RESOLUTIONS AND STATEMENTS OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL 2001

14 January 2002
SC/7267

RESOLUTIONS AND STATEMENTS OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL 2001

14/01/2002
Press ReleaseSC/7267

RESOLUTIONS AND STATEMENTS

OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL

2001

CONTENTS

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Page

Chronology of 2001 Security CouncilResolutions                                                                                                                     iii

Chronology of 2001 Security Council Presidential Statements                                                                                                  v

Security Council Presidency 2001, Security Council Members 2001                                                                                       vii

Security Council Resolutions                                                                                                                                                          1

Security Council Presidential Statements                                                                                                                                    97

Peacekeeping Operations Subject to Security CouncilAction in 2001                                                                                 137

Index                                                                                                                                                                                                139

CHRONOLOGY OF SECURITY COUNCIL RESOLUTIONS

                                                                                                                                                                                                       Page

S/RES/1335            Extension of UN Mission of Observers in Prevlaka                                                                                     1

S/RES/1336            Extension of Angola sanctions monitoring mechanism                                                                              2

S/RES/1337            Extension of UN Interim Force in Lebanon                                                                                                    3

S/RES/1338            Extension of UN Transitional Administration in East Timor                                                                       5

S/RES/1339            Extension of UN Observer Mission in Georgia                                                                                             7

S/RES/1340            Forwarding of nominations of judges for former Yugoslavia Tribunal                                                     9

S/RES/1341            Reaffirms UN Organization Mission in Democratic Republic of Congo                                                   9

S/RES/1342            Extension of UN Mission for Referendum in Western Sahara                                                                 13

S/RES/1343            Demand that Liberia cease support for Sierra Leone rebel groups                                                          14

S/RES/1344            Extension of UN Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea                                                                                       19

S/RES/1345            Condemnation of violence in former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Serbia                                   21

S/RES/1346            Extension of UN Mission in Sierra Leone                                                                                                    22

S/RES/1347            Forwarding of nominations for Rwanda Tribunal judges                                                                          24

S/RES/1348            Extension of Angola sanctions monitoring mechanism                                                                            25

S/RES/1349            Extension of UN Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara                                                           26

S/RES/1350            Forwarding of nomination of Yugoslavia Tribunal ad litem judges                                                         27

S/RES/1351            Extension of UN Disengagement Observer Force                                                                                      28

S/RES/1352            Extension of Iraq oil-for-food programme                                                                                                    28

S/RES/1353            Strengthening of partnership with troop-contributing States                                                                  29

S/RES/1354            Extension of UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus                                                                                        35

S/RES/1355            Extension of UN Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo                               36

S/RES/1356            Exemption of non-lethal military equipment from Somalia weapons embargo                                       40

S/RES/1357            Extension of UN Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina                                                                               41

S/RES/1358            Recommends appointment of Secretary-General                                                                                        45

S/RES/1359            Extension of UN Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara                                                           45

S/RES/1360            Extension of Iraq oil-for-food provisions for 150 days                                                                              46

S/RES/1361            Sets 12 October to fill vacancy on International Court of Justice                                                            48

S/RES/1362            Extension of UN Mission of Observers in Prevlaka                                                                                   48

S/RES/1363    Requests establishment of Taliban sanctions monitoring mechanism                                                   50

S/RES/1364            Extension of UN Observer Mission in Georgia                                                                                           52

S/RES/1365            Extension of UN Interim Force in Lebanon                                                                                                  54

S/RES/1366            Commitment to pursue conflict prevention by all appropriate means                                                     56

S/RES/1367            End of prohibition of arms sales to Yugoslavia                                                                                          59

S/RES/1368            Condemnation of terrorist attacks on United States                                                                                  60

S/RES/1369            Extension of UN Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea                                                                                       60

S/RES/1370            Extension of UN Mission in Sierra Leone                                                                                                    63

S/RES/1371            Condemnation of violence in former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Serbia                                   65

S/RES/1372            Lifting of sanctions against Sudan                                                                                                               66

S/RES/1373            Anti-terrorism measures                                                                                                                                 67

S/RES/1374            Extension of sanction monitoring mechanism against Angola                                                                69

S/RES/1375            Support for implementation of Arusha Peace Agreement  in Burundi                                                    71

S/RES/1376            Support for phase III deployment in Democratic Republic of Congo                                                     72

S/RES/1377            Elimination of international terrorism                                                                                                            74

S/RES/1378            Support for transitional administration in Afghanistan                                                                             75

S/RES/1379            Recruitment and use of children in armed conflict                                                                                     77

S/RES/1380            Extension of UN Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara                                                           81

S/RES/1381            Extension of UN Disengagement Observer Force                                                                                      81

S/RES/1382            Extension of Iraq oil-for-food programme                                                                                                    81

S/RES/1383            Endorsement of Afghanistan interim arrangements                                                                                   92

S/RES/1384            Extension of UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus                                                                                        93

S/RES/1385            Extension of prohibition of import of Sierra Leone rough diamonds                                                       93

S/RES/1386            Authorization of international security force for Afghanistan                                                                 94

CHRONOLOGY OF SECURITY COUNCIL PRESIDENTIAL STATEMENTS

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S/PRST/2001/1                      Council Commitment to Peace in Somalia                                                                                    97

S/PRST/2001/2                      Tension in Central African Republic                                                                                            98

S/PRST/2001/3                      Establishment of Council working group on peacekeeping issues                                         99

S/PRST/2001/4                      Peace agreement between Ethiopia, Eritrea                                                                               100

S/PRST/2001/5                      Comprehensive approach to peace-building                                                                             102

S/PRST/2001/6                      Condemnation of attacks in Burundi                                                                                          104

S/PRST/2001/7                      Condemnation of violence in former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia                              105

S/PRST/2001/8                      Call for end to ethnic violence in Kosovo, support for elections                                          106

S/PRST/2001/9                      Agreement between Georgian and Abkhaz sides                                                                     107

S/PRST/2001/10                    Implementation of September 2000 Summit commitments                                                       108

S/PRST/2001/11                    Welcomes briefing by High Representative in Bosnia and Herzegovina                             109

S/PRST/2001/12                    Lack of progress in Abkhazia, Georgia, conflict                                                                       109

S/PRST/2001/13                    Illegal exploitation of Democratic Republic of Congo natural resources                              110

S/PRST/2001/14                    Call for access, freedom of movement for UN Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea                   111

S/PRST/2001/15                    Extension of UN Disengagement Observer Force                                                                    112

S/PRST/2001/16                    Implication of HIV/AIDS on UN Peacekeeping                                                                        112

S/PRST/2001/17                    Call for suspension of hostilities in Burundi                                                                             113

S/PRST/2001/18                    Situation in Central African Republic, killing of UN security coordinator                            114

S/PRST/2001/19                    Call for cooperation with UN Organization Mission

                                                in Democratic Republic of Congo                                                                                               115

S/PRST/2001/20                    Implementation of agreement in former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia                          117

S/PRST/2001/21                    Small arms                                                                                                                                       117

S/PRST/2001/22                    Success of preparatory meeting for inter-Congolese dialogue                                              119

S/PRST/2001/23                    East Timor elections                                                                                                                      120

S/PRST/2001/24                    Terrorist attacks in Angola                                                                                                          120

S/PRST/2001/25                    Extension of UN Office in Central African Republic                                                                121

S/PRST/2001/26                    Installation of transitional government in Burundi                                                                  122

S/PRST/2001/27                    Voting in Kosovo elections                                                                                                         123

S/PRST/2001/28                    UN, Secretary-General Nobel Peace Prize                                                                                  124

S/PRST/2001/29                    Support for next phase of deployment in Democratic Republic of Congo                           124

S/PRST/2001/30                    Comprehensive settlement in Somalia                                                                                        125

S/PRST/2001/31                    Women’s role in conflict prevention, conflict resolution                                                        127

S/PRST/2001/32                    Endorses date for East Timor independence                                                                             129

S/PRST/2001/33                    Welcomes Transitional Government in Burundi                                                                       130

S/PRST/2001/34                    Call to vote in Kosovo elections                                                                                                 130

S/PRST/2001/35                    Commends Nelson Mandela for commitment in Burundi                                                        131

S/PRST/2001/36                    Effectiveness of sanctions against rebel group in Angola                                                     131

S/PRST/2001/37                    Extension of UN Disengagement Observer Force                                                                    132

S/PRST/2001/38                    Office of Special Representative of Secretary-General for West Africa                                133

S/PRST/2001/39                    Condemns plundering of natural resources in Democratic Republic of Congo                   134

                Presidents of the Security Councilin 2001:

                                                                  January                Singapore

                                                                February                Tunisia

                                                                    March                Ukraine

                                                                       April                United Kingdom

                                                                        May                United States

                                                                        June                Bangladesh

                                                                         July                China

                                                                  August                Colombia

                                                             September                France

                                                                  October                Ireland

                                                              November                Jamaica

                                                              December                Mali

                Security CouncilMembers in 2001:

Bangladesh, China, Colombia, France, Ireland, Jamaica, Mali, Mauritius, Norway, Russiand Federation, Singapore, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY THE SECURITY COUNCIL IN 2001

S/RES/1335         Extension of UNMission of Observers in Prevlaka

                                                Date:  12 January 2001                         Meeting:  4256

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling all its earlier relevant resolutions, including resolutions 779 (1992) of 6 October 1992, 981 (1995) of 31 March 1995, 1088 (1996) of 12 December 1996, 1147 (1998) of 13 January 1998, 1183 (1998) of 15 July 1998, 1222 (1999) of 15 January 1999, 1252 (1999) of 15 July 1999, 1285 (2000) of 13 January 2000, 1305 (2000) of 21 June 2000 and 1307 (2000) of 13 July 2000,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 29 December (S/2000/1251) on the United Nations Mission of Observers in Prevlaka (UNMOP),

            Recalling also the letters to its President from the Chargé d’affaires a.i. of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia of 22 December 2000 (S/2000/1235) and from the Permanent Representative of Croatia of 5 January 2001 (S/2001/13), concerning the disputed issue of Prevlaka,

            Reaffirming once again its commitment to the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Republic of Croatia within its internationally recognized borders,

            Noting once again that the Joint Declaration signed at Geneva on 30 September 1992 by the Presidents of the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, in particular articles 1 and 3 thereof, the latter reaffirming their agreement concerning the demilitarization of the Prevlaka peninsula,

            Noting with satisfaction that the overall situation in the UNMOP area of responsibility has remained stable and calm,

            Reiterating its concern about continuing violations of the demilitarization regime, including limitations placed on the free movement of United Nations military observers,

            Noting with satisfaction that the opening of crossing points between Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in the demilitarized zone continues to facilitate civilian and commercial traffic in both directions without security incidents and continues to represent a significant confidence-building measure in the normalization of relations between the two parties, and urging the parties to utilize these openings as a basis for further confidence-building measures to achieve the normalization of relations between them,

            Welcoming the commitment of the democratic governments of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, as expressed by the Prime Minister of the Federal Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (S/2000/1235) and the Foreign Minister of Croatia (S/2001/13), to resume as soon as possible bilateral talks on the disputed issue of Prevlaka pursuant to the Agreement on Normalization of Relations between the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia of 23 August 1996 (S/1996/706, annex), which would end a long period during which no substantive progress was made on the issue,

            Expressing its concern over the delay in putting in place a comprehensive demining programme by the parties,

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            Commending the role played by UNMOP, and noting also that the presence of the United Nations military observers continues to be essential to maintaining conditions that are conducive to a negotiated settlement of the disputed issue of Prevlaka,

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of the United Nations and of Associated Personnel adopted on 9 December 1994 and the statement of its President of 10 February 2000 (S/PRST/2000/4),

            Welcoming and encouraging efforts by the United Nations to sensitize peacekeeping personnel in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases in all its peacekeeping operations,

            1.        Authorizes the United Nations military observers to continue monitoring the demilitarization of the Prevlaka Peninsula, in accordance with resolutions 779 (1992) and 981 (1995) and paragraphs 19 and 20 of the report of the Secretary-General of 13 December 1995 (S/1995/1028), until 15 July 2001;

            2.        Reiterates its calls upon the parties to cease all violations of the demilitarized regime in the United Nations designated zones, to take steps further to reduce tension and to improve safety and security in the area, to cooperate fully with the United Nations military observers and to ensure their safety and full and unrestricted freedom of movement;

            3.        Calls on the parties to resume talks on the disputed issue of Prevlaka as soon as possible and encourages them to make use of the recommendations and options to develop confidence-building measures with which they were provided pursuant to its request in resolution 1252 (1999) with a view to, inter alia, further facilitating the freedom of movement of the civilian population, and requests the Secretary-General to report by 15 April 2001;

            4.        Urges once again that parties abide by their mutual commitments and implement fully the Agreement on Normalization of Relations, and stresses in particular the urgent need for them to fulfil rapidly and in good faith their commitment to reach a negotiated resolution of the disputed issue of Prevlaka in accordance with article 4 of that Agreement;

            5.        Requests the parties to continue to report at least bi-monthly to the Secretary-General on the status of their bilateral negotiations;

            6.        Reiterates its call upon the parties to put a comprehensive demining programme in place in the identified minefields in the UNMOP area of responsibility;

            7.        Requests the United Nations military observers and the multinational stabilization force authorized by the Council in resolution 1088 (1996) of 12 December 1996 and extended by resolution 1305 (2000) of 21 June 2000 to cooperate fully with each other;

            8.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1336         Extension of Angola sanctions monitoring mechanism

                                                Date:  23 January 2001                         Meeting:  4263

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its resolution 864 (1993) of 15 September 1993 and all subsequent relevant resolutions, in particular resolutions 1127 (1997) of 28 August 1997, 1173 (1998) of 12 June 1998, 1237 (1999) of 7 May 1999 and 1295 (2000) of 18 April 2000,

            Reaffirming also its commitment to preserve the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Angola,

            Expressing its continued concern regarding the humanitarian effects of the present situation on the civilian population of Angola,

            Determining that the situation in Angola constitutes a threat to international peace and security in the region,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Takes note of the final report (S/2000/1225) of the monitoring mechanism established pursuant to resolution 1295 (2000);

            2.        Expresses its intention to give full consideration to the final report pursuant to paragraph 5 of resolution 1295 (2000);

            3.        Decides to extend the mandate of the monitoring mechanism as set out in resolution 1295 (2000) for a period of three months;

            4.        Requests the monitoring mechanism to report periodically to the Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993), and to provide a written addendum to the final report, by 19 April 2001;

            5.        Requests the Secretary-General, upon adoption of this resolution and acting in consultation with the Committee, to re-appoint up to five of the experts appointed by him pursuant to resolution 1295 (2000) to serve on the monitoring mechanism, and further requests the Secretary-General to make the necessary financial arrangements to support the work of the monitoring mechanism;

            6.        Requests the Chairman of the Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993) to submit the written addendum to the final report to the Council by 19 April 2001;

            7.        Calls upon all States to cooperate fully with the monitoring mechanism in the discharge of its mandate;

            8.        Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1337         Extension of UN Interim Force in Lebanon

                                                Date:  30 January 2001                         Meeting:  4267

                                                                                                                                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 425 (1978) and 426 (1978) of 19 March 1978, 501 (1982) of 25 February 1982, 508 (1982) of 5 June 1982, 509 (1982) of 6 June 1982, 520 (1982) of 17 September 1982 and 1310 (2000) of 27 July 2000, as well as its resolutions and the statements of its President on the situation in Lebanon,

            Recalling further its resolution 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000,

            Recalling also the Secretary-General’s conclusion that, as of 16 June 2000, Israel had withdrawn its forces from Lebanon in accordance with resolution 425 (1978) and met the requirements defined in the Secretary-General’s report of 22 May 2000 (S/2000/460),

            Emphasizing the interim nature of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL),

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel adopted on 9 December 1994,

            Responding to the request of the Government of Lebanon as stated in the letter from its Permanent Representative to the United Nations of 5 January 2001 to the Secretary-General (S/2001/14),

            1.        Welcomes the report of the Secretary-General on UNIFIL of 22 January 2001 (S/2001/66), and endorses his observations and recommendations;

            2.        Decides to extend the present mandate of UNIFIL for a further period of six months, until 31 July 2001;

            3.        Decides to return the military personnel of UNIFIL to the operational level referred to in paragraph 24 of the Secretary-General’s report of 22 January 2001 by 31 July, and requests that the Secretary-General take the necessary measures to implement this decision, including taking into account the upcoming rotations of the battalions, in consultation with the Government of Lebanon and the troop-contributing countries;

            4.        Reiterates its strong support for the territorial integrity, sovereignty and political independence of Lebanon within its internationally recognized boundaries;

            5.        Calls on the Government of Lebanon to ensure the return of its effective authority and presence in the south, and in particular to increase the rate of the deployment of the Lebanese armed forces;

            6.        Welcomes the establishment of checkpoints by the Government of Lebanon in the vacated area, and encourages the Government of Lebanon to ensure a calm environment throughout the south, including through the control of all checkpoints;

            7.        Calls on the parties to fulfil the commitments they have given to respect fully the withdrawal line identified by the United Nations, as set out in the Secretary-General’s report of 16 June 2000 (S/2000/590), to exercise utmost restraint and to cooperate fully with the United Nations and with UNIFIL;

            8.        Condemns all acts of violence, expresses concern about the serious breaches and violations of the withdrawal line, and urges the parties to put an end to them and to respect the safety of UNIFIL personnel;

            9.        Commends UNIFIL for having fulfilled its mandate regarding verification of Israeli withdrawal, and supports its continued efforts to maintain the ceasefire along the withdrawal line through patrols and observation from fixed positions and close contacts with the parties, with a view to correcting violations and preventing the escalation of incidents;

            10.      Welcomes the contribution of UNIFIL to operational demining, encourages further assistance in mine action by the United Nations to the Government of Lebanon in support of both the continued development of its national mine action capacity and emergency demining activities in the south, and calls on donor countries to support these efforts through financial and in-kind contributions;

            11.      Requests the Secretary-General to continue consultations with the Government of Lebanon and other parties directly concerned on the implementation of this resolution and to report to the Security Council thereon;

            12.      Looks forward to the early fulfilment of the mandate of UNIFIL;

            13.      Endorses the general approach for reconfiguration of UNIFIL, as outlined in paragraph 23 of the report of the Secretary-General of 22 January 2001, and requests the Secretary-General to submit to the Council a detailed report by 30 April 2001 on UNIFIL reconfiguration plans and on the tasks that could be carried out by the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO);

            14.      Decides to review the situation by early May 2001 and to consider any steps it deems appropriate regarding UNIFIL and UNTSO, on the basis of this report;

            15.      Stresses the importance of, and the need to achieve, a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East, based on all its relevant resolutions including its resolutions 242 (1967) of 22 November 1967 and 338 (1973) of 22 October 1973.

S/RES/1338         Extension of UN Transitional Administration in East Timor

                                                Date:  31 January 2001                         Meeting:  4268

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its previous resolutions on the situation in East Timor, in particular resolutions 1272 (1999) of 25 October 1999 and 1319 (2000) of 8 September 2000, and the relevant statements of its President, in particular those of 3 August 2000 (S/PRST/2000/26) and of 6 December 2000 (S/PRST/2000/39),

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 16 January 2001 (S/2001/42),

            Commending the work of the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) and the leadership of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General,

            Expressing support for the steps taken by UNTAET to strengthen the involvement and direct participation of the East Timorese people in the administration of their territory, and urging further measures to delegate authority to the East Timorese people as an essential part of the transition to independence,

            Encouraging efforts to achieve the goal of independence for East Timor by the end of 2001, as set out in paragraphs 4 and 50 of the report of the Secretary-General, and acknowledging that it is the responsibility of UNTAET to ensure free and fair elections in collaboration with the East Timorese people,

            Reiterating its endorsement of the recommendations contained in the report of the Security Council Mission to East Timor and Indonesia (S/2000/1105) of 21 November 2000, in particular the view of the Mission that a strong international commitment will be required in East Timor after independence,

            Underlining its concern at the continued presence of large numbers of refugees from East Timor in the camps in the province of East Nusa Tenggara (West Timor), and at the security situation there, particularly as it relates to militia activity and the effect on refugees, and stressing the need to find a comprehensive solution to the problem,

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel adopted on 9 December 1994, and emphasizing the need to take further steps to ensure the safety and security of international personnel in East Timor and Indonesia, in view of the dangers faced,

            Welcoming and encouraging efforts by the United Nations to sensitize international personnel in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases in all its peacekeeping operations,

            Emphasizing the need for continued international financial support to East Timor, and urging all those who have made pledges to the Trust Fund for East Timor to make their contributions expeditiously,

            1.        Welcomes the report of the Secretary-General of 16 January 2001;

            2.        Decides to extend the current mandate of UNTAET until 31 January 2002, bearing in mind the possible need for adjustments related to the independence timetable;

            3.        Requests the Special Representative of the Secretary-General to continue to take steps to delegate progressively further authority within the East Timor Transitional Administration (ETTA) to the East Timorese people until authority is fully transferred to the government of an independent State of East Timor, as set out in the report of the Secretary-General;

            4.        Encourages UNTAET, bearing in mind the need to support capacity-building for self-government, to continue to support fully the transition to independence, including through development and training for the East Timorese people;

            5.        Calls upon the international financial institutions, the United Nations funds and programmes and bilateral donors who have committed resources to East Timor to fulfil their commitments and to accelerate disbursements, in particular in areas relevant to peace-building and development assistance, and reaffirms in this regard the continued need for effective coordination of development assistance to East Timor;

            6.        Urges the international community to provide financial and technical assistance to the creation of an East Timor Defence Force, and encourages and welcomes the coordinating role of UNTAET in this endeavour;

            7.        Underlines that UNTAET should respond robustly to the militia threat in East Timor, consistent with its resolution 1272 (1999);

            8.        Emphasizes the need, in the light of the recommendations in the report of the Security Council Mission, for measures to address shortcomings in the administration of justice in East Timor, particularly with a view to bringing to justice those responsible for serious crimes in 1999, and for urgent action to expedite the training of the Timor Lorosae Police Service and to attract sufficient resources to develop this police service and the judicial system;

            9.        Encourages the Government of Indonesia, while acknowledging their efforts so far, to continue to take steps, in cooperation with UNTAET and relevant international agencies, in accordance with its resolution 1319 (2000) and the relevant recommendations in the statement of its President of 6 December 2000;

            10.      Requests the Secretary-General to submit to the Security Council by 30 April 2001 a report on the implementation of the mandate of UNTAET, which should include in particular military and political assessments of the situation on the ground and their implications for the size, structure and deployment of UNTAET, and expresses its intention to take appropriate steps on the basis of this report expeditiously, taking into account the views of troop-contributing countries;

            11.      Stresses the need for a substantial international presence in East Timor after independence, and requests the Secretary-General to make detailed recommendations in this regard to the Council within six months of the adoption of this resolution, which should be developed in close consultation with the East Timorese people and in coordination with other relevant international and bilateral actors, in particular the international financial institutions and the United Nations funds and programmes;

            12.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1339         Extension of UN Observer Mission in Georgia

                                                Date:  31 January 2001                         Meeting:  4269

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling all its relevant resolutions, in particular resolution 1311 (2000) of 28 July 2000, and the statement of its President of 14 November 2000 (S/PRST/2000/32),

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 18 January 2001 (S/2001/59),

            Recalling the conclusions of the Lisbon (S/1997/57, annex) and Istanbul summits of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) regarding the situation in Abkhazia, Georgia,

            Stressing that the continued lack of progress on key issues of a comprehensive settlement of the conflict in Abkhazia, Georgia, is unacceptable,

            Deeply concerned that, although currently mostly calm, the general situation in the conflict zone remains very volatile,

            Noting the holding of the twelfth session of the Coordinating Council of the Georgian and Abkhaz sides on 23 January 2001,

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel adopted on 9 December 1994,

            Welcoming the important contributions that the United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG) and the Collective Peacekeeping Forces of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS peacekeeping force) continue to make in stabilizing the situation in the zone of conflict, noting that the working relationship between UNOMIG and the CIS peacekeeping force has remained very close, and stressing the importance of close cooperation between them in the performance of their respective mandates,

            1.        Welcomes the report of the Secretary-General of 18 January 2001;

            2.        Strongly supports the sustained efforts of the Secretary-General and his Special Representative, with the assistance of the Russian Federation in its capacity as facilitator as well as of the Group of Friends of the Secretary-General and of the OSCE, to promote the stabilization of the situation and the achievement of a comprehensive political settlement, which must include a settlement of the political status of Abkhazia within the State of Georgia;

            3.        Strongly supports, in particular, the intention of the Special Representative to submit, in the near future, the draft paper containing specific proposals to the parties on the question of the distribution of constitutional competences between Tbilisi and Sukhumi as a basis for meaningful negotiations;

            4.        Stresses the need to accelerate work on the draft protocol on the return of the refugees to the Gali region and measures for economic rehabilitation, as well as on the draft agreement on peace and guarantees for the prevention and for the non-resumption of hostilities;

            5.        Calls upon the parties, in particular the Abkhaz side, to undertake immediate efforts to move beyond the impasse and to engage into negotiations on the core political questions of the conflict and all other outstanding issues in the United Nations-led peace process;

            6.        Welcomes the readiness of the Government of Ukraine to host the third meeting on confidence-building measures, welcomes also the commitment of both sides to the conflict to meet in Yalta in March 2001, and notes the important contribution a successful conference would make to the peace process;

            7.        Reaffirms the unacceptability of the demographic changes resulting from the conflict, and reaffirms also the inalienable right of all refugees and displaced persons affected by the conflict to return to their homes in secure and dignified conditions, in accordance with international law and as set out in the Quadripartite Agreement of 4 April 1994 (S/1994/397, annex II);

            8.        Urges the parties, in this context, to address urgently and in a concerted manner, as a first step, the undefined and insecure status of spontaneous returnees to the Gali district, which remains an issue of serious concern;

            9.        Expresses its satisfaction with the joint assessment mission to the Gali district, carried out under the aegis of the United Nations, and looks forward to the careful consideration of the mission’s recommendations regarding human rights, law enforcement and education;

            10.      Condemns all violations of the Moscow Agreement of 14 May 1994 on a Ceasefire and Separation of Forces (S/1994/583, annex I), and notes with particular concern the Abkhaz military exercise conducted in November 2000;

            11.      Deplores the rise in criminality and activities of armed groups in the conflict zone, which constitutes a major destabilizing factor affecting the overall situation, calls upon the parties to increase their efforts at curbing them and to cooperate in good faith using the means provided by the Coordinating Council mechanism, condemns the recent killings of civilians and Abkhaz militiamen, and calls upon both sides, in particular the Georgian side, to investigate these incidents and bring to justice those responsible;

            12.      Condemns the abduction of two UNOMIG military observers on 10 December 2000, recalls that the Georgian and the Abkhaz sides bear the primary responsibility for the security of UNOMIG, the CIS peacekeeping force and other international personnel, and appeals to them to bring to justice the perpetrators of the hostage-taking incidents of October 1999, June 2000 and December 2000;

            13.      Calls upon the parties to ensure security and freedom of movement of the United Nations and other international personnel;

            14.      Welcomes UNOMIG keeping its security arrangements under constant review in order to ensure the highest possible level of security for its staff;

            15.      Decides to extend the mandate of UNOMIG for a new period terminating on 31 July 2001, subject to a review by the Council of the mandate of UNOMIG in the event of any changes that may be made in the mandate or in the presence of the CIS peacekeeping force, and expresses its intention to conduct a thorough review of the operation at the end of its current mandate, in the light of steps taken by the parties to achieve a comprehensive settlement;

            16.      Requests the Secretary-General to continue to keep the Council regularly informed and to report three months from the date of the adoption of this resolution on the situation in Abkhazia, Georgia, and requests also the Secretary-General to provide for a briefing within three months on the progress of the political settlement, including on the status of the draft paper his Special Representative intends to submit to the parties as referred to in paragraph 3 above;

            17.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1340         Forwarding of nominations of judges for former Yugoslavia Tribunal

                                                Date:  8 February 2001                         Meeting:  4274

                                                                                                                                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 808 (1993) of 22 February 1993, 827 (1993) of 25 May 1993, 1166 (1998) of 13 May 1998 and 1329 (2000) of 30 November 2000,

            Having decided to consider the nominations for Permanent Judges of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia received by the Secretary-General by 31 January 2001,

            Forwards the following nominations to the General Assembly in accordance with article 13 bis (1) (d) of the Statute of the International Tribunal:

            Mr. Carmel A. Agius (Malta)

            Mr. Richard Allen Banda (Malawi)

            Mr. Mohamed Amin El Abbassi Elmahdi (Egypt)

            Mr. Mohamed El Habib Fassi Fihri (Morocco)

            Mr. David Hunt (Australia)

            Mr. Claude Jorda (France)

            Mr. O-gon Kwon (Republic of Korea)

            Mr. Liu Daqun (China)

            Mr. Abderraouf Mahbouli (Tunisia)

            Mr. Richard George May (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland)

            Mr. Theodor Meron (United States of America)

            Mrs. Florence Ndepele Mwachande Mumba (Zambia)

            Mr. Rafael Nieto Navia (Colombia)

            Mr. Leopold Ntahompagaze (Burundi)

            Mr. Alphonsus Martinus Maria Orie (Netherlands)

            Mr. Fausto Pocar (Italy)

            Mr. Jonah Rahetlah (Madagascar)

            Mr. Patrick Lipton Robinson (Jamaica)

            Mr. Almiro Simões Rodrigues (Portugal)

            Ms. Miriam Defensor Santiago (Philippines)

            Mr. Wolfgang Schomburg (Germany)

            Mr. Mohamed Shahabuddeen (Guyana)

            Mr. Demetrakis Stylianides (Cyprus)

            Mr. Krister Thelin (Sweden)

            Mr. Volodymyr Vassylenko (Ukraine)

            Mr. Karam Chand Vohrah (Malaysia)

S/RES/1341         Reaffirms UN Organization Mission in Democratic Republic of Congo

                                                Date:  22 February 2001                       Meeting:  4282

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 1234 (1999) of 9 April 1999, 1258 (1999) of 6 August 1999, 1265 (1999) of 17 September 1999, 1273 (1999) of 5 November 1999, 1279 (1999) of 30 November 1999, 1291 (2000) of 24 February 2000, 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000, 1304 (2000) of 15 June 2000, 1323 (2000) of 13 October 2000 and 1332 (2000) of 14 December 2000 and the statements of its President of 13 July 1998 (S/PRST/1998/20), 31 August 1998 (S/PRST/1998/26), 11 December 1998 (S/PRST/1998/36), 24 June 1999 (S/PRST/1999/17), 26 January 2000 (S/PRST/2000/2), 5 May 2000 (S/PRST/2000/15), 2 June 2000 (S/PRST/2000/20) and 7 September 2000 (S/PRST/2000/28),

            Reaffirming the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and of all States in the region,

            Reaffirming further the obligation of all States to refrain from the use of force against the territorial integrity and political independence of any State, or in any other manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations,

            Reaffirming also the sovereignty of the Democratic Republic of the Congo over its natural resources, and noting with concern reports of the illegal exploitation of the country’s assets and the potential consequences of these actions for security conditions and the continuation of hostilities,

            Expressing its alarm at the dire consequences of the prolonged conflict for the civilian population throughout the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in particular the increase in the number of refugees and displaced persons and stressing the urgent need for substantial humanitarian assistance to the Congolese population,

            Expressing its deep concern at all violations of human rights and international humanitarian law, including atrocities against civilian populations, especially in the eastern provinces,

            Deeply concerned at the increased rate of HIV/AIDS infection, in particular amongst women and girls as a result of the conflict,

            Gravely concerned by the continued recruitment and use of child soldiers by armed forces and groups, including cross-border recruitment and abduction of children,

            Reaffirming its primary responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security,

            Reaffirming its support for the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement (S/1999/815), as well as the Kampala plan and the Harare sub-plans for disengagement and redeployment,

            Stressing the importance of giving new impetus to the peace process in order to secure the full and definitive withdrawal of all foreign troops from the Democratic Republic of the Congo,

            Also stressing the importance of advancing the political process called for under the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement and facilitating national reconciliation,

            Recalling the responsibilities of all parties to cooperate in the full deployment of the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC), and noting with satisfaction the recent statements by the President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and his assurances of support for the deployment of MONUC,

            Welcoming the participation of the members of the Political Committee of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement in its meetings of 21 and 22 February 2001, and stressing the need for the parties to honour the commitments they made to take concrete steps to advance the peace process,

            Commending the outstanding work of MONUC personnel in challenging conditions, and noting the strong leadership of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General,

            Taking note of the Secretary-General’s report of 12 February 2001 (S/2001/128) and his conclusion that the necessary conditions of respect for the ceasefire, a valid plan for disengagement and cooperation with MONUC are being met,

