a recorded vote of 60 in favour to 76 against, with 33 abstentions (see annex XXI).


The text on Turkmenistan was subsequently adopted by a recorded vote of 69 in favour to 47 against, with 63 abstentions (see annex XXII).


The resolutions on the human rights situations in Iran and the Democratic Republic of the Congo were also adopted by respective recorded votes of 71 in favour to 54 against, with 55 abstentions (see annex XX), and 76 in favour to 2 against (Rwanda, Uganda), with 100 abstentions (see annex XXVI).


In other business today, the Assembly also acted upon seven plenary-generated texts, including an endorsement of the Maldives and Cape Verde’s graduation from the list of least developed countries.  That action, taken after agreeing on a strategy to ensure the smooth transition of such graduating States, would have the two States’ graduation become effective three years hence.  During that period, such countries would remain on the least developed countries list, and would maintain associated advantages.  Also during that three-year period, the graduating country would be invited to prepare a transition strategy to adjust to the phasing-out of the advantages associated with membership on the list of least developed countries.


Continuing with the reports and recommendations of the Third Committee, the Assembly reaffirmed that narrowing the gap between rich and poor, both within and between countries, remained an explicit goal at the national and international levels, as it adopted a resolution on globalization and its impact on human rights by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 53 against, with 4 abstentions (Brazil, Chile, Malawi, Singapore) (see annex VI).  Similarly, a resolution on human rights and extreme poverty, adopted without a vote, reaffirmed that extreme poverty constituted a violation of human dignity and that urgent national and international action is required to eliminate it.


Resolutions were also passed affirming the right to development and the right to food, the first of which was adopted by a recorded vote of 181 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 4 abstentions (Australia, Canada, Japan, Sweden) (see annex VII), and the second by a vote of 182 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Palau, United States), with no abstentions (see annex XVII).


The text on the right to development had the Assembly call upon the Working Group on the Right to Development, and its high-level task force, to contribute actively towards the mainstreaming of the right to development at the high-level event to be held in New York at the commencement of the sixtieth session of the General Assembly.


Meanwhile, recognizing that the promises made at the World Food Summit in 1996 to halve the number of undernourished individuals by 2015 were not being fulfilled, the text on the right to food had the Assembly welcome the meeting of world leaders for action against hunger and poverty convened by Brazil, Chile, France and Spain, and urge States to give adequate priority in their development strategies and expenditures to the realization of the right to food.


Several resolutions that aimed at creating a more equitable international order were approved, among them a resolution on enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, which urged all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on inclusion, justice, equality, human dignity and promotion of and respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights.  Another text had the Assembly reaffirm that the promotion, protection and full realization of all human rights should be guided by the principles of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity and should not be used for political ends.


Once more reiterating its unequivocal condemnation of acts, methods and practices of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations as activities aimed at the destruction of human rights, the Assembly adopted a resolution on human rights and terrorism –- by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 50 against, with 8 abstentions (Argentina, Armenia, Brazil, Chile, Fiji, Malawi, Nauru, Syria) (see annex X) –- which urged enhanced cooperation at the regional and international levels in the fight against terrorism.  With the unanimous adoption of the resolution on protection of human rights while countering terrorism, it also continued to reaffirm that any measure taken to combat terrorism must comply with States’ obligations under international law, in particular international human rights, refugee and humanitarian law.


The Assembly also adopted a number of traditional resolutions related to action against torture and involuntary disappearances, as well as texts for protection of missing persons, human rights defenders and migrants, without votes.  Two other traditional resolutions –- concerning elimination of religious intolerance and extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions –- were adopted, respectively, by recorded votes of 186 in favour to none against, with no abstentions (see annex XV), and 142 in favour to none against, with 43 abstentions (see annex XIII).


Among new initiatives enacted as a result of the Assembly’s actions in other areas of its work, a second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People was proclaimed, to commence on 1 January 2005.  By the text, the Secretary-General was requested to appoint the Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs as the Second Decade’s Coordinator, and to establish a voluntary fund as a successor to the already-existing Voluntary Fund.  The Assembly also decided to continue observing the International Day of Indigenous People during the Second Decade.


Recognizing that 2005 would mark the tenth anniversary of the World Summit for Social Development, the Assembly unanimously adopted a resolution to underscore the significance of the forty-third session of the Commission for Social Development, at which time a review of implementation of the Copenhagen Declaration and Programme of Action would be taken.  By the text, the Assembly recommended that particular attention be given to the principle of a people-centred approach.


Another text had the Assembly decide to convene, at its sixtieth session, two plenary meetings of the General Assembly devoted to evaluation of the progress made in implementation of the World Programme of Action for Youth to the Year 2000 and Beyond.


Additionally, the Assembly adopted three new resolutions on international drug control, which addressed the specific issues of trafficking in cannabis, chemical precursors, and international support for efforts by the Government of Afghanistan to eliminate illicit opium.  Those texts were adopted in addition to the omnibus text on international cooperation against the world drug problem.


Nine texts concerning various aspects of the international community’s activities for crime prevention and criminal justice were adopted, including a resolution on preparations for the Eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice.  That text called for particular attention to be paid to practical arrangements related to the effective implementation of international legal instruments pertaining to transnational organized crime, terrorism and corruption and related technical assistance.


Turning to the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the Assembly adopted the four recommended resolutions without votes, including a resolution to enlarge the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 66 to 68 members, and requested the Economic and Social Council to elect the additional members at its resumed organizational session for 2005.


Among texts related to advancement of women and follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and “Women 2000”, the Assembly adopted a text on follow-up to the Fourth World Conference and the twenty-third special session, which underlined the significance of the forty-ninth session of the Commission on the Status of Women, which would mark the events’ anniversaries.  That text stressed the importance of strong, sustained political will and commitment at the national, regional and international levels to achieve the outcome documents’ full implementation.


Within its consideration of children’s rights, the Assembly approved a draft on the situation of and assistance to Palestinian children by a recorded vote of 117 in favour to 5 against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 62 abstentions (see annex I).


The Assembly also adopted several texts related to the Committee’s joint work on eliminating racism and promoting self-determination, among them a resolution on global efforts for the total elimination of racism and racial discrimination –- adopted by a recorded vote of 183 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Palau, United States), with 2 abstentions (Australia, Canada) (see annex II).  That text had the Assembly endorse concerns expressed by the Commission on Human Rights that the deadline for universal ratification of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination will not be realized, and urge action in that regard.  It also recognized with deep concern the increase in anti-Semitism, Christianophobia and Islamophobia, and called upon States to cooperate with the Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of intolerance.


The Assembly was also informed today that consideration of a number of texts had been postponed in order to allow the Fifth Committee time to consider the programme budget implications of those drafts.  Specifically, those drafts concerned future operations of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW), children’s rights, the International Convention on migrants’ rights, and the human rights situation in Myanmar.


The General Assembly will meet next at a time to be announced.


Background


The General Assembly met this afternoon to take action on the draft resolutions and draft decisions contained in the reports of its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural).  It is also expected to take action on a number of other draft resolutions before the Assembly’s plenary body.


**Implementation of the Outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the Twenty-Fourth Special Session of the General Assembly


First on its agenda, the Assembly has before it a draft resolution contained in the report on Implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly (document A/59/491).  That text would have the Assembly underline the significance of the forty-third session of the Commission for Social Development, marking the tenth anniversary of the World Summit for Social Development.  At that time, the Commission would undertake a review of implementation of the Copenhagen Declaration and Programme of Action and, by the text, the Assembly would recommend that particular attention be given to the principle of a people-centred approach during the review.


Stressing the vital importance of achieving social development for all and integrating social development objectives, the Assembly would also underline the importance of adopting effective measures to support the efforts of developing countries to achieve sustained economic growth, sustainable development, poverty reduction and strengthening of democratic systems, while reaffirming that each country has the primary responsibility for its own economic and social development.


**Social Development


Within the context of the Committee’s report on Social development, including questions relating to the world social situation and to youth, ageing, disabled persons and the family (document A/59/492), the Assembly has before it three draft resolutions and two draft decisions.


Draft resolution I, on Celebration of the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family and beyond, would have the Assembly urge governments to continue to take sustained action at all levels concerning family issues to promote the role of families in development, and urge the international community to address family-related concerns within the framework of the commitments undertaken at relevant major United Nations conferences and their follow-up processes.  The Assembly would also request the Secretary-General to give appropriate consideration to the tenth anniversary of the International Year by preparing the observance of the International Day of Families on 15 May 2004 and to continue to utilize the United Nations Trust Fund on Family Activities to provide financial assistance for activities specific to the family.


Draft resolution II, on Policies and programmes involving youth:  tenth anniversary of the World Programme of Action for Youth to the Year 2000 and Beyond, would have the Assembly decide to convene, at its sixtieth session, two plenary meetings of the General Assembly devoted to evaluation of the progress made in implementation of the World Programme of Action for Youth to the Year 2000 and Beyond and urge Member States to consider being represented by youth representatives.  It would also decide to hold an informal, interactive round-table discussion on the theme “Young people:  making commitments matter”, which would be open to the participation of Member States, observers, organizations of the United Nations system and non-governmental youth organizations.  One youth representative from a MemberState would orally present a summary of the informal round-table discussion to the General Assembly at the beginning of the plenary meeting.


Draft resolution III, on the United Nations Literacy Decade:  education for all, would have the Assembly appeal to all governments to develop reliable literacy data and information and to reinforce political will, mobilize national resources, develop more inclusive policy-making and devise innovative strategies to achieve the goals of the Decade.  Governments would be urged to take the lead in coordinating the activities of the Decade at the national level.


The text would further appeal to all governments and to economic and financial organizations and institutions, both national and international, to lend greater financial and material support to efforts to increase literacy, and invite Member States, the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system, as well as relevant intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, to intensify their efforts effectively to implement the International Plan of Action for the Decade.


Further, draft decision I, which concerns the Proposed supplement to the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities, would have the Assembly postpone consideration of the issue until its sixty-first session at the latest, and request the Special Rapporteur on disability for the Commission on Social Development to take into account the general ideas contained in the proposed supplement to the Standard Rules in the accomplishment of her mandate.


Meanwhile, draft decision II, which relates to Preparations for and observance of the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family in 2004, would have the Assembly take note of the report of the Secretary-General on the issue (document A/59/176).


**Follow-up to the International Year of Older Persons:  Second World Assembly on Ageing


The report on Follow-up to the International Year of Older Persons (document A/59/493) contains one draft resolution that would have the world body call on governments and the agencies and organizations of the United Nations system, as well as the non-governmental community, to ensure that the challenges of population ageing and the concerns of older persons are adequately incorporated into their programmes and projects.


Inviting Member States and the United Nations system to take the needs and concerns of older persons into account in decision-making at all levels, the Assembly would stress the need for additional capacity-building at the national level to promote and facilitate implementation of the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing.  The functional commissions of the Economic and Social Council would be invited to integrate the issues of population and individual ageing into their programmes of work to promote implementation of the Madrid Plan.


**Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice


The report on Crime prevention and criminal justice (document A/59/494) recommends nine draft resolutions and one draft decision for adoption, the first of which concerns Preparations for the eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice.  That text would have the Assembly request the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice to begin preparation of a draft declaration for submission to the eleventh Congress at least one month prior to its commencement, and approve the draft programme of work and related documentation for the Congress.  Reiterating its invitation to Member States to be represented at the Congress at the highest possible level, it would call upon the Congress to formulate concrete proposals for further follow-up and action, paying particular attention to practical arrangements relating to the effective implementation of the international legal instruments pertaining to transnational organized crime, terrorism and corruption and related technical assistance.


Draft resolution II, on Assistance to least developed countries to ensure their participation in the sessions of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and the sessions of conferences of States parties, would have the General Assembly call upon Member States, international organizations and funding institutions to redouble their efforts to increase their voluntary contributions to assist the Secretary-General in covering the cost of travel and daily subsistence allowance for the participation of representatives of the least developed countries.


Draft resolution III, which concerns Strengthening international cooperation and technical assistance in promoting the implementation of the universal conventions and protocols related to terrorism, would have the General Assembly call upon Member States who have not yet done so to become parties to and to implement the universal conventions and protocols relating to terrorism as soon as possible and urge them to continue working together, including on a regional and bilateral basis and in close cooperation with the United Nations, to prevent and combat acts of terrorism by strengthening international cooperation and technical assistance within the framework of relevant Security Council resolutions.  It would also request the Secretary-General to convene an expert workshop to examine and analyse problems encountered by criminal justice practitioners in affording mutual legal assistance and granting extradition for terrorist offences, with a view to identifying proven and promising practices.


The fourth draft resolution, on International cooperation in the prevention, combating and elimination of kidnapping and in providing assistance to victims, would have the General Assembly vigorously condemn and reject once again the practice of kidnapping, especially when it is carried out by organized criminal groups and terrorist groups, and call upon Member States to strengthen measures against money-laundering and to engage in international cooperation and mutual assistance in the tracing, detection, freezing and confiscating of the proceeds of kidnapping.  It would also urge Member States to adopt legislative, administrative and other measures to provide appropriate support and assistance to victims and their families.


The Assembly would also request the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to prepare a handbook of proven and promising practices in the fight against kidnapping, and to provide technical assistance to States, upon request, to enable them to strengthen their capacity to combat kidnapping.

Draft resolution V, related to Action against corruption, would have the Assembly urge Member States to consider signing and ratifying the United Nations Convention against Corruption as soon as possible, in order to allow its early entry into force and subsequent implementation.  It would also request the Secretary-General to provide the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime with the resources necessary to enable it to promote the Convention’s entry into force and implementation.


Draft resolution VI, on Preventing, combating and punishing trafficking in human organs, would have the Assembly urge Member States to adopt the necessary measures to prevent, combat and punish the illicit removal of and trafficking in human organs and request the eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice to pay attention to this issue.  It would also request the Secretary-General to prepare a study on the extent of the phenomenon of trafficking in human organs for submission to the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice at its fifteenth session.


The seventh draft, which concerns International cooperation in the fight against transnational organized crime, would have the Assembly urge all States and relevant regional economic integration organizations to consider ratifying or acceding to the Protocol against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Component and Ammunition and request the Secretary-General to continue to provide the UNODC with the resources necessary to enable it to promote the implementation of the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its protocols.  It would also request the UNODC to continue to assist States with capacity-building in the areas of international cooperation in criminal matters, in particular extradition and mutual legal assistance.


Draft resolution VIII, on the United Nations African Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders, would have the General Assembly urge the States members of the Institute to make every possible effort to meet their obligations under the Institute.  It would also call upon MemberStates and non-governmental organizations to adopt concrete practical measures to support the Institute and request the Secretary-General to intensify efforts to mobilize all relevant entities of the United Nations system to provide the necessary financial and technical support to the Institute.  It would also call upon the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Programme and the United Nations International Drug Control Programme to work closely with the Institute.


And draft resolution IX, concerning Strengthening the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity, would have the General Assembly invite all States to support the operational activities of the Programme through voluntary contributions to the related Fund or in direct support of such activities, as well as the activities of the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute.  It would also urge States and relevant international organizations to develop national, regional and international strategies and other necessary measures, which complemented the work of the Programme and urge States and funding agencies to review, as appropriate, their funding policies for development assistance.


The Assembly would invite relevant United Nations system bodies, including the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the World Bank, and other international funding agencies to increase their interaction with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and urge all States and regional economic organizations to ratify or accede to the United Nations Conventions against Transnational Organized Crime and Corruption.


Lastly, the draft decision contained in the report would have the Assembly take note of the reports of the Secretary-General on preparations for the Eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (document A/59/123-E/2004/90); strengthening international cooperation and technical assistance in preventing and combating terrorism (document A/59/187); preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of funds of illicit origin and returning such assets to the countries of origin (document A/59/203 and Add.1); and international cooperation in the fight against transnational organized crime (document A/59/204).  The Assembly would also take note of the note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the High-level Political Conference for the Purpose of Signing the United Nations Convention against Corruption (document A/59/77).


**International Drug Control


Within the context of the Committee’s report on International Drug Control (document A/59/495), the Assembly will take action on four draft resolutions.


Draft resolution I, entitled Control of, cultivation of, and trafficking in cannabis, would have the General Assembly request the UNODC to begin a global survey of cannabis, initially with a market survey, before the forty-eighth session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs, and to support the creation or strengthening of national and subregional strategies and plans of action for the eradication of cannabis crops.  It would urge Member States to extend cooperation to affected States, particularly in Africa, in the area of alternative development and to encourage appropriate access to international markets for products of alternative development projects.


Draft resolution II, which addresses Providing support to the Government of Afghanistan in its efforts to eliminate illicit opium and foster stability and security in the region, would have the Assembly call upon the international community to enhance financial and technical support to Afghanistan in order to enable the Government successfully to implement its national drug control strategy and, thereby, reduce the threat to peace and stability created by illicit opium poppy cultivation and the illicit opium trade.  It would also urge all stakeholders to accelerate efforts to implement a combined strategy, comprising law enforcement, eradication, interdiction, demand reduction and awareness-building, with a view to creating sustainable livelihoods, independent of illicit opium.


Furthermore, draft resolution III, on Follow-up on strengthening the systems of control over chemical precursors and preventing their diversion and trafficking, would have the Assembly urge all Member States to put in place systems and procedures to ensure that the details of any interdiction, seizure or diversion of precursors are communicated expeditiously to all governments concerned and the International Narcotics Control Board.  The Assembly would also invite States, which do not have mechanisms to enable the real-time exchange of information under current international operations, to consider establishing a national focal point or central national authority through which all information on licit and illicit consignments can be channelled.  It would also invite MemberStates and appropriate international and regional bodies to review intelligence on the smuggling of drugs and precursor chemicals to identify common links and plan appropriate operations to stop such activities.


The Assembly would also encourage Member States to conduct backtracking law enforcement investigations, in order to counter smuggling networks, and to investigate the possibility of establishing operational chemical profiling programmes.


Lastly, draft resolution IV –- the omnibus text on International cooperation against the world drug problem –- would have the world body reaffirm that countering the world drug problem was a common and shared responsibility that must be addressed in a multilateral setting and required an integrated and balanced approach, carried out in full conformity with the purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter and international law.


In follow-up to the General Assembly’s twentieth special session on countering the world drug problem, the text would call upon all States to strengthen their efforts to achieve the objectives targeted for 2008, including by developing and implementing comprehensive demand reduction policies and programmes and making special efforts to counter the abuse and recreational use of amphetamine-type stimulants; by strengthening international cooperation among judicial and law enforcement authorities; by developing and strengthening comprehensive international regimes to combat money-laundering and the financing of terrorist acts; and by enhancing support for alternative development strategies and to prevent the emergence of illicit crop cultivation in other areas.


In particular, it would call upon the international community to enhance financial and technical support for Afghanistan to enable the Government to successfully implement its national drug control strategy.


Under action to be taken by the United Nations system, the Office on Drugs and Crime would be requested to strengthen its dialogue and cooperation with Member States and to increase assistance to countries implementing the outcome of the twentieth special session.  The Office would also be requested to include an updated and comprehensive assessment of worldwide trends in illicit traffic and transit of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances, and to seek extrabudgetary resources to publish the World Drug Report in all the official languages.


**Advancement of Women


The report on advancement of women (document A/59/496) contains four draft resolutions and one draft decision, recommended for adoption by the General Assembly.


The first draft resolution, on Improvement of the status of women in the United Nations system, would have the General Assembly urge the Secretary-General and the executive heads of the organizations of the United Nations system to redouble their efforts to realize significant progress towards the goal of 50/50 gender distribution in the very near future.  Member States would be strongly encouraged to support the efforts of the United Nations and the specialized agencies, funds and programmes to achieve the goal of 50/50 gender distribution, especially at senior and policy-making levels, by identifying and regularly submitting more women candidates for appointment to positions in the United Nations system.


Draft resolution II, concerning Working towards elimination of crimes against women and girls committed in the name of honour, would have the General Assembly express its concern that women continue to be victims of crimes committed in the name of honour, and at the continuing occurrence in all regions of the world of such violence.  States would be called upon to continue to intensify efforts to prevent and eliminate crimes against women and girls committed in the name of honour and to investigate, prosecute and document cases of such crimes and to punish the perpetrators, and to intensify efforts to raise awareness of the need to prevent and eliminate them.  The international community would be invited to support the efforts of all countries to strengthen the institutional capacity for preventing crimes against women and girls committed in the name of honour.


Draft resolution III, on Future operation of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW), would have the General Assembly request INSTRAW actively to participate and contribute to the review and appraisal of the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, and the outcome document of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly in the context of the forty-ninth session of the Commission on the Status of Women.  It would stress the critical importance of voluntary financial contributions to the INSTRAW Trust Fund and urge Member States to make such contributions.  It would also decide to provide full support to the current efforts to revitalize the Institute.


Further, draft resolution IV, on Trafficking in women and girls, would have the General Assembly urge governments to devise, enforce and strengthen effective measures to combat and eliminate all forms of trafficking in women and girls, particularly for commercialized sexual exploitation, through a comprehensive anti-trafficking strategy.  Urging governments to consider signing and ratifying relevant United Nations legal instruments, the Assembly would call upon them to criminalize all forms of trafficking in persons, and to condemn and penalize all those offenders, including intermediaries, through competent national authorities, either in the country of origin of the offender or in the country in which the abuse occurs.


Governments would be urged to support and allocate resources for programmes to strengthen preventive action, in particular education and campaigns to increase public awareness of the issue at the national and grass-roots levels; to allocate resources to provide comprehensive programmes for the physical, psychological and social recovery of victims of trafficking; and to enable women victims of trafficking to make complaints to the police or other authorities.  Governments would also be encouraged to undertake campaigns to clarify opportunities, limitations and rights in the event of migration to enable women to make informed decisions.


While stressing the need for a global approach to eradicate trafficking in women and children, the Assembly would also urge governments to strengthen national programmes to combat trafficking in persons, especially women and girls, through increased bilateral, regional and international cooperation.


By the draft decision, the Assembly would take note on the report of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women on the work of its thirtieth and thirty-first sessions (document A/59/38).


**Implementation of the Outcome of the Fourth World Conference on Women and of “Women 2000”


Also before the Assembly for action are two draft resolutions contained in the report on implementation of the outcome of the Fourth World Conference on Women and of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, entitled “Women 2000: gender equality, development and peace for the twenty-first century” (document A/59/497).


By the terms of draft resolution I, on Elimination of all forms of violence against women, including crimes identified in the outcome document of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, entitled “Women 2000: gender equality, development and peace for the twenty-first century”, the Assembly would urge Member States to strengthen awareness and preventive measures for the elimination of all forms of violence against women, whether occurring in public or private life.  It would call upon States to encourage and support the active participation of men and boys in the prevention and elimination of all forms of violence and to fulfil their obligations under relevant human rights instruments, and to implement the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome document of the twenty-third special session.


All States parties to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women and other relevant treaty bodies would be encouraged to include in their reports sex-disaggregated data and information on measures taken or initiated to eliminate all forms of violence against women.


Draft resolution II, on Follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, would have the Assembly stress the need to undertake further action to ensure the full and accelerated implementation of the outcome documents of those events.  Underlining the significance of the forty-ninth session of the Commission on the Status of Women, which would mark the events’ anniversaries, the text would have the Assembly stress the importance of strong, sustained political will and commitment at the national, regional and international levels to achieve that full implementation, and encourage participation at a high political level at that meeting.


Calling for the promotion of further cooperation among governments, and the incorporation of gender perspectives in preparations for the review of the Millennium Declaration, the Assembly would also strongly encourage support for the role and contribution of civil society and non-governmental organizations in implementation of the outcomes of the Beijing Conference and the General Assembly’s special session.


**Refugees


The Assembly will then take action on the four draft resolutions contained in the Committee’s report on the activities of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/59/498).


Draft resolution I, on Enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, would have the Assembly decide to increase the number of members of the Executive Committee from 66 to 68 States and request the Economic and Social Council to elect the additional members at its resumed organizational session for 2005.


Draft resolution II, on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, would have the Assembly re-emphasize that protection of refugees is primarily the responsibility of States, whose full and effective cooperation, action and political resolve are required to enable the Office of the High Commissioner to fulfil its mandated functions.  The Assembly would strongly reaffirm the fundamental importance and the purely humanitarian and non-political character of the Office.  The text would also have the world body condemn all acts that pose a threat to the personal security and well-being of refugees and asylum-seekers.