            Determining that the situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo continues to pose a threat to international peace and security in the region,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Notes the recent progress made in achieving respect for the ceasefire, and urgently calls on all parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement not to resume hostilities and to implement this agreement, as well as the agreements reached in Kampala and Harare and the relevant Security Council resolutions;

            2.        Demands once again that Ugandan and Rwandan forces and all other foreign forces withdraw from the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in compliance with paragraph 4 of its resolution 1304 (2000) and the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, and urges these forces to take urgent steps to accelerate this withdrawal;

            3.        Demands that the parties implement fully the Kampala plan and the Harare sub-plans for disengagement and redeployment of forces without reservations within the 14-day period stipulated in the Harare Agreement, starting from 15 March 2001;

            4.        Welcomes the commitment by the Rwandan authorities in their letter of 18 February 2001 (S/2001/147), to withdraw their forces from Pweto in accordance with the Harare Agreement, calls on them to implement this commitment, and calls on other parties to respect this withdrawal;

            5.        Welcomes also the commitment of the Ugandan authorities to reduce immediately by two battalions the strength of their forces in the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, calls on the Ugandan authorities to implement this commitment, and calls on MONUC to verify it;

            6.        Urges the parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement to prepare and adopt not later than 15 May 2001, in close liaison with MONUC, a precise plan and schedule which, in accordance with the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, would lead to the completion of the orderly withdrawal of all foreign troops from the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and requests the Secretary-General to report to it by 15 April 2001 on the progress of these efforts;

            7.        Demands that all the parties refrain from any offensive military action during the process of disengagement and withdrawal of foreign forces;

            8.        Urges all the parties to the conflict, in close liaison with MONUC, to prepare by 15 May 2001 for immediate implementation prioritized plans for the disarmament, demobilization, reintegration, repatriation or resettlement of all armed groups referred to in Annex A, Chapter 9.1, of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, and demands that all parties cease all forms of assistance and cooperation with these groups and use their influence to urge such groups to cease their activities;

            9.        Condemns the massacres and atrocities committed in the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and demands once again that all the parties concerned put an immediate end to violations of human rights and international humanitarian law;

            10.      Demands that all armed forces and groups concerned bring an effective end to the recruitment, training and use of children in their armed forces, calls upon them to extend full cooperation to MONUC, the United Nations Children’s Fund, and humanitarian organizations for speedy demobilization, return and rehabilitation of such children, and requests the Secretary-General to entrust the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflicts with pursuing these objectives on a priority basis;

            11.      Calls on all parties to ensure the safe and unhindered access of relief personnel to all those in need, and recalls that the parties must also provide guarantees for the safety, security and freedom of movement of United Nations and associated humanitarian relief personnel;

            12.      Calls also on all the parties to respect the principles of neutrality and impartiality in the delivery of humanitarian assistance;

            13.      Calls on the international community to increase its support to humanitarian relief activities within the Democratic Republic of the Congo and in neighbouring countries affected by the crisis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo;

            14.      Reminds all parties of their obligations with respect to the security of civilian populations under the Fourth Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War of 12 August 1949 and stresses that occupying forces should be held responsible for human rights violations in the territory under their control;

            15.      Welcomes the expressed willingness of the authorities of the Democratic Republic of the Congo to proceed with the inter-Congolese Dialogue under the aegis of the neutral Facilitator, Sir Ketumile Masire, and in this regard welcomes the announcement by the President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo at the Summit in Lusaka on 15 February 2001 that the Facilitator has been invited to Kinshasa, and calls on all Congolese parties to take immediate concrete steps to take forward the inter-Congolese dialogue;

            16.      Reiterates that MONUC shall cooperate closely with the Facilitator of the Inter-Congolese Dialogue, provide support and technical assistance to him, and coordinate the activities of other United Nations agencies to this effect;

            17.      Calls on all the parties to the conflict to cooperate fully in the deployment and operations of MONUC including through full implementation of the provisions and the principles of the Status of Forces Agreement throughout the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and reaffirms that it is the responsibility of all the parties to ensure the security of United Nations personnel, together with associated personnel;

            18.      Requests the parties, as a follow-up to the discussions on this matter at the Lusaka Summit on 15 February 2001, to relocate the Joint Military Commission (JMC) to Kinshasa, co-locating it at all levels with MONUC, and calls on the authorities of the Democratic Republic of the Congo to ensurethe security of all the JMC members;

            19.      Reaffirms the authorization contained in resolution 1291 (2000) and the mandate set out in its resolution for the expansion and deployment of MONUC, and endorses the updated concept of operations put forward by the Secretary-General in his report of 12 February 2001, with a view to the deployment of all the civilian and military personnel required to monitor and verify the implementation by the parties of the ceasefire and disengagement plans, stressing that this disengagement is a first step towards the full and definitive withdrawal of all foreign troops from the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo;

            20.      Emphasizes that it will be prepared to consider a further review of the concept of operations for MONUC, when appropriate and in the light of developments, in order to monitor and verify the withdrawal of foreign troops and the implementation of the plan mentioned in paragraph 8 above and, in coordination with existing mechanisms, to enhance security on the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo with Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi, and requests the Secretary-General to make proposals when appropriate;

            21.      Reaffirms that it is ready to support the Secretary-General if and when he deems that it is necessary and it determines that conditions allow it to deploy troops in the border areas in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, including possibly in Goma or Bukavu;

            22.      Welcomes the dialogue initiated between the authorities of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Burundi, urges them to continue their efforts, and emphasizes in this respect that the settlement of the crisis in Burundi would contribute positively to the settlement of the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo;

            23.      Welcomes also the recent meetings of the parties, including the meeting of the Presidents of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda, encourages them to intensify their dialogue with the goal of achieving regional security structures based on common interest and mutual respect for the territorial integrity, national sovereignty and security of both States, and emphasizes in this respect that the disarmament and demobilization of and cessation of any support to the ex-Rwandese Armed Forces and Interahamwe forces will facilitate the settlement of the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo;

            24.      Expresses its full support for the work of the expert panel on the illegal exploitation of natural resources and other forms of wealth in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and once again urges the parties to the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the other parties concerned to cooperate fully with it;

            25.      Reaffirms that it attaches the highest importance to the cessation of the illegal exploitation of the natural resources of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, affirms that it is ready to consider the necessary actions to put an end to this exploitation, and awaits with interest in this respect the final conclusions of the expert panel, including the conclusions relating to the level of cooperation of States with the expert panel;

            26.      Reaffirms also that an international conference on peace, security, democracy and development in the Great Lakes region, with participation by all the Governments of the region and all the other parties concerned, should be organized at the appropriate time under the aegis of the United Nations and the Organization of African Unity with a view to strengthening stability in the region and working out conditions that will enable everyone to enjoy the right to live peacefully within national borders;

            27.      Expresses its intention to monitor closely progress by the parties in implementing the requirements of this resolution and to undertake a mission to the region, possibly in May 2001, to monitor progress and discuss the way forward;

            28.      Expresses its readiness to consider possible measures which could be imposed, in accordance with its responsibilities and obligations under the Charter of the United Nations, in case of failure by parties to comply fully with this resolution;

            29.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1342         Extension of UN Mission for Referendum in Western Sahara

                                                                                                                                                       Date:  27 February 2001                                Meeting:  4284

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming all its previous resolutions on Western Sahara, in particular resolutions 1108 (1997) of 22 May 1997, 1292 (2000) of 29 February 2000, 1301 (2000) of 31 May 2000, 1309 (2000) of 25 July 2000 and 1324 (2000) of 30 October 2000, and also its resolution 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000,

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel of 9 December 1994,

            Welcoming the report of the Secretary-General of 20 February 2001 (S/2001/148) and the observations and recommendations contained therein, and expressing full support for the role and work of the Personal Envoy,

            Reiterating full support for the continued efforts exerted by the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) to implement the Settlement Plan and agreements adopted by the parties to hold a free, fair and impartial referendum for the self-determination of the people of Western Sahara,

            Noting that fundamental differences between the parties over the interpretation of the main provisions of the Settlement Plan remain to be resolved,

            1.        Decides to extend the mandate of MINURSO until 30 April 2001, with the expectation that the parties, under the auspices of the Secretary-General’s Personal Envoy, will continue to try to resolve the multiple problems relating to the implementation of the Settlement Plan and try to agree upon a mutually acceptable political solution to their dispute over Western Sahara;

            2.        Requests the Secretary-General to provide an assessment of the situation before the end of the present mandate;

            3.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1343         Demand that Liberia cease support for Sierra Leone rebel groups

                                                Date:  7 March 2001                             Meeting:  4287

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 1132 (1997) of 8 October 1997, 1171 (1998) of 5 June 1998, 1306 (2000) of 5 July 2000 and its other resolutions and statements of its President on the situation in Sierra Leone and the region,

            Welcoming General Assembly resolution A/RES/55/56 of 1 December 2000, in particular its call for measures engaging all concerned parties including diamond producing, processing, exporting and importing countries as well as the diamond industry to break the link between diamonds and armed conflict, and its call upon all States to implement fully Security Council measures targeting the link between the trade in conflict diamonds and the supply to rebel movements of weapons, fuel or other prohibited materiel,

            Taking note of the report of the United Nations Panel of Experts established pursuant to paragraph 19 of resolution 1306 (2000) in relation to Sierra Leone (S/2000/1195),

            Taking note of the findings of the Panel of Experts that diamonds represent a major and primary source of income for the Revolutionary United Front (RUF), that the bulk of RUF diamonds leave Sierra Leone through Liberia, and that such illicit trade cannot be conducted without the permission and involvement of Liberian government officials at the highest levels, and expressing its deep concern at the unequivocal and overwhelming evidence presented by the report of the Panel of Experts that the Government of Liberia is actively supporting the RUF at all levels,

            Recalling the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Moratorium on the Importation, Exportation and Manufacture of Small Arms and Light Weapons in West Africa adopted in Abuja on 31 October 1998 (S/1998/1194, annex),

            Taking note of the measures announced by the Government of Liberia since the publication of the report of the Panel of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1306 (2000), and welcoming the intention of ECOWAS to monitor their implementation in close cooperation with the United Nations and to report thereon after a period of two months,

            Recalling its concern already expressed in resolution 1306 (2000) at the role played by the illicit diamond trade in fuelling the conflict in Sierra Leone and at reports that such diamonds transit neighbouring countries, including Liberia,

            Reiterating its call made in the statement of its President of 21 December 2000 (S/PRST/2000/41) on all States in West Africa, particularly Liberia, immediately to cease military support for armed groups in neighbouring countries and prevent armed individuals from using their national territory to prepare and commit attacks in neighbouring countries,

            Determining that the active support provided by the Government of Liberia for armed rebel groups in neighbouring countries, and in particular its support for the RUF in Sierra Leone, constitutes a threat to international peace and security in the region,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

A

            Recalling its resolutions 788 (1992) of 19 November 1992 and 985 (1995) of 13 April 1995,

            Noting that the conflict in Liberia has been resolved, that national elections have taken place within the framework of the Yamoussoukro IV Agreement of 30 October 1991 (S/24815, annex) and that the Final Communiqué of the informal consultative group meeting of ECOWAS Committee of Five on Liberia issued in Geneva on 7 April 1992 (S/23863) has been implemented, and determining therefore that the embargo imposed by paragraph 8 of resolution 788 (1992) should be terminated,

            1.        Decides to terminate the prohibitions imposed by paragraph 8 of resolution 788 (1992) and to dissolve the Committee established under resolution 985 (1995);

B

            2.        Demands that the Government of Liberia immediately cease its support for the RUF in Sierra Leone and for other armed rebel groups in the region, and in particular take the following concrete steps:

(a)  expel all RUF members from Liberia, including such individuals as are listed by the Committee established by paragraph 14 below, and prohibit all RUF activities on its territory, provided that nothing in this paragraph shall oblige Liberia to expel its own nationals from its territory;

(b)  cease all financial and, in accordance with resolution 1171 (1998), military support to the RUF, including all transfers of arms and ammunition, all military training and the provision of logistical and communications support, and take steps to ensure that no such support is provided from the territory of Liberia or by its nationals;

(c)  cease all direct or indirect import of Sierra Leone rough diamonds which are not controlled through the Certificate of Origin regime of the Government of Sierra Leone, in accordance with resolution 1306 (2000);

(d)  freeze funds or financial resources or assets that are made available by its nationals or within its territory directly or indirectly for the benefit of the RUF or entities owned or controlled directly or indirectly by the RUF;

(e)  ground all Liberia-registered aircraft operating within its jurisdiction until it updates its register of aircraft pursuant to Annex VII to the Chicago Convention on International Civil Aviation of 1944 and provides to the Council the updated information concerning the registration and ownership of each aircraft registered in Liberia;

            3.        Stresses that the demands in paragraph 2 above are intended to lead to further progress in the peace process in Sierra Leone, and, in that regard, calls upon the President of Liberia to help ensure that the RUF meet the following objectives:

(a) allow the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) free access throughout Sierra Leone;

(b)  release all abductees;

(c)  enter their fighters in the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration process;

(d)  return all weapons and other equipment seized from UNAMSIL;

            4.        Demands that all States in the region take action to prevent armed individuals and groups from using their territory to prepare and commit attacks on neighbouring countries and refrain from any action that might contribute to further destabilization of the situation on the borders between Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone;

            5. (a) Decides that all States shall take the necessary measures to prevent the sale or supply to Liberia, by their nationals or from their territories or using their flag vessels or aircraft, of arms and related materiel of all types, including weapons and ammunition, military vehicles and equipment, paramilitary equipment and spare parts for the aforementioned, whether or not originating in their territories;

            (b)      Decides that all States shall take the necessary measures to prevent any provision to Liberia by their nationals or from their territories of technical training or assistance related to the provision, manufacture, maintenance or use of the items in subparagraph (a) above;

            (c)      Decides that the measures imposed by subparagraphs (a) and (b) above shall not apply to supplies of non-lethal military equipment intended solely for humanitarian or protective use, and related technical assistance or training, as approved in advance by the Committee established by paragraph 14 below;

            (d)      Affirms that the measures imposed by subparagraph (a) above do not apply to protective clothing, including flak jackets and military helmets, temporarily exported to Liberia by United Nations personnel, representatives of the media and humanitarian and development workers and associated personnel, for their personal use only;

            6.        Decides further that all States shall take the necessary measures to prevent the direct or indirect import of all rough diamonds from Liberia, whether or not such diamonds originated in Liberia;

            7. (a) Decides also that all States shall take the necessary measures to prevent the entry into or transit through their territories of senior members of the Government of Liberia and its armed forces and their spouses and any other individuals providing financial and military support to armed rebel groups in countries neighbouring Liberia, in particular the RUF in Sierra Leone, as designated by the Committee established by paragraph 14 below, provided that nothing in this paragraph shall oblige a State to refuse entry into its territory to its own nationals, and provided that nothing in this paragraph shall impede the transit of representatives of the Government of Liberia to United Nations Headquarters to conduct United Nations business or the participation of the Government of Liberia in the official meetings of the Mano River Union, ECOWAS and the Organization of African Unity;

            (b)      Decides that the measures imposed by subparagraph (a) above shall not apply where the Committee established by paragraph 14 below determines that such travel is justified on the grounds of humanitarian need, including religious obligation, or where the Committee concludes that exemption would otherwise promote Liberian compliance with the demands of the Council, or assist in the peaceful resolution of the conflict in the subregion;

            8.        Further decides that the measures imposed by paragraphs 6 and 7 above shall come into force at 00.01 Eastern Daylight Time two months after the date of adoption of this resolution, unless the Security Council determines before that date that Liberia has complied with the demands in paragraph 2 above, taking into account the report of the Secretary-General referred to in paragraph 12 below, inputs from ECOWAS, relevant information provided by the Committee established by paragraph 14 below and the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1132 (1997) and any other relevant information;

            9.        Decides that the measures imposed by paragraph 5 are established for 14 months and that, at the end of the period, the Council will decide whether the Government of Liberia has complied with the demands in paragraph 2 above, and, accordingly, whether to extend these measures for a further period with the same conditions;

            10.      Decides further that the measures imposed by paragraphs 6 and 7 above are established for a period of 12 months, and that at the end of this period the Council will decide whether the Government of Liberia has complied with the demands in paragraph 2 above, and, accordingly, whether to extend these measures for a further period with the same conditions;

            11.      Decides also that the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above shall be terminated immediately if the Council, taking into account, inter alia, the reports of the Panel of Experts referred to in paragraph 19 below and of the Secretary-General referred to in paragraph 12 below, inputs from ECOWAS, any relevant information provided by the Committee established by paragraph 14 below and the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1132 (1997) and any other relevant information, determines that the Government of Liberia has complied with the demands in paragraph 2 above;

            12.      Requests the Secretary-General to submit a first report to the Council by 30 April 2001 and thereafter at 6-month intervals from that date, drawing on information from all relevant sources, including the United Nations Office in Liberia, UNAMSIL and ECOWAS, on whether Liberia has complied with the demands in paragraph 2 above and on any progress made towards the objectives set out in paragraph 3 above, and calls on the Government of Liberia to support United Nations efforts to verify all information on compliance which is brought to the United Nations notice;

            13.      Requests the Secretary-General to provide to the Council six months from the date of the adoption of this resolution:

            (a)      a preliminary assessment of the potential economic, humanitarian and social impact on the Liberian population of possible follow-up action by the Council in the areas of investigation indicated in paragraph 19 (c) below;

            (b)      a report on the steps taken by the Government of Liberia to improve its capacity in air traffic control and surveillance in accordance with the recommendations of the Panel of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1306 (2000) and any advice which may be provided by ICAO;

            14.      Decides to establish, in accordance with rule 28 of its provisional rules of procedure, a Committee of the Security Council, consisting of all the members of the Council, to undertake the following tasks and to report on its work to the Council with its observations and recommendations:

            (a)      to seek from all States information regarding the actions taken by them to implement effectively the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above, and thereafter to request from them whatever further information it may consider necessary;

            (b)      to consider, and to take appropriate action on, information brought to its attention by States concerning alleged violations of the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above, identifying where possible persons or entities, including vessels or aircraft, reported to be engaged in such violations, and to make periodic reports to the Council;

            (c)      to promulgate expeditiously such guidelines as may be necessary to facilitate the implementation of the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above;

            (d)      to give consideration to and decide upon requests for the exemptions set out in paragraphs 5 (c) and 7 (b) above;

            (e)      to designate the individuals subject to the measures imposed by paragraph 7 above, and to update this list regularly;

            (f)       to make information it considers relevant, including the list referred to in subparagraph (e) above, publicly available through appropriate media, including through the improved use of information technology;

            (g)      to make recommendations to the Council on ways of increasing the effectiveness of the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above and on ways to limit unintended effects, if any, of these measures on the Liberian population;

            (h)      to cooperate with other relevant Security Council Sanctions Committees, in particular that established pursuant to resolution 1132 (1997) and that established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993);

            (i)       to establish a list of RUF members present in Liberia as referred to in paragraph 2 (a) above;

            15.      Calls upon the Government of Liberia to establish an effective Certificate of Origin regime for trade in rough diamonds that is transparent and internationally verifiable and has been approved by the Committee established by paragraph 14 above, to come into operation after the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above have been terminated in accordance with this resolution;

            16.      Urges all diamond exporting countries in West Africa to establish Certificate of Origin regimes for the trade in rough diamonds similar to that adopted by the Government of Sierra Leone, as recommended by the Panel of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1306 (2000), and calls upon States, relevant international organizations and other bodies in a position to do so to offer assistance to those Governments to that end;

            17.      Calls upon the international community to provide the necessary assistance to reinforce the fight against the proliferation and illicit trafficking of light weapons in West Africa, in particular the implementation of the ECOWAS Moratorium on the Importation, Exportation and Manufacture of Small Arms and Light Weapons in West Africa, and to improve air traffic control in the West African subregion;

            18.      Requests all States to report to the Committee established by paragraph 14 above, within 30 days of the promulgation of the list referred to in paragraph 14 (e) above, on the actions they have taken to implement the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above;

            19.      Requests the Secretary-General to establish, within one month from the date of adoption of this resolution, in consultation with the Committee established by paragraph 14 above, a Panel of Experts for a period of six months consisting of no more than five members, drawing, as much as possible and as appropriate, on the expertise of the members of the Panel of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1306 (2000), with the following mandate:

            (a)      to investigate any violations of the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above;

            (b)      to collect any information on the compliance by the Government of Liberia with the demands in paragraph 2 above, including any violations by the Government of Liberia of the measures imposed by paragraph 2 of resolution 1171 (1998) and paragraph 1 of resolution 1306 (2000);

            (c)      to further investigate possible links between the exploitation of natural resources and other forms of economic activity in Liberia, and the fuelling of conflict in Sierra Leone and neighbouring countries, in particular those areas highlighted by the report of the Panel of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1306 (2000);

            (d)      to collect any information linked to the illegal activities of the individuals referred to in paragraph 21 below and to any other alleged violations of this resolution;

            (e)      to report to the Council through the Committee established by paragraph 14 above no later than six months from the date of adoption of this resolution with observations and recommendations in the areas set out in subparagraphs (a) to (d) above;

            (f)       to keep the Committee established by paragraph 14 above updated on their activities as appropriate;

and further requests the Secretary-General to provide the necessary resources;

            20.      Requests the Panel of Experts referred to in paragraph 19 above, as far as possible, to bring any relevant information collected in the course of its investigations conducted in accordance with its mandate to the attention of the States concerned for prompt and thorough investigation and, where appropriate, corrective action, and to allow them the right of reply;

            21.      Calls upon all States to take appropriate measures to ensure that individuals and companies in their jurisdiction, in particular those referred to in the report of the Panel of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1306 (2000), act in conformity with United Nations embargoes, in particular those established by resolutions 1171 (1998), 1306 (2000) and this resolution, and, as appropriate, take the necessary judicial and administrative action to end any illegal activities by those individuals and companies;

            22.      Calls upon all States and all relevant international and regional organizations to act strictly in accordance with the provisions of this resolution notwithstanding the existence of any rights or obligations entered into or any licence or permit granted prior to the date of adoption of this resolution;

            23.      Decides to conduct reviews of the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above not more than sixty days after the adoption of this resolution, and every six months thereafter;

            24.      Urges all States, relevant United Nations bodies and, as appropriate, other organizations and interested parties to cooperate fully with the Committee established by paragraph 14 above and the Panel of Experts referred to in paragraph 19 above, including by supplying information on possible violations of the measures imposed by paragraphs 5 to 7 above;

            25.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1344         Extension of UN Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea

                                                Date:  15 March 2001                           Meeting:  4294

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling resolutions 1298 (2000) of 17 May 2000, 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000, 1312 (2000) of 31 July 2000, and 1320 (2000) of 15 September 2000, the statement of its President of 9 February 2001 (S/PRST/4), and all relevant previous resolutions and statements of its President pertaining to the Ethiopia-Eritrea conflict,

            Reaffirming the commitment of all Member States to the sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of Ethiopia and Eritrea,

            Further reaffirming the need for both parties to fulfil all of their obligations under international humanitarian, human rights and refugee law,

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 49/59 of 9 December 1994,

            Reaffirming its strong support for the Agreement of Cessation of Hostilities signed between the Government of the State of Eritrea and the Government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia in Algiers on 18 June 2000 (S/2000/601) and the subsequent Comprehensive Peace Agreement signed by the parties in Algiers on 12 December 2000 (S/2000/1183),

            Welcoming the progress made thus far in the implementation of these agreements,

            Reaffirming its strong support for the Secretary-General’s role in continuing to help implement the Agreements, including through his good offices, for the continuing efforts of his Special Representative and for the contributions of relevant United Nations entities,

            Expressing its strong support for the role played by the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE) in the implementation of its mandate,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 7 March 2001 (S/2001/202),

            1.        Decides to extend the mandate of UNMEE at the troop and military observer levels authorized by its resolution 1320 (2000) until 15 September 2001;

            2.        Calls on the parties to continue working towards the full and prompt implementation of their Agreements, including an expeditious completion of the remaining steps, in particular the rearrangement of forces necessary for the establishment of the Temporary Security Zone, and to fulfil the following obligations:

            a.        to ensure freedom of movement and access for UNMEE;

                b.  to establish a direct air corridor between Addis Ababa and Asmara in the interests of the safety of United Nations personnel;

            c.        to conclude Status of Forces Agreements with the Secretary-General;

            d.       to facilitate mine action in coordination with the United Nations Mine Action Service, in particular through exchanging and providing existing maps and any other relevant information to the United Nations;

            3.        Stresses that the Agreements link the termination of the United Nations peacekeeping mission with the completion of the process of delimitation and demarcation of the Ethiopia-Eritrea border, which is a key element of the peace process;

            4.        Notes the primary responsibility of the parties under the Comprehensive Peace Agreement to fund the Boundary Commission and urges them to fulfil their financial obligations in this regard;

            5.        Stresses the importance of the close relationship between UNMEE and the Boundary Commission and, noting the recommendations contained in paragraphs 50 and 53 of the Secretary-General’s report, encourages UNMEE to provide appropriate support to the Boundary Commission;

            6.        Decides to consider the recommendations in paragraphs 50 and 53 of the Secretary-General’s report upon receipt of more detailed information;

            7.        Calls on all States and international organizations to consider providing further support to the peace process, including through contributions to the voluntary Trust Fund to facilitate the rapid delimitation and demarcation of the common border, as well as to assist and participate in the longer term tasks of reconstruction and development, and the economic and social recovery of Ethiopia and Eritrea;

            8.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1345         Condemnation of violence in former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Serbia

                                                Date:  21 March 2001                           Meeting:  4301

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 1160 (1998) of 31 March 1998, 1199 (1998) of 23 September 1998, 1203 (1998) of 24 October 1998, 1239 (1999) of 14 May 1999 and 1244 (1999) of 10 June 1999 and the statements of its President of 19 December 2000 (S/PRST/2000/40), 7 March 2001 (S/PRST/2001/7) and 16 March 2001 (S/PRST/2001/8),

            Welcoming the steps taken by the Government of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to consolidate a multiethnic society within its borders, and expressing its full support for the further development of this process,

            Also welcoming the plan put forward by the Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to resolve peacefully the crisis in certain municipalities in southern Serbia, and expressing encouragement for the implementation of political and economic reforms designed to reintegrate the ethnic Albanian population as full members of civil society,

            Welcoming international efforts, including those of the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo, the International security presence in Kosovo (KFOR), the European Union, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) in cooperation with the Governments of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and other States, to prevent the escalation of ethnic tensions in the area,

            Further welcoming the contribution of the European Union to a peaceful solution to the problems in certain municipalities in southern Serbia, its decision substantially to increase the presence of the European Union Monitoring Mission there on the basis of its existing mandate, and its wider contribution to the region,

            Welcoming the cooperation between the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the authorities of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in addressing the security problems in parts of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and certain municipalities in southern Serbia,

            1.        Strongly condemns extremist violence, including terrorist activities, in certain parts of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and certain municipalities in southern Serbia, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, and notes that such violence has support from ethnic Albanian extremists outside these areas and constitutes a threat to the security and stability of the wider region;

            2.        Reaffirms its commitment to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and the other States of the region, as set out in the Helsinki Final Act;

            3.        Reiterates its strong support for the full implementation of resolution 1244 (1999);

            4.        Demands that all those who are currently engaged in armed action against the authorities of those States immediately cease all such actions, lay down their weapons and return to their homes;

            5.        Supports the Government of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in their efforts to end the violence in a manner consistent with the rule of law;

            6.        Underlines the need for all differences to be resolved by dialogue among all legitimate parties;

            7         Further underlines the requirement for all parties to act with restraint and full respect for international humanitarian law and human rights;

            8.        Welcomes the efforts of the Government of Albania to promote peace in the region and isolate extremists working against peace, and encourages it and all States to take all possible concrete steps to prevent support for extremists, taking also into account resolution 1160 (1998);

            9.        Calls on Kosovo Albanian political leaders, and leaders of the ethnic Albanian communities in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, southern Serbia and elsewhere, publicly to condemn violence and ethnic intolerance and to use their influence to secure peace, and calls on all those who have contact with the extremist armed groups to make clear that they have no support from any quarter in the international community;

            10.      Welcomes the efforts of KFOR to implement resolution 1244 (1999) in cooperation with the authorities of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, and calls on KFOR to continue further to strengthen its efforts to prevent unauthorized movement and illegal arms shipments across borders and boundaries in the region, to confiscate weapons within Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, and to continue to keep the Council informed in accordance with resolution 1160 (1998);

            11.      Calls on States and appropriate international organizations to consider how they can best give practical help to efforts in the region further to strengthen democratic, multiethnic societies in the interests of all and to assist the return of displaced persons in the areas in question;

            12.      Calls on all States in the region to respect each other’s territorial integrity and to cooperate on measures that foster stability and promote regional political and economic cooperation in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, the basic principles of the OSCE and the Stability Pact for South East Europe;

            13.      Decides to monitor developments on the ground carefully and remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1346         Extension of UN Mission in Sierra Leone

                                                Date:  30 March 2001                           Meeting:  4306

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its previous resolutions and the statements of its President concerning the situation in Sierra Leone,

            Affirming the commitment of all States to respect the sovereignty, political independence and territorial integrity of Sierra Leone,

            Expressing its continued concern at the fragile security situation in Sierra Leone and neighbouring countries, and in particular at the continued fighting on the border regions of Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia and at the grave humanitarian consequences for the civilian, refugee and internally displaced populations in those areas,

            Recognizing the importance of the progressive extension of State authority throughout the entire country, political dialogue and national reconciliation, the full implementation of a disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programme, the legitimate exploitation of the natural resources of Sierra Leone for the benefit of its people, full respect for the human rights of all and the rule of law, effective action on the issues of impunity and accountability, the voluntary and unhindered return of refugees and internally displaced persons, the holding by the Government of Sierra Leone of free, fair and transparent elections, and the formulation of a long-term plan for the peace process in order to achieve sustainable peace and security in Sierra Leone, and stressing that the United Nations should continue to support the fulfilment of these objectives,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 14 March 2001 (S/2001/228),

            1.        Decides that the mandate of the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL),established in its resolutions 1270 (1999) of 22 October 1999 and 1289 (2000) of 7 February 2000, shall be extended for a period of six months from the date of the adoption of this resolution;

            2.        Further decides to increase the military component of UNAMSIL to a strength of 17,500, including the 260 military observers already deployed, as recommended by the Secretary-General in paragraphs 99 and 100 of his report;

            3.        Welcomes the revised concept of operations for UNAMSIL as set out in paragraphs 57 to 67 of the report of the Secretary-General and the progress already made towards its implementation, and encourages the Secretary-General to proceed to its completion;

            4.        Expresses its appreciation to those Member States providing additional troops and support elements to UNAMSIL and those who have made commitments to do so, encourages the Secretary-General to continue his efforts to seek, if necessary, further properly trained and equipped forces to strengthen the military components of UNAMSIL in order to enable the mission to implement fully its revised concept of operations, and requests the Secretary-General to inform the Council upon receipt of firm commitments to that end;

            5.        Requests the Secretary-General to inform the Council at regular intervals on progress made by UNAMSIL in the implementation of key aspects of its concept of operations, and further requests him to provide an assessment in his next report on steps taken to improve the effectiveness of UNAMSIL;

            6.        Expresses its deep concern at the reports of human rights abuses committed by the Revolutionary United Front (RUF) and others, including other military groups, against the civilian population, in particular the harassment and forced recruitment of adults and children for fighting and forced labour, demands that these acts cease immediately, and requests the Secretary-General to ensure all human rights monitoring positions within UNAMSIL are filled in order to address the concerns raised in paragraphs 44 to 51 of the report of the Secretary-General;

            7.        Expresses also its deep concern that the Ceasefire Agreement signed in Abuja on 10 November 2000 (S/2000/1091) between the Government of Sierra Leone and the RUF has not been fully implemented, and demands that the RUF take immediate steps to fulfil itscommitments under that Agreement to ensure full liberty for the United Nations to deploy its troops throughout the country, the free movement of persons and goods, unimpeded movement of humanitarian agencies, refugees and displaced persons and the immediate return of all seized weapons, ammunition and other equipment, and to recommence active participation in the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programme;

            8.        Requests, in this respect, UNAMSILto maintain its support, within its capabilities and areas of deployment, for returning refugees and displaced persons and to encourage the RUF to cooperate to this end in fulfilment of its commitments under the Abuja Ceasefire Agreement;

            9.        Requests the Secretary-General to submit to the Council his views on how to take forward the issue of refugees and internally displaced persons, including their return;