Draft resolution III, on a New international humanitarian order, would have the Assembly express its appreciation for the continuing efforts of the Secretary-General in the humanitarian field, and urge governments to assist him in promoting a new international humanitarian order corresponding to new realities and challenges, including the development of an agenda for humanitarian action.  Reaffirming the obligation of all States and parties to armed conflicts to protect civilians in armed conflicts, the Assembly would call upon all governments and parties in complex humanitarian emergencies to cooperate fully with the United Nations and other humanitarian agencies and organizations and to ensure safe and unhindered access for humanitarian personnel.  Member States, the Secretary-General and the United Nations system would be invited to strengthen the capacities of regional and subregional organizations in the context of the response to complex humanitarian crises.


Further, draft resolution IV, on Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, would have the Assembly recognize that among refugees, returnees and internally displaced persons, women and children are the majority of the population affected by conflict and bear the brunt of atrocities and other consequences of conflict.  Noting, with great concern, that despite all the efforts made so far by the United Nations, the African Union and others, the situation of refugees and displaced persons in Africa remains precarious, it would call upon States and other parties to armed conflict to observe international humanitarian law, bearing in mind that armed conflict is one of the principal causes of forced displacement in Africa.


The text would also have the General Assembly call upon the Office of the High Commissioner, the international community and other concerned entities to intensify their support to African governments through appropriate capacity-building activities.  It would further urge the international community to continue to fund generously the refugee programmes of the Office of the High Commissioner, taking into account the substantially increased needs of programmes in Africa.


**Children’s Rights


Turning to the report on promotion and protection of the rights of children (document A/59/499), the Assembly will take action on the two draft resolutions and one draft decision included therein.


Draft resolution I, on the situation of and assistance to Palestinian children, would have the General Assembly express deep concern about the negative consequences, including psychological consequences, of the Israeli military actions for the present and future well-being of Palestinian children.  The text would have the Assembly demand that Israel, the occupying Power, respect relevant provisions of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and comply fully with the provisions of the Geneva Convention on Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War.  It would also call upon the international community to provide urgently needed assistance and services in an effort to alleviate the dire humanitarian crisis being faced by Palestinian children and their families.


Draft resolution II -– the omnibus resolution on rights of the child –- would have the Assembly urge States that have not yet done so to sign and ratify or accede to the Convention on the Rights of the Child as a matter of priority, and to the Optional Protocols to the Convention on the involvement of children in armed conflict and on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.  It would also express concern about the growing number of reservations to the Convention and urge States parties to withdraw incompatible reservations.


Also by the draft, States would be urged to intensify their efforts to ensure implementation of the right of the child to birth registration, preservation of identity and family relations.  They would be called upon to prevent and combat illegal adoptions and to address cases of international abduction of children.


Calling upon States and the international community to cooperate, support and participate in global efforts for poverty reduction, the Assembly would reaffirm investments in children and realization of their rights as among the most effective ways to eradicate poverty.  States would also be called upon to recognize the right to education on the basis of equal opportunity and non-discrimination.


States would be called upon to take all measures to prevent and protect children from all forms of violence, including by protecting schoolchildren from violence, injury or abuse, as well as sexual abuse and intimidation or maltreatment in schools.  They would also be called upon to take measures specific to protection of the girl-child, children with disabilities, migrant children, children working and/or living on the street and refugee and internally displaced children.


Regarding children infringing penal law, the Assembly would call upon all States to abolish by law the death penalty for those below 18 years at the time of the offence.


Under a section on the prevention and eradication of the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, the General Assembly would call upon States to criminalize and effectively penalize all forms of sexual exploitation and sexual abuse of children, including within the family or for commercial purposes, child pornography and child prostitution, child sex tourism, the sale of children and their organs, and the use of the Internet for those purposes.  In addition, States would be called upon to combat the existence of a market that encouraged such criminal practices against children.


States would also be called upon to take all feasible measures to ensure the demobilization and effective disarmament of children used in armed conflict and implement effective measures for their rehabilitation and reintegration into society.


Finally, States that had not yet done so would be urged to complete national action plans incorporating the goals of “A world fit for children”, while the Secretary-General would be requested to prepare an updated report on progress achieved with regard to those goals.  The Chair of the Committee on the Rights of the Child would be invited to present an oral report on the work of the Committee at the Assembly’s sixtieth session.


Additionally, the draft decision recommended in the report would have the Assembly take note of the report of the Committee on the Rights of the Child covering its activities at its thirtieth to thirty-fifth sessions (document A/59/41 and Corr.1 and Add.1).


**Indigenous People


The report on the programme of activities for the International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People, 1995-2004 (document A/59/500) contains one draft resolution and one draft decision.  The draft resolution, concerning proclamation of a Second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People, and would have the General Assembly proclaim that Decade to commence on 1 January 2005.  It would also decide that its goal should be the further strengthening of international cooperation for the solution of problems faced by indigenous people in such areas as culture, education, health, human rights, the environment and social and economic development.  The Secretary-General would be requested to appoint the Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs as the Second Decade’s Coordinator, and to establish a voluntary fund as a successor to the already-existing Voluntary Fund established for the present Decade.  The Assembly would decide to continue observing the International Day of Indigenous People during the Second Decade.


The draft decision would have the General Assembly take note of the notes by the Secretary-General transmitting the annual report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the implementation of the programme of activities for the International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People (document A/59/277); the report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people (document A/59/258); and the status of the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Populations (document A/59/257).


**Elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination


Three draft resolutions and one draft decision are recommended to the Assembly in the report on elimination of racism and racial discrimination (document A/59/501), including the first text -- on measures to be taken against political platforms and activities based on doctrines of superiority and violent nationalist ideologies which are based on racial discrimination or ethnic exclusiveness and xenophobia, including neo-Nazism.  The terms of the draft would have the General Assembly urge States to take all available measures in accordance with their obligations under international human rights instruments to combat political platforms and activities based on doctrines of superiority and violent nationalist ideologies, which are based on racial discrimination.  It would call on States to undertake activities aimed at educating young people in human rights and democratic citizenship and instilling values of respect and appreciation of diversity.  By terms of the text, the Assembly would also call upon States to cooperate fully with the Special Rapporteur with a view to enabling him to fulfil his mandate.


Draft resolution II, on the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination,  would have the General Assembly call upon States parties to fulfil their obligation under the Convention to submit their periodic reports on measures taken to implement the Convention in due time.  It would also encourage States parties to the Convention whose reports are overdue to avail themselves of the advisory services and technical assistance provided by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights for the preparation of the reports.  In addition, States parties would be encouraged to include a gender perspective in their reports to the Committee.


Expressing profound concern that a number of States parties to the Convention have still not fulfilled their financial obligations, the draft would have the Assembly strongly appeal to all States parties that are in arrears to fulfil their outstanding financial obligations.  Also, the Assembly would strongly urge States parties to the Convention to accelerate their domestic ratification procedures regarding the amendment to the Convention concerning the financing of the Committee.  States not yet party to the Convention would be urged to ratify or accede to it as a matter of urgency with a view to universal ratification by the year 2005.


Draft resolution III, on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action, would have the Assembly acknowledge that no derogation from the prohibition of racial discrimination, genocide, apartheid or slavery is permitted, as defined in relevant human rights instruments, and emphasize that it is the responsibility of States to adopt effective measures to combat criminal acts motivated by intolerance.


Regarding the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, the text would have the Assembly endorse the concerns expressed by the Commission on Human Rights that the deadline for its universal ratification will not be realized, and would urge action in that regard.  It also would request resources to follow up on the Durban Declaration and call upon Member States to adopt measures in that effort.  In addition, recognizing with deep concern the increase in anti-Semitism, Christianophobia and Islamophobia, it would call upon States to cooperate with the Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights on contemporary forms of intolerance.


The draft decision contained in that report would have the Assembly take note of the report of the Secretary-General on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action (document A/59/375).


**Right of Peoples to Self-Determination


A further three draft resolutions are forwarded within the report on the right of peoples to self-determination (document A/59/502), including a text on the Use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination, which would have the General Assembly urge all States to take the necessary steps and to exercise the utmost vigilance against the menace posed by the activities of mercenaries.  States should take legislative measures to ensure that their territories and nationals were not used for recruitment, assembly, financing, training and transit of mercenaries for the planning of activities designed to impede the right of peoples to self-determination, to destabilize or overthrow the government of a State or to dismember of impair the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States.


Condemning recent mercenary activities in Africa, the Assembly would call upon States to investigate the possibility of mercenary involvement whenever and wherever criminal acts of a terrorist nature occurred and condemned any form of impunity granted to perpetrators of mercenary activities.  Also requesting the new Special Rapporteur to circulate the proposal for a new legal definition of a mercenary, drafted by her predecessor, the text would request the Special Rapporteur to take into account in the discharge of her duties that mercenary activities continued to occur in many parts of the world and were taking on new forms, manifestations and modalities.


Draft resolution II, on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, would have the General Assembly reaffirm the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, including the right to their independent State of Palestine.  Recalling the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice on the wall in occupied Palestinian territory, and expressing the urgent need for the resumption of negotiations within the Middle East peace process, it would urge all States, specialized agencies and organizations of the United Nations system to support and assist the Palestinian people in the early realization of their right to self-determination.


Draft resolution III, regarding the Universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination, would have the General Assembly reaffirm the universal realization of the rights of all peoples, including those under colonial, foreign and alien domination, to self-determination as a fundamental condition for the effective guarantee and observance of human rights.  Declaring its firm opposition to acts of foreign military intervention, aggression and occupation, the Assembly would call upon those States responsible to cease immediately their military intervention in an occupation of foreign countries and territories.


**Human Rights Questions


Also before the Assembly is the report on human rights questions (document A/59/503 and Add.1, Add.2, Add.3, Add.4 and Add.5).  The main report recommends one draft decision for adoption by the Assembly, which would have that body take note of the following reports submitted under the item entitled “human rights questions”:


Under sub-item (a):


-- Report of the Secretary-General on the status of the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (document A/59/306);


-- Report of the Secretary-General on the effective implementation of international instruments on human rights, including reporting obligations under international instrument on human rights (document A/59/308);


-- Report of the Secretary-General on the status of the United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery (document A/59/309);


-- Report of the Secretary-General on the status of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (document A/59/310);


-- Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the chairpersons of the human rights treaty bodies on their sixteenth meeting (document A/59/254);


Under sub-item (b):


-- Report of the Secretary-General on the right to development (document A/59/255);


-- Report of the Secretary-General on the protection of migrants (document A/59/328);


-- Report of the Secretary-General on strengthening of the rule of law (document A/59/402);


-- Report of the Secretary-General on the Subregional Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Central Africa (document A/59/403);


-- Report of the Secretary-General on Khmer Rouge trials (document A/59/432 and Add.1);


-- Report of the Secretary-General on human rights and unilateral coercive measures (document A/59/436);


-- Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the interim report prepared by the Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief (document A/59/366);


-- Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants (document A/59/377);


-- Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of his Special Representative on human rights defenders (document A/59/401);


-- Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health (document A/59/422);


Under sub-item (c):


-- Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the interim report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied by Israel since 1967 (document A/59/256);


-- Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on assistance to Sierra Leone in the field of human rights (document A/59/340);


-- Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the independent expert on the situation of human rights in Afghanistan (document A/59/370);


-- Oral report of the independent expert on the situation of human rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (document A/C.3/59/SR.29);


-- Oral report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (document A/C.3/59/SR.29);


-- Oral report of the independent expert on the situation of human rights in the Sudan (document A/C.3/59/SR.30).


**Implementation of Human Rights Instruments


The first addendum to the report on human rights questions, which specifically concerns implementation of human rights instruments, contains three draft resolutions recommended by the Third Committee.


Draft resolution I, on the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrants Workers and Member of Their Families, would have the Assembly welcome the increasing number of signatures, ratifications or accessions to the Conventionand call upon States that have not yet done so to consider signing and ratifying or acceding to the Convention, with the aim of achieving a broader participation by Member States therein.  It would also call upon States parties to submit in due time their first periodic report under article 73 of the Convention.


Draft resolution II, on Equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies, would have the Assembly call upon the States parties to the United Nations human rights instruments to include, at their forthcoming meetings, a debate on ways and means to ensure equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies.  The Assembly would recommend that each of the five regional groups be assigned a quota of the membership of each treaty body, in equivalent proportion to the number of States parties to the instrument it represents, and that provisions be made for periodic revisions to reflect relative changes in the geographical distribution of States parties.