            10.      Calls upon all the parties to the Sierra Leone conflict to intensify their efforts towards the full and peaceful implementation of the Abuja Ceasefire Agreement and the resumption of the peace process, taking into account the basis of the Abuja Ceasefire Agreement and relevant Security Council resolutions, and urges Governments and regional leaders concerned to continue their full cooperation with the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the United Nations to promote these efforts, and, in particular, to use their influence with the leaders of the RUF to obtain their cooperation towards achievement of the above-mentioned goals;

            11.      Encourages the efforts of ECOWAS towards a lasting and final settlement of the crisis in the Mano River Union region caused by the continued fighting in the border areas of Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, and underlines the importance of the political support that the United Nations can provide to these efforts in order to stabilize the region;

            12.      Takes note of the responsibilities to be undertaken by UNAMSIL in support of the Government of Sierra Leone’s disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programme, notably the decision to provide an enhanced management role as referred to in paragraphs 76 to 79 of the report of the Secretary-General, commends the Government of Sierra Leone for the improvements it has already brought about in the programme, encourages it to take the necessary urgent decisions to allow finalization of the programme and dissemination of information on its benefits and conditions to proceed expeditiously, and also encourages international organizations and donor countries to support generously the efforts of the Government of Sierra Leone in this regard;

            13.      Emphasizes that the development and extension of the administrative capacities of Sierra Leone are also essential to sustainable peace and development in the country, and therefore urges the Government of Sierra Leone to take the necessary practical steps to prepare for and bring about the restoration of civil authority and basic public services throughout its territory, including in the locations where UNAMSIL is expected to deploy in accordance with its concept of operations, and encourages States, other international organizations and non-governmental organizations to provide appropriate assistance in this regard;

            14.      Encourages the Government of Sierra Leone, together with the Secretary-General, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and other relevant international actors, to expedite the establishment of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Special Court envisaged by resolution 1315 (2000) of 14 August 2000, bearing in mind in particular the need to ensure the appropriate protection of children;

            15.      Welcomes the Secretary-General’s intention to keep the security, political, humanitarian and human rights situation in Sierra Leone under close review and to report to the Council, after due consultations with troop-contributing countries, with any additional recommendations, including, if necessary, for a further strengthening of the military component of UNAMSIL for the completion of the planned concept of operations to fulfil the overall objective of assisting the Government of Sierra Leone to re-establish its authority throughout the country, including the diamond-producing areas, and to create the necessary conditions for the conduct of free, fair and transparent elections in due course under the authority of the Government of Sierra Leone;

            16.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1347         Forwarding of nominations for Rwanda Tribunal judges

                                                Date:  30 March 2001                           Meeting:  4307

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 955 (1994) of 8 November 1994, 1165 (1998) of 30 April 1998 and 1329 (2000) of 30 November 2000,

            Having considered the nominations for judges of the International Tribunal for Rwanda received by the Secretary-General,

            Forwards the following nominations to the General Assembly in accordance with article 12, paragraph 2 (d), of the Statute of the International Tribunal:

            Mr. Mouinou Aminou (Benin)

            Mr. Frederick Mwela Chomba (Zambia)

            Mr. Winston Churchill Matanzima Maqutu (Lesotho)

            Mr. Harris Michael Mtegha (Malawi)

            Ms. Arlette Ramaroson (Madagascar)

S/RES/1348         Extension of Angola sanctions monitoring mechanism

                                                Date:  19 April 2001                              Meeting:  4311

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its resolution 864 (1993) of 15 September 1993 and all subsequent relevant resolutions, in particular resolutions 1127 (1997) of 28 August 1997, 1173 (1998) of 12 June 1998, 1237 (1999) of 7 May 1999, 1295 (2000) of 18 April 2000 and 1336 (2001) of 23 January 2001,

            Reaffirming also its commitment to preserve the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Angola,

            Expressing once again its concern regarding the humanitarian effects of the present situation on the civilian population of Angola,

            Recognizing the importance attached, inter alia, to the monitoring, for as long as it is necessary, of the implementation of the provisions contained in resolutions 864 (1993), 1127 (1997) and 1173 (1998),

            Determining that the situation in Angola continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security in the region,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Takes note of the written addendum (S/2001/363) provided pursuant to paragraph 4 of resolution 1336 (2001) to the final report (S/2000/1225) of the monitoring mechanism established pursuant to resolution 1295 (2000);

            2.        Expresses its intention to give full consideration to the written addendum and to the final report, pursuant to paragraph 5 of resolution 1295 (2000);

            3.        Decides to extend the mandate of the monitoring mechanism for a further period of six months, ending on 19 October 2001;

            4.        Requests the monitoring mechanism to report periodically to the Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993), and to provide a supplementary report by 19 October 2001;

            5.        Requests the Secretary-General, upon adoption of this resolution and acting in consultation with the Committee, to appoint up to five experts to serve on the monitoring mechanism, and further requests the Secretary-General to make the necessary financial arrangements to support the work of the monitoring mechanism;

            6.        Requests the Chairman of the Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993) to submit the supplementary report to the Council by 19 October 2001;

            7.        Calls upon all States to cooperate fully with the monitoring mechanism in the discharge of its mandate;

            8.        Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1349         Extension of UN Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara

                                                Date:  27 April 2001                              Meeting: 4315

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming all its previous resolutions on Western Sahara, in particular resolutions 1108 (1997) of 22 May 1997, 1292 (2000) of 29 February 2000, 1301 (2000) of 31 May 2000, 1309 (2000) of 25 July 2000, 1324 (2000) of 30 October 2000, and 1342 (2001) of 27 February 2001, and also its resolution 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000,

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel of 9 December 1994,

            Welcoming the report of the Secretary-General of 24 April 2001 (S/2001/398) and the observations and recommendations contained therein, and expressing full support for the role and work of the Personal Envoy,

            Reiterating full support for the continued efforts exerted by the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) to implement the Settlement Plan and agreements adopted by the parties to hold a free, fair and impartial referendum for the self-determination of the people of Western Sahara,

            Noting that fundamental differences between the parties over the interpretation of the main provisions of the Settlement Plan remain to be resolved,

            1.        Decides to extend the mandate of MINURSO until 30 June 2001, with the expectation that the parties, under the auspices of the Secretary-General’s Personal Envoy, will continue to try to resolve the multiple problems relating to the implementation of the Settlement Plan and try to agree upon a mutually acceptable political solution to their dispute over Western Sahara;

            2.        Requests the Secretary-General to provide an assessment of the situation before the end of the present mandate;

            3.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1350         Forwarding of nomination of Yugoslavia Tribunal ad litem judges

                                                Date:  27 April 2001                              Meeting:  4316

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 808 (1993) of 22 February 1993, 827 (1993) of 25 May 1993, 1166 (1998) of 13 May 1998 and 1329 (2000) of 30 November 2000,

            Having decided to consider the nominations for ad litem judges of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia received by the Secretary-General,

            Forwards the following nominations to the General Assembly in accordance with article 13 ter (1) (d) of the Statute of the International Tribunal:

            Mr. Aydin Sefa Akay (Turkey)

            Ms. Carmen María Argibay (Argentina)

            Ms. Lucy Asuagbor (Cameroon)

            Mr. Jeremy Badgery-Parker (Australia)

            Mr. Chifumu Kingdom Banda (Zambia)

            Mr. Roberto Bellelli (Italy)

            Mr. Pierre G. Boutet (Canada)

            Mr. Hans Henrik Brydensholt (Denmark)

            Mr. Guibril Camara (Senegal)

            Mr. Joaquin Martin Canivell (Spain)

            Mr. Romeo T. Capulong (Philippines)

            Mr. Oscar Ceville (Panama)

            Mr. Isaac Chibulu Tantameni Chali (Zambia)

            Mr. Arthur Chaskalson (South Africa)

            Ms. Maureen Harding Clark (Ireland)

            Ms. Fatoumata Diarra (Mali)

            Mr. Cenk Alp Durak (Turkey)

            Mr. Moise Ebongue (Cameroon)

            Mr. Mathew Epuli(Cameroon)

            Mr. Albin Eser (Germany)

            Mr. Mohamed Al Habib Fassi Fihri (Morocco)

            Mr. John Foster Gallop (Australia)

            Mr. Joseph Nassif Ghamroun (Lebanon)

            Mr. Michael Grotz (Germany)

            Mr. Adbullah Mahamane Haidara (Mali)

            Mr. Claude Hanoteau (France)

            Mr. Hassan Bubacarr Jallow (Gambia)

            Ms. Ivana Janu (Czech Republic)

            Mr. Aykut Kiliç (Turkey)

            Ms. Flavia Lattanzi (Italy)

            Mr. Per-Johan Lindholm (Finland)

            Mr. Augustin P. Lobejón (Spain)

            Mr. Diadié Issa Maiga (Mali)

            Ms. Irene Chirwa Mambilima (Zambia)

            Mr. Dick F. Marty (Switzerland)

            Ms. Jane Hamilton Mathews (Australia)

            Ms. Suzanne Mengue Zomo (Cameroon)

            Mr. Ghulam Mujaddid Mirza (Pakistan)

            Mr. Ahmad Aref Moallem (Lebanon)

            Mr. Mphanza Patrick Mvunga (Zambia)

            Mr. Rafael Nieto-Navia (Colombia)

            Mr. Léopold Ntahompagaze (Burundi)

            Mr. André Ntahomvukiye (Burundi)

            Mr. Cesar Pereira Burgos (Panama)

            Mr. Mauro Politi (Italy)

            Ms. Vonimbolana Rasoazanany (Madagascar)

            Mr. Ralph Riachy (Lebanon)

            Mr. Ingo Risch (Germany)

            Mr. Robert Roth (Switzerland)

            Mr. Zacharie Rwamaza (Burundi)

            Mr. Sourahata Babouccar Semega-Janneh (Gambia)

            Mr. Tom Farquhar Shepherdson (Australia)

            Mr. Amarjeet Singh (Singapore)

            Ms. Ayla Songor (Turkey)

            Mr. Albertus Henricus Joannes Swart (Netherlands)

            Mr. Gyorgy Szénási (Hungary)

            Mr. Ahmad Takkieddine (Lebanon)

            Ms. Chikako Taya (Japan)

            Mr. Krister Thelin (Sweden)

            Mr. Stefan Trechsel (Switzerland)

            Ms. Christine Van Den Wyngaert (Belgium)

            Mr. Volodymyr Vassylenko (Ukraine)

            Mr. Lal Chand Vohrah (Malaysia)

            Ms. Sharon A. Williams (Canada)

S/RES/1351         Extension of UN Disengagement Observer Force

                                                Date:  30 May 2001                              Meeting:  4322

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force of 18 May 2001 (S/2001/499), and also reaffirming its resolution 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000,

            1.        Calls upon the parties concerned to implement immediately its resolution 338 (1973) of 22 October 1973;

            2.        Decides to renew the mandate of the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force for another period of six months, that is, until 30 November 2001;

            3.        Requests the Secretary-General to submit, at the end of this period, a report on the developments in the situation and the measures taken to implement resolution 338 (1973).

S/RES/1352         Extension of Iraq oil-for-food programme

                                Date:  1 June 2001                                Meeting:  4324

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its previous relevant resolutions, including its resolutions 986 (1995) of 14 April 1995, 1284 (1999) of 17 December 1999 and 1330 (2000) of 5 December 2000,

            Convinced of the need, as a temporary measure, to provide for the civilian needs of the Iraqi people until the fulfilment by the Government of Iraq of the relevant resolutions, including notably resolutions 687 (1991) of 3 April 1991 and 1284 (1999), allows the Council to take further action with regard to the prohibitions referred to in resolution 661 (1990) of 6 August 1990, in accordance with the provisions of those resolutions,

            Recalling the Memorandum of Understanding between the United Nations and the Government of Iraq of 20 May 1996 (S/1996/356),

            Determined to improve the humanitarian situation in Iraq,

            Reaffirming the commitment of all Member States to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Decides to extend the provisions of resolution 1330 (2000) until 3 July 2001;

            2.        Expresses its intention to consider new arrangements for the sale or supply of commodities and products to Iraq and for the facilitation of civilian trade and economic cooperation with Iraq in civilian sectors, based on the following principles;

            (a)      that such new arrangements will improve significantly the flow of commodities and products to Iraq, other than commodities and products referred to in paragraph 24 of resolution 687 (1991), and subject to review by the Committee established by resolution 661 (1990) of the proposed sale or supply to Iraq of commodities and products on a Goods Review List to be elaborated by the Council;

            (b)      that such new arrangements will improve the controls to prevent the sale or supply of items prohibited or unauthorized by the Council, in the categories referred to in paragraph 2 (a) above, and to prevent the flow of revenues to Iraq outside the escrow account established pursuant to paragraph 7 of resolution 986 (1995) from the export of petroleum and petroleum products from Iraq, and also expresses its intention to adopt and implement such new arrangements, and provisions on various related issues under discussion in the Council, for a period of 190 days beginning at 00.01 hours on 4 July 2001;

            3.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1353         Strengthening of partnership with troop-contributing States

                                                Date:  13 June 2001                              Meeting:  4326

                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its resolutions 1318 (2000) of 7 September 2000 and 1327 (2000) of 13 November 2000 and the statements by its President of 3 May 1994 (S/PRST/1994/22) and 28 March 1996 (S/PRST/1996/13), and all other relevant statements by its President,

            Recalling also the statement of its President of 31 January 2001 (S/PRST/2001/3),

            Taking into consideration the views expressed at its debate on the subject “Strengthening cooperation with troop-contributing countries” at its 4257th meeting on 16 January 2001,

            Reaffirming its commitment to the Purposes of the Charter of the United Nations as set out in Article 1, paragraphs 1 to 4, of the Charter, and to the Principles of the Charter as set out in Article 2, paragraphs 1 to 7, of the Charter, including its commitment to the principles of the political independence, sovereign equality and territorial integrity of all States, and to respect for the sovereignty of all States,

            Reaffirming its primary responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security, reiterating its commitment to enhance the capacity of the United Nations in this area, and emphasizing its willingness to take all necessary steps within its competence to that end,

            Recalling the relevant recommendations in the report of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations (S/2000/809), and reaffirming its support for all efforts to strengthen the efficiency and effectiveness of United Nations peacekeeping operations,

            Stressing the need to ensure the safety and security of peacekeepers and other United Nations and associated personnel, including humanitarian personnel,

            Stressing the need to improve the relationship between the Security Council, the troop-contributing countries and the Secretariat to foster a spirit of partnership, cooperation, confidence and mutual trust,

            Recognizing the need to strengthen cooperation with troop-contributing countries, as part of a series of measures to ensure more coherent and integrated concepts of operations and to enhance managerial efficiency and operational effectiveness of United Nations peacekeeping operations,

            Noting that relevant provisions contained in the annexes to the present resolution pertain also to strengthening cooperation with countries contributing civilian police and other personnel,

            1.        Agrees to adopt the decisions and recommendations contained in the annexes to the present resolution;

            2.        Requests its Working Group on Peacekeeping Operations to continue its work on strengthening the capacity of the United Nations to establish and support efficient and effective peacekeeping operations;

            3.        Undertakes to follow closely the implementation of the agreed measures for cooperation with troop-contributing countries, and requests its Working Group for Peacekeeping Operations to assess within six months of the adoption of this resolution the efficiency and effectiveness of the agreed measures, consider their further improvement taking into account the proposals of the troop-contributing countries and to report to the Council on these matters;

            4.        Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

Annex I

A

Statement of principles on cooperation with troop-contributing countries

            The Security Council

            1.        Recognizes that its partnership with troop-contributing countries can be strengthened by the assumption by Member States, in particular those with the greatest capacity and means to do so, of their shared responsibility to provide personnel, assistance and facilities to the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security;

            2.        Encourages Member States to take steps to bridge the commitment gap with regard to personnel and equipment for specific United Nations peacekeeping operations;

            3.        Emphasizes the importance of troop-contributing countries taking the necessary and appropriate steps to ensure the capability of their peacekeepers to fulfil the missions’ mandate, and underlines the importance of bilateral and international cooperation in this regard, including in the area of training, logistics and equipment;

            4.        Underlines the importance of ensuring that national contingents participating in United Nations peacekeeping operations receive effective and appropriate support from the Secretariat, including in the area of training, logistics and equipment;

            5.        Stresses the need to ensure that the Secretariat is given sufficient human and financial resources to fulfil these tasks, and that these resources be used efficiently and effectively;

            6.        Underlines that consultations between the Security Council, the Secretariat and troop-contributing countries should enhance the ability of the Security Council to make appropriate, effective and timely decisions in fulfilling its responsibilities;

            7.        Underlines also the need to maintain a comprehensive approach to improving the effectiveness of peacekeeping operations from their conception, including in preparing contingency plans for volatile situations, and promoting cohesive exit strategies;

B

Operational issues

            1.        Encourages international cooperation and support for peacekeeping training, including the establishment of regional peacekeeping training centres, and stresses the need for technical support from the Secretary-General to such centres;

            2.        Requests the Secretary-General to include information on his consultations with troop-contributing countries in his regular reports to the Security Council on individual peacekeeping operations, and undertakes to take account of the views expressed in these consultations and in its meetings with troop-contributing countries when taking decisions on such operations;

            3.        Also requests the Secretary-General to convene assessments meetings with interested delegations, in particular troop-contributing countries, at appropriate stages of each peacekeeping operation as a part of his efforts to draw the lessons that can be learned, which should be taken into account in the conduct and planning of current and future operations;

            4.        Further requests the Secretary-General to take into account in the conduct of peacekeeping operations and in the regular lessons-learned process, the operational experiences of national contingents while in the field or following departure;

            5.        Undertakes to inform troop-contributing countries fully of the terms of reference of missions of the Security Council involving peacekeeping operations and subsequently of the conclusions of the missions;

            6.        Expresses its view that the conduct of reconnaissance visits to the mission area by countries committing troops can be highly valuable in preparing for effective participation in peacekeeping operations, and encourages support for such visits;

            7.        Urges the Secretary-General to take further steps to implement the proposal of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations to create integrated mission task forces, and to pursue other related capabilities to improve United Nations planning and support capacities;

            8.        Stresses the need to improve the information and the analysis capacity of the United Nations Secretariat, with a view to improving the quality of advice to the Secretary-General, the Security Council and the troop-contributing countries;

            9.        Stresses also that the Secretariat’s advice to the Security Council and the troop-contributing countries should include a range of recommendations for action on the basis of an objective assessment of the situation on the ground, rather than what Member States are presumed to be willing to support;

            10.      Underlines the importance of an effective mission-specific public information and communications capacity within peacekeeping operations, in particular through campaigns to improve awareness of the objectives and scope of the mission within the local population in the mission area;

            11.      Stresses the need for an effective public information programme to generate international public support for United Nations peacekeeping operations, and stresses also in this regard the need for special programmes, in particular in troop-contributing countries, to project the contribution of peacekeepers;

            12.      Underlines in this regard the need for an effective public information capacity within the United Nations, and takes note in this regard of the proposals made by the Secretary-General to strengthen Secretariat planning and support for public information in peacekeeping operations (S/2000/1081);

C

Other mechanisms

            1.        Undertakes to continue to consider the possibility of using the Military Staff Committee as one of the means of enhancing United Nations peacekeeping operations;

            2.        Expresses its belief that Groups of Friends of the Secretary-General, as well as other informal mechanisms which might include troop-contributing countries, Security Council members, donors and the countries in the region, can play a useful role in increasing the coherence and effectiveness of United Nations action, and stresses that they should conduct their work in close cooperation with the Security Council;

D

Follow-up

            1.        Expresses its intention to assess within six months the efficiency and effectiveness of its meetings with troop-contributing countries, with a view to the possibility of further improvement to the current system, including through the consideration of specific proposals of troop-contributing countries for new mechanisms;

            2.        Decides to strengthen cooperation with the troop-contributing countries in addition to and on the basis of the principles and provisions contained in the resolution and the present annex by improving and expanding existing consultation mechanisms as elaborated in annex II, with a view to ensuring proper reflection of the views and concerns of troop-contributing countries.

Annex II

Format, procedures and documentation of meetings with the troop-contributing countries

            The consultations with troop-contributing countries will take place in the following formats:

            A.      Public or private meetings of the Security Council with the participation of troop-contributing countries;

            B.       Consultation meetings with the troop-contributing countries;

            C.       Meetings between the Secretariat and troop-contributing countries;

A

Public or private meetings of the Security Council

1.         The Security Council will hold public or private meetings with the participation of troop-contributing countries, including at their request, and without prejudice to the provisional rules of procedure of the Security Council, in order to ensure a full and high-level consideration of issues of critical importance to a specific peacekeeping operation;

2.         Such meetings may be held, in particular, when the Secretary-General has identified potential troop-contributing countries for a new or ongoing peacekeeping operation, when considering a change in, or renewal or completion of a peacekeeping mandate, or when there is a rapid deterioration in the situation on the ground, including when it threatens the safety and security of United Nations peacekeepers;

B

Consultation meetings with the troop-contributing countries

            1.        Consultation meetings with troop-contributing countries will continue as the principal means of consultation, and will continue to be convened and chaired by the President of the Security Council;

            2.        Such consultation meetings may be convened, including at the request of troop-contributing countries, as appropriate at different stages of peacekeeping operations, including:

            (a)      Mission planning, including the development of the concept of operations and the elaboration of the mandate of a new operation;

            (b)      Any change in the mandate, in particular the broadening or narrowing of the scope of the mission, the introduction of new or additional functions or components, or a change in the authorization to use force;

            (c)      The renewal of a mandate;

            (d)      Significant or serious political, military or humanitarian developments;

            (e)      A rapid deterioration of the security situation on the ground;

            (f)       The termination, withdrawal or scaling down in size of the operation, including the transition from peacekeeping to post-conflict peace-building;

            (g)      Before and after Council missions to a specific peacekeeping operation;

            3.        The following parties will be invited to these meetings:

            (a)      Countries contributing troops, military observers or civilian police to the peacekeeping operation;

            (b)      Prospective troop-contributing countries as identified by the Secretary-General;

            (c)      Relevant United Nations bodies and agencies, when they have specific contributions to make to the issue under discussion;

            (d)      Other bodies and agencies, as observers, as appropriate;

            (e)      Countries that make special contributions, such as other civilian personnel, contributions to trust funds, logistics, equipment and facilities and other contributions, as appropriate;

            (f)       The host country/countries, as observers, as appropriate;

            (g)      The representative of a regional or subregional organization or arrangement, contributing troops as appropriate;

            (h)      Regional organizations, as observers when not contributing troops, as appropriate;

            4.        Such consultation meetings will, as appropriate, include consideration of:

            (a)      Preparations for the establishment of a peacekeeping mandate by the Security Council;

            (b)      Operational issues, including the concept of operations, mission planning, authorization to use force, the chain of command, force structure, the unity and cohesion of the force, training and equipment, risk assessment and deployment;

            (c)      Significant concerns of or recommendations by the Secretary-General, as set out in his report, a briefing note from the Secretariat or the Secretariat’s oral briefing;

            (d)      The specific concerns of troop-contributing countries, including those communicated to the President of the Security Council;

            (e)      Progress in the accomplishment of the mission’s tasks in different areas or mission components;

            5.        The following measures will be ensured to improve the quality and effectiveness of such consultations:

            (a)      An informal paper setting out the agenda, including issues to be covered and drawing attention to relevant background documentation, will be circulated by the President of the Security Council to the participants when inviting them to attend these meetings;

            (b)      The Secretary-General should ensure, within the constraints of the Security Council’s programme of work, that reports requested by the Security Council on specific peacekeeping operations are issued in good time to allow the timely holding of meetings with troop-contributing countries before discussion among Security Council members;

            (c)      The Secretariat should also make fact sheets available to all participants at the beginning of these meetings;

            (d)      The Secretary-General should ensure, where possible, that briefings are given by senior personnel working with the mission in the field;

            (e)      The Secretary-General should ensure that briefings consist of an objective assessment and analysis of the political, military, humanitarian and human rights situations, where appropriate;

            (f)       The Secretary-General should add value to the briefings by making them more user-friendly, including through the exploitation of information technology;

            6.        The following arrangements will be made to ensure timely and appropriate communication of the concerns and views of troop-contributing countries, as expressed at the consultation meetings, to the members of the Security Council so that these concerns and views can receive due consideration:

                       The President of the Security Council will prepare, with the assistance of the Secretariat, and make available a summary of the content of such meetings;

                       The summary of discussion will be distributed to Council members in advance of informal consultations or of the next meeting on the relevant peacekeeping operation, where appropriate;

C

Meetings between the Secretariat and troop-contributing countries

            The Security Council supports the existing practice of meetings between the Secretariat and troop-contributing countries to discuss matters concerning specific peacekeeping operations, and also the participation at such meetings, where appropriate, of Special Representatives of the Secretary-General, Force Commanders and Civilian Police Commissioners.

Other forms of consultations

            The Security Council notes that the forms of consultations mentioned herein are not exhaustive and that consultations may take a variety of other forms, including formal or informal communication between the President of the Council or its members, the Secretary-General and the troop-contributing countries and, as appropriate, with other countries especially affected, including countries from the region concerned.

S/RES/1354         Extension of UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus

                                                Date:  15 June 2001                              Meeting:  4328

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Welcoming the report of the Secretary-General of 30 May 2001 (S/2001/534) on the United Nations operation in Cyprus, and in particular the call to the parties to assess and address the humanitarian issue of missing persons with due urgency and seriousness,

            Noting that the Government of Cyprus has agreed that in view of the prevailing conditions in the island it is necessary to keep the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) beyond 15 June 2001,

            Welcoming and encouraging efforts by the United Nations to sensitize peacekeeping personnel in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases in all its peacekeeping operations,

            1.        Reaffirms all its relevant resolutions on Cyprus, and in particular resolutions 1251 (1999) of 29 June 1999 and subsequent resolutions;

            2.        Decides to extend the mandate of UNFICYP for a further period ending 15 December 2001;

            3.        Requests the Secretary-General to submit a report by 1 December 2001 on the implementation of this resolution;

            4.        Urges the Turkish Cypriot side and Turkish forces to rescind the restrictions imposed on 30 June 2000 on the operations of UNFICYP and to restore the military status quo ante at Strovilia;

            5.        Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1355         Extension of UN Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

                                                Date:  15 June 2001                              Meeting:  4329

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 1234 (1999) of 9 April 1999, 1258 (1999) of 6 August 1999, 1265 (1999) of 17 September 1999, 1273 (1999) of 5 November 1999, 1279 (1999) of 30 November 1999, 1291 (2000) of 24 February 2000, 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000, 1304 (2000) of 15 June 2000, 1323 (2000) of 13 October 2000, 1332 (2000) of 14 December 2000 and 1341 (2001) of 22 February 2001 and the statements of its President of 13 July 1998 (S/PRST/1998/20), 31 August 1998 (S/PRST/1998/26), 11 December 1998 (S/PRST/1998/36), 24 June 1999 (S/PRST/1999/17), 26 January 2000 (S/PRST/2000/2), 5 May 2000 (S/PRST/2000/15), 2 June 2000 (S/PRST/2000/20), 7 September 2000 (S/PRST/2000/28) and 3 May 2001 (S/PRST/2001/13),

            Reaffirming the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and of all States in the region,

            Reaffirming further the obligation of all States to refrain from the use of force against the territorial integrity and political independence of any State, or in any other manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations,

            Reaffirming also the sovereignty of the Democratic Republic of the Congo over its natural resources,

            Expressing its alarm at the dire consequences of the prolonged conflict for the civilian population throughout the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in particular the increase in the number of refugees and displaced persons, and stressing the urgent need for substantial humanitarian assistance to the Congolese population,

            Expressing its deep concern at all violations of human rights and international humanitarian law, including atrocities against civilian populations, especially in the eastern provinces,

            Deeply concerned at the increased rate of HIV/AIDS infection, in particular amongst women and girls in the Democratic Republic of the Congo,

            Gravely concerned by the continued recruitment and use of child soldiers by armed forces and groups, including cross-border recruitment and abduction of children,

            Reaffirming its primary responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security,

            Reaffirming its support for the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement (S/1999/815), as well as the Kampala plan and the Harare sub-plans for disengagement and redeployment,

            Reaffirming that the primary responsibility for implementing the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement lies with the parties,

            Reiterating its support for the Inter-Congolese Dialogue and the Facilitator, and stressing the need for the parties to resolve outstanding substantive and procedural issues,

            Recalling the responsibilities of all parties to cooperate in the full deployment of the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC),

            Endorsing the report of the Security Council mission to the Great Lakes region (S/2001/521), and recalling the communiqué of the joint meeting of the Political Committee for the Implementation of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the United Nations Security Council mission to the Great Lakes region (S/2001/525),

            Taking note of the Secretary-General’s report of 8 June 2001 (S/2001/572) and its recommendations,

            Determining that the situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo continues to pose a threat to international peace and security in the region,

A

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Notes with satisfaction that the ceasefire among the parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement has been respected, welcomes the progress on disengagement and redeployment noted in the Secretary-General’s report of 8 June 2001, and reiterates its urgent call on all parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement to implement this agreement, as well as the agreements reached in Kampala and Harare and all relevant Security Council resolutions;

            2.        Demands that the Front de Libération du Congo disengage and redeploy its forces in accordance with the Harare sub-plans and the commitment it made to the Security Council mission to the Great Lakes region, in their meeting of 25 May 2001, and expresses its intention to monitor this process;

            3.        Demands once again that Ugandan and Rwandan forces and all other foreign forces withdraw from the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in compliance with paragraph 4 of its resolution 1304 (2000) and the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, urges those forces to take the necessary steps to accelerate this withdrawal, and welcomes in this regard the decision by Ugandan authorities to start withdrawing their troops from the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (S/2001/461);

            4.        Calls on all the parties to refrain from any offensive action during the process of disengagement and withdrawal of foreign forces, and expresses concern at recent reports of military operations in the Kivus;

            5.        Demands that the Rassemblement Congolais pour la Démocratie demilitarize Kisangani in accordance with resolution 1304 (2000), and that all parties respect the demilitarization of the city and its environs;

            6.        Demands that all parties, including the Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, cease immediately all forms of assistance and cooperation with all armed groups referred to in Annex A, Chapter 9.1, of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement;

            7.        Takes note of the plans drafted by the Political Committee (S/2001/521/Add.1) for the orderly withdrawal of all foreign forces from the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and for the disarmament, demobilization, repatriation and reintegration (DDRR) of all armed groups in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and calls on the parties to finalize these plans and to implement them as a matter of urgency;

            8.        With a view to ensuring the finalization of these plans, requests all parties that have not already done so to provide the Joint Military Commission, as soon as possible, with all necessary operational information on the withdrawal, including, inter alia, the numbers and locations of the foreign forces, their assembly areas and withdrawal routes and the timetable, and on DDRR, including, inter alia, the numbers, location and armaments of the armed groups, and the proposed sites of their demobilization areas, in order to facilitate United Nations planning to assist the parties in the implementation of these plans;

            9.        Encourages the Presidents and Governments of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda to intensify their dialogue with the goal of achieving regional security structures based on common interest and mutual respect for the territorial integrity, national sovereignty and security of both States, and emphasizes in this respect that the disarmament and demobilization of, and cessation of any support to, the ex-Forces Armées Rwandaises and Interahamwe forces are essential to the settlement of the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo;

            10.      Condemns the recent incursions by armed groups into Rwanda and Burundi;

            11.      Welcomes the dialogue initiated between the authorities of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Burundi, strongly urges them to continue their efforts, calls on all States in the region to bring to bear their influence on Burundian armed groups to encourage them to refrain from violence, to enter negotiations for a political settlement and to join the Arusha peace process, and demands that all States in the region cease any military support to such groups;

            12.      Stresses that a durable peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo should not be achieved at the expense of peace in Burundi, and requests the Secretary-General as well as interested Member States to make proposals, on an urgent basis, on how best to address these interrelated crises;

            13.      Welcomes the announcement by the Facilitator of the Inter-Congolese Dialogue of the organization of the Preparatory Meeting of the Inter-Congolese Dialogue on 16 July 2001, calls on all Congolese parties to commence that dialogue as soon as possible, preferably on Congolese soil, and to ensure a successful outcome, and welcomes in this regard the initial measures taken by the authorities of the Democratic Republic of the Congo towards the liberalization of political activities;

            14.      Calls on all relevant parties to ensure that urgent child protection concerns, including DDRR of child soldiers, the plight of girls affected by the conflict, the protection and safe return of refugee and internally displaced children, and the registration and reunification of unaccompanied or orphaned children, are addressed in all national, bilateral and regional dialogues, and that solutions are designed in accordance with international best practice;

            15.      Condemns the massacres and atrocities committed in the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, demands once again that all the parties to the conflict put an immediate end to violations of human rights and international humanitarian law, and stresses that those responsible will be held accountable;

            16.      Reminds all parties of their obligations with respect to the security of civilian populations under the Fourth Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War of 12 August 1949, and stresses that all forces present on the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo are responsible for preventing violations of international humanitarian law in the territory under their control;