Draft resolution III, on Torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, would have the Assembly condemn all forms of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, call upon all governments to give full effect to the prohibition of such treatment or punishment, and condemn any action or attempt by States or public officials to legalize or authorize it, including on grounds of national security or through judicial decisions.


Stressing that all allegations of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment must be promptly and impartially examined by the competent national authority, the text would have the Assembly stress that all acts of torture must be made offences under domestic criminal law, and that acts of torture are serious violations of international humanitarian law and can constitute crimes against humanity and war crimes.  It would also emphasize that statements made as a result of torture shall not be invoked as evidence in any proceedings, except against a person accused of torture, and that victims of torture must obtain redress, be rewarded fair and adequate compensation and receive appropriate social and medical rehabilitation.


Noting the interim report of the Special Rapporteur on torture, the Assembly would call upon all governments to cooperate with and assist the Special Rapporteur in the performance of his task.  It would also express gratitude and appreciation to the governments, organizations and individuals that already contributed to the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture and appeal to all governments and organizations to contribute annually to the Fund.


**Alternative Approaches to Full Enjoyment of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms


The second addendum, related to alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, contains 22 recommendations for action.


Draft resolution I, on the Subregional Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Central Africa, would have the Assembly welcome the activities of the Centre and request the Secretary-General and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to provide adequate assistance for the proper functioning of the Centre.


Draft resolution II, on Globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights, would have the Assembly reaffirm that narrowing the gap between rich and poor, both within and between countries, is an explicit goal at the national and international levels, as part of the effort to create an enabling environment for the full enjoyment of all human rights.  It would call upon Member States, relevant agencies of the United Nations system, intergovernmental organizations and civil society to promote equitable and environmentally sustainable economic growth for managing globalization, so that poverty is systematically reduced and the international development targets are achieved.  It would also underline the urgent need to establish an equitable, transparent and democratic international system in which poor people and countries have a more effective voice.


Draft resolution III, on the right to development, would have the Assembly call upon the Working Group on the Right to Development, and its high-level task force, to contribute actively towards the mainstreaming of the right to development at the high-level event to be held in New York at the commencement of the sixtieth session of the General Assembly.  Also, noting with concern that the Subcommission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights did not consider the working paper on possible alternatives at its fifty-sixth session, the Assembly would request that body to submit to the Commission on Human Rights without further delay the concept document establishing options for implementation of the right to development.


Furthermore, while stressing that the basic responsibility for promotion and protection of all human rights lies with the State and reaffirming that States have the primary responsibility for their own economic and social development, the Assembly would stress the need to strive for greater acceptance, operationalization and realization of the right to development at the international and national levels.  It would call upon States to institute the measures required for implementation of the right to development as a fundamental human right, and stress the need for policies and measures, at the national and global levels, to respond to the challenges and opportunities of globalization.  It would also call for implementation of a desirable pace of meaningful trade liberalization.


Finally, the text would have the Assembly reaffirm the request to the High Commissioner for Human Rights to strengthen the global partnership for development between MemberStates, development agencies and the international development, financial and trade institutions and call upon United Nations agencies, funds and programmes to mainstream the right to development in their operational programmes and objectives.


Draft resolution IV, on Human rights and extreme poverty, would have the Assembly reaffirm that extreme poverty constitutes a violation of human dignity and that urgent national and international action is required to eliminate it.  It would reaffirm that it is essential for States to foster participation by the poorest people in the decision-making process in the societies in which they live, in the promotion of human rights and in efforts to combat extreme poverty.  The draft would have the General Assembly call upon States, United Nations bodies, intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations to continue to give appropriate attention to the links between human rights and extreme poverty.


Draft resolution V, on Enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, would have the Assembly urge all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on inclusion, justice, equality, human dignity and promotion of and respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights.  It would call upon Member States, specialized agencies and intergovernmental organizations to continue to carry out a constructive dialogue for the enhancement of understanding and the promotion and protection of all human rights and fundamental freedoms.


Draft resolution VI, on Human rights and unilateral coercive measures, would have the Assembly urge all States to refrain from adopting or implementing any unilateral measures not in accordance with internal law and the Charter of the United Nations, in particular those of a coercive nature with all their extraterritorial effects, which create obstacles to trade relations among States.  It would reject unilateral coercive measures with all their extraterritorial effects as tools for political or economic pressure against any country, in particular against developing countries.  It would also urge the Commission on Human Rights to take fully into account the negative impact of unilateral coercive measures, including the enactment of national laws and their extraterritorial application, in its task concerning the implementation of the right to development.


Draft resolution VII, on Missing persons, would have the Assembly call upon States party to armed conflict to take all appropriate measures to prevent persons from going missing in connection with such conflicts and to account for persons reported missing thereby.  Also requesting States to pay the utmost attention to cases of children reported missing in connection with armed conflict, the Assembly would urge States, and encourage intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, to take all necessary measures at the national, regional and international levels to address the problem of persons reported missing in connection with armed conflicts.  It would also invite relevant human rights mechanisms and procedures to address the problem in their forthcoming reports to the General Assembly.


Draft resolution VIII, on Strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity, would have the Assembly reaffirm that the promotion, protection and full realization of all human rights should be guided by the principles of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity and should not be used for political ends.  It would also stress the continuing need for impartial and objective information on the political, economic and social situations and events of all countries.


Draft resolution IX, on Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, would have the Assembly reaffirm that States must ensure that any measure taken to combat terrorism complies with their obligations under international law, in particular international human rights, refugee and humanitarian law.  It would encourage States, while countering terrorism, to take into account relevant United Nations resolutions on human rights and relevant comments and views of United Nations human rights treaty bodies.


Draft resolution X, on the Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, would have the Assembly call upon States to promote and give full effect to the Declaration.  Condemning all human rights violations committed against persons engaged in promoting and defending human rights and fundamental freedoms around the world, it would call upon States to take all necessary measures to ensure protection of human rights defenders, at both the local and national levels.


Also urging States to ensure that any measures to combat terrorism and preserve national security comply with their obligations under international law and did not hinder the work and safety of human rights defenders, the Assembly would urge States to address the question of impunity for threats, attacks and acts of intimidation against human rights defenders, and to cooperate with and assist the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on human rights defenders in the performance of her tasks.


Also requesting all concerned United Nations agencies and organizations, within their mandates, to provide all possible assistance and support to the Special Representative, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to provide her with all necessary human, material and financial resources to carry out her mandate effectively.


Draft resolution XI, on Promotion of a democratic and equitable international order, would have the Assembly call upon all Member States to fulfil their commitment, expressed during the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance, to maximize the benefits of globalization.  By the text, the Assembly would affirm that such an order required realization of the right of all peoples to self-determination, development, peace, an international economic order based on equal participation in the decision-making process, solidarity and the promotion and consolidation of transparent, democratic, just and accountable international institutions in all areas of cooperation, among other principles.


Stressing that all human rights are universal, indivisible, interdependent and interrelated, the text would have the Assembly urge all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on inclusion, justice, equality and equity, human dignity, mutual understanding and promotion of and respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights.


Draft resolution XII, on Protection of migrants, would have the Assembly strongly condemn manifestations and acts of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance against migrants, as well as all forms of discrimination and xenophobia related to access to employment, vocational training, housing, schooling, health services and social services.  Welcoming the growing number of signatures and ratifications or accessions to the International Convention on the Protection on the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, it would call upon all States to consider reviewing and revising immigration policies with a view to eliminating all discriminatory practices against migrants and their families.


Among other provisions, the text would have the Assembly request all States firmly to prosecute violations of labour law regarding conditions of work of migrant workers, encourage all States to remove obstacles that may prevent the safe, unrestricted and expeditious transfer of earnings, assets and pensions of migrants to their country of origin and urge them to adopt effective measures to end the arbitrary arrest and detention of migrants.  Also requesting States to adopt concrete measures to prevent the violation of the human rights of migrants while in transit, the Assembly would encourage States to enact domestic legislation to combat the international trafficking and smuggling of migrants.


Draft resolution XIII, on Human rights and terrorism, would have the Assembly reiterate its unequivocal condemnation of acts, methods and practices of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations as activities aimed at the destruction of human rights.  Strongly condemning the violations of the right to life, liberty and security, the text would have the Assembly deplore profoundly the increasing number of innocent persons killed, massacred and maimed by terrorists in indiscriminate and random acts of violence and terror, which cannot be justified in any circumstances.


Urging the international community to enhance cooperation at the regional and international levels in the fight against terrorism, the text would have the Assembly call upon States to take all necessary and effective measures to prevent, combat and eliminate terrorism.  Urging all States to deny safe haven to terrorists, it would call upon them to take appropriate measures to ensure that an asylum-seeker has not planned, facilitated or participated in the commission of terrorist acts, and that refugee status is not abused by the perpetrators, organizers or facilitators of terrorist acts.


The text would also have the Assembly condemn incitement to ethnic hatred, violence and terrorism, and stress that every person, regardless of nationality, race, sex, religion or any other distinction, has a right to protection from terrorism and terrorist acts.  It would also reject the identification of terrorism with any religion, nationality or culture.


Draft resolution XIV, on Regional arrangements for the promotion and protection of human rights, would have the Assembly stress the importance of the programme of technical cooperation in the field of human rights.  The Assembly would further renew its appeal to all governments to consider making use of the possibilities offered by the United Nations under the programme of organizing information or training courses at the national level for government personnel on the application of international human rights standards.


The text would have the General Assembly invite States to consider concluding appropriate agreements to establish suitable regional machinery for the promotion and protection of human rights and request the Secretary-General to continue to strengthen exchanges between the United Nations and regional intergovernmental organizations dealing with human rights.  It would also request the Office of the High Commissioner to continue to pay special attention to the most appropriate ways of assisting countries of the various regions under the programme of technical cooperation.


Draft resolution XV, on Extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, would have the General Assembly strongly condemn all extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions that continued to take place throughout the world and demand that all governments ensure that the practice of such executions was brought to an end.  Noting with grave concern that the practice of such executions could result in genocide or crimes against humanity, and that impunity continued to be a major cause of the perpetuation of violations of human rights, it would reiterate the obligation of all governments to conduct exhaustive and impartial investigations into all suspected cases of extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions.


All States in which the death penalty had not been abolished would be called upon to comply with their obligations under relevant provisions of international human rights instruments.  Moreover, the Assembly would urge all governments to undertake all necessary measures to prevent the occurrence of such executions and to investigate promptly and thoroughly all killings.


Taking note of the interim report of the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, the Assembly would urge him to continue to bring to attention situations of such executions that were of particularly serious concern or where early action might prevent further deterioration.  All governments would be urged to respond to communications and requests for information from the Special Rapporteur.


Draft resolution XVI, on the Ad Hoc Committee on a Comprehensive and Integral International Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights and Dignity of Persons with Disabilities, would have the Assembly request that the Ad Hoc Committee increase its momentum in the current negotiations on the draft convention, with the aim of submitting it to the Assembly at its sixtieth session.  The Assembly would request the Secretary-General to continue to provide the Ad Hoc Committee with the facilities necessary for the performance of its work and to reallocate resources to the United Nations Programme on Disability so as to provide support to the negotiations on a draft convention.


Draft resolution XVII, on Elimination of all forms of religious intolerance, would have the Assembly urge States to ensure that their constitutional and legal systems provide effective guarantees of freedom of thought, conscience, religion or belief.  Also urging States to ensure that no one within their jurisdiction is deprived of their right to life, liberty and security of person, the right to freedom of expression, the right not to be subjected to torture and the right not to be arbitrarily arrested and detained because of their religion or belief, the Assembly would urge States to combat hatred, intolerance and acts of violence, intimidation and coercion motivated by intolerance.


Calling upon all States to recognize the right of all persons to worship or assemble in connection with a religion or belief, the Assembly would express grave concern at all attacks upon religious places, sites and shrines.  The text would invite States, religious bodies and civil society to undertake dialogue at all levels to promote greater tolerance, respect and understanding of freedom or religion or belief, and to promote those values through the educational system.


Draft resolution XVIII, on the Question of enforced or involuntary disappearances, would have the General Assembly urge all governments to take appropriate legislative or other steps to prevent and suppress the practice of enforced disappearances, and to take steps to ensure that, when a state of emergency is introduced, the protection of human rights is ensured.


Once again urging governments concerned to take steps to protect witnesses of enforced disappearances, human rights defenders and the lawyers and families of disappeared persons, the Assembly would also urge them to continue efforts to elucidate the fate of disappeared persons and to make provision in their legal systems for victims of enforced or involuntary disappearances or their families to seek fair and adequate reparation.


By the text, the Assembly would also stress the importance of the endeavours of the Working Group on the subject and invite the Group to identify obstacles to the realization of the provisions of the Declaration on the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearances.  The Assembly would appeal to all governments to cooperate with the Working Group and to reply promptly to its requests for information.


Draft resolution XIX, on Enhancing the role of regional, subregional and other organizations and arrangements in promoting and consolidating democracy, would have the Assembly declare that the essential elements of democracy included respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms.  It would have the General Assembly invite intergovernmental regional, subregional and other organizations and arrangements, as well as relevant non-governmental organizations, to engage actively in work at the local, national, subregional and regional levels for promotion and consolidation of democracy, and to initiate exchanges with the United Nations systems on their experiences.


By the text, the United Nations system would be invited to identify, develop and coordinate effective policies of assistance in the field of democracy and to support programmes of technical assistance to States, including those to develop a competent, independent and impartial judiciary and accountable government institutions; strengthen political party systems, free and independent media and civil society organizations; and to foster a democratic culture.  The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights would be called upon to stimulate dialogue and interaction within the United Nations system and between the system and interested intergovernmental regional, subregional and other organizations and arrangements on the ways and means of promoting democratic values and principles.


Draft resolution XX, on The right to food, would have the Assembly encourage all States to take steps with a view to achieving progressively the full realization of the right to food and stress the need to make efforts to mobilize and optimize the allocation and utilization of technical and financial resources from all sources, including external debt relief for developing countries, and to reinforce national actions to implement sustainable food security policies.


Recognizing that the promises made at the World Food Summit in 1996 to halve the number of persons who are undernourished by 2015 are not being fulfilled, the Assembly, under the draft’s terms, would welcome the meeting of world leaders for action against hunger and poverty convened by the Presidents of Brazil, Chile and France and the President of the Government of Spain, and urge States to given adequate priority in their development strategies and expenditures to the realization of the right to food.


Encouraging the Special Rapporteur on the right to food to continue mainstreaming a gender perspective in the activities relating to his mandate, the assembly would invite governments, relevant United Nations agencies, funds and programmes, treaty bodies, civil society actors, including non-governmental organizations, as well as the private sector, to cooperate fully with the Special Rapporteur in the fulfilment of his mandate.


Draft resolution XXI, on Respect for the right to universal freedom of travel and the vital importance of family reunification, would have the Assembly call upon all States to guarantee the universally recognized freedom of travel to all foreign nationals legally residing in their territory.  Calling upon States to allow the free flow of financial remittances by foreign nationals residing in their territory to their relatives in the country of origin, it would also call upon them to refrain from enacting, and to repeal, if it already exists, legislation intended as a coercive measure that discriminates against individuals or groups of legal migrants by adversely affecting family reunification and the right to send financial remittances to relatives in the country of origin.


Lastly, draft resolution XXII, on Respect for the purposes and principles contained in the Charter of the United Nations to achieve international cooperation in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms and in solving international problems of a humanitarian character, would have the Assembly stress the vital role of the work of United Nations and regional arrangements in promoting and encouraging such respect.  Calling upon Member States to refrain from enacting or enforcing unilateral coercive measures as tools of political, military or economic pressure against any country, the Assembly would also call upon them fully to cooperate, through constructive dialogue, to ensure promotion and protection of all human rights and to promote peaceful solutions to international problems of a humanitarian character.


**Human Rights Situations and Reports of Special Rapporteurs and Representatives


Addendum III, on human rights situations and report of special rapporteurs and representatives, recommends four draft resolutions on the situations of human rights in specific countries for action by the Assembly.


Draft resolution I, concerning the situation of human rights in Myanmar, would have the General Assembly express its grave concern at the ongoing systematic violation of human rights, including political, economic, social and cultural rights, of the people of Myanmar; the events of 30 May 2003 and the continuing detention and house arrest of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and members of the National League for Democracy; the fact that the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General and the Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights have not been permitted to visit the country for six and twelve months, respectively; and the continuing restrictions placed on the National League for Democracy and other political parties, among other circumstances.


Among other provisions, the text would have the Assembly call upon the Government of Myanmar to end the systematic violations of human rights, restore democracy and respect the results of the 1990 elections and release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, other members of the National League for Democracy and other prisoners of conscience, as well as all detained or imprisoned political prisoners.  The Government would be called upon to initiate a full and independent inquiry, with international cooperation, into the Depayin incident of 30 May 2003, and to cooperate fully with the Special Envoy and the Special Rapporteur.  It would also be called upon to put an immediate end to the recruitment and use of child soldiers.


Draft resolution II, concerning the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, would have the Assembly note the commitment made by the Government to strengthen respect for human rights and to promote the rule of law, yet express its serious concern at the continuing violations of human rights in that country, including with regard to the worsening situation concerning freedom of opinion and expression and freedom of the media.  Concern would also be expressed at continuing executions in the absence of respect for internationally recognized safeguards; the use of torture and other forms of cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment; continued restrictions on free assembly and forcible dissolution of political parties; the failure to comply fully with international standards for the administration of justice; systematic discrimination against women and girls, and continuing discrimination against persons belonging to minorities, among other phenomena.


Among other provisions, the text would have the Assembly call upon the Government to cooperate with United Nations mechanisms, fully to implement the ban on torture announced in April 2004 and to expedite judicial reform.  It would also be encouraged to appoint an impartial prosecutor, to abolish the punishment of execution by stoning and to vigorously pursue penitentiary reform.  It would also encourage the thematic mechanisms of the Commission on Human Rights, including those dealing with extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, independence of judges and lawyers and freedom of religion or belief, as well as the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on the situation of human rights defenders, to visit Iran.


Draft resolution III, concerning the situation of human rights in Turkmenistan, would have the Assembly express its grave concern at the continuing and serious human rights violations occurring in Turkmenistan, in particular the persistence of a governmental policy based on the repression of all political opposition activities, the continuing abuse of the legal system through arbitrary detentions and imprisonment of persons who try to exercise their freedoms of expression, assembly and association and continued restrictions on the exercise of the freedoms of thought, conscience, religion and belief.


The draft would have the General Assembly call upon the Government of Turkmenistan to work closely with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights with regard to the areas of concern and to release immediately all prisoners of conscience.  It would also call on the Government to remove remaining restrictions on the activities of public associations, including non-governmental organizations and, in particular, human rights organizations.


Finally, draft resolution IV, concerning the situation of human rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, would have the Assembly welcome the extended mandate of the United Nations Mission in that country regarding the protection of human rights and the measures taken by transitional institutions in that regard.  It would condemn the continuing violations of human rights and international humanitarian law, as well as the lack of fair trial and due process guarantees for many detainees and defendants in the country.


Also by the text, the Assembly would urge all parties to the conflict in that country to further implement the Global and All-Inclusive Agreement on the transition; to adhere fully to the Principles on Good-Neighbourly relations signed with Burundi, Rwanda and Uganda; to immediately cease all military activity that impedes further progress; to support the Transitional Government; to put an immediate end to the use of child soldiers; to take measures to protect women, children and displaced persons, and to promote their human rights and participation in post-conflict efforts; and to protect the human rights and security of all civilians, United Nations personnel and human rights defenders.


The text would also have the Assembly call upon the Government of National Unity and Transition to achieve the holding of free and transparent elections; to strengthen transitional institutions; to comply fully with its obligations under human rights instruments; to reform the judicial system; to reinstate the moratorium on capital punishment; to put an end to impunity; and to cooperate with the International Criminal Court and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.


**Comprehensive Implementation of and Follow-up to Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action


Addendum IV, related to comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, notes that the Committee held its general discussion on this subject, jointly with its discussion of implementation of human rights instruments, on 25 and 26 October.  No action was taken on this item during the current session.


**Report of United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights


Further, the fifth addendum, which contains the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, notes that the High Commissioner addressed delegations on 26 October, and took part in a subsequent question-and-answer session.


**Organization of Work


There are also two texts related to revitalization of the work of the Third Committee and its provisional programme of work for the sixtieth session of the General Assembly.


The first text (document A/C.3/59/CRP.1/Rev.1), which concerned Revitalization of the work of the Third Committee, would have the Assembly reorganize several of the items before the Committee for consideration.  It would merge the items currently entitled “Implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly”, “Social development, including questions relating to the world social situation and to youth, ageing, disabled persons and the family” and “Follow-up to the International Year of Older Persons:  Second World Assembly on Ageing” into one new agenda item entitled “Social development”.


The items entitled “Advancement of women” and “Implementation of the outcome of the Fourth World Conference on Women and of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, entitled “Women 2000:  gender equality, development and peace for the twenty-first century” would be merged into one new agenda item, “Advancement of women”.  Similarly, the current items “Follow-up to the special session on children” –- normally considered in the General Assembly plenary –- and “Promotion and protection of the rights of children” would be merged into one new agenda item, “Promotion and protection of the rights of children”, to be considered by the Third Committee.


The text would also rename the item “Programme of activities for the International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People, 1995-2004” as “Indigenous issues”.  The sub-items “Implementation of human rights instruments”, “Human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms”, “Human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives”, “Comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action” and “Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights” into one new agenda item, “Promotion and protection of human rights”.


Among other provisions regarding the Committee’s methods of work, the text would approve the introduction –- on a pilot basis -– of interactive debates in an informal setting during the sixtieth session, on the understanding that the Committee would not meet at the same time.


The second text set forth the Provisional programme of work (document A/C.3/59/CRP.2) for the Third Committee during the General Assembly’s sixtieth session.


Plenary Texts


The Assembly also had before it a number of plenary-generated draft resolutions.


The Assembly had before it the report of its Credentials Committee (document A/59/602), which covers the Committee’s meeting on December, at which it elected its Chair (Nana Effah-Apenteng of Ghana), and accepted the credentials of Member States to the Assembly’s current session.  That text contains a draft resolution recommending that the Assembly approve that report.


Also before the Assembly was an addendum to the report of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), contained in document A/59/3/Add.2 (not yet released).


Next, the Assembly took up a draft on the smooth transition strategy for countries graduating from the list of least developed countries (document A/59/L.47), by which it would decide that the process through which to ensure such a transition would unfold as follows:


(a)            When the Committee on Development Policy, in its triennial review of the list identified a country that meets the criteria for graduation for the first time, it will submit its findings to the ECOSOC.


(b)            After a country has met the criteria for first-time graduation, the Secretary-General will invite the Secretary-General of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) to prepare a vulnerability profile on the identified country to be taken into account by the Committee for development Policy at its subsequent triennial review.


(c)            At the Committee’s review (referred to above), if the qualifications for the country’s graduation are reconfirmed, the Committee will submit a recommendation, in accordance with the established procedures, with the ECOSOC.


(d)            The ECOSOC, in turn, will take action on the Committee’s recommendation at its first substantive meeting following the Committee’s triennial review and will transmit that decision to the Assembly.


(e)            Three years following the Assembly’s decision to take note of the Committee’s recommendation to graduate a country from the list, graduation will become effective; during that period, the country in question will remain on the list and will maintain the advantages associated with membership.


The draft would have the Assembly invite the graduating country, during that three-year period, in cooperation with bilateral and multilateral development and trading partners, and with United Nations support, to prepare a transition strategy to adjust to the phasing out of, over a period appropriate to specific development conditions, of the advantages associated with membership on the list of least developed countries and to identify action to be taken by the country and its development and trading partners to that end.


Further, the text would have the Assembly invite development and trading partners to consider extending the graduate country’s trade preferences previously made available as a result of least developed country status or reducing them in a phased manner in order to avoid their abrupt reduction.

By a related draft, on the report of the Committee for Development Policy on its sixth session (document A/59/L.48), the Assembly would take into account the above text, and take note of the Committee’s recommendation to graduate Cape Verde and Maldives from the list of least developed countries.


The Assembly also had before it a draft resolution on the safety and security of humanitarian personnel and protection of United Nations personnel (document A/59/L.51), by which it would express its deep concern at the dangers and security risks faced by humanitarian workers and United Nations staff in the field, as well as the erosion, in many cases, of the respect for international humanitarian law.


It would strongly deplore the rising toll of casualties among such personnel in complex humanitarian emergencies and would urge all parties involved in armed conflict to respect their international legal obligations, particularly under the 12 August 1949 Geneva Convention and optional protocols thereto, to ensure the security and protection of all humanitarian personnel.