            17.      Condemns strongly the attacks against the personnel of humanitarian organizations, and demands that the perpetrators be brought to justice;

            18.      Condemns the use of child soldiers, demands that all armed forces and groups concerned bring an end to all forms of recruitment, training and use of children in their armed forces, calls upon all parties to collaborate with the United Nations, humanitarian organizations and other competent bodies to ensure the expeditious demobilization, rehabilitation and reintegration of children abducted or enrolled in armed forces or groups and to allow their reunification with their families, and urges Member States to ensure adequate and sustained resources for long-term reintegration;

            19.      Calls on all parties to ensure, in accordance with relevant international law, the full, safe and unhindered access of relief personnel to all those in need and the delivery of humanitarian assistance, in particular to all children affected by the conflict, and recalls that the parties must also provide guarantees for the safety, security and freedom of movement of United Nations and associated humanitarian personnel;

            20.      Calls on the international community to increase its support for humanitarian relief activities within the Democratic Republic of the Congo and in neighbouring countries affected by the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo;

            21.      Expresses its full support for the work of the Expert Panel on the illegal exploitation of natural resources and other forms of wealth in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and notes that the report of the Expert Panel of 12 April 2001 (S/2001/357) contains disturbing information about the illegal exploitation of Congolese resources by individuals, Governments and armed groups involved in the conflict and the link between the exploitation of the natural resources and other forms of wealth in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the continuation of the conflict;

            22.      Reaffirms that it attaches the highest importance to the cessation of the illegal exploitation of the natural resources of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and reaffirms that it is ready to consider the necessary actions to put an end to this exploitation;

            23.      Awaits in this respect the publication of the addendum to the report of the Expert Panel which should contain an updated evaluation of the situation, again urges all the parties to the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the other parties concerned to cooperate fully with the Expert Panel while ensuring necessary security for the experts, and welcomes the action taken by Ugandan authorities in setting up a commission of inquiry in this regard;

            24.      Stresses the link between the progress in the peace process and economic recovery of the Democratic Republic of the Congo,welcomes initial economic reforms undertaken by the Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and underlines the urgent need for international economic assistance;

            25.      Stresses the importance of the restoration of river traffic, welcomes the reopening of the Congo and the Oubangui Rivers, calls urgently on all parties, and in particular the Rassemblement Congolais pour la Démocratie in light of its recent public comments, to cooperate further in order to permit the re-establishment of economic links between, inter alia, Kinshasa, Mbandaka and Kisangani, and expresses its support for the proposed establishment of a Congo River Basin Commission comprising the Congolese parties, United Nations agencies and some neighbouring countries under the chairmanship of MONUC;

            26.      Stresses that durable peace can only be achieved if all the countries of the region are successful in defining amongst themselves the rules by which to promote security and development, and reaffirms in this regard that an international conference on peace, security, democracy and development in the region, with participation by all the Governments of the region and all the other parties concerned, should be organized at the appropriate time under the aegis of the United Nations and the Organization of African Unity;

            27.      Expresses its intention to monitor closely progress by the parties in implementing the requirements and demands of this resolution;

            28.      Expresses again its readiness to consider possible measures which could be imposed, in accordance with its responsibilities and obligations under the Charter of the United Nations, in case of failure by parties to comply fully with this resolution and other relevant resolutions;

B

            29.      Decides to extend the mandate of MONUC until 15 June 2002, and also decides to review progress at least every four months based on reporting by the Secretary-General;

            30.      Requests the Secretary-General to submit to the Council, once all necessary information has been provided by the parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, and subject to the continuing cooperation of the parties, proposals concerning the way MONUC could assist in, monitor and verify the implementation by the parties of the plans referred to in paragraphs 7 and 8 above;

            31.      Approves the updated concept of operations put forward by the Secretary-General in paragraphs 84 to 104 of his report of 8 June 2001, including, for further planning purpose, the creation of a civilian police component and of an integrated civilian/military section to coordinate DDRR operations, the strengthening of the MONUC presence in Kisangani, and the strengthening of the MONUC logistic support capability to support current and foreseen future deployment, with a view to preparing the transition towards the third phase of the deployment of MONUC after the necessary information has been provided by the parties;

            32.      Authorizes in this regard MONUC, consistent with the Secretary-General’s report, to assist, upon request, and within its capabilities, in the early implementation, on a voluntary basis, of the DDRR of armed groups, and requests the Secretary-General to deploy military observers in locations where early withdrawal is implemented, with a view to monitoring the process;

            33.      Reiterates the authorization contained in resolution 1291 (2000) for up to 5,537 MONUC military personnel, including observers as deemed necessary by the Secretary-General;

            34.      Requests the Secretary-General to expand the civilian component of MONUC, in accordance with the recommendations in his report, in order to assign to areas in which MONUC is deployed human rights personnel, so as to establish a human rights monitoring capacity, as well as civilian political affairs and humanitarian affairs personnel;

            35.      Calls on the Secretary-General to ensure sufficient deployment of child protection advisers to ensure consistent and systematic monitoring and reporting on the conduct of the parties to the conflict as concerns their child protection obligations under humanitarian and human rights law and the commitments they have made to the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict;

            36.      Stresses the need for an increased public information capacity, including the establishment of United Nations radio stations to promote understanding of the peace process and of the role of MONUC among local communities and the parties;

            37.      Calls on all the parties to the conflict to cooperate fully in the deployment and operations of MONUC, including through full implementation of the provisions of the Status of Forces Agreement throughout the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and reaffirms that it is the responsibility of all the parties to ensure the security of United Nations personnel, together with associated personnel;

            38.      Stresses the need for the co-location of the Joint Military Commission with MONUC in Kinshasa;

            39.      Reaffirms that it is ready to support the Secretary-General if and when he deems it necessary and when conditions allow it, in the context of viable security frameworks, to further deploy military personnel in the border areas in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo;

            40.      Expresses its appreciation for the partnership established with the parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, which was strengthened during the last Security Council mission to the Great Lakes region, and reiterates that it is firmly determined to continue to provide assistance to the parties in their efforts to achieve peace;

            41.      Commends the outstanding work of MONUC personnel who operate in challenging conditions, and expresses its strong support for the Special Representative of the Secretary-General;

            42.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1356         Exemption of non-lethal military equipment from Somalia weapons embargo

                                                Date:  19 June 2001                              Meeting:  4332

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its resolutions 733 (1992) of 23 January 1992 and 751 (1992) of 24 April 1992,

            Expressing its desire to see peace and security return to Somalia,

            Recognizing the ongoing efforts of the United Nations, its specialized agencies and humanitarian organizations to deliver humanitarian assistance to Somalia,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Reiterates to all States their obligation to comply with the measures imposed by resolution 733 (1992), and urges each State to take the necessary steps to ensure full implementation and enforcement of the arms embargo;

            2.        Decides that the measures imposed by paragraph 5 of resolution 733 (1992) shall not apply to protective clothing, including flak jackets and military helmets, temporarily exported to Somalia by United Nations personnel, representatives of the media and humanitarian and development workers and associated personnel for their personal use only;

            3.        Decides also that the measures imposed by paragraph 5 of resolution 733 (1992) shall not apply to supplies of non-lethal military equipment intended solely for humanitarian or protective use, as approved in advance by the Committee established pursuant to resolution 751 (1992) (the Committee);

            4.        Requests the Committee to give consideration to and decide upon requests for the exemptions set out in paragraph 3 above;

            5.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1357         Extension of UN Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina

                                                Date:  21 June 2001                              Meeting:  4333

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling all its previous relevant resolutions concerning the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, including resolutions 1031 (1995) of 15 December 1995, 1035 (1995) of 21 December 1995, 1088 (1996) of 12 December 1996, 1144 (1997) of 19 December 1997, 1168 (1998) of 21 May 1998, 1174 (1998) of 15 June 1998, 1184 (1998) of 16 July 1998, 1247 (1999) of 18 June 1999, and 1305 (2000) of 21 June 2000,

            Reaffirming its commitment to the political settlement of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, preserving the sovereignty and territorial integrity of all States there within their internationally recognized borders,

            Underlining its commitment to supporting implementation of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Annexes thereto (collectively the Peace Agreement, S/1995/999, annex),

            Emphasizing its appreciation to the High Representative, the Commander and personnel of the multinational stabilization force (SFOR), the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and the personnel of the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH), including the Commissioner and personnel of the International Police Task Force (IPTF), the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), and the personnel of other international organizations and agencies in Bosnia and Herzegovina for their contributions to the implementation of the Peace Agreement,

            Noting that the States in the region must play a constructive role in the successful development of the peace process in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and noting especially the obligations of the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in this regard as signatories to the Peace Agreement,

            Welcoming, in this regard, the positive steps taken by the Governments of the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to strengthen their bilateral relations with Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as their increasing cooperation with all relevant international organizations in implementing the Peace Agreement,

            Emphasizing that a comprehensive and coordinated return of refugees and displaced persons throughout the region continues to be crucial to lasting peace,

            Recalling the declarations of the Ministerial meetings of the Peace Implementation Conference,

            Noting the reports of the High Representative, including his latest report of 13 March 2001 (S/2001/219),

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 7 June 2001 (S/2001/571), and welcoming the UNMIBH Mandate Implementation Plan,

            Determining that the situation in the region continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security,

            Determined to promote the peaceful resolution of the conflicts in accordance with the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations,

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel adopted on 9 December 1994 and the statement of its President of 10 February 2000 (S/PRST/2000/4),

            Welcoming and encouraging efforts by the United Nations to sensitize peacekeeping personnel in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases in all its peacekeeping operations,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

I

            1.        Reaffirms once again its support for the Peace Agreement, as well as for the Dayton Agreement on implementing the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 10 November 1995 (S/1995/1021, annex), calls upon the parties to comply strictly with their obligations under those Agreements, and expresses its intention to keep the implementation of the Peace Agreement, and the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina, under review;

            2.        Reiterates that the primary responsibility for the further successful implementation of the Peace Agreement lies with the authorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina themselves and that the continued willingness of the international community and major donors to assume the political, military and economic burden of implementation and reconstruction efforts will be determined by the compliance and active participation by all the authorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina in implementing the Peace Agreement and rebuilding a civil society, in particular in full cooperation with the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, in strengthening joint institutions and in facilitating returns of refugees and displaced persons;

            3.        Reminds the parties once again that, in accordance with the Peace Agreement, they have committed themselves to cooperate fully with all entities involved in the implementation of this peace settlement, as described in the Peace Agreement, or which are otherwise authorized by the Security Council, including the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, as it carries out its responsibilities for dispensing justice impartially, and underlines that full cooperation by States and entities with the International Tribunal includes, inter alia, the surrender for trial of all persons indicted by the Tribunal and provision of information to assist in Tribunal investigations;

            4.        Emphasizes its full support for the continued role of the High Representative in monitoring the implementation of the Peace Agreement and giving guidance to and coordinating the activities of the civilian organizations and agencies involved in assisting the parties to implement the Peace Agreement, and reaffirms that the High Representative is the final authority in theatre regarding the interpretation of Annex 10 on civilian implementation of the Peace Agreement and that in case of dispute he may give his interpretation and make recommendations, and make binding decisions as he judges necessary on issues as elaborated by the Peace Implementation Council in Bonn on 9 and 10 December 1997;

            5.        Expresses its support for the declarations of the Ministerial meetings of the Peace Implementation Conference;

            6.        Recognizes that the parties have authorized the multinational force referred to in paragraph 10 below to take such actions as required, including the use of necessary force, to ensure compliance with Annex 1-A of the Peace Agreement;

            7.        Reaffirms its intention to keep the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina under close review, taking into account the reports submitted pursuant to paragraphs 18 and 25 below, and any recommendations those reports might include, and its readiness to consider the imposition of measures if any party fails significantly to meet its obligations under the Peace Agreement;

II

            8.        Pays tribute to those Member States which participated in the multinational stabilization force established in accordance with its resolution 1088 (1996), and welcomes their willingness to assist the parties to the Peace Agreement by continuing to deploy a multinational stabilization force;

            9.        Notes the support of the parties to the Peace Agreement for the continuation of the multinational stabilization force, set out in the declaration of the Ministerial meeting of the Peace Implementation Conference in Madrid on 16 December 1998 (S/1999/139, annex);

            10.      Authorizes the Member States acting through or in cooperation with the organization referred to in Annex 1-A of the Peace Agreement to continue for a further planned period of 12 months the multinational stabilization force (SFOR) as established in accordance with its resolution 1088 (1996) under unified command and control in order to fulfil the role specified in Annex 1-A and Annex 2 of the Peace Agreement, and expresses its intention to review the situation with a view to extending this authorization further as necessary in the light of developments in the implementation of the Peace Agreement and the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina;

            11.      Authorizes the Member States acting under paragraph 10 above to take all necessary measures to effect the implementation of and to ensure compliance with Annex 1-A of the Peace Agreement, stresses that the parties shall continue to be held equally responsible for compliance with that Annex and shall be equally subject to such enforcement action by SFOR as may be necessary to ensure implementation of that Annex and the protection of SFOR, and takes note that the parties have consented to SFOR’s taking such measures;

            12.      Authorizes Member States to take all necessary measures, at the request of SFOR, either in defence of SFOR or to assist the force in carrying out its mission, and recognizes the right of the force to take all necessary measures to defend itself from attack or threat of attack;

            13.      Authorizes the Member States acting under paragraph 10 above, in accordance with Annex 1-A of the Peace Agreement, to take all necessary measures to ensure compliance with the rules and procedures established by the Commander of SFOR, governing command and control of airspace over Bosnia and Herzegovina with respect to all civilian and military air traffic;

            14.      Requests the authorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina to cooperate with the Commander of SFOR to ensure the effective management of the airports of Bosnia and Herzegovina, in the light of the responsibilities conferred on SFOR by Annex 1‑A of the Peace Agreement with regard to the airspace of Bosnia and Herzegovina;

            15.      Demands that the parties respect the security and freedom of movement of SFOR and other international personnel;

            16.      Invites all States, in particular those in the region, to continue to provide appropriate support and facilities, including transit facilities, for the Member States acting under paragraph 10 above;

            17.      Recalls all the agreements concerning the status of forces as referred to in Appendix B to Annex 1-A of the Peace Agreement, and reminds the parties of their obligation to continue to comply therewith;

            18.      Requests the Member States acting through or in cooperation with the organization referred to in Annex 1-A of the Peace Agreement to continue to report to the Council, through the appropriate channels and at least at monthly intervals;

* * *

            Reaffirming the legal basis in the Charter of the United Nations on which the IPTF was given its mandate in resolution 1035 (1995),

III

            19.      Decides to extend the mandate of UNMIBH, which includes the IPTF, for an additional period terminating on 21 June 2002, and also decides that the IPTF shall continue to be entrusted with the tasks set out in Annex 11 of the Peace Agreement, including the tasks referred to in the Conclusions of the London, Bonn, Luxembourg, Madrid and Brussels Conferences and agreed by the authorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina;

            20.      Requests the Secretary-General to keep the Council regularly informed and to report at least every six months on the implementation of the mandate of UNMIBH as a whole;

            21.      Reiterates that the successful implementation of the tasks of the IPTF rests on the quality, experience and professional skills of its personnel, and once again urges Member States, with the support of the Secretary-General, to ensure the provision of such qualified personnel;

            22.      Reaffirms the responsibility of the parties to cooperate fully with, and to instruct their respective responsible officials and authorities to provide their full support to, the IPTF on all relevant matters;

            23.      Reiterates its call upon all concerned to ensure the closest possible coordination between the High Representative, SFOR, UNMIBH and the relevant civilian organizations and agencies so as to ensure the successful implementation of the Peace Agreement and of the priority objectives of the civilian consolidation plan, as well as the security of IPTF personnel;

            24.      Urges Member States, in response to demonstrable progress by the parties in restructuring their law enforcement institutions, to intensify their efforts to provide, on a voluntary-funded basis and in coordination with the IPTF, training, equipment and related assistance for local police forces in Bosnia and Herzegovina;

            25.      Also requests the Secretary-General to continue to submit to the Council reports from the High Representative, in accordance with Annex 10 of the Peace Agreement and the conclusions of the Peace Implementation Conference held in London on 4 and 5 December 1996 (S/1996/1012), and later Peace Implementation Conferences, on the implementation of the Peace Agreement and in particular on compliance by the parties with their commitments under that Agreement;

            26.      Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1358         Recommends appointment of Secretary-General

                                                Date:  27 June 2001                              Meeting:  4337th (closed)

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Having considered the question of the recommendation for the appointment of the Secretary-General of the United Nations,

            Recommends to the General Assembly that Mr. Kofi Annan be appointed Secretary-General of the United Nations for a second term of office from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2006.

S/RES/1359         Extension of UN Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara

                                                Date:  29 June 2001                              Meeting:  4342

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling all its previous resolutions on Western Sahara, in particular resolution 1108 (1997) of 22 May 1997, and the statement by its President of 19 March 1997 (S/PRST/1997/16),

            Recalling also its resolution 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000, and the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel of 9 December 1994,

            Reaffirming the provisions contained in paragraph 2 of Article 1 of the Charter of the United Nations,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 20 June 2001 (S/2001/613),

            Expressing full support for the role and work of the Personal Envoy,

            Reiterating full support for the ongoing efforts of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) to implement the Settlement Plan and agreements adopted by the parties to hold a free, fair and impartial referendum for the self-determination of the people of the Western Sahara,

            Taking into consideration the Official Proposals submitted by the Polisario Front in order to overcome the obstacles preventing the implementation of the Settlement Plan contained in annex IV to the report of the Secretary-General,

            Taking into consideration also the draft Framework Agreement on the Status of Western Sahara contained in annex I to the report of the Secretary-General, which would provide for a substantial devolution of authority, which does not foreclose self-determination, and which indeed provides for it,

            Taking into consideration further the Memorandum of the Government of Algeria on the Draft Status for Western Sahara contained in annex II to the report of the Secretary-General,

            Reaffirming its commitment to assist the parties to achieve a just and lasting solution to the question of Western Sahara,

            1.        Decides, as recommended by the Secretary-General in his report of 20 June 2001, to extend the mandate of MINURSO until 30 November 2001;

            2.        Supports fully the efforts of the Secretary-General to invite all the parties to meet directly or through proximity talks, under the auspices of his Personal Envoy, and encourages the parties to discuss the draft Framework Agreement and to negotiate any specific changes they would like to see in this proposal, as well as to discuss any other proposal for a political solution, which may be put forward by the parties, to arrive at a mutually acceptable agreement;

            3.        Affirms that while discussions referred to above go on, the official proposals submitted by the Polisario Front to overcome the obstacles preventing implementation of the Settlement Plan will be considered;

            4.        Recalls that according to the rules of the consultations established by the Personal Envoy nothing would be agreed until everything had been agreed, and therefore emphasizes that by engaging in these negotiations the parties will not prejudice their final positions;

            5.        Urges the parties to solve the problem of the fate of people unaccounted for, and calls on the parties to abide by their obligations under international humanitarian law to release without further delay all those held since the start of the conflict;

            6.        Requests the Secretary-General to provide an assessment of the situation before the end of the present mandate, and, as appropriate, recommendations on the future mandate and composition of MINURSO;

            7.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1360         Extension of Iraq oil-for-food provisions for 150 days

                                                Date:  3 July 2001                 Meeting:  4344

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its previous relevant resolutions, including its resolution 986 (1995) of 14 April 1995, 1284 (1999) of 17 December 1999, 1330 (2000) of 5 December 2000 and 1352 (2001) of 1 June 2001, as they relate to the improvement of the humanitarian programme for Iraq,

            Convinced of the need as a temporary measure to continue to provide for the humanitarian needs of the Iraqi people until the fulfilment by the Government of Iraq of the relevant resolutions, including notably resolution 687 (1991) of 3 April 1991, allows the Council to take further action with regard to the prohibitions referred to in resolution 661 (1990) of 6 August 1990, in accordance with the provisions of those resolutions,

            Convinced also of the need for equitable distribution of humanitarian supplies to all segments of the Iraqi population throughout the country,

            Determined to improve the humanitarian situation in Iraq,

            Reaffirming the commitment of all Member States to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Decides that the provisions of resolution 986 (1995), except those contained in paragraphs 4, 11 and 12 and subject to paragraph 15 of resolution 1284 (1999), shall remain in force for a new period of 150 days beginning at 00.01 hours, Eastern Daylight Time, on 4 July 2001;

            2.        Further decides that from the sum produced from the import by States of petroleum and petroleum products originating in Iraq, including financial and other essential transactions related thereto, in the 150-day period referred to in paragraph 1 above, the amounts recommended by the Secretary-General in his report of 1 February 1998 (S/1998/90) for the food/nutrition and health sectors should continue to be allocated on a priority basis in the context of the activities of the Secretariat, of which 13 per cent of the sum produced in the period referred to above shall be used for the purposes referred to in paragraph 8 (b) of resolution 986 (1995);

            3.        Requests the Secretary-General to continue to take the actions necessary to ensure the effective and efficient implementation of this resolution, and to continue to enhance as necessary the United Nations observation process in Iraq in such a way as to provide the required assurance to the Council that the goods produced in accordance with this resolution are distributed equitably and that all supplies authorized for procurement, including dual usage items and spare parts, are utilized for the purpose for which they have been authorized, including in the housing sector and related infrastructure development;

            4.        Decides to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the implementation of this resolution 90 days after the entry into force of paragraph 1 above and again prior to the end of the 150-day period, and expresses its intention, prior to the end of the 150-day period, to consider favourably renewal of the provisions of this resolution as appropriate, provided that the reports referred to in paragraphs 5 and 6 below indicate that those provisions are being satisfactorily implemented;

            5.        Requests the Secretary-General to provide a comprehensive report to the Council 90 days after the date of entry into force of this resolution on its implementation and again at least one week prior to the end of the 150-day period, on the basis of observations of United Nations personnel in Iraq, and of consultations with the Government of Iraq, on whether Iraq has ensured the equitable distribution of medicine, health supplies, foodstuffs, and materials and supplies for essential civilian needs, financed in accordance with paragraph 8 (a) of resolution 986 (1995), including in his reports any observations which he may have on the adequacy of the revenues to meet Iraq’s humanitarian needs;

            6.        Requests the Committee established by resolution 661 (1990), in close consultation with the Secretary-General, to report to the Council 90 days after the entry into force of paragraph 1 above and prior to the end of the 150-day period on the implementation of the arrangements in paragraphs 1, 2, 6, 8, 9 and 10 of resolution 986 (1995);

            7.        Decides that from the funds produced pursuant to this resolution in the escrow account established by paragraph 7 of resolution 986 (1995), up to a total of 600 million United States dollars may be used to meet any reasonable expenses, other than expenses payable in Iraq, which follow directly from the contracts approved in accordance with paragraph 2 of resolution 1175 (1998) of 19 June 1998 and paragraph 18 of resolution 1284 (1999), and expresses its intention to consider favourably the renewal of this measure;

            8.        Requests the Secretary-General to take the necessary steps to transfer the excess funds drawn from the account created pursuant to paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 986 (1995) for the purposes set out in paragraph 8 (a) of resolution 986 (1995) in order to increase the funds available for humanitarian purchases, including as appropriate the purposes referred to in paragraph 24 of resolution 1284 (1999);

            9.        Decides that the effective deduction rate of the funds deposited in the escrow account established by resolution 986 (1995) to be transferred to the Compensation Fund in the 150-day period shall be 25 per cent, further decides that the additional funds resulting from this decision will be deposited into the account established under paragraph 8 (a) of resolution 986 (1995) to be used for strictly humanitarian projects to address the needs of the most vulnerable groups in Iraq as referred to in paragraph 126 of the report of the Secretary-General of 29 November 2000 (S/2000/1132), requests the Secretary-General to report on the use of these funds in his reports referred to in paragraph 5 above, and expresses its intention to establish a mechanism to review, before the end of the 150-day period, the effective deduction rate of the funds deposited in the escrow account to be transferred to the Compensation Fund in future phases, taking into account the key elements of the humanitarian needs of the Iraqi people;

            10.      Urges all States, and in particular the Government of Iraq, to provide their full cooperation in the effective implementation of this resolution;

            11.      Calls upon the Government of Iraq to take the remaining steps necessary to implement paragraph 27 of resolution 1284 (1999), and further requests the Secretary-General to include in his reports under paragraph 5 above a review of the progress made by the Government of Iraq in the implementation of these measures;

            12.      Stresses the need to continue to ensure respect for the security and safety of all persons directly involved in the implementation of this resolution in Iraq;

            13.      Appeals to all States to continue to cooperate in the timely submission of applications and expeditious issue of export licences, facilitating the transit of humanitarian supplies authorized by the Committee established by resolution 661 (1990), and to take all other appropriate measures within their competence in order to ensure that urgently needed humanitarian supplies reach the Iraqi people as rapidly as possible;

            14.      Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1361         Sets 12 October to fill vacancy on International Court of Justice

                                                Date:  5 July 2001                 Meeting:  4345

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Noting with regret the resignation of Judge Mohammed Bedjaoui, taking effect on 30 September 2001,

            Noting further that a vacancy in the International Court of Justice for the remainder of the term of office of Judge Mohammed Bedjaoui will thus occur and must be filled in accordance with the terms of the Statute of the Court,

            Noting that, in accordance with Article 14 of the Statute, the date of the election to fill the vacancy shall be fixed by the Security Council,

            Decides that the election to fill the vacancy shall take place on 12 October 2001 at a meeting of the Security Council and at a meeting of the General Assembly at its fifty-sixth session.

S/RES/1362         Extension of UN Mission of Observers in Prevlaka

                                                Date:  11 July 2001                               Meeting:  4346

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling all its earlier relevant resolutions, including resolutions 779 (1992) of 6 October 1992, 981 (1995) of 31 March 1995, 1088 (1996) of 12 December 1996, 1147 (1998) of 13 January 1998, 1183 (1998) of 15 July 1998, 1222 (1999) of 15 January 1999, 1252 (1999) of 15 July 1999, 1285 (2000) of 13 January 2000, 1307 (2000) of 13 July 2000, 1335 (2001) of 12 January 2001 and 1357 (2001) of 21 June 2001,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 3 July (S/2001/661) on the United Nations Mission of Observers in Prevlaka (UNMOP),

            Recalling also the letters to its President from the Chargé d’affaires a.i. of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia of 5 July 2001 (S/2001/668) and from the Chargé d’affaires a.i. of the Republic of Croatia of 9 July 2001 (S/2001/680), concerning the disputed issue of Prevlaka,

            Reaffirming once again its commitment to the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Republic of Croatia within its internationally recognized borders,

            Noting once again the Joint Declaration signed at Geneva on 30 September 1992 by the Presidents of the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, in particular articles 1 and 3 thereof, the latter reaffirming their agreement concerning the demilitarization of the Prevlaka peninsula, and the Agreement on Normalization of Relations between the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia of 23 August 1996 (S/1996/706, annex),

            Noting with satisfaction that the overall situation in the UNMOP area of responsibility has remained stable and calm despite continuing violations of the demilitarization regime, including limitations placed on the free movement of United Nations military observers,

            Noting with satisfaction that the opening of crossing points between Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in the demilitarized zone continues to facilitate civilian and commercial traffic in both directions without security incidents and continues to represent a significant confidence-building measure in the normalization of relations between the two parties, and urging the parties to utilize these openings as a basis for further confidence-building measures to achieve the normalization of relations between them,

            Welcoming the joint statement by the Presidents of the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia issued in Verbania, Italy, on 8 June 2001 (A/56/116-S/2001/617) in which they expressed their commitment to normalize the bilateral relations between their countries, with a special emphasis on facilitating the free movement of persons, commodities and ideas, and to implement bilateral agreements already signed,

            Commending the role played by UNMOP, and noting also that the presence of the United Nations military observers continues to be essential to maintaining conditions that are conducive to a negotiated settlement of the disputed issue of Prevlaka,

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of the United Nations and Associated Personnel adopted on 9 December 1994 and the statement of its President of 10 February 2000 (S/PRST/2000/4),

            Welcoming and encouraging efforts by the United Nations to sensitize peacekeeping personnel in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases in all its peacekeeping operations,

            1.        Authorizes the United Nations military observers to continue monitoring the demilitarization of the Prevlaka Peninsula, in accordance with resolutions 779 (1992) and 981 (1995) and paragraphs 19 and 20 of the report of the Secretary-General of 13 December 1995 (S/1995/1028), until 15 January 2002, and requests the Secretary-General to continue to report to the Council where appropriate;

            2.        Reiterates its calls upon the parties to cease all violations of the demilitarized regime in the United Nations designated zones, to cooperate fully with the United Nations military observers and to ensure their safety and full and unrestricted freedom of movement;

            3.        Welcomes the resumption of talks between the Governments of the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, and urges the parties to continue their talks with the aim of fulfilling rapidly and in good faith their commitment to a negotiated resolution on the disputed issue of Prevlaka in accordance with article 4 of the Agreement on Normalization of Relations;

            4.        Encourages the parties to consider all confidence-building measures, including the options provided to them pursuant to resolution 1252 (1999), that could help facilitate a solution to the disputed issue of Prevlaka;

            5.        Requests the parties to continue to report at least bi-monthly to the Secretary-General on the status of their bilateral negotiations;

            6.        Requests the United Nations military observers and the multinational stabilization force authorized by the Council in resolution 1088 (1996) of 12 December 1996 and extended by resolution 1357 (2001) of 21 June 2001 to cooperate fully with each other;

            7.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1363    Requests establishment of Taliban sanctions monitoring mechanism

                                                Date:  30 July 2001                               Meeting:  4352

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its previous resolutions, in particular resolution 1267 (1999) of 15 October 1999 and resolution 1333 (2000) of 19 December 2000, as well as the statements of its President on the situation in Afghanistan,

            Determining that the situation in Afghanistan constitutes a threat to international peace and security in the region,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Stresses the obligation under the Charter of the United Nations of all Member States to comply fully with the measures imposed by resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000);

            2.        Welcomes the report (S/2001/511) of the Committee of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1333 (2000), and notes the conclusions and recommendations contained therein, following consultations with the States bordering the territory of Afghanistan under Taliban control which it had visited;

            3.        Requests the Secretary-General to establish, in consultation with the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999), within 30 days of the date of adoption of this resolution and for a period running concurrently with the application of the measures imposed by resolution 1333 (2000), a mechanism:

            (a)      to monitor the implementation of the measures imposed by resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000);

            (b)      to offer assistance to States bordering the territory of Afghanistan under Taliban control and other States, as appropriate, to increase their capacity regarding the implementation of the measures imposed by resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000); and

            (c)      to collate, assess, verify wherever possible, report and make recommendations on information regarding violations of the measures imposed by resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000);

            4.        Decides that the composition of the monitoring mechanism, bearing in mind inter alia equitable geographical distribution, should be comprised of:

            (a)      a Monitoring Group in New York of up to five experts, including a Chairman, to monitor the implementation of all the measures imposed by resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000), including in the fields of arms embargoes, counter-terrorism and related legislation and, in view of the link to the purchase of arms and financing of terrorism, money laundering, financial transactions and drug trafficking; and

            (b)      a Sanctions Enforcement Support Team, under the coordination of the Monitoring Group, of up to fifteen members with expertise in areas such as: customs, border security and counter-terrorism, to be located in those States referred to in paragraph 2 above, in full consultation and in close cooperation with those States;

            5.        Requests the Monitoring Group to report to the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999) including through briefings of experts of the monitoring mechanism regarding the work of the monitoring mechanism as established in paragraph 3 above, and requests also the Sanctions Enforcement Support Team to report at least once a month to the Monitoring Group;

            6.        Requests also the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999) to report to the Security Council on the implementation of this resolution at regular intervals;

            7.        Calls upon all States, the United Nations and concerned parties, to cooperate in a full and timely manner with the monitoring mechanism;

            8.        Urges all States to take immediate steps to enforce and strengthen through legislative enactments or administrative measures, where appropriate, the measures imposed under their domestic laws or regulations against their nationals and other individuals or entities operating on their territory, to prevent and punish violations of the measures imposed by resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000), and to inform the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999) of the adoption of such measures, and invites States to report the results of all related investigations or enforcement actions to the Committee unless to do so would compromise the investigation or enforcement action;

            9.        Requests the Secretary-General to make the necessary arrangements to support the work of the monitoring mechanism, as an expense of the Organization and through a United Nations Trust Fund established for this purpose, affirms that this Trust Fund will be established by the Secretary-General, encourages States to contribute to the Fund and to contribute, through the Secretary-General, personnel, equipment and services to the monitoring mechanism; and further requests the Secretary-General to keep the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999) informed on a regular basis of the financial arrangements supporting the mechanism;

            10.      Expresses its intention to review the implementation of the measures imposed by resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000) on the basis of the information provided by the monitoring mechanism through the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999);