The text commends the courage and commitment of those who take part in humanitarian operations, often at great personal risk, especially of locally recruited staff, and extends, as well, the Assembly’s profound regret at the death of international and national humanitarian personnel in the field.  The Assembly would also strongly condemn acts of murder and other forms of violence, rape and sexual assault and all forms of violence committed, in particular against women, and intimidation, robbery, abduction, hostage-taking, kidnapping, harassment, illegal arrest and detention to which those participating in humanitarian operations are increasingly exposed.


The Assembly would urge all States to take the necessary measures to ensure the full and effective implementation of the relevant principles and rules of international law –- humanitarian, human rights and refugee law -– to ensure the safety of humanitarian personnel, and strongly urge States to take the necessary measures to ensure their safety and security.  It would also call upon governments and parties in complex humanitarian emergencies, in particular in armed conflicts and in post-conflict situations, where humanitarian personnel are operating, to cooperate with the United Nations and other humanitarian agencies or organizations and to ensure safe, unhindered access of such personnel.


Amendments to that text contained in document A/59/L.52, would, in the first instance, replace the fourteenth preambular paragraph as follows:  “Recallingthat attacks directed against humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping missions in accordance with the Charter are serious violations of international law”.


The second amendment, replacing the text of operative paragraph 7 of the L.51 draft, would read as follows:  “Further calls upon all States to hold those responsible for human rights violations as well as for crimes against humanity, accountable through appropriate judicial mechanisms”.


Also before the Assembly was a draft resolution on international cooperation on humanitarian assistance in the field of natural disasters, from relief to development (document A/59/L.26/Rev.1).  By that text, the Assembly would emphasize that the affected State has primary responsibility in the initiation, organization and implementation of humanitarian assistance within its territory, and also the importance of integrating risk reduction into all phases of disaster management, development planning and post-disaster recovery.  Welcoming the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, the Assembly would stress that national authorities need to enhance the resilience of populations to disasters through, among other things, implementing the Strategy.


The text would also have the Assembly express deep concern at the number and scale of natural disasters and their increasing impact, resulting massive losses of life and property worldwide, and call upon States, to adopt, where required, and continue to implement necessary legislative and other appropriate measures to mitigate the effects of natural disasters.  States, as well as the United Nations system would also be called upon to assist in addressing the gaps in disaster management and risk reduction by identifying ways of improving systems and networks for the collection and analysis of relevant information.


The final draft resolution before the Assembly today concerned cooperation between the United Nations and the African Union (document A/5(/L.54).  The text would have the Assembly note the efforts undertaken by the Union and its organs and regional economic communities in the area of economic integration, and the need to accelerate the process of the Union’s full establishment and consolidation so as to achieve sustainable development.


The text would have the Assembly stress the need to address the plight of refugees and internally displaced persons in Africa, as well as stress the need to extend the scope of United Nations cooperation with the Union in the area of combating illegal exploitation of natural resources.  The Assembly would urge the United Nations system to continue to support the African Union, and call upon the Secretary-General to involve the Union and its organs closely in the implementation of the commitments contained in the Millennium Declaration, especially those related to the special needs of the continent.


Further, the Assembly would also request the United Nations system to intensify its assistance to the Union, as appropriate, in strengthening the institutional and operational capacity of its Peace and Security Council, in particular in areas such as development of its early warning system, including the Situation Room of the Peace and Security Directorate; training of civilian and military personnel; support for the Council in taking humanitarian action on the continent, and establishment of the African Standby Force and Military Staff Committee.


Action on Reports


CARLOS ENRIQUE GARCIA GONZALEZ (El Salvador), Vice-Chairperson of the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural), introduced the Committee’s 18 reports.


**Implementation of the Outcome of the World Summit for Social Development


First up on the day’s agenda was a draft resolution contained within the Third Committee’s report on Implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly (document A/59/491), which the Assembly adopted without a vote.


**Social Development


The Assembly next turned to the report on social development (document A/59/492), which contained three draft resolutions and two draft decisions.


Speaking in explanation of position, the representative of the United States said that her country wished to dissociate from the consensus on draft resolution I, contained in the report presently under consideration.  She noted that the General Assembly had adopted a text entitled “Celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of the International Year of the Family” –- General Assembly resolution 59/111 -- on 6 December during its commemoration of that anniversary. That text better reflected the current international agreement on how to recognize and celebrate this important milestone.


Moving forward, she said, the international community should consider issues related to the family in respect of the definition of the family provided in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and in the Secretary-General’s recent report on the family.  That report noted that, given the diversity of family structures and relationships, the international community should not focus on one type of family alone, but should take all forms into account and make provisions for the different needs and circumstances of each.


Both resolutions called for continued Secretariat reporting and continuing consideration of the situation of the family, she continued.  The United States held that future consideration of this issue would draw definitively from the resolution adopted during the plenary’s commemoration of the tenth anniversary.


The representative of Qatar said his delegation attached great importance to matter related to the family, and, like the rest of the international community believed that the family was the central unit of all societies.  It had hosted the Doha International Conference on the Family and it had introduced the most recent text on the matter before the Assembly.  That resolution reflected the very latest activities that had occurred related to the holding of the International Year of the Family.  His delegation would not propose an amendment at this late stage.  The text included in its preamble referred to various forms of families in different social and economic circumstances.  Still, that must not detract from internationally agreed definitions of the family.  Qatar would set itself aside from the consensus.


The representative of Switzerland said her delegation welcomed the fact that the resolution recognized the family in all its forms and it would recognize as well the decision on the family upheld in the outcome documents of the various United Nations conferences and summits of the past decade.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, draft resolution I on celebration of the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family.


Draft resolutions II and III –- which concerned policies and programmes involving youth and the United Nations Literacy Decade, respectively –- were also adopted without votes.


Subsequently, the Assembly adopted draft decision I, on the proposed supplement to the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities, without a vote.  It also adopted draft decision II, on preparations for and observance of the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family without a vote.


Speaking in explanation of position, the Observer for the Holy See noted the adoption of General Assembly resolution 59/111 on 6 December.  Today, it seemed that the Assembly had adopted another resolution on the same subject, which appeared to move away from the unequivocal definition of family contained in the Universal Declaration on Human Rights and subsequent negotiations.  It was to be hoped that future work would be guided by the consensus mandate contained in resolution 59/111.


**Follow-up to International Year of Older Persons


Next turning to the draft resolution contained in the report on Follow-up to the International Year of Older Persons:  Second World Assembly on Ageing (document A/59/493), the Assembly adopted the text without a vote.


**Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice


The Assembly next took up the nine draft resolutions and one draft decision contained in the report on Crime prevention and criminal justice (document A/59/494).


Draft resolution I, on preparations for the eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II, on assistance to least developed countries to ensure their participation in the sessions of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution III, on strengthening international cooperation and technical assistance in promoting the implementation of the universal conventions and protocols related to terrorism, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution IV, on international cooperation in the prevention, combating and elimination of kidnapping and in providing assistance to victims, was also adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution V, on action against corruption, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution VI, on preventing, combating and punishing trafficking in human organs, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution VII, on international cooperation in the fight against transnational organized crime, was also adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution VIII, on the United Nations African Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution IX, on strengthening the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity, was also adopted without a vote.


Draft decision I to take note of the reports submitted to the Committee on crime prevention and criminal justice was also adopted without a vote.


**International Drug Control


Subsequently, the Assembly took up consideration of the four texts contained in the Committee’s report on International drug control (document A/59/495), adopting draft resolution I -- concerning the control, cultivation and trafficking in cannabis –- draft resolution II –- concerning support for Afghanistan –- and draft resolution III –- on chemical precursors -- without votes.


Draft resolution IV –- the omnibus text on international cooperation against the world drug problem –- was also adopted without a vote.


**Advancement of Women


The Assembly next turned to the report on Advancement of Women (document A/59/496), which contained four draft resolutions and one draft decision.


Before it took action, the Assembly was informed that action on draft resolution III, on future operation of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW), had been postponed to a later date, owing to consideration of the text’s programme budget implications.


Speaking in explanation of position, the representative of Qatar stressed that his country gave women’s issues the utmost importance.  Women enjoyed full rights in Qatar.  The High Council for the Family had been created to defend families and women, and had always promoted equal rights for men and women. Moreover, national legislation provided for severe sanctions for crimes committed against women.  Therefore, Qatar supported the condemnation of vile crimes committed against women, including crimes committed in the name of honour, but regretted that the text’s co-sponsors had not consulted with all Member States on the language used in that draft, especially on reproductive and sexual health. Such terminology could have many interpretations, some of which ran counter to Qatar’s national legislation and religious beliefs.  Therefore, he wished to have his reservation to that resolution recorded.


The Assembly then adopted, without votes, draft resolutions I and II, which concerned improvement of the status of women in the United Nations system and working towards elimination of crimes against women and girls committed in the name of honour, respectively.


The Assembly also adopted draft resolution IV, on trafficking in women and girls,without a vote.


The draft decision to take note on the report of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against was also adopted, without a vote.


**Implementation of and follow-up to Fourth World Conference on Women and “Women 2000”


Subsequently, the Assembly turned its attention to two texts contained in the Committee’s report on Implementation of and follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and the outcome of the twenty-third special session in the General Assembly (document A/59/497).


Draft resolution I, related to elimination of all forms of violence against women, including crimes identified during the special session, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II, on follow-up to the Fourth World Conference and the twenty-third special session, was also adopted without a vote.


**Refugees


The Assembly then turned to the four draft resolutions contained in the report on the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/59/498).


Draft resolution I, on enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II, on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution III, on a new international humanitarian order, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution IV, on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, was also adopted without a vote.


**Children’s Rights


The Assembly next turned to the two draft resolutions and one draft decision contained in the report on Children’s rights (document A/59/499).


Before taking action, the Assembly was informed that action on draft resolution II –- rights of the child -- would be postponed until a later date, in order to allow time for review of its programme budgetary implications by the Fifth Committee.


The Assembly then adopted draft resolution I on the situation of and assistance to Palestinian children by a recorded vote of 117 in favour to five against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 62 abstentions.  (See annex I.)


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft decision to take note of the report of the Child Rights Committee covering its activities at its thirtieth to thirty-fifth session.


**Indigenous Issues


Subsequently, the Assembly took up the report on the Programme of activities for the International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People, 1995-2004 (document A/59/500), adopting the included draft resolution to proclaim a Second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People –- without a vote.


The Assembly then adopted the draft decision to take note of the reports on implementation of the programme of activities for the International Decade, the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people, and the status of the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Populations.


**Racism and Racial Discrimination


The Assembly then turned to the report on Elimination of racism and racial discrimination (document A/59/501), to take action on the three draft resolutions and one draft decision contained therein.


Draft resolution I, on measures to be taken against political platforms based on racial, and draft resolution II, on the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, were adopted without votes.


However, the Assembly adopted draft resolution III –- on global efforts for the total elimination of racism and racial discrimination –- by a recorded vote of 183 in favour to three against (Israel, Palau, United States), with two abstentions (Australia, Canada).  (See annex II.)


The Assembly adopted the draft decision to take note of the report of the Secretary-General on global efforts against racism and racial discrimination without a vote.


**Self-Determination


Subsequently, the Assembly took up the three draft resolutions contained in the report on the Right of peoples to self-determination (document A/59/502), adopting draft resolution I on the use of mercenaries by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 46 against, with 13 abstentions.  (See annex III.)


Draft resolution II, on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, was also adopted by a recorded vote of 179 in favour to five against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with three abstentions (Australia, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu).  (See annex IV.)


Draft resolution III –- on the universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination -- was adopted without a vote.


**Human Rights


The Assembly next took up the Committee’s report on human rights questions (document A/59/503), which recommends the adoption of a draft decision concerning documents considered by the General Assembly in connection with the question of human rights.  The General Assembly adopted the text without a vote, and took note of the various reports.


**Human Rights Instruments


The Assembly then took up the report on Implementation of human rights instruments (document A/59/503/Add.1), which contained three recommendations for action.


Before taking action, the Assembly was informed that action on draft resolution I, on the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrants Workers and Member of Their Families, had been postponed to a later date, to allow time for the review of its programme budgetary implications by the Fifth Committee.


Draft resolution II, on equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies, was adopted by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 52 against, with four abstentions (Brazil, Equatorial Guinea, Paraguay, Ukraine).  (See annex V.)


Draft resolution III, on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, was adopted without a vote.


**Alternative Approaches to Human Rights


Next, the Assembly took up the report on alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms (document A/59/503/Add.2), which contained 22 recommendations for action by the Assembly.


Speaking in explanation of vote, the representative of the United States said, regarding draft resolution XV on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions and draft resolution XVIII on disappearances, she wished to bring to the Assembly’s attention the amendments that had been proposed –- concerning references to the International Criminal Court -- by her country during the Third Committee’s consideration of those drafts.  She would not resubmit those amendments at the present time, but she wished to have it recorded that her country’s position remained unchanged.  The United States held that the international community should use all available and appropriate international, regional and domestic judicial mechanisms to address crimes against humanity and to hold responsible those who had committed such crimes.


Draft resolution I, on the Subregional Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Central Africa, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II, on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights, was adopted by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 53 against, with four abstentions (Brazil, Chile, Malawi, Singapore) (see annex VI).


Draft resolution III, on the right to development, was adopted by a recorded vote of 181 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 4 abstentions (Australia, Canada, Japan, Sweden) (see annex VII.).


Draft resolution IV, on human rights and extreme poverty, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution V, on enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, was also adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution VI, on human rights and unilateral coercive measures, was adopted by a recorded vote of 132 in favour to 53 against, with no abstentions (see annex VIII).


Draft resolution VII, on missing persons, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution VIII, on strengthening the United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity, was also adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution IX, on protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, was adopted without a vote as well.


Draft resolution X, on human rights defenders, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution XI, on promotion of a democratic and equitable international order, was adopted by a recorded vote of 125 in favour to 55 against, with six abstentions (Argentina, Armenia, Fiji, Mexico, Nauru, Peru) (see annex IX).


Draft resolution XII, on protection of migrants, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution XIII, on human rights and terrorism, was adopted by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 50 against, with 8 abstentions (Argentina, Armenia, Brazil, Chile, Fiji, Malawi, Nauru, Syria) (see annex X).


Draft resolution XIV, on regional arrangements for the promotion and protection of human rights, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution XV, on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, was adopted by a recorded vote of 142 in favour to none against, with 43 abstentions (see annex XIII).


Before that draft’s adoption, however, the Assembly voted to retain operative paragraphs 7 and 8(c) by separate recorded votes.


Operative paragraph 7 –- which refers to the death penalty –- was retained by a recorded vote of 86 in favour to 44 against, with 39 abstentions (see annex XI).


Thirdly, operative paragraph 8 (c) –- specifically, the words “including sexual orientation” –- was retained by a recorded vote of 95 in favour to 41 against, with 26 abstentions (see annex XII).


Draft resolution XVI, on the Ad Hoc Committee on a Convention on persons with disabilities, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution XVII, on elimination of all forms of religious intolerance, was adopted by a recorded vote of 186 in favour to none against, with no abstentions (see annex XV).


Before the text’s adoption, however, the Assembly voted to retain operative paragraph 9 of the draft by a recorded vote of 105 in favour to 35 against, with 19 abstentions (see annex XIV).


Draft resolution XVIII, on the question of enforced or involuntary disappearances, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution XIX, on enhancing the role of regional, subregional and other organizations and arrangements in promoting and consolidating democracy, was adopted by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to none against, with 15 abstentions (see annex XVI).


Draft resolution XX, on the right to food, was also adopted by a recorded vote of 182 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Palau, United States), with no abstentions (see annex XVII).


Draft resolution XXI, on respect for the right to universal freedom of travel and the vital importance of family reunification, was adopted by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Palau, United States), with 61 abstentions (see annex XVIII).


Lastly, draft resolution XXII, on respect for the purposes and principles contained in the Charter of the United Nations, was adopted by a recorded vote of 118 in favour to 55 against, with 13 abstentions (see annex XIX).


**Reports of Special Rapporteurs and Representatives


The Assembly then took up the report on Human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives (document A/59/503/Add.3), which contained recommendations for action on four country-specific human rights situations.


The Assembly was first informed that action on draft resolution I, concerning the situation of human rights in Myanmar, had been postponed until a later date to allow time for the Fifth Committee to consider the programme budget implications of the text.


Speaking in explanation of vote before the vote, the representative of the United States, speaking to the draft text on the situation of human rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, drew the Assembly’s attention to relevant amendments submitted by her delegation when the draft had been considered in the Committee.  It would not re-submit those amendments but would like to reflect that its position had not changed.  She added that those responsible for human rights violations and crimes against humanity should be held accountable through the use of all available national and international mechanisms.


Draft resolution II, concerning the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, was adopted by a recorded vote of 71 in favour to 54 against, with 55 abstentions (see annex XX).


The Assembly next took up draft resolution III on the situation of human rights in Turkmenistan.


The representative of Turkmenistan took to the floor to request a motion of no-action on the draft resolution on the human rights situation in her country. The text’s sponsors had themselves stated that the text had been arrived at on the basis of cooperation, and that it reflected improvements that had occurred.  None could deny the open, active and constructive approach taken by her country to resolve issues related to the promotion of human rights.


The unthinking pressure that had been used to push the text forward at a time when her country had expressed its openness only reinforced the feeling that it was not human rights that the text’s sponsors had in mind, but something else, she added.  The proponents of such texts had received a very serious signal during the Third Committee’s consideration of country-specific texts; they had failed to gain support for some resolutions, not because Member States did not consider human rights to be of high priority, but because they disagreed with the way in which the sponsors had chosen to selectively target some Member States.


The sponsors should ask themselves whether they had chosen the correct path in their approach to the issue of country-specific situations, she continued.  One could not selectively apply blame for violations in one country and ignore the same in his own.  None could claim their country was perfect, and none should impose a recipe for building democracy.  That double standard had resulted in much resentment.


Countries that made progress in development, that practiced openness and constructive dialogue, should not be condemned, she concluded.  The sponsors of country-specific resolutions should contemplate alternate ways to achieve human rights goals rather than the biased and selective use of resolutions.


The Assembly thus proceeded to hear two statements in favour of the motion of no-action, followed by two against.


The representative of China said his country supported the motion for no-action.


The representative of Pakistan recalled that his country had consistently opposed the practice of submitting country-specific resolutions that selectively targeted some countries human rights records.  Such texts transformed human rights work into a politically motivated exercise and did nothing to advance the cause of human rights.  Success in promotion of human rights was not to be measured by naming-and-shaming.  His country supported the motion for no-action.


The representative of the United States said her delegation would oppose the procedural motion, since one of the basic aims of the Organization was the promotion and protection of human rights.  The text had been considered and adopted by the Third Committee, the Assembly’s main organ for addressing such issues.  It contained language that addressed the positive changes in Turkmenistan, while it also expressed serious concerns due to the continued actions of the Government to limit human rights.


The attempt to push forward a “no action” motion was not only an attempt to silence the Assembly’s interpretation of the human rights situation in Turkmenistan, but also to silence the work of the Assembly’s main Committee charged with considering such matters.  Silencing those bodies by use of such a motion had no place in the United Nations, she said, strongly urging delegations to vote against the motion regardless of how they would vote on the text as a whole.


The representative of the Netherlands, speaking on behalf of the European Union and associated countries, said that the resolution on the situation of the human rights in Turkmenistan had been adopted in the Third Committee.  Dialogue with all negotiating parties, as well as with the Government of Turkmenistan had preceded that action.  During a series of discussions with the Government, the European Union had listened carefully to all concerns and had taken steps to ensure the resolution was as balanced as it could be.  The Union, therefore, regretted that the Assembly was confronted with a “no action” motion after the Third Committee had taken action.  All delegations should be aware of the grave consequences of such an action aimed at undermining the work of the only United Nations body dealing with human rights that had universal membership.


Such a motion would prevent the Assembly from carrying out one of its key mandates, he continued, adding that such procedural actions would also seriously undercut the Third Committee’s work.  The “no action” motion, proposed after the Committee had taken action was an entirely new procedural move that would undermine its work.  He reiterated that the wider implications of such a move were “most grave”, amounting to the plenary consciously choosing to ignore a recommendation explicitly made to it by one of its main committees.  That was unheard of, and would have severe implications for the credibility of the Third Committee and the Assembly in the area of human rights.


The motion for no action was then rejected by a recorded vote of 60 in favour to 76 against, with 33 abstentions (see annex XXI).


Thus, the Assembly proceeded to vote on draft resolution III, concerning the situation of human rights in Turkmenistan, which was adopted by a recorded vote of 69 in favour to 47 against, with 63 abstentions (see annex XXII).


Finally, draft resolution IV, concerning the situation of human rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, was adopted by a recorded vote of 76 in favour to two against (Rwanda, Uganda), with 100 abstentions (see annex XXVI).


Prior to the text’s adoption, the Assembly decided to retain preambular paragraphs 3 and 4 of the text, and operative paragraph 6, by separate recorded votes.


Preambular paragraph 3 –- which recalls previous resolutions on the situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo –- was retained by a recorded vote of 96 in favour to 2 against (Rwanda, Uganda), with 66 abstentions (see annex XXIII).


Preambular paragraph 4 –- which references the report of the Secretary-General on the event in Ituri between January 2002 and December 2003 –- was retained by a recorded vote of 98 in favour to 2 against (Rwanda, Uganda), with 65 abstentions (see annex XXIV).


Operative paragraph 5 –- which urges all parties to the conflict in the country to respect and further implement the Global and All-Inclusive agreement –- was retained by a recorded vote of 96 in favour to 2 against (Rwanda, Uganda), with 68 abstentions (see annex XXV).

**Comprehensive Implementation of and Follow-up to Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action


The Assembly decided to take note of the report on Comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action (document A/59/503/Add.4), without a vote.


**Report of United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights


It also decided to take note of the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (document A/59/503/Add.5) without a vote.


Introduction of and Action on Plenary Drafts


The Assembly then took up a number of plenary-generated texts.


The first draft resolution before it during this phase of its work was contained in the report of the Credentials Committee (document A/59/602).


That draft was approved without a vote.


Following that action, the representative of Iran said his delegation had joined the consensus but would express its reservations on the parts of the report that could be construed as recognition of the State of Israel.


Next, the Assembly took up a draft resolution on the smooth transition for countries graduating from the list of least developed countries (document A/59/L.47) and a related text on the report of the Committee on Development Policy at its sixth session (document A/59/L.48).


Introducing those texts, the representative of Belgium said the first resolution urged all development and trading partners to help countries identified as graduating from the list.  The second text welcomed the decision to graduate both Maldives and Cape Verde from the list.  He then made a few technical corrections to the text.


The text on smooth transition for least developed countries was adopted, as orally advised, without a vote.


Resolution L.48 was also adopted without a vote.


Following that action, the representative of Maldives said the text just adopted, which had graduated his country from the list of least developed countries had significant implications.  Maldives believed that its achievements thus far were testimony to political stability, good governance and hard work.  With little or no natural resources and a fragile economic base, Maldives and its people had worked hard to raise the country’s level of development.  He expressed the determination to double those efforts towards the goal of achieving the level of “middle income developing country” by 2020.


But he stressed that graduation from the list would not eliminate Maldives’ inherent vulnerabilities, particularly structural handicaps stemming from geo-physical characteristics.  Therefore, continued assistance and cooperation of the international community would always be vital for the country to further enhance its development prospects.


The representative of Cape Verde said that the resolution on graduating her country, as well as Maldives, from the least developed countries list marked a turning point in the complex process.  She stressed that one of the most relevant agreements reached during the discussions was that, before graduating a country, conditions should be created to ensure that, in the long run, graduation was a genuine step forward –- not backward –- in its overall development process.  Graduation could indeed pave the way to further development, if the graduating country was effectively supported in its efforts to adapt its policies to that new context and reviewed strategies for sustainable development.  Otherwise, it could disrupt progress.


She went on to say that her Government was convinced that the guidelines for the smooth transition period contained in the resolution just adopted served as a fair basis for considering such issues.  By accepting the challenges that accompanied graduation from the list, her Government had initiated a set of measures aimed at launching institutional, economic, social and structural reforms.  Cape Verde looked forward to working closely with its development partners and the United Nations system in the preparation of its transition strategy.  In addition, she strongly appealed to Cape Verde’s development partners in the effective implementation of the provisions of the resolution.