            11.      Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1364         Extension of UN Observer Mission in Georgia

                                                Date:  31 July 2001                               Meeting:  4353

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling all its relevant resolutions, in particular resolution 1339 (2001) of 31 January 2001, and the statements of its President of 21 March 2001 (S/PRST/2001/9) and 24 April 2001 (S/PRST/2001/12),

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 19 July 2001 (S/2001/713),

            Recalling the conclusions of the Lisbon (S/1997/57, annex) and Istanbul summits of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) regarding the situation in Abkhazia, Georgia,

            Stressing that the continued lack of progress on key issues of a comprehensive settlement of the conflict in Abkhazia, Georgia, is unacceptable,

            Deeply concerned by the interruption of negotiating activities following the killings and hostage-taking incidents in April and May 2001 in the district of Gali, on 8 and 9 July 2001 in the Gulripshi area and again on 22 July 2001 in Primorsk,

            Expressing its regrets at the cancellation of the thirteenth session of the Coordinating Council of the Georgian and Abkhaz sides, initially scheduled for 17 July 2001, due to the withdrawal of the Abkhaz side following those incidents,

            Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel adopted on 9 December 1994,

            Welcoming the important contributions that the United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG) and the Collective Peacekeeping Forces of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS peacekeeping force) continue to make in stabilizing the situation in the zone of conflict, noting that the working relationship between UNOMIG and the CIS peacekeeping force has remained very close, and stressing the importance of close cooperation between them in the performance of their respective mandates,

            Noting the invitation of the Georgian Government for the Security Council to dispatch a mission to the region,

            1.        Welcomes the report of the Secretary-General of 19 July 2001;

            2.        Regrets the deterioration of the situation in the zone of conflict due to the ongoing violence, hostage-taking incidents, the rise in criminality and the activities of illegal armed groups in the conflict zone, which constitutes a constant threat to the peace process;

            3.        Strongly supports the sustained efforts of the Secretary-General and his Special Representative, with the assistance of the Russian Federation, in its capacity as facilitator as well as of the Group of Friends of the Secretary-General and of the OSCE, to promote the stabilization of the situation and the achievement of a comprehensive political settlement, which must include a settlement of the political status of Abkhazia within the State of Georgia;

            4.        Recalls the intention of the Special Representative to submit the draft paper on the question of the distribution of constitutional competences between Tbilisi and Sukhumi as a basis for meaningful negotiations, and not as an attempt to impose or dictate any specific solution to the parties;

            5.        Stresses the importance of early submission to the parties of the paper as a starting point and significant catalyst for negotiations on a comprehensive political settlement, and deeply regrets that the Special Representative of the Secretary-General has not been in a position to do so;

            6.        Stresses also the need to accelerate work on the draft protocol on the return of the refugees to the Gali region and measures for economic rehabilitation, as well as on the draft agreement on peace and guarantees for the prevention and for the non-resumption of hostilities;

            7.        Calls upon the parties, in particular the Abkhaz side, to undertake immediate efforts to move beyond the impasse and to engage into negotiations on the core political questions of the conflict and all other outstanding issues in the United Nations-led peace process;

            8.        Welcomes the documents signed at the Yalta meeting on confidence-building measures in March 2001 (S/2001/242), and urges the Georgian and Abkhaz sides to implement the proposals agreed in those documents in a purposeful and cooperative manner;

            9.        Calls upon the parties to resume their work in the Coordinating Council and its relevant mechanisms as soon as possible;

            10.      Urges the parties to work together, through more effective use of existing arrangements within the Coordinating Council mechanisms, in order to clarify the incidents of 8, 9 and 22 July 2001, bring about the release of the hostages still being held and bring the perpetrators to justice;

            11.      Reaffirms the unacceptability of the demographic changes resulting from the conflict, and reaffirms also the inalienable right of all refugees and internally displaced persons affected by the conflict to return to their homes in secure and dignified conditions, in accordance with international law and as set out in the Quadripartite Agreement of 4 April 1994 (S/1994/397,       annex II);

            12.      Further urges the parties, in this context, to address urgently and in a concerted manner, as a first step, the undefined and insecure status of spontaneous returnees to the Gali district, which remains an issue of serious concern;

            13.      Welcomes measures undertaken by the Government of Georgia, the United Nations Development Programme, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the Office for the Coordinator of Humanitarian Affairs and the World Bank to improve the situation of refugees and internally displaced persons to develop their skills and to increase their self-reliance with full respect for their inalienable right to return to their homes in secure and dignified conditions;

            14.      Recalls with satisfaction the joint assessment mission to the Gali district, carried out under the aegis of the United Nations, and looks forward to a discussion by the parties of practical steps to implement the mission’s recommendations;

            15.      Deplores all violations of the Moscow Agreement of 14 May 1994 on a Ceasefire and Separation of Forces (S/1994/583, annex I), and notes with particular concern the military exercises conducted by both parties in June and July 2001 in violation of the Moscow Agreement;

            16.      Expresses its concern at the disturbing tendency by the parties to restrict the freedom of movement of UNOMIG, thereby hindering the ability of the Mission to fulfil its mandate, urges both sides to return immediately to full compliance with the Moscow Agreement, which remains a cornerstone of the United Nations peace effort, and calls upon the parties to ensure the security and freedom of movement of United Nations and other international personnel;

            17.      Recalls that the Georgian and the Abkhaz sides bear the primary responsibility for the security of UNOMIG, the CIS peacekeeping force and other international personnel and for full compliance with all security arrangements agreed between them to preclude any further aggravation of the situation, and urges both parties to bring to justice the perpetrators of all hostage-taking incidents, particularly the abduction of two UNOMIG military observers in the Kodori Valley on 10 December 2000;

            18.      Reminds the Georgian side in particular to uphold its commitment to put a stop to the activities of illegal armed groups crossing into Abkhazia, Georgia, from the Georgian-controlled side of the ceasefire line;

            19.      Welcomes UNOMIG keeping its security arrangements under constant review in order to ensure the highest possible level of security for its staff;

            20.      Decides to extend the mandate of UNOMIG for a new period terminating on 31 January 2002, subject to a review by the Council of the mandate of UNOMIG in the event of any changes that may be made in the mandate or in the presence of the CIS peacekeeping force, and expresses its intention to conduct a thorough review of the operation at the end of its current mandate, in the light of steps taken by the parties to achieve a comprehensive settlement;

            21.      Requests the Secretary-General to continue to keep the Council regularly informed and to report three months from the date of the adoption of this resolution on the situation in Abkhazia, Georgia, and requests also the Secretary-General to provide for a briefing within three months on the progress of the political settlement, including on the status of the draft paper his Special Representative intends to submit to the parties as referred to in paragraph 4 above;

            22.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1365         Extension of UN Interim Force in Lebanon

                                                Date:  31 July 2001                               Meeting:  4354

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling all its previous resolutions on Lebanon, in particular resolutions 425 (1978) and 426 (1978) of 19 March 1978, 1310 (2000) of 27 July 2000 and 1337 (2001) of 30 January 2001, as well as the statements of its President on the situation in Lebanon, in particular the statement of 18 June 2000 (S/PRST/2000/21),

            Recalling further the letter from its President to the Secretary-General of 18 May 2001 (S/2001/500),

            Recalling also the Secretary-General’s conclusion that, as of 16 June 2000, Israel had withdrawn its forces from Lebanon in accordance with resolution 425 (1978) and met the requirements defined in the Secretary-General’s report of 22 May 2000 (S/2000/460), as well as the Secretary-General’s conclusion that the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) had essentially completed two of the three parts of its mandate, focusing now on the remaining task of restoring international peace and security,

            Emphasizing the interim nature of UNIFIL,

            Recalling its resolution 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000,

            Recalling further the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel adopted on 9 December 1994,

            Responding to the request of the Government of Lebanon, as stated in the letter from its Permanent Representative to the United Nations of 9 July 2001 to the Secretary-General (S/2001/677),

            1.        Welcomes the report of the Secretary-General on UNIFIL of 20 July 2001 (S/2001/714), and endorses his observations and recommendations;

            2.        Decides to extend the present mandate of UNIFIL, as recommended by the Secretary-General, for a further period of 6 months, until 31 January 2002;

            3.        Requests the Secretary-General to continue to take the necessary measures to implement the reconfiguration and redeployment of UNIFIL as outlined in his report and in accordance with the letter of the President of the Security Council of 18 May 2001 in the light of developments on the ground and in consultation with the Government of Lebanon and the troop-contributing countries;

            4.        Reiterates its strong support for the territorial integrity, sovereignty and political independence of Lebanon within its internationally recognized boundaries;

            5.        Calls on the Government of Lebanon to take more steps to ensure the return of its effective authority throughout the south, including the deployment of Lebanese armed forces;

            6.        Calls on the parties to ensure UNIFIL is accorded full freedom of movement in the discharge of its mandate throughout its area of operation;

            7.        Encourages the Government of Lebanon to ensure a calm environment throughout the south;

            8.        Reiterates its call on the parties to continue to fulfil the commitments they have given to respect fully the withdrawal line identified by the United Nations, as set out in the Secretary-General’s report of 16 June 2000 (S/2000/590), to exercise utmost restraint and to cooperate fully with the United Nations and UNIFIL;

            9.        Condemns all acts of violence, expresses great concern about the serious breaches and the air, sea and land violations of the withdrawal line, and urges the parties to put an end to them and to respect the safety of the UNIFIL personnel;

            10.      Supports the continued efforts of UNIFIL to maintain the ceasefire along the withdrawal line through mobile patrols and observation from fixed positions and through close contacts with the parties to correct violations, resolve incidents and prevent the escalation of incidents;

            11.      Welcomes the continued contribution of UNIFIL to operational demining, encourages further assistance in mine action by the United Nations to the Government of Lebanon in support of both the continued development of its national mine action capacity and emergency demining activities in the south, commends donor countries for supporting these efforts through financial and in-kind contributions, and stresses the necessity to provide the Government of Lebanon and UNIFIL with any additional maps and records on the location of mines;

            12.      Requests the Secretary-General to continue consultations with the Government of Lebanon and other parties directly concerned on the implementation of this resolution;

            13.      Looks forward to the early fulfilment of the mandate of UNIFIL;

            14.      Requests the Secretary-General, following appropriate consultations, including with the Government of Lebanon and the troop-contributing countries, to submit to the Council before the end of the present mandate a comprehensive report on the activities of UNIFIL, taking into account its possible reconfiguration to an observer mission in the light of developments on the ground and on the tasks carried out by the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO);

            15.      Stresses the importance of, and the need to achieve, a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East, based on all its relevant resolutions including its resolution 242 (1967) of 22 November 1967 and 338 (1973) of 22 October 1973.

S/RES/1366         Commitment to pursue conflict prevention by all appropriate means

                                                                                                                                                         Date:  30 August 2001                                Meeting:  4360

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 1196 (1998) of 16 September 1998, 1197 (1998) of 18 September 1998, 1208 (1998) of 19 November 1998, 1209 (1998) of 19 November 1998; 1265 (1999) of 17 September 1999, 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000, 1318 (2000) of 7 September 2000, 1325 (2000) of 31 October 2000 and 1327 (2000) of 13 November 2000,

            Recalling also the statements of its President of 16 September 1998 (S/PRST/1998/28), 24 September 1998 (S/PRST/1998/29), 30 November 1998 (S/PRST/1998/35), 24 September 1999 (S/PRST/1999/28), 30 November 1999 (S/PRST/1999/34), 23 March 2000 (S/PRST/2000/10), 20 July 2000 (S/PRST/2000/25), 20 February 2001 (S/PRST/2001/5) and 22 March 2001 (S/PRST/2001/10),

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Armed Conflict (S/2001/574) and in particular the recommendations contained therein relating to the role of the Security Council,

            Reiterating the purposes and principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations and reaffirming its commitment to the principles of the political independence, sovereign equality and territorial integrity of all States,

            Mindful of the consequences of armed conflict on relations between and among States, the economic burden on the nations involved as well as on the international community, and above all, the humanitarian consequences of conflicts,

            Bearing in mind its primary responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security and reaffirming its role in the prevention of armed conflicts,

            Stressing the need for the maintenance of regional and international peace and stability and friendly relations among all States, and underlining the overriding political, humanitarian and moral imperatives as well as the economic advantages of preventing the outbreak and escalation of conflicts,

            Emphasizing the importance of a comprehensive strategy comprising operational and structural measures for prevention of armed conflict; and recognizing the ten principles outlined by the Secretary-General in his report on prevention of armed conflicts,

            Noting with satisfaction the increased recourse, with consent of receiving Member States, to Security Council missions to areas of conflict or potential conflict, which among others, can play an important role in the prevention of armed conflicts,

            Reiterating that conflict prevention is one of the primary responsibilities of Member States,

            Recognizing the essential role of the Secretary-General in the prevention of armed conflict and the importance of efforts to enhance his role in accordance with Article 99 of the Charter of the United Nations,

            Recognizing the role of other relevant organs, offices, funds and programmes and the specialized agencies of the United Nations, and other international organizations including the World Trade Organization and the Bretton Woods institutions; as well as the role of non-governmental organizations, civil society actors and the private sector in the prevention of armed conflict,

            Stressing the necessity of addressing the root-causes and regional dimensions of conflicts, recalling the recommendations contained in the report of the Secretary-General on Causes of Conflicts and the Promotion of Durable Peace and Sustainable Development in Africa of 13 April 1998 (S/1998/318) and underlining the mutually supportive relationship between conflict prevention and sustainable development,

            Expressing serious concern over the threat to peace and security caused by the illicit trade in and the excessive and destabilizing accumulation of small arms and light weapons in areas of conflict and their potential to exacerbate and prolong armed conflicts,

            Emphasizing the importance of adequate, predictable and properly targeted resources for conflict prevention and of consistent funding for long-term preventive activities,

            Reiterating that early warning, preventive diplomacy, preventive deployment, practical disarmament measures and post-conflict peace-building are interdependent and complementary components of a comprehensive conflict prevention strategy,

            Underlining the importance of raising awareness of and ensuring respect for international humanitarian law, stressing the fundamental responsibility of Member States to prevent and end impunity for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, recognizing the role of the ad hoc tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda in deterring the future occurrence of such crimes thereby helping to prevent armed conflict; and stressing the importance of international efforts in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations in this regard,

            Reiterating the shared commitment to save people from the ravages of armed conflicts, acknowledging the lessons to be learned for all concerned from the failure of preventive efforts that preceded such tragedies as the genocide in Rwanda (S/1999/1257) and the massacre in Srebrenica (A/54/549), and resolving to take appropriate action within its competence, combined with the efforts of Member States, to prevent the recurrence of such tragedies,

            1.        Expresses its determination to pursue the objective of prevention of armed conflict as an integral part of its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security;

            2.        Stresses that the essential responsibility for conflict prevention rests with national Governments, and that the United Nations and the international community can play an important role in support of national efforts for conflict prevention and can assist in building national capacity in this field and recognizes the important supporting role of civil society;

            3.        Calls upon Member States as well as regional and subregional organizations and arrangements to support the development of a comprehensive conflict prevention strategy as proposed by the Secretary-General;

            4.        Emphasizes that for the success of a preventive strategy, the United Nations needs the consent and support of the Government concerned and, if possible the cooperation of other key national actors and underlines in this regard that the sustained political will of neighbouring States, regional allies or other Member States who would be well placed to support United Nations efforts, is necessary;

            5.        Expresses its willingness to give prompt consideration to early warning or prevention cases brought to its attention by the Secretary-General and in this regard, encourages the Secretary-General to convey to the Security Council his assessment of potential threats to international peace and security with due regard to relevant regional and subregional dimensions, as appropriate, in accordance with Article 99 of the Charter of the United Nations;

            6.        Undertakes to keep situations of potential conflict under close review as part of a conflict prevention strategy and expresses its intention to consider cases of potential conflict brought to its attention by any Member State, or by a State not a Member of the United Nations or by the General Assembly or on the basis of information furnished by the Economic and Social Council;

            7.        Expresses its commitment to take early and effective action to prevent armed conflict and to that end to employ all appropriate means at its disposal including, with the consent of the receiving States, its missions to areas of potential conflict;

            8.        Reiterates its call to Member States to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations in the maintenance of international peace and security and in this regard urges them to provide the necessary human, material and financial resources for timely and preventive measures including early warning, preventive diplomacy, preventive deployment, practical disarmament measures and peace-building as appropriate in each case;

            9.        Reaffirms its role in the peaceful settlement of disputes and reiterates its call upon the Member States to settle their disputes by peaceful means as set forth in Chapter VI of the Charter of the United Nations including by use of regional preventive mechanisms and more frequent resort to the International Court of Justice;

            10.      Invites the Secretary-General to refer to the Council information and analyses from within the United Nations system on cases of serious violations of international law, including international humanitarian law and human rights law and on potential conflict situations arising, inter alia, from ethnic, religious and territorial disputes, poverty and lack of development and expresses its determination to give serious consideration to such information and analyses regarding situations which it deems to represent a threat to international peace and security;

            11.      Expresses its intention to continue to invite the Office of the United Nations Emergency Relief Coordinator and other relevant United Nations agencies to brief its members on emergency situations which it deems to represent a threat to international peace and security and supports the implementation of protection and assistance activities by relevant United Nations agencies in accordance with their respective mandates;

            12.      Expresses its willingness to consider preventive deployment upon the recommendation of the Secretary-General and with the consent of the Member States concerned;

            13.      Calls upon all Member States to ensure timely and faithful implementation of the United Nations Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (A/CONF.192/15) adopted on 20 July 2001 and to take all necessary measures at national, regional and global levels to prevent and combat the illicit flow of small arms and light weapons in areas of conflict;

            14.      Expresses its willingness to make full use of information from the Secretary-General provided to him inter alia, under paragraph 33 section II of the Programme of Action in its efforts to prevent armed conflict;

            15.      Stresses the importance of the inclusion, as part of a conflict prevention strategy, of peace-building components including civilian police within peacekeeping operations on a case-by-case basis to facilitate a smooth transition to the post conflict peace-building phase and the ultimate conclusion of the mission;

            16.      Decides to consider inclusion as appropriate, of a disarmament, demobilization and reintegration component in the mandates of United Nations peacekeeping and peace-building operations with particular attention to the rehabilitation of child soldiers;

            17.      Reiterates its recognition of the role of women in conflict prevention and requests the Secretary-General to give greater attention to gender perspectives in the implementation of peacekeeping and peace-building mandates as well as in conflict prevention efforts;

            18.      Supports the enhancement of the role of the Secretary-General in conflict prevention including by increased use of United Nations interdisciplinary fact-finding and confidence-building missions to regions of tension, developing regional prevention strategies with regional partners and appropriate United Nations organs and agencies, and improving the capacity and resource base for preventive action in the Secretariat;

            19.      Endorses the call of the Secretary-General for support to the follow-up processes launched by the Third and Fourth High-level United Nations-Regional Organizations Meetings in the field of conflict prevention and peace-building, and to provide increased resources for the development of regional capacities in these fields;

            20.      Calls for the enhancement of the capacity for conflict prevention of regional organizations, in particular in Africa, by extending international assistance to, inter alia, the Organization of African Unity and its successor organization, through its Mechanism of Conflict Prevention, Management and Resolution, as well as to the Economic Community of West African States and its Mechanism for Prevention, Management and Resolution of Conflicts, Peacekeeping and Security;

            21.      Stresses the need to create conditions for durable peace and sustainable development by addressing the root-causes of armed conflict and to this end, calls upon Member States and relevant bodies of the United Nations system to contribute to the effective implementation of the United Nations Declaration and Programme of Action for a Culture of Peace (A/53/243);

            22.      Looks forward to further consideration of the report of the Secretary-General on Prevention of Armed Conflict by the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council, as well as other actors including the Bretton Woods institutions and supports the development of a system-wide coordinated and mutually supportive approach to prevention of armed conflict;

            23.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1367         End of prohibition of arms sales to Yugoslavia

                                                Date:  10 September 2001                    Meeting:  4366

                                                                                                                                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 1160 (1998) of 31 March 1998, 1199 (1998) of 23 September 1998, 1203 (1998) of 24 October 1998, and reaffirming, in particular, its resolutions 1244 (1999) of 10 June 1999 and 1345 (2001) of 21 March 2001,

            Noting with satisfaction that the conditions listed in paragraph 16 (a) to (e) of its resolution 1160 (1998) have been satisfied,

            Noting, in that respect, the letter of the Secretary-General dated 6 September 2001 (S/2001/849),

            Noting further the difficult security situation along Kosovo’s administrative boundary and parts of the border of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and emphasizing the continuing authority of the Secretary-General’s Special Representative as head of the international civil presence and of the Commander of the international security presence (KFOR) to restrict and strictly control the flow of arms into, within and out of Kosovo, pursuant to resolution 1244 (1999),

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Decides to terminate the prohibitions established by paragraph 8 of resolution 1160 (1998);

            2.        Decides further to dissolve the Committee established by paragraph 9 of resolution 1160 (1998).

S/RES/1368         Condemnation of terrorist attacks on United States

                                                Date:  12 September 2001                    Meeting:  4370

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming the principles and purposes of the Charter of the United Nations,

            Determined to combat by all means threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts,

            Recognizing the inherent right of individual or collective self-defence in accordance with the Charter,

            1.        Unequivocally condemns in the strongest terms the horrifying terrorist attacks which took place on 11 September 2001 in New York, Washington, D.C. and Pennsylvania and regards such acts, like any act of international terrorism, as a threat to international peace and security;

            2.        Expresses its deepest sympathy and condolences to the victims and their families and to the people and Government of the United States of America;

            3.        Calls on all States to work together urgently to bring to justice the perpetrators, organizers and sponsors of these terrorist attacks and stresses that those responsible for aiding, supporting or harbouring the perpetrators, organizers and sponsors of these acts will be held accountable;

            4.        Calls also on the international community to redouble their efforts to prevent and suppress terrorist acts including by increased cooperation and full implementation of the relevant international anti-terrorist conventions and Security Council resolutions, in particular resolution 1269 (1999) of 19 October 1999;

            5.        Expresses its readiness to take all necessary steps to respond to the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, and to combat all forms of terrorism, in accordance with its responsibilities under the Charter of the United Nations;

            6.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1369         Extension of UN Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea

                                                Date:  14 September 2001                    Meeting:  4372

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling resolutions 1298 (2000) of 17 May 2000, 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000, 1312 (2000) of 31 July 2000, 1320 (2000) of 15 September 2000 and 1344 (2001) of 15 March 2001, the statements of its President of 9 February 2001 (S/PRST/4) and of 15 May 2001 (S/PRST/2001/14) and all relevant previous resolutions and statements pertaining to the situation between Ethiopia and Eritrea,

            Reaffirming the commitment of all Member States to the sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of Ethiopia and Eritrea,

            Further reaffirming the need for both parties to fulfil their obligations under international law, international humanitarian law, human rights law and refugee law, and to ensure the safety of all personnel of the United Nations, the International Committee of the Red Cross and other humanitarian organizations,

            Reaffirming its strong support for the Comprehensive Peace Agreement between the Government of the State of Eritrea and the Government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, signed in Algiers on 12 December 2000 (S/2000/1183), and the preceding Agreement of Cessation of Hostilities, signed in Algiers on 18 June 2000 (hereafter referred to collectively as the Algiers Agreements),

            Further reaffirming its strong support for the help in implementing the Algiers Agreements continuously provided by the Secretary-General and his Special Representative, including through their good offices, and by the Organization of African Unity (OAU),

            Reaffirming its strong support for the role played by the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE) in the implementation of its mandate, as well as by the OAU Liaison Mission in Ethiopia-Eritrea (OLMEE),

            Welcoming the progress made thus far in implementing the Algiers Agreements, including in the establishment and functioning of the Temporary Security Zone (TSZ) and the constitution of the Boundary and Claims Commissions, respectively,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 5 September 2001 (S/2001/843),

            1.        Decides to extend the mandate of UNMEE at the troop and military observer levels authorized by its resolution 1320 (2000) until 15 March 2002;

            2.        Calls on the parties to cooperate fully and expeditiously with UNMEE in the implementation of its mandate and to abide scrupulously by the letter and spirit of their agreements, including regarding cooperation with the Boundary Commission and facilitation of its work;

            3.        Emphasizes that the Algiers Agreements link the termination of UNMEE with the completion of the work of the Boundary Commission related to delimitation and demarcation of the Ethiopia-Eritrea border;

            4.        Further emphasizes that the Temporary Security Zone (TSZ) must be completely demilitarized;

            5.        Calls on the parties to urgently resolve the outstanding issues in accordance with the Algiers Agreements and fulfil the following obligations:

            (a)      The parties must provide freedom of movement and access for UNMEE personnel and its supplies as required for the performance of UNMEE’s duties; Eritrea must without restrictions allow UNMEE to monitor the 15 km area north of the TSZ and Ethiopia must avoid creating restrictions on the freedom of movement of UNMEE in the 15 km area south of the TSZ;

            (b)      The parties must facilitate the establishment of a secure and practicable air corridor between Addis Ababa and Asmara, which does not require a detour through other countries, by accepting the proposal made in this regard by the Special Representative of the Secretary General;

            (c)      Eritrea must provide UNMEE with information on the local militia and police inside the TSZ, including their weapons, necessary for the mission to verify that the functions and configuration of the militia and police do not exceed that which prevailed before the outbreak of the conflict;

            (d)      Ethiopia must provide UNMEE with full information and maps concerning all minefields so as to facilitate the work of the Mine Action Coordination Centre with a view, inter alia, to allow internally displaced persons to return safely to homes within the TSZ;

            (e)      Eritrea must, without further delay, conclude the Status of Forces Agreement with the Secretary-General;

            (f)       The parties must, unconditionally and without further delay, and in accordance with the 1949 Geneva Conventions, release and return the remaining prisoners of war and detainees under the auspices of the International Committee of the Red Cross;

            (g)      The parties must fulfil their financial responsibilities regarding the Boundary Commission;

            6.        Further calls on the parties, where relevant in cooperation with UNMEE, to explore and pursue a range of confidence-building measures, including the following:

            (a)      Affording humane treatment to each other’s nationals and persons of each other’s national origin and allowing each other’s nationals to remain, without discrimination, in locations where they have decided to settle;

            (b)      Assisting relevant initiatives and contacts between organizations and groups, including those of the civil society, in the two countries;

            (c)      Exercising restraint in public statements;

            7.        Encourages all States and international organizations to support the peace process, including through:

            (a)      Contributions to the voluntary Trust Fund to Support the Peace Process in Ethiopia and Eritrea to facilitate Quick-Impact Projects for emergency reconstruction and confidence-building measures;

            (b)      Contributions to the voluntary Trust Fund for the Delimitation and Demarcation of the border between Ethiopia and Eritrea;

            (c)      Contributions to the United Nations Country Teams’ Consolidated Appeals for Humanitarian Assistance to Eritrea and Ethiopia;

            (d)      Assistance to facilitate sustainable reintegration of demobilized soldiers, internally displaced persons and refugees;

            (e)      Assistance in the longer term tasks of reconstruction and development, and the economic and social recovery of Ethiopia and Eritrea;

            (f)       Exercising the highest degree of responsibility in discouraging arms flows to the region;

            8.        Urges the parties to ensure that efforts are redirected from weapons procurement and other military activities towards the reconstruction and development of their economies and encourages both countries to continue and enhance the efforts to improve their relations in order to promote regional peace and security;

            9.        Expresses its intention to continue to monitor closely progress by the parties in implementing the provisions of the Algiers Agreements and the requirements of this resolution, and to consider a mission to the two countries before agreeing to a further mandate renewal in order to monitor progress and discuss possible further steps towards reconciliation;

            10.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1370         Extension of UN Mission in Sierra Leone

                                                Date:  18 September 2001                    Meeting:  4374

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 1270 (1999) of 22 October 1999, 1289 (2000) of 7 February 2000, 1313 (2000) of 4 August 2000, 1317 (2000) of 5 September 2000, 1321 (2000) of 20 September 2000 and 1346 (2001) of 30 March 2001, and the statement of its President of 3 November 2000 (S/PRST/2000/31), and all other relevant resolutions and statements of its President concerning the situation in Sierra Leone,

            Affirming the commitment of all States to respect the sovereignty, political independence and territorial integrity of Sierra Leone,

            Expressing its concern at the fragile security situation in the Mano River countries, in particular the continued fighting in Liberia, and at the humanitarian consequences for the civilian, refugee and internally displaced populations in those areas,

            Welcoming the progress made in the peace process aimed at achieving sustainable peace and security in Sierra Leone and commending the positive role of the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) in advancing the peace process,

            Recognizing the importance of the progressive extension of State authority throughout the entire country, political dialogue and national reconciliation, the holding by the Government of Sierra Leone of free, fair and transparent elections, the transformation of the Revolutionary United Front (RUF) into a political party, full respect for the human rights of all and the rule of law, effective action on the issues of impunity and accountability, the voluntary and unhindered return of refugees and internally displaced persons, the full implementation of a disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programme, the legitimate exploitation of the natural resources of Sierra Leone for the benefit of its people, and stressing that the United Nations should continue to support the fulfilment of these objectives,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 7 September 2001 (S/2001/857),

            1.        Decides that the mandate of UNAMSIL shall be extended for a period of six months from 30 September 2001;

            2.        Expresses its appreciation to those Member States providing troops and support elements to UNAMSIL and those who have made commitments to do so;

            3.        Requests the Secretary-General to inform the Council at regular intervals on progress made by UNAMSIL in the implementation of key aspects of its concept of operations, and further requests him to provide an assessment in his next report on steps taken to improve the effectiveness of UNAMSIL;

            4.        Expresses its continued deep concern at the reports of human rights abuses and attacks committed by the RUF, the Civil Defence Forces (CDF) and other armed groups and individuals, against the civilian population, in particular the widespread violation of the human rights of women and children, including sexual violence, demands that these acts cease immediately, and requests the Secretary-General to ensure that all human rights monitoring positions within UNAMSIL are filled in order to address the concerns raised in paragraphs 40 to 43 of the report of the Secretary-General;

            5.        Welcomes the efforts made by the Government of Sierra Leone and the RUF towards full implementation of the Ceasefire Agreement signed in Abuja on 10 November 2000 (S/2000/1091) between the Government of Sierra Leone and the RUF and reaffirmed at the meeting of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), the United Nations, the Government of Sierra Leone and the RUF at Abuja on 2 May 2001, and encourages them to continue those efforts;

            6.        In particular, urges the RUF to step up its efforts to fulfil its commitment under the Abuja Ceasefire Agreement to ensure full liberty for the United Nations to deploy its troops throughout the country and also, with a view to restoring the authority of the Government of Sierra Leone throughout the country, to ensure the free movement of persons, goods and humanitarian assistance, unimpeded and safe movement of humanitarian agencies, refugees and displaced persons and the immediate return of all seized weapons, ammunition and other equipment;

            7.        Encourages the Government of Sierra Leone and the RUF to continue to take steps towards furthering of dialogue and national reconciliation, and, in this regard, stresses the importance of the reintegration of the RUF into Sierra Leone society and the transformation of the RUF into a political party, and demands that the RUF cease any effort at maintaining options for military action;

            8.        Requests UNAMSIL to continue to support, within its capabilities and areas of deployment, returning refugees and displaced persons and urges the RUF to cooperate to this end in fulfilment of its commitments under the Abuja Ceasefire Agreement;

            9.        Requests the Secretary-General to provide the Council, further to his report of 23 May 2001 (S/2001/513), an update of his views on how to take forward the issue of refugees and internally displaced persons, including their return;

            10.      Urges Governments and regional leaders concerned to continue their full cooperation with ECOWAS and the United Nations to promote the efforts of all parties to the Sierra Leone conflict towards the full and peaceful implementation of the Abuja Ceasefire Agreement, and to provide assistance to that end;

            11.      Encourages the ongoing efforts of ECOWAS towards a lasting and final settlement of the crisis in the Mano River Union region, and underlines the importance of the continuing political and other support that the United Nations provides to these efforts in order to stabilize the region;

            12.      Welcomes the positive impact of progress made in the Sierra Leone peace process on the situation in the Mano River basin, including the recent Ministerial meetings of the Mano River Union and the prospects for a summit meeting of Mano River Union Presidents, and in this regard, encourages the efforts of the Mano River Union Women’s Peace Network towards regional peace;

            13.      Emphasizes the importance of a successful disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programme to long-term stability in Sierra Leone, welcomes the progress made in that process and urges the RUF, CDF and other groups to continue their commitment to, and active participation in, the programme;

            14.      Expresses concern at the serious financial shortfall in the multi-donor Trust Fund for the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programme, and urges international organizations and donor countries to support generously and urgently the efforts of the Government of Sierra Leone in this regard, as well as provide additional funds for the wide range of urgently needed post-conflict activities, including humanitarian and rehabilitation requirements;