Following that, the representative of Qatar, speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, introduced a draft resolution on international cooperation on humanitarian assistance in the field of natural disasters, from relief to development (document A/59/L.26/Rev.1), saying natural disasters had long-lasting impacts on the socio-economic development on the countries and regions in which they occurred, particularly those most vulnerable.  The Group of 77 had continued to believe the efforts of the United Nations system in such maters should be strengthened and should, along with other international cooperation, should be provided through all stages of a disaster.  He then introduced a number of small technical changes to the language of the text.


The Assembly then took up a draft resolution on the safety and security of humanitarian personnel and protection of United Nations personnel (document A/59/L.51) and amendments to that text contained in document A/59/L.52.


Introducing the main text, the representative of the Netherlands, speaking on behalf of the European Union and associated countries, said the delivery of humanitarian assistance was a core function of the United Nations system.  Humanitarian personnel provided relief to the most vulnerable and needy populations in complex emergencies and natural disasters.  They also implemented the humanitarian policies as set by the United Nations.  The resolution before the Assembly, among other things, called for the full respect of international law, in particular, the Geneva Conventions, and recognized the importance of various conventions, including the 1994 Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel.


He added that the text had met with consensus except on two paragraphs referring to the International Criminal Court, for which an amendment had been introduced.  The European Union strongly felt that references to that body were relevant to the text, since the Court could play an important role in bringing to justice those responsible for attacks against humanitarian personnel, and help end impunity for such attacks.


Introducing the amendments, the representative of the United States said the changes would enhance the draft and make it more widely acceptable.  The United States believed that the important text should receive the strong support of Member States.


Following those statements, the amendments to the draft were rejected by a recorded vote of 1 in favour (United States) to 89 against, with 27 abstentions (see annex XXVII).


The main text, contained in document A/59/L.52, was adopted without a vote.


Speaking in explanation of position following the vote, the representative of the United States said that her delegation strongly supported the broad principles enunciated in the text, particularly the protection of aid workers and peacekeepers working in dangerous environments.  Out of its strong concern for the well-being and security of aid workers worldwide, the United States had joined consensus on the text.


The Assembly then adopted the text on strengthening emergency humanitarian assistance without a vote.


Before any further action was taken the representative of the United Republic of Tanzania said that her delegation had voted in favour of the Third Committee text on the “right to food”.


Finally, the representative of Nigeria, speaking on behalf of the African Union, introduced a draft text on cooperation between the United Nations and the African Union (document A/59/L.54), saying the challenges facing African countries and the Union in achieving peace, security and development remained daunting.  Considerable efforts had been deployed to tackle poverty, diseases and resolution of armed conflict.  The attainment of those goals required the concerted efforts of the international community to remove the main obstacles in that regard, particularly the resolution of conflict, resolution of the debt overhang, and the deployment of resources.


The present draft was intended to strengthen the efforts of the African Union through cooperation with the United Nations and the international community in that regard.  In addition, the text recognized the expanded mandate and new organs of the African Union since the Assembly adopted the last resolution on the matter.


The text was adopted by consensus.


ANNEX I


Vote on Assistance to Palestinian Children


Draft resolution I on assistance to Palestinian children (document A/59/499) was adopted by a recorded vote of 117 in favour to 5 against, with 62 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Central African Republic, Congo, Kiribati, Nicaragua, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Timor-Leste.


ANNEX II


Vote on Global Efforts against Racism


Draft resolution III on global efforts to eliminate racism (document A/59/501) was adopted by a recorded vote of 183 in favour to 3 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Australia, Canada.


Absent:  Congo, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis.


ANNEX III


Vote on Use of Mercenaries


Draft resolution I on the use of mercenaries to violate human rights (document A/59/502) was adopted by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 46 against, with 13 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Australia, Kazakhstan, Liechtenstein, Malawi, Nauru, New Zealand, Republic of Korea, San Marino, Switzerland, Tonga, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Congo, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis.


ANNEX IV


Vote on Palestinian Self-Determination


Draft resolution II on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination (document A/59/502) was adopted by a recorded vote of 179 in favour to 5 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Australia, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Congo, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tonga.


ANNEX V


Vote on Equitable Geographic Distribution


Draft resolution II on the equitable geographic distribution of members of human rights treaty bodies (document A/59/503/add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 52 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Brazil, Equatorial Guinea, Paraguay, Ukraine.


Absent:  Congo, Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Lebanon, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tonga, Vanuatu.


ANNEX VI


Vote on Globalization’s Impact on Human Rights


Draft resolution II on globalization’s impact on the full enjoyment of human rights (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 53 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Brazil, Chile, Malawi, Singapore.


Absent:  Congo, Kiribati, Seychelles, Swaziland, Saint Kitts and Nevis.


ANNEX VII


Vote on Right to Development


Draft resolution III on the right to development (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 181 in favour to 2 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United States.


Abstain:  Australia, Canada, Japan, Sweden.


Absent:  Congo, Kiribati, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis.


ANNEX VIII


Vote on Human Rights and Coercive Measures


Draft resolution VI on human rights and unilateral coercive measures (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 132 in favour to 53 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Congo, Kiribati, Maldives, Seychelles, Saint Kitts and Nevis.


ANNEX IX


Vote on Promotion of Democratic Order


Draft resolution XI on promotion of a democratic, equitable international order (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 125 in favour to 55 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Fiji, Mexico, Nauru, Peru.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Congo, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tonga.


ANNEX X


Vote on Human Rights and Terrorism


Draft resolution XIII on human rights and terrorism (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 50 against, with 8 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Brazil, Chile, Fiji, Malawi, Nauru, Syria.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Congo, Kiribati, Republic of Moldova, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Solomon Islands.


ANNEX XI


Vote on Extrajudicial Executions


Operative paragraph 7 concerning the death penalty in draft resolution XV on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions (document A/59/503/Add.2) was retained by a recorded vote of 86 in favour to 44 against, with 39 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kenya, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Mozambique, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Tuvalu, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela.


Against:  Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Cameroon, China, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt, Gambia, Grenada, Guyana, Indonesia, Iran, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Morocco, Namibia, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:  Angola, Belarus, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Colombia, Djibouti, Dominica, Fiji, Ghana, Honduras, India, Iraq, Israel, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Palau, Philippines, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tunisia, United States, Zambia.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Gabon, Guinea, Haiti, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Lesotho, Monaco, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XII


Vote on Extrajudicial Executions


Operative paragraph 8 referring to sexual orientation in the draft resolution on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions (document A/59/503/Add.2) was retained by a recorded vote of 95 in favour to 41 against, with 26 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela.


Against:  Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, China, Comoros, Costa Rica, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Bhutan, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cape Verde, Colombia, Dominica, Ghana, Grenada, Iraq, Jamaica, Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Russian Federation, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Suriname.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Monaco, Mozambique, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland, Togo, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XIII


Vote on Extrajudicial Executions


Draft resolution XV, as a whole, on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 142 in favour to none against, with 43 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Zambia.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brunei Darussalam, China, Colombia, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Absent:  Chad, Congo, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tonga, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XIV


Vote on Elimination of Racial Intolerance


Operational paragraph 9 of draft resolution XVII on elimination of all forms of religious intolerance (document A/59/503/Add.2) was retained by a recorded vote of 105 in favour to 35 against, with 19 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Latvia, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia.


Against:  Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Syria, Togo, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:  Angola, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, China, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Gambia, Grenada, Guyana, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mongolia, Nigeria, Philippines, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Tunisia.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Burundi, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Maldives, Mozambique, Myanmar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Tonga, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


ANNEX XV


Vote on Elimination of Racial Intolerance


Draft resolution XVII, as a whole, on the elimination of all forms of religious intolerance (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 186 in favour to none against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Congo, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tonga, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XVI


Vote on Role of Regional Organizations


Draft resolution XIX on enhancing the role of regional and subregional organizations (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to none against, with 15 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Belarus, Bhutan, China, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Libya, Myanmar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.


Absent:  Congo, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tonga.


ANNEX XVII


Vote on Right to Food


Draft resolution XX on the right to food (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 182 in favour to 3 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Congo, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, United Republic of Tanzania.


ANNEX XVIII


Vote on Right to Travel


Draft resolution XXI on respect for the right to universal freedom of travel (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 3 against, with 61 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Paraguay, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan.


Absent:  Congo, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tonga, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XIX


Vote on Respect for Charter


Draft resolution XXII on respect for the purpose and principles in the United Nations Charter (document A/59/503/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 118 in favour to 55 against, with 13 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Nauru, Paraguay, Peru, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Tonga, Tuvalu, Uruguay, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Congo, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles.


ANNEX XX


Vote on Human Rights in Iran


Draft resolution II on the situation of human rights in Iran (document A/59/503/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 71 in favour to 54 against, with 55 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kiribati, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Tuvalu, United Kingdom, United States.


Against:  Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brunei Darussalam, Chad, China, Comoros, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Gambia, Guinea, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Colombia, Côte d’Ivoire, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Zambia.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Congo, Gabon, Georgia, Mali, Mongolia, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Tonga, Turkey, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XXI


Vote on Human Rights in Turkmenistan


The motion for no action on draft resolution III concerning the human rights situation in Turkmenistan (document A/59/503/Add.3) was defeated by a recorded vote of 60 in favour to 76 against, with 33 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brunei Darussalam, Cameroon, Chad, China, Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Guinea, Guyana, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Belize, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Colombia, Dominica, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Georgia, Ghana, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mongolia, Namibia, Philippines, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Angola, Azerbaijan, Bhutan, Central African Republic, Congo, Djibouti, Gabon, Iraq, Kiribati, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XXII


Vote on Human Rights in Turkmenistan


Draft resolution III on the human rights situation in Turkmenistan (document A/59/503/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 69 in favour to 47 against, with 63 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, United Kingdom, United States.


Against:  Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brunei Darussalam, Chad, China, Comoros, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, Gambia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Colombia, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Jamaica, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Zambia.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Congo, Gabon, Georgia, Iraq, Kiribati, Mongolia, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Turkey.


ANNEX XXIII


Vote on Human Rights in Democratic Republic of Congo


Preambular paragraph 3 of draft resolution IV on the human rights situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (document A/59/503/Add.3) was retained by a recorded vote of 96 in favour to 2 against, with 66 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay.


Against:  Rwanda, Uganda.


Abstain:  Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Colombia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Botswana, Burundi, Cape Verde, Comoros, Congo, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Iraq, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Lesotho, Maldives, Mozambique, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Tonga, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


ANNEX XXIV


Vote on Human Rights in Democratic Republic of Congo


Preambular paragraph 4 of draft resolution IV on the human rights situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (document A/59/503/Add.3) was retained by a recorded vote of 98 in favour to 2 against, with 65 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay.


Against:  Rwanda, Uganda.


Abstain:  Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Colombia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Botswana, Burundi, Cape Verde, Comoros, Congo, Gabon, Gambia, Iraq, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Lesotho, Maldives, Mozambique, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Tonga, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


ANNEX XXV


Vote on Human Rights in Democratic Republic of Congo


Operative paragraph 5 of draft resolution IV on the human rights situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (document A/59/503/Add.3) was retained by a recorded vote of 96 in favour to 2 against, with 68 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay.


Against:  Rwanda, Uganda.


Abstain:  Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, China, Colombia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Grenada, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Burundi, Cape Verde, Comoros, Congo, Gabon, Gambia, Iraq, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Maldives, Mozambique, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Tonga, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


ANNEX XXVI


Vote on Human Rights in Democratic Republic of Congo


The draft resolution, as a whole, on the human rights situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (document A/59/503/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 76 in favour to 2 against, with 100 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay.


Against:  Rwanda, Uganda.


Abstain:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Burundi, Congo, Gambia, Iraq, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Tonga, Viet Nam.


ANNEX XXVII


Vote on Amendments to Draft on Safety of UN Personnel


The amendments (document A/59/L.52) to the draft resolution on the safety of United Nations and humanitarian workers (document A/59/L.51) were defeated by a recorded vote of 1 in favour to 89 against, with 27 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  United States.


Against:  Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela.


Abstain:  Albania, Algeria, Angola, Bangladesh, Bhutan, BruneiDarussalam, China, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Grenada, India, Indonesia, Malawi, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Senegal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Barbados, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, Iraq, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Libya, Maldives, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Nauru, Nicaragua, Niger, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


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For information media. Not an official record.