            15.      Emphasizes the importance of free, fair, transparent and inclusive elections for the long-term stability of Sierra Leone and takes note of UNAMSIL’s readiness to provide support, within its capabilities, to facilitate the smooth holding of the elections;

            16.      Emphasizes that the development and extension of the administrative capacities of Sierra Leone are essential to sustainable peace and development in the country, and to the holding of free, fair and transparent elections, and therefore urges the Government of Sierra Leone, with the assistance of UNAMSIL, in accordance with its mandate, to accelerate and coordinate efforts to restore civil authority and basic public services throughout the country (including in the diamond mining areas), including by the deployment of key administrative officials and the Sierra Leone police and the progressive involvement of the Sierra Leone Army in providing border security against external forces, and encourages States, other international organizations and non-governmental organizations to provide appropriate assistance in this regard;

            17.      Encourages the Government of Sierra Leone, together with the Secretary-General, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and other relevant international actors, to expedite the establishment of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Special Court envisaged by resolution 1315 (2000) of 14 August 2000, bearing in mind in particular the need to ensure the appropriate protection of children, and urges donors urgently to commit funds for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and to disburse their financial pledges to the Trust Fund for the Special Court;

            18.      Welcomes the Secretary-General’s intention to keep the security, political, humanitarian and human rights situation in Sierra Leone under close review and to report to the Council, after due consultations with troop-contributing countries, with any additional recommendations, including on how UNAMSIL will provide support to the Government of Sierra Leone in holding elections;

            19.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1371         Condemnation of violence in former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Serbia

                                                Date:  26 September 2001                    Meeting:  4381

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 1244 (1999) of 10 June 1999 and 1345 (2001) of 21 March 2001 and the statements of its President of 7 March 2001 (S/PRST/2001/7), 16 March 2001 (S/PRST/2001/8) and 13 August 2001 (S/PRST/2001/20),

            Welcoming the steps taken by the Government of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to consolidate a multi-ethnic society within its borders, and expressing its full support for the further development of this process,

            Welcoming in this regard the signing of the Framework Agreement at Skopje on 13 August 2001 by the President of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and the leaders of four political parties,

            Welcoming international efforts, including those of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the European Union and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, in cooperation with the Government of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and other States, to prevent the escalation of ethnic tensions in the area and to facilitate the full implementation of the Framework Agreement, thus contributing to peace and stability in the region,

            Welcoming the letter from the Permanent Representative of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to the President of the Security Council of 21 September 2001 (S/2001/897),

            1.        Reaffirms its commitment to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and other States of the region;

            2.        Calls for the full implementation of resolution 1345 (2001);

            3.        Supports the full and timely implementation of the Framework Agreement, rejects the use of violence in pursuit of political aims and stresses that only peaceful political solutions can assure a stable and democratic future for The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia;

            4.        Welcomes the efforts of the European Union and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe to contribute to the implementation of the Framework Agreement, in particular through the presence of international observers;

            5.        Endorses the efforts of Member States and relevant international organizations to support the implementation of the Framework Agreement and strongly supports in that regard the establishment of a multinational security presence in The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia at the request of its Government to contribute towards the security of the observers, and invites the Government of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to keep the Council informed;

            6.        Demands that all concerned ensure the safety of international personnel in The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia;

            7.        Welcomes the efforts of the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo and the international security presence (KFOR) to implement fully resolution 1244 (1999), in particular by further strengthening its efforts to prevent unauthorized movement and illegal arms shipments across borders and boundaries, to confiscate illegal weapons within Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, and to keep the Council informed;

            8.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1372         Lifting of sanctions against Sudan

                                                Date:  28 September 2001                    Meeting:  4384

                                                Vote:  14-0-1

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolutions 1044 (1996) of 31 January 1996, 1054 (1996) of 26 April 1996 and 1070 (1996) of 16 August 1996,

            Noting the steps taken by the Government of the Sudan to comply with the provisions of resolutions 1044 (1996) and 1070 (1996),

            Noting in that respect the communications from the Permanent Representative of South Africa on behalf of the Non-aligned Movement, and the Permanent Representative of Algeria on Behalf of the League of Arab States and the Permanent Representative of Gabon on behalf of the African Group (S/2000/521, S/2000/517 and S/2000/533), and from the Secretary-General of the Organization of African Unity dated 20 June 2000,

            Noting further, the letter of the Acting Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, dated 5 June 2000, and the letter of the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Arab Republic of Egypt, dated 9 June 2000 supporting the lifting of sanctions imposed on the Republic of the Sudan,

            Noting also the contents of the letter dated 1 June 2000 from the Minister of External Relations of the Republic of the Sudan addressed to the Secretary-General of the United Nations (S/2000/513),

            Welcoming the accession of the Republic of the Sudan to the relevant international conventions for the elimination of terrorism, its ratification of the 1997 International Convention for the Suppression of Terrorist Bombing and its signing of the 1999 International Convention for the Suppression of Financing of Terrorism,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Decides to terminate, with immediate effect, the measures referred to in paragraphs 3 and 4 of resolution 1054 (1996) and paragraph 3 of resolution 1070 (1996).

                Vote on resolution 1372:

                In favour:     Bangladesh, China, Colombia, France, Ireland, Jamaica, Mali, Mauritius, Norway,

                                       Russiand Federation, Singapore, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

                Against:       None.

                Abstaining:  United States.

S/RES/1373         Anti-terrorism measures

                                                Date:  28 September 2001                    Meeting:  4385

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its resolutions 1269 (1999) of 19 October 1999 and 1368 (2001) of 12 September 2001,

            Reaffirming also its unequivocal condemnation of the terrorist attacks which took place in New York, Washington, D.C. and Pennsylvania on 11 September 2001, and expressing its determination to prevent all such acts,

            Reaffirming further that such acts, like any act of international terrorism, constitute a threat to international peace and security,

            Reaffirming the inherent right of individual or collective self-defence as recognized by the Charter of the United Nations as reiterated in resolution 1368 (2001),

            Reaffirming the need to combat by all means, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts,

            Deeply concerned by the increase, in various regions of the world, of acts of terrorism motivated by intolerance or extremism,

            Calling on States to work together urgently to prevent and suppress terrorist acts, including through increased cooperation and full implementation of the relevant international conventions relating to terrorism,

            Recognizing the need for States to complement international cooperation by taking additional measures to prevent and suppress, in their territories through all lawful means, the financing and preparation of any acts of terrorism,

            Reaffirming the principle established by the General Assembly in its declaration of October 1970 (resolution 2625 (XXV)) and reiterated by the Security Council in its resolution 1189 (1998) of 13 August 1998, namely that every State has the duty to refrain from organizing, instigating, assisting or participating in terrorist acts in another State or acquiescing in organized activities within its territory directed towards the commission of such acts,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Decides that all States shall:

            (a)      Prevent and suppress the financing of terrorist acts;

            (b)      Criminalize the wilful provision or collection, by any means, directly or indirectly, of funds by their nationals or in their territories with the intention that the funds should be used, or in the knowledge that they are to be used, in order to carry out terrorist acts;

            (c)      Freeze without delay funds and other financial assets or economic resources of persons who commit, or attempt to commit, terrorist acts or participate in or facilitate the commission of terrorist acts; of entities owned or controlled directly or indirectly by such persons; and of persons and entities acting on behalf of, or at the direction of such persons and entities, including funds derived or generated from property owned or controlled directly or indirectly by such persons and associated persons and entities;

            (d)      Prohibit their nationals or any persons and entities within their territories from making any funds, financial assets or economic resources or financial or other relatedservices available, directly or indirectly, for the benefit of persons who commit or attempt to commit or facilitate or participate in the commission of terrorist acts, of entities owned or controlled, directly or indirectly, by such persons and of persons and entities acting on behalf of or at the direction of such persons;

            2.        Decides also that all States shall:

            (a)      Refrain from providing any form of support, active or passive, to entities or persons involved in terrorist acts, including by suppressing recruitment of members of terrorist groups and eliminating the supply of weapons to terrorists;

            (b)      Take the necessary steps to prevent the commission of terrorist acts, including by provision of early warning to other States by exchange of information;

            (c)      Deny safe haven to those who finance, plan, support, or commit terrorist acts, or provide safe havens;

            (d)      Prevent those who finance, plan, facilitate or commit terrorist acts from using their respective territories for those purposes against other States or their citizens;

            (e)      Ensure that any person who participates in the financing, planning, preparation or perpetration of terrorist acts or in supporting terrorist acts is brought to justice and ensure that, in addition to any other measures against them, such terrorist acts are established as serious criminal offences in domestic laws and regulations and that the punishment duly reflects the seriousness of such terrorist acts;

            (f)       Afford one another the greatest measure of assistance in connection with criminal investigations or criminal proceedings relating to the financing or support of terrorist acts, including assistance in obtaining evidence in their possession necessary for the proceedings;

            (g)      Prevent the movement of terrorists or terrorist groups by effective border controls and controls on issuance of identity papers and travel documents, and through measures for preventing counterfeiting, forgery or fraudulent use of identity papers and travel documents;

            3.        Calls upon all States to:

            (a)      Find ways of intensifying and accelerating the exchange of operational information, especially regarding actions or movements of terrorist persons or networks; forged or falsified travel documents; traffic in arms, explosives or sensitive materials; use of communications technologies by terrorist groups; and the threat posed by the possession of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist groups;

            (b)      Exchange information in accordance with international and domestic law and cooperate on administrative and judicial matters to prevent the commission of terrorist acts;

            (c)      Cooperate, particularly through bilateral and multilateral arrangements and agreements, to prevent and suppress terrorist attacks and take action against perpetrators of such acts;

            (d)      Become parties as soon as possible to the relevant international conventions and protocols relating to terrorism, including the International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism of 9 December 1999;

            (e)      Increase cooperation and fully implement the relevant international conventions and protocols relating to terrorism and Security Council resolutions 1269 (1999) and 1368 (2001);

            (f)       Take appropriate measures in conformity with the relevant provisions of national and international law, including international standards of human rights, before granting refugee status,for the purpose of ensuring that theasylum-seeker has not planned, facilitated or participated in the commission of terrorist acts;

            (g)      Ensure, in conformity with international law, that refugee status is not abused by the perpetrators, organizers or facilitators of terrorist acts, and that claims of political motivation are not recognized as grounds for refusing requests for the extradition of alleged terrorists;

            4.        Notes with concern the close connection between international terrorism and transnational organized crime, illicit drugs, money-laundering,illegal arms-trafficking, and illegal movement of nuclear, chemical, biological and other potentially deadly materials, and in this regard emphasizes the need to enhance coordination of efforts on national, subregional, regional and international levels in order to strengthen a global response to this serious challenge and threat to international security;

            5.        Declares that acts, methods, and practices of terrorism are contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations and that knowingly financing, planning and inciting terrorist acts are also contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations;

            6.        Decides to establish, in accordance with rule 28 of its provisional rules of procedure, a Committee of the Security Council, consisting of all the members of the Council, to monitor implementation of this resolution, with the assistance of appropriate expertise, and calls upon all States to report to the Committee, no later than 90 days from the date of adoption of this resolution and thereafter according to a timetable to be proposed by the Committee, on the steps they have taken to implement this resolution;

            7.        Directs the Committee to delineate its tasks, submit a work programme within 30 days of the adoption of this resolution, and to consider the support it requires, in consultation with the Secretary-General;

            8.        Expresses its determination to take all necessary steps in order to ensure the full implementation of this resolution, in accordance with its responsibilities under the Charter;

            9.        Decides to remain seized of this matter.

S/RES/1374         Extension of sanction monitoring mechanism against Angola

                                                Date:  19 October 2001                        Meeting:  4393

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its resolution 864 (1993) of 15 September 1993 and all subsequent relevant resolutions, in particular resolutions 1127 (1997) of 28 August 1997, 1173 (1998) of 12 June 1998, 1237 (1999) of 7 May 1999, 1295 (2000) of 18 April 2000, 1336 (2001) of 23 January 2001 and 1348 (2001) of 19 April 2001,

            Reaffirming also its commitment to preserve the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Angola,

            Expressing once again its concern regarding the humanitarian effects of the present situation on the civilian population of Angola,

            Recognizing the importance attached, inter alia, to the monitoring,for as long as it is necessary, of the implementation of the provisions contained in resolutions 864 (1993), 1127 (1997) and 1173 (1998),

            Determining that the situation in Angola continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security in the region,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Takes note of the supplementary report (S/2001/966) of 12 October 2001 provided pursuant to paragraph 4 of resolution 1348 (2001);

            2.        Expresses its intention to give full consideration to this supplementary report;

            3.        Decides to extend the mandate of the monitoring mechanism for a further period of six months, ending on 19 April 2002;

            4.        Calls upon the Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993) to undertake a review to be completed by 31 December 2001 of the Final Report of the Monitoring Mechanism (S/2000/1225), the Addendum to the Final Report (S/2001/363*), and the Supplementary Report (S/2001/966) with a view to examining the recommendations contained in these reports and to offer guidance to the monitoring mechanism on its future work;

            5.        Requests the monitoring mechanism to provide the Committee within 60 days of the adoption of this resolution with a detailed action plan for its future work, in particular, but not exclusively, on sanctions on UNITA diamonds, violations of arms sanctions, and on UNITA finances;

            6.        Requests further the monitoring mechanism to report periodically to the Committee and to provide an additional report by 19 April 2002;

            7.        Requests the Secretary-General, upon adoption of this resolution and acting in consultation with the Committee, to appoint four experts to serve on the monitoring mechanism and further requests the Secretary-General to make the necessary financial arrangements to support the work of the monitoring mechanism;

            8.        Requests the Chairman of the Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993) to submit the additional report to the Council by 19 April 2002;

            9.        Calls upon all States to cooperate fully with the monitoring mechanism in the discharge of its mandate;

            10.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1375         Support for implementation of Arusha Peace Agreement  in Burundi

                                                Date:  29 October 2001                        Meeting:  4399

                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling all its previous resolutions and statements of its President on the situation in Burundi, in particular the statement of its President of 26 September 2001 (S/PRST/2001/26),

            Reaffirming that the Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agreement of August 2000 (Arusha Agreement) remains the most viable basis for a resolution of the conflict together with the continued efforts to build an internal political partnership in Burundi,

            Expressing deep concern at the ongoing violence and insecurity in Burundi,

            Noting with concern the implications of the situation in Burundi for the region as well as the consequences for Burundi of continued regional instability,

            Reiterating its strong support for the facilitation of former President Nelson Mandela in his efforts to achieve a peaceful solution to the conflict in Burundi,

            Supporting the efforts of the Secretary-General to enhance the role of the United Nations in Burundi, and in particular the continued work of his Special Representative for the Great Lakes region, as well as in his capacity as Chairman of the Implementation Monitoring Committee (IMC),

            Commending the continued efforts of, and support from the Organization of African Unity/African Union for a peaceful resolution of the conflict,

            Welcoming the agreement reached at the Summit of the Regional Initiative on 11 October 2001 in Pretoria, South Africa, on the legal framework and the structure of the transitional government, and the composition of the cabinet, the senate and the transitional national assembly,

            Also welcoming the letter from the Foreign Minister of South Africa to the President of the Security Council of 23 October 2001 and the letter from the President of Burundi to the President of South Africa annexed thereto (S/2001/1013),

            1.        Reaffirms its strong support for the 1 November 2001 installation of the transitional government in Burundi;

            2.        Calls on the parties to the Arusha Agreement and the armed groups, namely the Forces pour la Défense de la Démocratie (FDD) and Forces Nationales de Libération (FNL), to put an end immediately to all acts of violence against civilians;

            3.        Calls on the FDD and FNL to cease immediately all hostilities, enter into negotiations and join the peace process, and calls on all the States of the region to support fully the process;

            4.        Endorses the efforts of the Government of South Africa and other member States to support the implementation of the Arusha Agreement, and strongly supports in this regard the establishment of an interim multinational security presence in Burundi, at the request of its Government, to protect returning political leaders and train an all-Burundian protection force;

            5.        Requests the Government of Burundi to keep the Council informed of progress to establish an all-Burundian protection force;

            6.        Reiterates its willingness to consider, in the light of progress in the peace process, further contributions to the peace process and the implementation of the Arusha Agreement;

            7.        Urges the international community, with the installation of the transitional government, to provide additional assistance, including by honouring fully the pledges made by donors during the Paris Conference of December 2000;

            8.        Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1376         Support for phase III deployment in Democratic Republic of Congo

                                                Date:  9 November 2001                      Meeting:  4412

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its previous resolutions and statements by its President,

            Reaffirming the obligation of all States to refrain from the use of force against the territorial integrity and political independence of any State, or in any other manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations, and reaffirming also the political independence, the territorial integrity and the sovereignty of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, including over its natural resources,

            Taking note of the Secretary-General’s report of 16 October 2001 (S/2001/970) and its recommendations,

            Welcoming the participation of the Political Committee for the implementation of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement (S/1999/818) in joint meetings held on 9 November 2001,

            Determining that the situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo continues to pose a threat to international peace and security in the region,

            1.        Welcomes the general respect for the ceasefire among the parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, expresses nonetheless its concern at the hostilities in areas of the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and calls on the parties to cease any form of support to the armed groups, particularly in the east of the country;

            2.        Welcomes the withdrawal of some foreign forces from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, including the full Namibian contingent, as a positive step towards the full withdrawal of all foreign forces, and requests all States that have not yet done so to begin to implement, without delay, their full withdrawal in accordance with resolution 1304 (2000) of 16 June 2000;

            3.        Demands once again that Kisangani be demilitarized rapidly and unconditionally in accordance with Security Council resolution 1304 (2000), takes note of the pledge by the RCD-Goma during the 4411th meeting of 9 November 2001 fully to demilitarize the city, welcomes the decision of the Secretary-General to further deploy MONUC personnel in this city, notably to contribute to the training of police, stresses that, once demilitarized, no party will be permitted to reoccupy the city militarily and welcomes in this regard the pledge by the Government of the DRC, during the same meeting, to respect this provision;

            4.        Expresses its support for the inter-Congolese dialogue, one of the key elements of the peace process, and for all efforts to promote this process, calls on the Congolese parties to work together for the success of the dialogue, and expresses its support for the Facilitator and his call on the parties to make the dialogue fully inclusive;

            5.        Expresses its grave concern at the repeated human rights violations throughout the Democratic Republic of the Congo in particular in the territories under the control of the rebel groups party to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, and calls on all parties to put an end to such violations;

            6.        Expresses its serious concern with regard to the humanitarian situation in the DRC and calls on the international community to increase, without delay, its support for humanitarian activities;

            7.        Expresses its serious concern with regard to the economic difficulties facing the Democratic Republic of the Congo, stresses that progress in the peace process and the economic recovery and development of the country are interdependent, and in this regard underlines the urgent need for increased international economic assistance in support of the peace process;

            8.        Reiterates its condemnation of all illegal exploitation of the natural resources of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, demands that such exploitation cease and stresses that the natural resources of the Democratic Republic of the Congo should not be exploited to finance the conflict in that country;

            9.        Emphasizes that there are links between the peace processes in Burundi and in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and, welcoming the recent progress in the Burundi process, invites the parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement to work with the Burundian authorities to advance these two processes;

            10.      Supports the launching of phase III of the deployment of the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) on the basis of the concept of operations detailed in paragraphs 59 to 87 of the Secretary-General’s report (S/2001/970) and stresses, in this regard, the importance it attaches to the deployment of MONUC in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in conformity with the new concept of operation and within the overall ceiling, including in the cities of Kindu and Kisangani;

            11.      Notes with concern the joint communiqué issued on 4 November 2001 by the Secretaries General of the Mouvement de Libération du Congo and of the Rassemblement Congolais pour la Démocratie concerning the deployment of a joint special force in Kindu, andstresses that appropriate conditions will be necessary to allow MONUC to fulfil its role in Kindu and to ensure that discussions on the voluntary disarmament and demobilization of concerned armed groups take place in a neutral environment;

            12.      Affirms that the implementation of phase III of the deployment of MONUC requires the following steps from the parties and requests the Secretary-General to report on progress thereon:

            (i)       The transmission to MONUC, as soon as possible and in accordance with its resolution 1355 (2001) of 15 June 2001, of the necessary operational information for the planning of MONUC support for the process of total withdrawal of foreign troops present in the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, including the number of foreign military personnel in the territory of the DRC, their equipment and armament, their exit routes, and a precise timetable for implementation;

            (ii)      The transmission to MONUC, as soon as possible and in accordance with its resolution 1355 (2001), of the necessary operational information for the planning of MONUC’s mandated role in the process of disarmament, demobilization, repatriation, resettlement and reintegration (DDRRR) programme for the armed groups referred to in annex A, chapter 9.1 of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, including the number of persons concerned, their equipment and armament, their location, their intentions, as well as a precise timetable for implementation;

            (iii)     The establishment of a direct dialogue between the governments of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda leading to confidence building and a joint mechanism for coordination, and exchanges of information regarding the DDRRR process;

            (iv)     The establishment by the governments of the countries concerned, in particular Rwanda, and noting steps taken so far, of conditions conducive to voluntary DDRRR of the members of the armed groups concerned, in particular, by assuring the protection of the personal safety of the members of these armed groups, their civil rights and their economic reintegration including with the assistance of the donor community;

            (v)      The demilitarization of Kisangani;

            (vi)     The full restoration of freedom of movement for persons and goods between Kinshasa and Kisangani and throughout the country;

            (vii)    The full cooperation by the parties with MONUC military and logistical operations, as well as its humanitarian, human rights, and child protection activities, including by permitting unrestricted access to ports and airports, and by refraining from introducing administrative and other impediments;

            13.      Expresses its satisfaction at the partnership established with the parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, strengthened by regular contacts between the Political Committee for the implementation of that Agreement and the Council, and reiterates its firm determination to continue to provide assistance to the parties in their efforts to achieve peace;

            14.      Commends the outstanding work of MONUC personnel in challenging conditions, and pays tribute in particular to the efforts of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General;

            15.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1377         Elimination of international terrorism

                                                Date:  12 November 2001                    Meeting:  4413

                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Decides to adopt the attached declaration on the global effort to combat terrorism.

Annex

            The Security Council,

            Meeting at the Ministerial level,

            Recalling its resolutions 1269 (1999) of 19 October 1999, 1368 (2001) of 12 September 2001 and 1373 (2001) of 28 September 2001,

            Declares that acts of international terrorism constitute one of the most serious threats to international peace and security in the twenty-first century,

            Further declares that acts of international terrorism constitute a challenge to all States and to all of humanity,

            Reaffirms its unequivocal condemnation of all acts, methods and practices of terrorism as criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivation, in all their forms and manifestations, wherever and by whomever committed,

            Stresses that acts of international terrorism are contrary to the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, and that the financing, planning and preparation of as well as any other form of support for acts of international terrorism are similarly contrary to the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations,

            Underlines that acts of terrorism endanger innocent lives and the dignity and security of human beings everywhere, threaten the social and economic development of all States and undermine global stability and prosperity,

            Affirms that a sustained, comprehensive approach involving the active participation and collaboration of all Member States of the United Nations, and in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and international law, is essential to combat the scourge of international terrorism,

            Stresses that continuing international efforts to broaden the understanding among civilizations and to address regional conflicts and the full range of global issues, including development issues, will contribute to international cooperation and collaboration, which themselves are necessary to sustain the broadest possible fight against international terrorism,

            Welcomes the commitment expressed by States to fight the scourge of international terrorism, including during the General Assembly plenary debate from 1 to 5 October 2001, calls on all States to become parties as soon as possible to the relevant international conventions and protocols relating to terrorism, and encourages Member States to take forward work in this area,

            Calls on all States to take urgent steps to implement fully resolution 1373 (2001), and to assist each other in doing so, and underlines the obligation on States to deny financial and all other forms of support and safe haven to terrorists and those supporting terrorism,

            Expresses its determination to proceed with the implementation of that resolution in full cooperation with the whole membership of the United Nations, and welcomes the progress made so far by the Counter-Terrorism Committee established by paragraph 6 of resolution 1373 (2001) to monitor implementation of that resolution,

            Recognizes that many States will require assistance in implementing all the requirements of resolution 1373 (2001), and invites States to inform the Counter-Terrorism Committee of areas in which they require such support,

            In that context, invites the Counter-Terrorism Committee to explore ways in which States can be assisted, and in particular to explore with international, regional and subregional organizations:

       the promotion of best-practice in the areas covered by resolution 1373 (2001), including the preparation of model laws as appropriate,

       the availability of existing technical, financial, regulatory, legislative or other assistance programmes which might facilitate the implementation of resolution 1373 (2001),

       the promotion of possible synergies between these assistance programmes,

            Calls on all States to intensify their efforts to eliminate the scourge of international terrorism.

S/RES/1378         Support for transitional administration in Afghanistan

                                                Date:  14 November 2001                    Meeting:  4415

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its previous resolutions on Afghanistan, in particular resolutions 1267 (1999) of 15 October 1999, 1333 (2000) of 19 December 2000 and 1363 (2001) of 30 July 2001,

            Supporting international efforts to root out terrorism, in keeping with the Charter of the United Nations, and reaffirming also its resolutions 1368 (2001) of 12 September 2001 and 1373 (2001) of 28 September 2001,

            Recognizing the urgency of the security and political situation in Afghanistan in light of the most recent developments, particularly in Kabul,

            Condemning the Taliban for allowing Afghanistan to be used as a base for the export of terrorism by the Al-Qaida network and other terrorist groups and for providing safe haven to Usama Bin Laden, Al-Qaida and others associated with them, and in this context supporting the efforts of the Afghan people to replace the Taliban regime,

            Welcoming the intention of the Special Representative to convene an urgent meeting of the various Afghan processes at an appropriate venue and calling on the United Front and all Afghans represented in those processes to accept his invitation to that meeting without delay, in good faith and without preconditions,

            Welcoming the Declaration on the Situation in Afghanistan by the Foreign Ministers and other Senior Representatives of the Six plus Two of 12 November 2001, as well as the support being offered by other international groups,

            Taking note of the views expressed at the meeting of the Security Council on the situation in Afghanistan on 13 November 2001,

            Endorsing the approach outlined by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General at the meeting of the Security Council on 13 November 2001,

            Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and national unity of Afghanistan,

            Deeply concerned by the grave humanitarian situation and the continuing serious violations by the Taliban of human rights and international humanitarian law,

            1.        Expresses its strong support for the efforts of the Afghan people to establish a new and transitional administration leading to the formation of a government, both of which:

       --  should be broad-based, multi-ethnic and fully representative of all the Afghan people and committed to peace with Afghanistan’s neighbours,

       --  should respect the human rights of all Afghan people, regardless of gender, ethnicity or religion,

       --  should respect Afghanistan’s international obligations, including by cooperating fully in international efforts to combat terrorism and illicit drug trafficking within and from Afghanistan, and

       --  should facilitate the urgent delivery of humanitarian assistance and the orderly return of refugees and internally displaced persons, when the situation permits;

            2.        Calls on all Afghan forces to refrain from acts of reprisal, to adhere strictly to their obligations under human rights and international humanitarian law, and to ensure the safety and security and freedom of movement of United Nations and associated personnel, as well as personnel of humanitarian organizations;

            3.        Affirms that the United Nations should play a central role in supporting the efforts of the Afghan people to establish urgently such a new and transitional administration leading to the formation of a new government and expresses its full support for the Secretary-General’s Special Representative in the accomplishment of his mandate, and calls on Afghans, both within Afghanistan and among the Afghan diaspora, and Member States to cooperate with him;

            4.        Calls on Member States to provide:

                       –  support for such an administration and government, including through the implementation of quick-impact projects,

                       –  urgent humanitarian assistance to alleviate the suffering of Afghan people both inside Afghanistan and Afghan refugees, including in demining, and

                       –  long-term assistance for the social and economic reconstruction and rehabilitation of Afghanistan and welcomes initiatives towards this end;

            5.        Encourages Member States to support efforts to ensure the safety and security of areas of Afghanistan no longer under Taliban control, and in particular to ensure respect for Kabul as the capital for all the Afghan people, and especially to protect civilians, transitional authorities, United Nations and associated personnel, as well as personnel of humanitarian organizations;

            6.        Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1379         Recruitment and use of children in armed conflict

                                                Date:  20 November 2001                    Meeting:  4423

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its resolution 1314 (2000) of 11 August 2000,

            Further recalling its resolutions 1261 (1999) of 28 August 1999, 1265 (1999) of 17 September 1999, 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000, 1306 (2000) of 5 July 2000, 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000 and 1325 (2000) of 31 October 2000 and the statements of its President of 29 June 1998 (S/PRST/1998/18), 12 February 1999 (S/PRST/1999/6), 8 July 1999 (S/PRST/1999/21), 30 November 1999 (S/PRST/1999/34), 20 July 2000 (S/PRST/2000/25) and of 31 August 2001 (S/PRST/2001/21),

            Recognizing the harmful and widespread impact of armed conflict on children and the long-term consequences this has for durable peace, security and development,

            Bearing in mind the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations and recalling the primary responsibility of the Security Council for the maintenance of international peace and security and, in this connection, its commitment to address the impact of armed conflict on children,

            Underlining the need for all parties concerned to comply with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations and with international law, in particular those regarding children,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 7 September 2001 on the implementation of resolution 1314 (2000) on children and armed conflict,

            1.        Expresses, accordingly, its determination to give the fullest attention to the question of the protection of children in armed conflict when considering the matters of which it is seized;

            2.        Expresses its readiness explicitly to include provisions for the protection of children, when considering the mandates of peacekeeping operations, and reaffirms, in this regard, its readiness to continue to include, where appropriate, child protection advisers in peacekeeping operations;

            3.        Supports the ongoing work of the Secretary-General, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, the United Nations Children’s Fund, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, other agencies of the United Nations system and other international organizations dealing with children affected by armed conflict;

            4.        Expresses its intention, where appropriate, to call upon the parties to a conflict to make special arrangements to meet the protection and assistance requirements of women, children and other vulnerable groups, including through the promotion of “days of immunization” and other opportunities for the safe and unhindered delivery of basic necessary services;

            5.        Underlines the importance of the full, safe and unhindered access of humanitarian personnel and goods and the delivery of humanitarian assistance to all children affected by armed conflict;

            6.        Expresses its intention to consider taking appropriate steps, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, to address the linkages between armed conflict and terrorism, the illicit trade in precious minerals, the illicit trafficking in small arms and light weapons, and other criminal activities, which can prolong armed conflict or intensify its impact on civilian populations, including children;

            7.        Undertakes to consider, as appropriate when imposing measures under Article 41 of the Charter of the United Nations, the economic and social impact of sanctions on children, with a view to providing appropriate humanitarian exemptions that take account of their specific needs and their vulnerability and to minimize such impact;

            8.        Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to:

            (a)      Respect fully the relevant provisions of applicable international law relating to the rights and protection of children in armed conflict, in particular the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and the obligations applicable to them under the Additional Protocols thereto of 1977, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989, the Optional Protocol thereto of 25 May 2000, and the amended Protocol II to the Convention on Prohibition or Restriction on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects, the International Labour Organization Convention No. 182 on the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour and the Ottawa Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, and notes the inclusion as a war crime in the Rome Statute of the conscription or enlistment of children under the age of fifteen years into the national armed forces or using them to participate actively in hostilities;

            (b)      Provide protection and assistance to refugees and internally displaced persons, the majority of whom are women and children, in accordance with applicable international norms and standards;

            (c)      Take special measures to promote and protect the rights and meet the special needs of girls affected by armed conflict, and to put an end to all forms of violence and exploitation, including sexual violence, particularly rape;

            (d)      Abide by the concrete commitments they have made to the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, as well as relevant United Nations bodies, to ensure the protection of children in situations of armed conflict;

            (e)      Provide protection of children in peace agreements, including, where appropriate, provisions relating to the disarmament, demobilization, reintegration and rehabilitation of child soldiers and the reunification of families, and to consider, when possible, the views of children in those processes;

            9.        Urges Member States to:

            (a)      Put an end to impunity, prosecute those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and other egregious crimes perpetrated against children and exclude, where feasible, these crimes from amnesty provisions and relevant legislation, and ensure that post-conflict truth-and-reconciliation processes address serious abuses involving children;

            (b)      Consider appropriate legal, political, diplomatic, financial and material measures, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, in order to ensure that parties to armed conflict respect international norms for the protection of children;

            (c)      Consider, where appropriate, measures that may be taken to discourage corporate actors, within their jurisdiction, from maintaining commercial relations with parties to armed conflicts that are on the Security Council’s agenda, when those parties are violating applicable international law on the protection of children in armed conflict;

            (d)      Consider measures against corporate actors, individuals and entities under their jurisdiction that engage in illicit trade in natural resources and small arms, in violation of relevant Security Council resolutions and the Charter of the United Nations;

            (e)      Consider ratifying the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict and the International Labour Organization Convention No. 182 on the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour;

            (f)       Consider further steps for the protection of children, especially in the context of the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-violence for the Children of the World (2001-2010);

            10.      Requests the Secretary-General to:

            (a)      Take the protection of children into account in peacekeeping plans submitted to the Security Council, inter alia, by including, on a case by case basis, child protection staff in peacekeeping and, as appropriate, peace-building operations and strengthening expertise and capacity in the area of human rights, where necessary;

            (b)      Ensure that all peacekeeping personnel receive and follow appropriate guidance on HIV/AIDS and training in international human rights, humanitarian and refugee law relevant to children;

            (c)      Continue and intensify, on a case by case basis, monitoring and reporting activities by peacekeeping and peace-building support operations on the situation of children in armed conflict;

            11.      Requests the agencies, funds and programmes of the United Nations to:

            (a)      Coordinate their support and assistance to parties to armed conflict in fulfilling their obligations and commitments to children;

            (b)      Take account of ways of reducing child recruitment that is contrary to accepted international standards when formulating development assistance programmes;

            (c)      Devote particular attention and adequate resources to the rehabilitation of children affected by armed conflict, particularly their counselling, education and appropriate vocational opportunities, as a preventive measure and as a means of reintegrating them into society;

            (d)      Ensure that the special needs and particular vulnerabilities of girls affected by armed conflict, including those heading households, orphaned, sexually exploited and used as combatants, are duly taken into account in the design of development assistance programmes, and that adequate resources are allocated to such programmes;

            (e)      Integrate HIV/AIDS awareness, prevention, care and support into emergency, humanitarian, and post-conflict programmes;

            (f)       Support the development of local capacity to address post-conflict child rehabilitation and reintegration concerns;

            (g)      Promote a culture of peace, including through support for peace education programmes and other non-violent approaches to conflict prevention and resolution, in peace-building activities;

            12.      Encourages the international financial institutions and regional financial and development institutions to:

            (a)      Devote part of their assistance to rehabilitation and reintegration programmes conducted jointly by agencies, funds, programmes and State parties to conflicts that have taken effective measures to comply with their obligations to protect children in situations of armed conflict, including the demobilization and reintegration of child soldiers, in particular those who have been used in armed conflicts contrary to international law;

            (b)      Contribute resources for quick-impact projects in conflict zones where peacekeeping operations are deployed or are in the process of deployment;

            (c)      Support the efforts of the regional organizations engaged in activities for the benefit of children affected by armed conflict, by providing them with financial and technical assistance, as appropriate;

            13.      Urges regional and subregional organizations and arrangements to:

            (a)      Consider establishing, within their secretariats, child protection mechanisms for the development and implementation of policies, activities and advocacy for the benefit of children affected by armed conflict, and consider the views of children in the design and implementation of such policies and programmes where possible;

            (b)      Consider including child protection staff in their peacekeeping and field operations and provide training to members of such operations on the rights and protection of children;

            (c)      Take steps leading to the elimination of cross-border activities deleterious to children in times of armed conflict, such as the cross-border recruitment and abduction of children, the sale of or traffic in children, attacks on camps and settlements of refugees and internally displaced persons, the illicit trade in precious minerals, the illicit trafficking in small arms and light weapons, and other criminal activities;

            (d)      Develop and expand regional initiatives to prevent the use of child soldiers in violation of international law and to take appropriate measures to ensure the compliance by parties to armed conflict with obligations to protect children in armed conflict situations;

            14.      Requests the Secretary-General to continue to include in his written reports to the Council on conflict situations his observations concerning the protection of children and recommendations in this regard;

            15.      Requests the Secretary-General to submit a report to the Council by 31 October 2002 on the implementation of this resolution and of resolutions 1261 (1999) and 1314 (2000);

            16.      Requests the Secretary-General to attach to his report a list of parties to armed conflict that recruit or use children in violation of the international obligations applicable to them, in situations that are on the Security Council’s agenda or that may be brought to the attention of the Security Council by the Secretary-General, in accordance with Article 99 of the Charter of the United Nations, which in his opinion may threaten the maintenance of international peace and security;

            17.      Decides to remain actively seized of this matter.

S/RES/1380         Extension of UN Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara

                                                                                                                                                    Date:  27 November 2001                                Meeting:  4427

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its resolution 1359 (2001) of 29 June 2001 and its previous resolutions on the question of Western Sahara,

            Taking note of the letter of the Secretary-General of 12 November 2001 (S/2001/1067),

            1.        Decides to extend the mandate of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) until 28 February 2002;

            2.        Requests the Secretary-General to keep the Council informed of all significant developments in an interim report by 15 January 2002 and to provide an assessment of the situation by 18 February 2002;

            3.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

S/RES/1381         Extension of UN Disengagement Observer Force

                                                Date:  27 November 2001                    Meeting:  4428

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force of 15 November 2001 (S/2001/1079), and also reaffirming its resolution 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000,

            1.        Calls upon the parties concerned to implement immediately its resolution 338 (1973) of 22 October 1973;

            2.        Decides to renew the mandate of the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force for another period of six months, that is, until 31 May 2002;

            3.        Requests the Secretary-General to submit, at the end of this period, a report on the developments in the situation and the measures taken to implement resolution 338 (1973).

S/RES/1382         Extension of Iraq oil-for-food programme

                                                Date:  29 November 2001                    Meeting:  4431

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its previous relevant resolutions, including its resolutions 986 (1995) of 14 April 1995, 1284 (1999) of 17 December 1999, 1352 (2001) of 1 June 2001 and 1360 (2001) of 3 July 2001, as they relate to the improvement of the humanitarian programme for Iraq,

            Convinced of the need as a temporary measure to continue to provide for the civilian needs of the Iraqi people until the fulfilment by the Government of Iraq of the relevant resolutions, including notably resolutions 687 (1991) on 3 April 1991 and 1284 (1999), allows the Council to take further action with regard to the prohibitions referred to in resolution 661 (1990) of 6 August 1990 in accordance with the provisions of these resolutions,

            Determined to improve the humanitarian situation in Iraq,

            Reaffirming the commitment of all Member States to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Decides that the provisions of resolution 986 (1995), except those contained in paragraphs 4, 11 and 12 and subject to paragraph 15 of resolution 1284 (1999), and the provisions of paragraphs 2, 3 and 5 to 13 of 1360 (2001) shall remain in force for a new period of 180 days beginning at 0001 hours, Eastern Standard Time, on 1 December 2001;

            2.        Notes the proposed Goods Review List (as contained in Annex 1 to this resolution) and the procedures for its application (as contained in Annex 2 to this resolution) and decides that it will adopt the List and the procedures, subject to any refinements to them agreed by the Council in light of further consultations, for implementation beginning on 30 May 2002;

            3.        Reaffirms the obligation of all States, pursuant to resolution 661 (1990) and subsequent relevant resolutions, to prevent the sale or supply to Iraq of any commodities or products, including weapons or any other military equipment, and to prevent the making available to Iraq of any funds or any other financial or economic resources, except as authorized by existing resolutions;

            4.        Stresses the obligation of Iraq to cooperate with the implementation of this resolution and other applicable resolutions, including by respecting the security and safety of all persons directly involved in their implementation;

            5.        Appeals to all States to continue to cooperate in the timely submission of technically complete applications and the expeditious issuing of export licences, and to take all other appropriate measures within their competence in order to ensure that urgently needed humanitarian supplies reach the Iraqi population as rapidly as possible;

            6.        Reaffirms its commitment to a comprehensive settlement on the basis of the relevant resolutions of the Security Council, including any clarification necessary for the implementation of resolution 1284 (1999);

            7.        Decides that, for the purposes of this resolution, references in resolution 1360 (2001) to the 150-day period established by that resolution shall be interpreted to refer to the 180-day period established pursuant to paragraph 1 above;

            8.        Decides to remain seized of the matter.

Annex 1

Proposed Goods Review List (GRL)

(Note: Arms and munitions are prohibited under UNSCR 687, para. 24 and thus are not included on the review list.)

A.        Items subject to the provisions of UNSCR 1051 (1996).

B.        The List contained in document S/2001/1120, annex (to the extent, if any, the items on these lists are not covered by UNSCR 687, para. 24). The list includes the following general categories and includes clarifying notes and statements of understanding: (1) advanced materials; (2) materials processing; (3) electronics; (4) computers; (5) telecommunications and information security; (6) sensors and lasers; (7) navigation and avionics; (8) marine; and (9) propulsion.

C.        The following individual items, as further described in the annex:

Command, Control, Communication and Simulation

1.         Specific advanced telecommunications equipment.

2.         Information security equipment.

                Sensors, Electronic Warfare, and Night Vision

3.         Specialized electronic instrumentation and test equipment.

4.         Image intensifier night vision systems, tubes, and components.

                Aircraft and Related Items

5.         Specialized radar equipment.

6.         Non-civil certified aircraft; all aero gas turbine engines; unmanned aerial vehicles; and parts and components.

7.         Non-xray explosive detection equipment.

                Naval-related Items

8.         Air independent propulsion (AIP) engines and fuel cells specially designed for underwater vehicles, and specially designed components therefor.

9.         Marine acoustic equipment.

                Explosives

10.       Charges and devices specially designed for civil projects, and containing small quantities of energetic materials.

Missile-Related Items

11.       Specialized vibration test equipment.

Conventional Weapons Manufacturing

12.       Specialized semiconductor manufacturing equipment.

                Heavy Military Transport

13.       Low-bed trailers/loaders with a carrying capacity greater than 30 metric tonnes and width equal to or greater than 3 meters.

                Biological Weapons Equipment

14.       Certain Biological Equipment.

Annex to Proposed Goods Review List (GRL)

Technical Parameters for Individual Items

#1.          Specific advanced telecommunication equipment

a.         Any type of telecommunications equipment, specially designed to operate outside the temperature range from 218 K (-55° C) to 397 K (124° C);

b.         Phased array antennae, containing active elements and distributed components, and designed to permit electronic control of beam shaping and pointing, except for landing systems with instruments meeting International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards (microwave landing systems (MLS));

c.         Radio relay communications equipment designed for use at frequencies of 7.9 through 10.55 GHz or exceeding 40 GHz and assemblies and components therefor;

d.         Optical fiber cables of more than 5 meters in length, and preforms or drawn fibers of glass or other materials optimized for manufacture and use as optical telecommunications transmission medium. Optical terminals and optical amplifiers;

e.         Software specially designed for the development or production of the components or equipment in a-d above;

f.          Technology for the development, design or production of the components, software, or equipment in a-d above.

#2.          Information security equipment

Information security equipment having any of the following characteristics:

a.         a symmetric encryption algorithm;

b.         an asymmetric encryption algorithm;

c.         a discrete-log encryption algorithm;

d.         analog encryption or scrambling;

e.         TCSEC Bl, B2, B3, or Al or equivalent Multilevel Secure (MLS) computer systems;

f.          Software specially designed for the development or production of a-a above;

g.         Technology for the development, design or production of a-a above.

Note 1: This entry does not require review of items that meet all of the following:

a.         Generally available to the public, by being sold, without restriction, from stock at retail selling points by means of any of the following:

            a.l.      Over the counter transactions;

            a.2.     Mail order transactions;

            a.3.     Electronic transactions;

            a.4.     Telephone call transactions;

b.         The cryptographic functionality cannot easily be changed by the user;

c.         Designed for installation by the user without further substantial support by the supplier; and

d.         When necessary, details of the items are accessible and will be provided, upon request, to the appropriate authority in the exporter’s country in order to ascertain compliance with conditions described in paragraphs a-c above.

Note 2: This item does not require review of:

a.         Personalized smart cards where the cryptographic capability is restricted for use in equipment or systems excluded from control under entries b-f of this note. If a personalized smart card has multiple functions, the control status of each function is addressed individually;

b.         Receiving equipment for radio broadcast, pay television, or similar restricted audience broadcast of the consumer type, without digital encryption except that exclusively used for sending the billing or program-related information back to the broadcast providers;

c.         Equipment where the cryptographic capability is not user-accessible and which is specially designed and limited to allow any of the following:

            c.l.      Execution of copy-protected software;

            c.2.     Access to any of the following:

            c.2.a.  Copy-protected contents stored on read-only media; or

            c.2.b.Information stored in encrypted form on media (e.g. in connection with intellectual property rights) where the media is offered for sale in identical sets to the public; or

            c.2.c.  One-time copying of copyright-protected audio/video data.

d.         Cryptographic equipment specially designed and limited for banking use or money transactions;

Technical Note: “Money transactions” includes the collection and settlement of fares or credit functions.

e.         Portable or mobile radiotelephones for civil use (e.g. for commercial civil cellular radiocommunications systems) that are not capable of end-to-end encryption;

f.          Cordless telephone equipment not capable of end-to-end encryption where the maximum effective range of unboosted cordless operation (i.e., a single, unrelayed hop between terminal and home basestation) is less than 400 meters according to the manufacturer’s specifications.

#3.          Specialized electronic instrumentation and test equipment

a.             Signal analysers from 4 through 31 GHz;

b.             Microwave test receivers from 4 through 40 GHz;

c.         Network analysers from 4 through 40 GHz;

d.         Signal generators from 4 through 31 GHz;

e.         Travelling wave tubes, pulsed or continuous wave, as follows:

            e.1.     Coupled cavity tubes, or derivatives thereof;

            e.2.     Helix tubes, or derivatives thereof, with any of the following:

            e.2.a.l. An instantaneous bandwidth of half an octave or more; and e.2.a.2. The product of the rated average output power (expressed in kW) and the maximum operating frequency (expressed in GHz) of more than 0.2;

            e.2.b.1. An instantaneous bandwidth of less than half an octave; and e.2.b.2. The product of the rated average output power (expressed in kW) and the maximum operating frequency (expressed in GHz) of more than 0.4;

f.          Equipment specially designed for the manufacture of electron tubes, optical elements and specially designed components therefor;

g.         Hydrogen/hydrogen-isotope thyratrons of ceramic-metal construction and rate for a peak current of 500 A or more;

h.         Digital instrumentation data recorders having any of the following characteristics:

            h.l.     A maximum digital interface transfer rate exceeding 175 Mbit/s; or

            h.2.    Space qualified.

i.          Radiation and radioisotope detection and simulation equipment, analysers, software, and Nuclear Instrumentation Module (NIM) componentry and mainframes;

j.          Software specially designed for the development or production of the components or equipment in a-i above;

k.         Technology for the development, design or production of the components or equipment in a-i above.

Note: Items a-e do not require review when contained in contracts for civil telecommunications projects, including ongoing maintenance, operation, and repair of the system, certified for civil use by the supplier government.

#4.          Image intensifier night vision systems, tubes, and components

a.         Night vision systems (i.e., cameras or direct view imaging equipment) using an image intensifier tube that utilizes a microchannel plate (MCP) and an S-20, S-25, GaAs, or GaInAs photocathode.

b.         Image intensifier tubes that utilize a microchannel plate (MCP) and an S-20, S‑25, GaAs, or GsINAs photocathode with a sensitivity of 240 micro Amps per lumen and below:

c.         Microchannel plates of 15 micrometers and above.

d.         Software specially designed for the development or production of the components or equipment in a-c above;

e.         Technology for the development, design or production of the components or equipment in a-c above.

#5.          Specialized radar equipment

a.         All airborne radar equipment and specially designed components therefor, not including radars specially designed for meteorological use or Mode 3, Mode C, and Mode S civilian air traffic control equipment specially designed to operate only in the 960-1215 MHz band;

Note: This entry does not require initial review of airborne radar equipment installed as original equipment in civil-certified aircraft operating in Iraq.

b.         All ground-based primary radar systems that are capable of aircraft detection and tracking.

c.         Software specially designed for the development or production of the components or equipment in a and b above;

d.         Technology for the development, design or production of the components or equipment in a and b above.

#6.          Non-civil certified aircraft; all aero gas turbine engines; unmanned aerial vehicles; and parts and components

a.         Non-civil certified aircraft and specially designed parts and components therefor. This does not include parts and components solely designed to accommodate a carrying of passengers including seats, food services, environmental conditioning, lighting systems, and passenger safety devices.

Note: Civil certified aircraft consist of aircraft that have been certified for general civil use by the civil aviation authorities of the original equipment manufacturer’s government.

b.         All gas turbine engines except those designed for stationary power generation applications, and specially designed parts and components therefor.

c.         Unmanned aerial vehicles and parts and components therefor with any of the following characteristics:

            c.l.      Capable of autonomous operation;

            c.2.     Capable of operating beyond line of sight;

            c.3.     Incorporating a satellite navigation receiver (i.e. GPS);

            c.4.     A gross take-off weight greater than 25 kg (55 pounds).

d.         Parts and components for civil-certified aircraft (not including engines).

Note 1: This does not include parts and components for normal maintenance of non-Iraqi owned or leased civil-certified aircraft that were originally qualified or certified by the original equipment manufacturer for that aircraft.

Note 2: For Iraqi-owned or leased civil aircraft, review of parts and components for normal maintenance is not required if the maintenance is performed in a country other than Iraq.

Note 3: For Iraqi-owned or leased aircraft, parts and components are subject to review except for equivalent one-for-one replacement of parts and components that have been certified or qualified by the original equipment manufacturer for use on that aircraft.

Note 4: Any specially designed parts or components that improve the performance of the aircraft remain subject to review. e. Technology, including software, for the design, development and production of equipment and parts/components for the items in sub-items a-d above.

#9.          Marine acoustic equipment

a.         Marine acoustic systems, equipment and specially designed components therefor, as follows:

            a.l. Active (transmitting or transmitting-and-receiving) systems, equipment and specially designed components therefor, as follows:

            a.l.a. Wide-swath bathymetric survey systems designed for sea bed topographic mapping designed to measure depths less than 600 m below the water surface

            a.2. Passive (receiving, whether or not related in normal application to separate active equipment) systems, equipment and specially designed components thereof as follows:

            a.2.a. Hydrophones with sensitivity better than minus 220 Db at any depth with no acceleration' compensation;

            a.2.b. Towed acoustic hydrophone arrays designed or able to be modified to operate at depths exceeding 15 meters but not exceeding 35 meters.

                       a.2.b.1. Heading sensors with an accuracy better than +/- 0.5 degrees.

            a.2.c. Processing equipment specially designed for towed acoustic hydrophone arrays.

            a.2.d. Processing equipment, specially designed for bottom or bay cable systems.

b.         Correlation-velocity sonar log equipment designed to measure the horizontal speed of the equipment carrier relative to the seabed.

Technical Note: Hydrophone sensitivity is defined as twenty times the logarithm to the base 10 of the ratio of rms output voltage to a 1 V rms reference, when the hydrophone sensor, without a pre-amplifier, is placed in a plane wave acoustic field with an rms pressure of 1 p2a. For example, a hydrophone of -160 Db, reference 1 V per uPa) -180 Db.

#10.        Charges and devices specially designed for civil projects, and containing small quantities of the following energetic materials:

1.         Cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (CAS 2691-41-0) (HMX); octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazine; 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraza-cyclooctane; (octogen, octogene);

2.         Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) (CAS 20062-22-0);

3.         Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) (CAS 3058-38-6);

4.         Triaminoguanidinenitrate (TAGN) (CAS 4000-16-2);

5.         Dinitroglycoluril (DNGU, DINGU) (CPS 55510-04-81: tetranitroglycoluril (TNGU, SORGUYL) (CAS 55510-03-7);

6.         Tetranitrobenzotriazolobenzotriazole (TACOT) (CAS 25243-36-1);

7.         Diaminohexanitrobiphenyl (DIPAM) (CAS 17215-44-0);

8.         Picrylaminodinitropyridine (PYX) (CAS 38082-89-2);

9.         3-vitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO or ONTA) (CAS 932-64-9);

l0.        Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) (CAS 121-82-4); cyclonite; T4; hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1, 3, 5-triazine; 1, 3, 5-trinitro-1, 3, 5-triaza-cyclohexane (hexogen, hexogene);

11.       2-(5-cyanotetrazolato) penta amine-cobalt (III) -perchlorate (or CP) (CAS 70247-32-4);

12.       cis-bis (5-nitrotetrazolato) tetra amine-cobalt (III) perchlorate (or BNCP);

13.       7-Amino-4,6-dinitrobenzofurazane-l-oxide (ADNBF) (CAS 97096-78-1); amino dinitrobenzofuroxan;

14.       5,7-diamino-4,6-dinitrobenzofurazane-l-oxide (CAS 117907-74-1), (CL-14 or diamino dinitrobenzofuroxan);

15.       2,4,6-trinitro-2,4,6-triazacyclohexanone (K-6 or Keto-RDX) (CAS 115029-35-1);

16.       2,4,6,8-tetran.itro-2,4,6,8-tetraazabicyclo

            [3,3,0]-octanone-3 (CAS 130256-72-3)

            (tetranitrosemiglycouril, K-55 or keto-bicyclic HMX);

17.       1,1,3-trinitroazetidine (TNAZ) (CAS 97645-24-4);

18.       1,4,5,8-tetranitro-1,4,5,8-tetraazadecalin (TNAD) (CAS 135877-16"=6);

19.       Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CAS 135285-90-4) (CL-20 or HNIW); and chlathrates of CL-20;

20.       Trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (tetryl) (CAS 479-45-8);

21.       Any explosive with a detonation velocity exceeding 8,700 m/s or a detonation pressure exceeding 34 GPa           (340 kbar);

22.       Other organic explosives yielding detonation pressures of 25 GPa(250 kbar) or more that will remain     stable at temperatures of 523 K (250°C) or higher for periods of 5 minutes or longer;

23.       Any other United Nations (UN) Class 1.1 solid propellant with a theoretical specific impulse (under standard conditions) of more than 250 s for non-metallized, or more than 270 s for aluminized compositions; and

24.       Any UN Class 1.3 solid propellant with a theoretical specific impulse of more than 230 s for non-halogenised, 250 s for non-metallized and 266 s for metallized compositions.

            Note:When not part of a charge or device specifically designed for civil projects in small quantities, the energetic materials above are considered military items and are subject to UNSCR 687, para. 24.

#11.        Specialized vibration test equipment

Vibration test equipment and specially designed parts and components capable of simulating flight conditions of less than 15,000 meters. a. Software specially designed for the development or production of the components or equipment above; b. Technology for the development, design or production of the components or equipment above.

#12.        Specialized semiconductor manufacturing equipment

a.         Items specially designed for the manufacture, assembly, packaging, test, and design of semiconductor devices, integrated circuits and assemblies with a minimum feature size of 1.0 micrometers, .including:

            a.l. Equipment and materials for plasma etch, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), lithography, mask lithography, masks, and photoresists.

            a.2. Equipment specially designed for ion implantation, ion-enhanced or photo-enhanced diffusion, having any of the following characteristics:

                       a.2.a. Beam energy (accelerating voltage) exceeding 200 keV; or

                       a.2.b. Optimized to operate at a beam energy (accelerating voltage) of less than 10 keV.

            a.3. Surface finishing equipment for the processing of semiconductor wafers as follows:

                       a.3.a. Specially designed equipment for backside processing of wafers thinner than 100 micrometer and the subsequent separation thereof; or

                       a.3.b. Specially designed equipment for achieving a surface roughness of the active surface of a processed wafer with a two-sigma value of 2 micrometer or less, total indicator reading (TIR) ;

            a.4. Equipment, other than general-purpose computers, specially designed for computer aided design (CAD) of semiconductor devices or integrated circuits; a.5. Equipment for the assembly of integrated circuits, as follows:

            a.5.a. Stored program controlled die bonders having all of the following characteristics:

                       a.5.a.l. Specially designed for hybrid integrated circuits;

                       a.5.a.2. X-Y stage positioning travel exceeding 37.5 x 37.5 mm; and

                       a.5.a.3. Placement accuracy in the X-Y plane of finer than + 10 micrometer;

            a.5.b. Stored program controlled equipment for producing multiple bonds in a single operation (e.g., beam lead bonders, chip carrier bonders, tape bonders);

            a.5.c. Semi-automatic or automatic hot cap sealers, in which the cap is heated locally to a higher temperature than the body of the package, specially designed for ceramic microcircuit packages and that have a throughput equal to or more than one package per minute.

b.         Software specially designed for the development or production of the components or equipment in a. above;

c.         Technology for the development, design or. production of the components or equipment in a. above-

#14.        Certain Biological Equipment

a.         Equipment for the microencapsulation of live microorganisms and toxins in the range of 1-15 micron particle size, to include interfacial polycondensors and phase separators.

Annex 2

Procedures

            1.        Applications for each export of commodities and products should be forwarded to the Office of the Iraq Programme (OIP) by the exporting States through permanent or observer missions, or by United Nations agencies and programmes. Each application should include technical specifications and end-user information in order for a determination to be made on whether the contract contains any item referred to in paragraph 24 of resolution 687 (1991) or any item on the Goods Review List (GRL). A copy of the concluded contractual arrangements should be attached to the application.

            2.        Each application and the concluded contractual arrangements will be reviewed by customs experts in the OIP and experts from UNMOVIC, consulting the IAEA as necessary, in order to determine whether the contract contains any item referred to in paragraph 24 of resolution 687 (1991) or included on the GRL. The OIP will identify an official to act as a contact point on each contract.

            3.        In order to verify that the conditions set out in paragraph 2 above are met, the experts may request additional information from the exporting States or Iraq. The exporting States or Iraq should provide the additional information requested within a period of 60 days. If the experts do not require any additional information within four working days, the procedure under paragraphs 5, 6 and 7 below applies.

            4.        If the experts determine that the exporting State or Iraq has not provided the additional information within the period set out in paragraph 3 above, the application will not proceed further until the necessary information has been provided.

            5.        If the UNMOVIC experts, consulting the IAEA as necessary, determine that the contract contains any item referred to in paragraph 24 of resolution 687 (1991), the application shall be considered lapsed and returned to mission or agency which submitted it.

            6.        If the UNMOVIC experts, consulting the IAEA as necessary, determine that the contract contains any item referred to in the GRL, they will forward to the Committee full details of the GRL listed items, including the technical specifications of the items and the associated contract. In addition, OIP and UNMOVIC, consulting the IAEA as necessary, shall provide to the Committee an assessment of the humanitarian, economic and security implications, of the approval or denial of the GRL listed items, including the viability of the whole contract in which the GRL listed item appears and the risk of diversion of the item for military purposes. OIP shall also provide information on the possible end-use monitoring of such items. OIP will immediately inform the missions or agencies concerned. The remaining items in the contract, which are determined as not included in the GRL, will be processed according to the procedure in paragraph 7 below.

            7.        If the UNMOVIC experts, consulting the IAEA as necessary, determine that the contract does not contain any item referred to in paragraph 2 above, the Office of the Iraq Programme will inform immediately the Government of Iraq and the exporting State in written form. The exporter will be eligible for payment upon verification by Cotecna that the goods have arrived as contracted in Iraq.

            8.        If the mission or agency submitting a contract disagrees with the decision to refer the contract to the Committee, it may appeal against this decision within two business days to the Executive Director of OIP. In that event, the Executive Director of OIP, in consultation with the Executive Chairman of UNMOVIC, will appoint experts to reconsider the contract in accordance with the procedures set out above. Their decision, endorsed by the Executive Director and Executive Chairman, will be final and no further appeals will be permitted. The application shall not be forwarded to the Committee until the appeal period has expired without an appeal being filed.

            9.        Experts from OIP and UNMOVIC who review contracts should be drawn from the broadest possible geographical base.

            10.      The Secretariat will report to the Committee at the end of each 180-day phase on the contracts submitted and approved for export to Iraq during this period and provide to any member of the Committee at the member’s request copies of applications for information purposes only.

            11.      Any Committee member may call for an urgent meeting of the Committee to consider revising or revoking these procedures. The Committee will keep these procedures under review and, in light of experience, will amend them as appropriate.

S/RES/1383         Endorsement of Afghanistan interim arrangements

                                                Date:  6 December 2001                       Meeting:  4434

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its previous resolutions on Afghanistan, in particular its resolution 1378 (2001) of 14 November 2001,

            Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and national unity of Afghanistan,

            Stressing the inalienable right of the Afghan people themselves freely to determine their own political future,

            Determined to help the people of Afghanistan to bring to an end the tragic conflicts in Afghanistan and promote national reconciliation, lasting peace, stability and respect for human rights, as well as to cooperate with the international community to put an end to the use of Afghanistan as a base for terrorism,

            Welcoming the letter of 5 December 2001 from the Secretary-General informing the Council of the signature in Bonn on 5 December 2001 of the Agreement on provisional arrangements in Afghanistan pending the re-establishment of permanent government institutions (S/2001/1154),

            Noting that the provisional arrangements are intended as a first step towards the establishment of a broad-based, gender sensitive, multi-ethnic and fully representative government,

            1.        Endorses the Agreement on provisional arrangements in Afghanistan pending the re-establishment of permanent government institutions as reported in the Secretary-General’s letter of 5 December 2001;

            2.        Calls on all Afghan groups to implement this Agreement in full, in particular through full cooperation with the Interim Authority which is due to take office on 22 December 2001;

            3.        Reaffirms its full support to the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and endorses the missions entrusted to him in annex 2 of the above-mentioned Agreement;

            4.        Declares its willingness to take further action, on the basis of a report by the Secretary-General, to support the Interim institutions established by the above-mentioned Agreement and, in due course, to support the implementation of the Agreement and its annexes;

            5.        Calls on all Afghan groups to support full and unimpeded access by humanitarian organizations to people in need and to ensure the safety and security of humanitarian workers;

            6.        Calls on all bilateral and multilateral donors, in coordination with the Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Agencies and all Afghan groups, to reaffirm, strengthen and implement their commitment to assist with the rehabilitation, recovery and reconstruction of Afghanistan, in coordination with the Interim Authority and as long as the Afghan groups fulfil their commitments;

            7.        Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1384         Extension of UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus

                                                Date:  14 December 2001                     Meeting:  4436

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Welcoming the report of the Secretary-General of 30 November 2001 (S/2001/1122*) on the United Nations operation in Cyprus, and in particular the call to the parties to assess and address the humanitarian issue of missing persons with due urgency and seriousness,

            Noting that the Government of Cyprus has agreed that in view of the prevailing conditions in the island it is necessary to keep the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) beyond 15 December 2001,

            Welcoming and encouraging efforts by the United Nations to sensitize peacekeeping personnel in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases in all its peacekeeping operations,

            1.        Reaffirms all its relevant resolutions on Cyprus, and in particular resolution 1251 (1999) of 29 June 1999 and subsequent resolutions;

            2.        Decides to extend the mandate of UNFICYP for a further period ending on 15 June 2002;

            3.        Requests the Secretary-General to submit a report by 1 June 2002 on the implementation of this resolution;

            4.        Urges the Turkish Cypriot side and Turkish forces to rescind the restrictions imposed on 30 June 2000 on the operations of UNFICYP and to restore the military status quo ante at Strovilia;

            5.        Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1385         Extension of prohibition of import of Sierra Leone rough diamonds

                                                Date:  19 December 2001                     Meeting:  4442

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Recalling its previous resolutions and the statements of its President concerning the situation in Sierra Leone, and in particular its resolutions 1132 (1997) of 8 October 1997, 1171 (1998) of 5 June 1998, 1299 (2000) of 19 May 2000 and 1306 (2000) of 5 July 2000,

            Affirming the commitment of all States to respect the sovereignty, political independence and territorial integrity of Sierra Leone,

            Welcoming the significant progress made in the peace process in Sierra Leone, including in the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programme, and the efforts of the Government to extend its authority over the diamond-producing areas, with the assistance of UNAMSIL, but noting that it has not yet established effective authority over those areas,

            Expressing its continued concern at the role played by the illicit trade in diamonds in the conflict in Sierra Leone,

            Welcoming General Assembly resolution A/RES/55/56 of 1 December 2000, as well as ongoing efforts by interested States, the diamond industry, in particular the World Diamond Council, and non-governmental organizations to break the link between illicit trade in rough diamonds and armed conflict, particularly through the significant progress made by the Kimberley Process, and encouraging further progress in this regard,

            Welcoming the establishment of a certification regime in relation to Guinea’s exports of rough diamonds and the continued efforts of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) as well as West African countries towards developing a region-wide certification regime,

            Emphasizing the responsibility of all member States, including diamond importing countries, for fully implementing the measures in resolution 1306 (2000),

            Taking note of the views of the Government of Sierra Leone on the extension of the measures imposed by paragraph 1 of resolution 1306 (2000),

            Determining that the situation in Sierra Leone continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security in the region,

            Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Welcomes the establishment and implementation of the Certificate of Origin regime for trade in diamonds in Sierra Leone, and the export of rough diamonds from Sierra Leone certified under that regime;

            2.        Welcomes reports that the Certificate of Origin regime is helping to curb the flow of conflict diamonds out of Sierra Leone;

            3.        Decides that the measures imposed by paragraph 1 of resolution 1306 (2000) shall remain in force for a new period of 11 months from 5 January 2002, except that, pursuant to paragraph 5 of resolution 1306 (2000), rough diamonds controlled by the Government of Sierra Leone under the Certificate of Origin regime shall continue to be exempt from these measures, and affirms that, in addition to its six-monthly review in accordance with paragraph 15 of resolution 1306 (2000), at the end of this period it will review the situation in Sierra Leone, including the extent of the government’s authority over the diamond-producing areas, in order to decide whether to extend these measures for a further period and, if necessary, to modify them or adopt further measures;

            4.        Decides also that the measures imposed by paragraph 1 of resolution 1306 (2000) as extended by paragraph 3 above, shall be terminated immediately if the Council determines that it would be appropriate to do so;

            5.       Requests the Secretary-General to publicize the provisions of this resolution and the obligations imposed by it;

            6.        Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

S/RES/1386         Authorization of international security force for Afghanistan

                                                Date:  20 December 2001                     Meeting:  4443

                                                Vote:  Unanimous

            The Security Council,

            Reaffirming its previous resolutions on Afghanistan, in particular its resolutions 1378 (2001) of 14 November 2001 and 1383 (2001) of 6 December 2001,

            Supporting international efforts to root out terrorism, in keeping with the Charter of the United Nations, and reaffirming also its resolutions 1368 (2001) of 12 September 2001 and 1373 (2001) of 28 September 2001,

            Welcoming developments in Afghanistan that will allow for all Afghans to enjoy inalienable rights and freedom unfettered by oppression and terror,

            Recognizing that the responsibility for providing security and law and order throughout the country resides with the Afghan themselves,

            Reiterating its endorsement of the Agreement on provisional arrangements in Afghanistan pending the re-establishment of permanent government institutions, signed in Bonn on 5 December 2001 (S/2001/1154) (the Bonn Agreement),

            Taking note of the request to the Security Council in Annex 1, paragraph 3, to the Bonn Agreement to consider authorizing the early deployment to Afghanistan of an international security force, as well as the briefing on 14 December 2001 by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on his contacts with the Afghan authorities in which they welcome the deployment to Afghanistan of a United Nations-authorized international security force,

            Taking note of the letter dated 19 December 2001 from Dr. Abdullah Abdullah to the President of the Security Council (S/2001/1223),

            Welcoming the letter from the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Secretary-General of 19 December 2001 (S/2001/1217), and taking note of the United Kingdom offer contained therein to take the lead in organizing and commanding an International Security Assistance Force,

            Stressing that all Afghan forces must adhere strictly to their obligations under human rights law, including respect for the rights of women, and under international humanitarian law,

            Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and national unity of Afghanistan,

            Determining that the situation in Afghanistan still constitutes a threat to international peace and security,

            Determined to ensure the full implementation of the mandate of the International Security Assistance Force, in consultation with the Afghan Interim Authority established by the Bonn Agreement,

            Acting for these reasons under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

            1.        Authorizes, as envisaged in Annex 1 to the Bonn Agreement, the establishment for 6 months of an International Security Assistance Force to assist the Afghan Interim Authority in the maintenance of security in Kabul and its surrounding areas, so that the Afghan Interim Authority as well as the personnel of the United Nations can operate in a secure environment;

            2.        Calls upon Member States to contribute personnel, equipment and other resources to the International Security Assistance Force, and invites those Member States to inform the leadership of the Force and the Secretary-General;

            3.        Authorizes the Member States participating in the International Security Assistance Force to take all necessary measures to fulfil its mandate;

            4.        Calls upon the International Security Assistance Force to work in close consultation with the Afghan Interim Authority in the implementation of the force mandate, as well as with the Special Representative of the Secretary-General;

            5.        Calls upon all Afghans to cooperate with the International Security Assistance Force and relevant international governmental and non-governmental organizations, and welcomes the commitment of the parties to the Bonn Agreement to do all within their means and influence to ensure security, including to ensure the safety, security and freedom of movement of all United Nations personnel and all other personnel of international governmental and non-governmental organizations deployed in Afghanistan;

            6.        Takes note of the pledge made by the Afghan parties to the Bonn Agreement in Annex 1 to that Agreement to withdraw all military units from Kabul, and calls upon them to implement this pledge in cooperation with the International Security Assistance Force;

            7.        Encourages neighbouring States and other Member States to provide to the International Security Assistance Force such necessary assistance as may be requested, including the provision of overflight clearances and transit;

            8.        Stresses that the expenses of the International Security Assistance Force will be borne by the participating Member States concerned, requests the Secretary-General to establish a trust fund through which contributions could be channelled to the Member States or operations concerned, and encourages Member States to contribute to such a fund;

            9.        Requests the leadership of the International Security Assistance Force to provide periodic reports on progress towards the implementation of its mandate through the Secretary-General;

            10.      Calls on Member States participating in the International Security Assistance Force to provide assistance to help the Afghan Interim Authority in the establishment and training of new Afghan security and armed forces;

            11.      Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

* * *

STATEMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL IN 2001

S/PRST/2001/1                   Council Commitment to Peace in Somalia

                                                Date:  11 January 2001                         Meeting:   4255

            The Security Council notes with appreciation the Secretary-General’s report of 19 December 2000 on the situation in Somalia (S/2000/1211) and reaffirms its commitment to a comprehensive and lasting settlement of the situation in Somalia, consistent with the principles of the Charter of the United Nations, bearing in mind respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia,

            The Security Council welcomes and supports the outcome of the Arta peace conference, the establishment of the Transitional National Assembly and the Transitional National Government. It expresses gratitude for the efforts undertaken by the Government and people of Djibouti in convening the peace conference. Furthermore, it recognizes with appreciation the impetus provided to the process by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), including the mandate extended by the Ministerial meeting in Djibouti in March 2000.

            The Security Council further welcomes the efforts of the Transitional National Government to promote reconciliation within Somalia. It strongly urges all political groups in the country, in particular those which have remained outside the Arta peace process, to engage in peaceful and constructive dialogue with the Transitional National Government in order to promote national reconciliation and facilitate the democratic elections scheduled for 2003 as called for in the Transitional National Charter. It further calls upon all groups, in particular armed movements, to support and participate in the demobilization efforts undertaken by the Transitional National Government. It encourages the Transitional National Government to continue, in a spirit of constructive dialogue, the process of engaging all groups in the country, including in the north-eastern and north-western areas, with the view to preparing for the installation of permanent governance arrangements through the democratic process.

            The Security Council underlines the massive challenges facing Somalia with respect to reconstruction and development, and the immediate need for urgent assistance, particularly in the areas of demobilization (with special attention to measures to combat HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases), disarmament and rehabilitation of basic infrastructure. It calls upon the United Nations, its Member States and specialized agencies, non-governmental organizations as well as the Bretton Woods institutions to assist in addressing these challenges.

            The Security Council, emphasizing the importance of respect for human rights and international humanitarian law, notes with concern that the humanitarian and security situation remains fragile in several parts of Somalia, including Mogadishu. It strongly condemns attacks by armed groups on civilians and humanitarian personnel and calls upon all Somalis to respect fully the security and safety of personnel of the United Nations and its specialized agencies, the International Committee of the Red Cross and of non-governmental organizations, and to guarantee their complete freedom of movement and safe access throughout Somalia.

            The Security Council reiterates to all States their obligation to comply with the measures imposed by resolution 733 (1992) of 23 January 1992 and urges each State to take the necessary steps to ensure full implementation and enforcement of the arms embargo. It strongly condemns the illegal supply of weapons to recipients in Somalia. It reiterates its call upon all States, the United Nations and other international organizations and entities to report to the Committee established by resolution 751 (1992) of 24 April 1992 information on possible violations of the arms embargo.

- 97 -

            The Security Council insists that all States should refrain from any military intervention in the internal situation in Somalia and that the territory of Somalia should not be used to undermine the stability in the subregion.

            The Security Council welcomes the Secretary-General’s intention to put in place a trust fund for peace-building in Somalia. It notes that despite the recent positive developments in Somalia, the security situation in the country is still a cause for serious concern. The Security Council therefore invites the Secretary-General to prepare a proposal for a peace-building mission for Somalia. Such a proposal should, with specific attention to the security situation in the country, outline possible ways to advance the peace process further.

            The Security Council remains seized of the matter.

S/PRST/2001/2                   Tension in Central African Republic

                                                Date:  23 January 2001                         Meeting:  4262

            The Security Council has considered the report of the Secretary-General dated 11 January 2001 (S/2001/35), submitted in accordance with the statement by the President of the Council of 10 February 2000 (S/PRST/2000/5).

            The Security Council commends the United Nations Peace-Building Support Office in the Central African Republic (BONUCA) and the Representative of the Secretary-General for the efforts they have constantly made to contribute to peace and stability in the Central African Republic. In this connection, the Council welcomes the additional progress made in certain areas since the previous report of the Secretary-General of 29 June 2000 (S/2000/639), particularly in the area of disarmament and the restructuring of the security and defence forces, and as regards respect for human rights by the police.

            The Security Council welcomes the mission to the region of the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General, to assess the impact of the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo on the Central African Republic and the Republic of the Congo, in particular its humanitarian, economic, social and security implications. The Council is looking forward to discussing the findings of that mission in the very near future.

            The Security Council expresses its concern at the political and social tensions which have recently resurfaced in the Central African Republic, which threaten the national reconciliation process undertaken four years ago with the active support of the international community. The Council notes with concern the absence of dialogue between the Government and the opposition. The Council is also disturbed by the deterioration of the economic situation, partly because of the repercussions of the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the resulting fuel crisis.

            The Security Council welcomes the contributions already received and calls upon bilateral and multilateral donors to provide full support to the efforts of the Government of the Central African Republic. The Council appreciates the release by the World Bank of the second tranche of credit for the consolidation of public finances and welcomes the recent decision by the International Monetary Fund to release additional funds. The Council calls upon Member States which made pledges at the special meeting in New York co-chaired by the Secretariat, Germany and the United Nations Development Programme in May 2000 to fulfil their commitments. The Council also stresses the importance of international assistance to refugees and displaced persons in the Central African Republic and in the other countries of the region in order to contribute to regional stability.

            The Security Council reaffirms that it is first up to the Central Africans to summon the necessary political will for national reconciliation. The Council strongly encourages the Government of the Central African Republic to do everything in its power to strengthen democratic institutions and broaden the scope of national reconciliation. The Council urges all political actors in the Central African Republic to contribute each in their own way to the reduction of the existing tension between the Government and the opposition. In this respect, while it welcomes the release, on 8 January 2001, of 62 persons who had been arrested during the prohibited demonstration of 19 December 2000, the Council nevertheless notes with concern certain constraints on the peaceful public assembly of opposition and labour groups.

            The Security Council calls upon the Government of the Central African Republic to take concrete measures to implement economic reforms and to ease social tensions. The Council stresses the priority need for the payment of salary arrears in the civil service and welcomes the recent announcement by the Government of the Central African Republic that it will take steps in this direction. The Council also encourages the Government of the Central African Republic to take all the financial measures that are necessary to relaunch the demobilization and reintegration programme.

            The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to continue to keep it regularly informed about the activities of BONUCA, the situation in the Central African Republic, and in particular the progress made in the political, economic and social reforms, and to submit a report by 30 June 2001, in accordance with the statement of the President of the Council dated 10 February 2000.

S/PRST/2001/3                   Establishment of Council working group on peacekeeping issues

                                                Date:  31 January 2001                         Meeting:  4270

            The Security Council has given further consideration to the question of strengthening cooperation between the Council, the troop-contributing countries and the Secretariat. In this connection, the Council stresses the importance of full implementation of provisions of resolution 1327 (2000) of 13 November 2000 and in the statements of its President of 28 March 1996 (S/PRST/1996/13) and 3 May 1994 (S/PRST/1994/22). The Council takes note of the views expressed at its debate on the subject ‘Strengthening Cooperation with Troop-Contributing Countries’ at its 4257th meeting on 16 January 2001. The Council recognizes the scope for further improvement in its relations with troop-contributing countries and the need to work together with a common purpose towards shared goals.

            The Security Council recognizes that in view of the increasing complexity of peacekeeping operations, there is a need for a transparent three-way relationship between the Security Council, the Secretariat and the troop-contributing countries that will foster a new spirit of partnership, cooperation and confidence.

            Recognizing that the experience and expertise of troop-contributing countries in theatres of operation can greatly assist the planning process, the Security Council reiterates its agreement to hold consultations with troop-contributing countries in a timely manner at different stages of a United Nations peacekeeping operation, in particular when the Secretary-General has identified potential troop-contributing countries for a new or ongoing peacekeeping operation, during the implementation phase of an operation, when considering a change to, or renewal of, or completion of a peacekeeping mandate, or when a rapid deterioration in the situation on the ground threatens the safety and security of United Nations peacekeepers.

            The Security Council will seek to ensure that all private meetings as provided for in resolution 1327 (2000) between members of the Council, the troop-contributing countries and the Secretariat are substantive, representative, meaningful and provide for a full exchange of views. The Council stresses the importance of full participation by all those involved and encourages troop-contributing countries to take the initiative to call for meaningful exchanges of information. The President of the Council will provide, where appropriate, a detailed report of consultations with the troop-contributing countries to the Council.

            The Security Council stresses the usefulness of full and comprehensive briefings by the Secretariat at private meetings with the troop-contributing countries, including, where appropriate, military factors.

            The Security Council encourages the Secretary-General to continue his efforts to improve coordination and cooperation on peacekeeping issues within the United Nations system and the Secretariat.

            The Security Council encourages the Secretary-General to raise public awareness globally of the positive contribution of peacekeeping operations and the role played by peacekeepers from various troop-contributing countries.

            The Security Council acknowledges that the Secretariat must be able to rely on sufficient human and financial resources to respond to the demands placed on it. It underlines the importance of follow-up to the report of the Panel on Peace Operations (S/2000/809) with a view to strengthening the Department of Peacekeeping Operations and other relevant departments of the Secretariat involved in peacekeeping.

            The Security Council reiterates that the problem of the commitment gap with regard to personnel and equipment for peacekeeping operations requires the assumption by all Member States of the shared responsibility to support United Nations peacekeeping.

            The Security Council acknowledges that the delay in reimbursement causes severe budgetary constraints to troop-contributing countries. It urges all Member States to pay their assessed contributions in full and on time, so that peacekeeping operations can stand on a solid financial basis.

            The Security Council decides to establish a Working Group of the Whole on United Nations peacekeeping operations. The Working Group will not replace the private meetings with the troop-contributing countries. The Working Group will address both generic peacekeeping issues relevant to the responsibilities of the Council, and technical aspects of individual peacekeeping operations, without prejudice to the competence of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. Where appropriate, the Working Group will seek the views of the troop-contributing countries, including through meetings between the Working Group and the troop-contributing countries, with a view to their views being taken into account by the Council.

            As a first step, the Working Group is tasked to undertake an in-depth consideration of, inter alia, all the proposals made in the course of the Council’s public meeting on 16 January 2001, including ways to improve the three-way relationship between the Council, the troop-contributing countries and the Secretariat and to report to the Council by 30 April 2001. An indicative list of all the ideas and proposals arising from the meeting on 16 January 2001 will be forwarded to the Working Group for its consideration.

S/PRST/2001/4                   Peace agreement between Ethiopia, Eritrea

                                                Date:  9 February 2001                         Meeting:  4275

            The Security Council, recalling all previous resolutions and statements of its President regarding the situation in Eritrea and Ethiopia, notes with appreciation the Secretary-General’s progress report of 12 January 2001 (S/2001/45) and subsequent update pertaining to the matter.

            The Security Council reaffirms the commitment of all Member States to the sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of Eritrea and Ethiopia, and further reaffirms its continued commitment to a peaceful definitive settlement of the conflict.

            The Security Council, reiterating its strong support for the Agreement of Cessation of Hostilities signed by the parties in Algiers on 18 June 2000 (S/2000/601), strongly welcomes and supports the subsequent Peace Agreement between the Government of the State of Eritrea and the Government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (S/2000/1183) signed in Algiers on 12 December 2000 (‘Algiers Agreement’). It commends the efforts of the Organization of African Unity, the President of Algeria and his Special Envoy, as well as the United States of America and the European Union for their role in achieving the Algiers Agreement.

            The Security Council encourages both parties to continue working towards the full and prompt implementation of the Algiers Agreement. In this connection, it further welcomes the agreement reached by the parties on 6 February 2001 to move forward with the establishment of the Temporary Security Zone on 12 February 2001.

            The Security Council expresses its strong support for the Secretary‑General’s role in continuing to help implement the Algiers Agreement, including through his own good offices, for the efforts of his Special Representative and for the contributions of relevant United Nations entities.

            The Security Council notes with satisfaction that the Algiers Agreement includes mechanisms for the delimitation and demarcation of the common border and for addressing claims and compensation, and that the parties are cooperating with the Secretary-General in these matters in accordance with agreed schedules. It draws the urgent attention of Member States to the fact that funds provided to date for border delimitation and demarcation, through the United Nations Trust Fund established under resolution 1177 (1998) of 26 June 1998, remain clearly inadequate to meet the expenses of the Boundary Commission for the work entrusted to it under the Algiers Agreement. While expressing appreciation to those Member States that have already contributed financially, the Council calls upon Member States to consider providing further support to the peace process, including through contributions to the voluntary Trust Fund in order to assist the parties in rapid delimitation and demarcation of the common border in accordance with resolution 1312 (2000) of 31 July 2000 and in accordance with the Algiers Agreement.

            The Security Council notes with appreciation the expeditious deployment of the United Nations Mission in Eritrea and Ethiopia (UNMEE) allowing the parties to redeploy and rearrange their forces as scheduled. It expresses appreciation to the troop-contributing countries and to those Member States that have provided UNMEE with additional assets.

            The Security Council urges the parties to cooperate fully and expeditiously with UNMEE in the implementation of its mandate, including through the complete redeployment of troops consistent with the Algiers Agreement, the establishment of a direct air corridor between Addis Ababa and Asmara to ensure freedom of movement for UNMEE flights, and the conclusion of the necessary Status of Forces Agreements, including identifying suitable accommodation sites for UNMEE.

            The Security Council further urges the parties to facilitate mine action in coordination with the United Nations Mine Action Service, including through exchanging and providing existing maps and any other relevant information to the United Nations. It notes with concern that mines and unexploded ordnance remain the pre-eminent threat to the safety and security of UNMEE troops and the population in and around the future Temporary Security Zone. It calls upon the international community to support generously non-governmental organizations with resources, skills and expertise in demining so that, in coordination with UNMEE and the United Nations country teams, they can assist both Governments in this undertaking.

            The Security Council encourages both parties to continue to exercise restraint and to implement confidence-building measures, to continue the release and voluntary and orderly return under the auspices of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) of civilians that remain interned, to release remaining prisoners of war and facilitate their return under the auspices of the ICRC, and to fulfil their commitments under the Algiers Agreement to afford humane treatment to each other’s nationals and persons of each other’s national origin.

            The Security Council calls on the parties to ensure the continued safe and unhindered access of humanitarian assistance to those in need, to guarantee the safety and security of all UNMEE, ICRC and other humanitarian personnel and to respect strictly the relevant provisions of international humanitarian law.

            The Security Council recognizes that the effects of the war have exacted a heavy toll on the civilian populations of Eritrea and Ethiopia, including through the internal displacement and outflow of refugees. It urges the respective Governments to continue to redirect their efforts towards the reconstruction and development of both economies, to work towards reconciliation with a view to normalizing their relations, and to engage in constructive cooperation with the other neighbouring States in the Horn of Africa, with a view to achieving stability in the subregion. It further urges contributions from the international community, including the United Nations agencies and the international financial institutions, in support of the reconstruction efforts of both countries.

            The Security Council remains seized of the matter.

S/PRST/2001/5                   Comprehensive approach to peace-building

                                                Date:  20 February 2001                       Meeting:  4278

            The Security Council recalls the open debate held at its 4274th meeting on 5 February 2001 on ‘Peace-building: towards a comprehensive approach’. The Council recalls also the statements of its President in relation to activities of the United Nations in preventive diplomacy, peacemaking, peacekeeping and post-conflict peace-building. The Security Council welcomes the convening by the Secretary-General of the Fourth High-level United Nations-Regional Organizations Meeting and notes with interest its results, in particular the ‘Framework for cooperation in peace-building’ as conveyed by the Secretary-General to the President of the Security Council in his letter of 12 February 2001 (S/2001/138).

            The Security Council reaffirms its primary responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security. The Council emphasizes the need for full respect for the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations and the relevant provisions of international law, in particular those related to prevention of armed conflicts and settlement of disputes by peaceful means.

            The Security Council reaffirms that the quest for peace requires a comprehensive, concerted and determined approach that addresses the root causes of conflicts, including their economic and social dimensions.

            The Security Council recognizes that peacemaking, peacekeeping and peace-building are often closely interrelated. The Council stresses that this interrelationship requires a comprehensive approach in order to preserve the results achieved and prevent the recurrence of conflicts. To this effect, the Council reiterates the value of including, as appropriate, peace-building elements in the mandates of peacekeeping operations.

            The Security Council recognizes that peace-building is aimed at preventing the outbreak, the recurrence or continuation of armed conflict and therefore encompasses a wide range of political, developmental, humanitarian and human rights programmes and mechanisms. This requires short and long-term actions tailored to address the particular needs of societies sliding into conflict or emerging from it. These actions should focus on fostering sustainable institutions and processes in areas such as sustainable development, the eradication of poverty and inequalities, transparent and accountable governance, the promotion of democracy, respect for human rights and the rule of law and the promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence.

            The Security Council further reaffirms that a comprehensive and integrated strategy in peace-building must involve all the relevant actors in this field, taking into account the unique circumstances of each conflict situation. The Council emphasizes that a well-planned and coordinated peace-building strategy can play a significant role in conflict prevention. In this connection, the Council underlines that international efforts in peace-building must complement and not supplant the essential role of the country concerned.

            The Security Council notes that the experiences of the United Nations and regional organizations and other actors in peace-building point to the need for enhancing peace-building activities by formulating a strategy based on the interdependence between sustainable peace, security and development in all its dimensions.

            The Security Council stresses that, to be successful, such a peace-building strategy should meet, inter alia, the following basic criteria: relevance, coherence and consistency of programmes and actions; the consent and cooperation of the authorities of the State concerned where they exist; continuity in and conclusion of the process; cooperation and coordination among organizations and other actors involved; and cost-effectiveness of the overall peace-building operation.

            The Security Council strongly encourages the United Nations system and regional and subregional organizations, donor countries and the international financial institutions to consider undertaking initiatives such as: utilization of the mechanism of consolidated appeals, the joint holding of pledging conferences to mobilize expeditiously international political support and the essential resource requirements; ensuring prompt financing of quick start-up peace-building projects; and strengthening mechanisms that promote development and self-reliance by improving capacity-building activities.

            The Security Council also underlines that successful peace-building is predicated on an effective and an unambiguous division of labour, based on the comparative advantage of different implementing bodies, between all the international partners, including the United Nations system, the international financial institutions, regional and subregional organizations, non-governmental organizations and the wider international community. In this regard, the Council strongly encourages all those actors to enhance their cooperation in areas such as the early identification of situations where peace-building is required; the definition of objectives and priority areas of peace-building; the development of an integrated operational response through mutual consultation; joint monitoring of peace-building activities; and establishing repertories of best practices and lessons learned in the area of peace-building.

            The Security Council stresses the importance of mainstreaming a gender perspective into peace agreements and peace-building strategies and of involving women in all peace-building measures.

            The Security Council further encourages the United Nations and regional and subregional organizations to establish consultative processes to ensure that peace settlements and agreements mediated by these organizations include commitments by the parties to the conflict to concerted action in different areas of peace-building, and stresses the need to identify such areas at early stages of the negotiation of peace agreements.

            The Security Council recognizes that the repatriation and resettlement of refugees and internally displaced persons as well as the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants should not be seen in isolation but must be carried out in the context of a broader search for peace, stability and development, with special emphasis on the revival of economic activities and reparation of the social fabric.

            The Security Council considers it essential to provide speedy operational solutions to the exceptional and urgent needs of countries emerging from or on the verge of conflict, through innovative and flexible means, including quick impact programmes which translate into concrete and visible improvements in the daily lives of their local populations.

            To enhance further the effectiveness of the United Nations in addressing conflicts at all stages, from prevention to settlement to post-conflict peace-building, the Security Council reiterates its willingness to consider ways to improve its cooperation with other United Nations bodies and organs directly concerned by peace-building, in particular the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council which have a primary role in this field.

            The Security Council recalls the essential role of the Secretary-General in peace-building, in particular in the establishment of strategies in this field and their implementation and recognizes the need to strengthen the coordination and analysis capacity of the Secretariat in order to allow the Secretary-General to fulfil his responsibilities in this area.

            The Security Council recognizes the need for the early involvement on the ground of peace-building actors and an orderly assumption of their responsibilities. To this effect and in order to avoid any gap between peacekeeping and peace-building, the Council expresses its determination, where appropriate, to consult at various stages of any peacekeeping operation that includes peace-building elements and in particular when the operation is being established, with the State concerned and with relevant actors who are primarily responsible for coordinating and implementing aspects of peace-building activities, such as the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council, the United Nations funds and programmes, the international financial institutions, regional organizations and major donor countries.

            The Security Council recognizes that troop-contributing countries may be involved in peace-building activities and that, within the existing system of consultations with these countries, relevant peace-building activities should be discussed.

            The Security Council encourages close cooperation between the authorities of the State concerned and the international community in elaborating programmes of peace-building activities where the commitment by the parties could be formalized in written communications.

            The Security Council underlines the importance of the presence of special representatives of the Secretary-General or other suitable United Nations coordination arrangements, such as the resident coordinator system, in coordinating the elaboration and implementation of peace-building programmes by international organizations and donor countries in close cooperation with local authorities, taking into account ongoing activities. The Council stresses that any United Nations peace-building presence should have the necessary personnel and financial resources to discharge its mandate.

            The Security Council stresses the importance of its being kept regularly informed of the progress achieved as well as of difficulties encountered in peace-building in countries where a peacekeeping operation had been mandated by the Security Council.

            The Security Council reiterates that efforts to ensure lasting solutions to conflicts and to maintain the momentum for peace in any given country or region require an increased solidarity, sustained political will and timely and adequate resources on the part of the international community.

            The Security Council recalls the decision by the Secretary-General to instruct the Executive Committee on Peace and Security to formulate a plan on the strengthening of the United Nations capacity to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of them, and looks forward to the submission by him of recommendations to the Security Council and the General Assembly on the basis of this plan.

            The Security Council will remain seized of the matter.

S/PRST/2001/6                   Condemnation of attacks in Burundi

                                                Date:  2 March 2001                             Meeting:   4285

            The Security Council strongly condemns the recent attacks by armed groups in Burundi, particularly those launched on Bujumbura by the Forces for National Liberation (FNL). The timing of these actions is of particular concern since they were launched during the meeting of the parties to the Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agreement (the Arusha Agreement) on Burundi convened by the Facilitator, Nelson Mandela, on 25 February 2001 in Arusha, Tanzania. The Council calls for the immediate cessation of these attacks.

            The Security Council expresses its strong disapproval of all acts aimed at undermining the peace process in Burundi. The Council urges all sides to exercise restraint and to refrain from any action that may exacerbate the situation.

            The Security Council condemns the deliberate targeting of the civilian population by the armed groups and calls upon all parties to abide by international humanitarian law and in particular to refrain from any further attacks or any military action that endangers the civilian population.

            The Security Council reiterates its call on the FNL and the Forces for the Defence of Democracy (FDD) to cease hostilities immediately and to join the peace process. The Council recalls the meeting in Libreville on 9 January 2001 between the President of the Republic of Burundi and the leader of the FDD and urges the continuation of this process. The Council calls on all the parties, including the armed groups, to engage in dialogue immediately so as to allow an early cessation of hostilities and to reach agreement on a permanent ceasefire.

            The Security Council stresses the importance of providing urgent humanitarian assistance to civilians displaced by the hostilities, and calls upon all parties to guarantee safe and unhindered access by humanitarian personnel to those in need. The Council reiterates its request to the donor community to help the Government of Burundi, United Nations agencies and the humanitarian community to respond effectively to the needs of the population of Burundi. The Council also urges donors to deliver on the commitments made at the Paris Donors Conference on 11 and 12 December 2000.

            The Security Council takes note of the scheme for power-sharing arrangements among parties to the Arusha Agreement worked out by the fourteenth Summit Meeting of the Regional Peace Initiative on Burundi, held in Arusha, Tanzania on 26 February 2001 and calls on all the parties to reach early agreement on the outstanding issues related to the transitional power-sharing arrangements and to give their full cooperation to the Facilitator.

            The Security Council stresses that the key to achieving lasting peace in Burundi lies with the Burundian parties. It is convinced that compromise is the only means to resolve the conflict, and to this end urges all parties to work towards settling outstanding differences over the peace accord, and to proceed to its implementation.

            The Security Council reaffirms its full support for the continuing efforts of the Facilitator, the Regional Peace Initiative and the Implementation Monitoring Committee to bring peace to Burundi. The Council also emphasizes the role of the Implementation Monitoring Committee in advancing the peace process. It takes note of the Communiqué of the 14th Summit Meeting of the Regional Peace Initiative on Burundi held in Arusha, Tanzania on 26 February 2001. It also reiterates its readiness to consider practical ways in which it can best support the peace process, and the implementation of the Arusha Agreement.

            The Security Council will remain seized of the matter.

S/PRST/2001/7                   Condemnation of violence in former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

                                                Date:  7 March 2001                             Meeting:  4290

            The Security Council welcomes the participation of the Foreign Minister of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia in its meeting on 7 March 2001 and carefully listened to him.

            The Security Council strongly condemns recent violence by ethnic Albanian armed extremists in the north of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, in particular the killing of three soldiers of the armed forces of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia in the area of Tanusevci. The Council regrets that the violence continues and calls for an immediate end to it.

            The Security Council expresses its deep concern at those events, which constitute a threat to the stability and security not only of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia but also of the entire region. It calls on all political leaders in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, who are in a position to do so to isolate the forces behind the violent incidents and to shoulder their responsibility for peace and stability in the region.

            The Security Council underlines the responsibility of the Government of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia for the rule of law in its territory. It supports actions by the Government of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to address the violence with an appropriate level of restraint and to preserve the political stability of the country and foster harmony between all ethnic components of the population.

            The Security Council recalls the need to respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. In this context it emphasizes that the border demarcation agreement, signed in Skopje on 23 February 2001, and ratified by the Parliament of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia on 1 March 2001, must be respected by all.

            The Security Council welcomes the steps taken by the international security presence (KFOR) to control the border between Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia in accordance with the military-technical agreement signed in Kumanovo on 9 June 1999. It welcomes the ongoing dialogue between the Government of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and KFOR on practical steps to address the immediate security situation and to prevent crossing of the border by extremists as well as possible violations of resolution 1160 (1998) of 31 March 1998. It welcomes the efforts of all relevant international organizations in cooperation with the Government of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to promote stability and to create conditions for a return of the inhabitants to their homes.

            The Security Council will continue to follow the developments on the ground closely, and requests to be briefed regularly on the outcome of the efforts referred to above.

S/PRST/2001/8                   Call for end to ethnic violence in Kosovo, support for elections

                                                Date:  16 March 2001                           Meeting:  4298

            The Security Council welcomes the briefing by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on progress in the implementation of its resolution 1244 (1999) of 10 June 1999.

            The Security Council commends the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and the commander of the international security presence (KFOR) for their ongoing efforts to implement fully resolution 1244 (1999), undertaken under difficult circumstances, and welcomes the priority areas of work identified by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General.

            The Security Council welcomes the establishment of a working group under the authority of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General aimed at developing a legal framework for provisional institutions for democratic and autonomous self-government in Kosovo and stresses the need for all ethnic groups to be represented in the work of this group. It underlines the need to keep the Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia informed on the process. It calls on all parties to support the efforts of the United Nations Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) to build a stable multi-ethnic democratic society in Kosovo and to ensure suitable conditions for Kosovo-wide elections. It stresses the importance of a number of steps being taken for the holding of these elections: the establishment of the legal framework, in particular the definition of the functions and powers of the elected bodies; the development of an integrated voter registry which should include the refugees and internally displaced persons; full involvement of all the communities in the ballot; and a high security environment for the voting.

            The Security Council welcomes close contact between the Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and UNMIK and KFOR, in particular the steps taken towards the opening of an UNMIK office in Belgrade, which will facilitate these consultations. It stresses the importance of substantial dialogue between Kosovo political leaders and the Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

            The Security Council calls for an end to all acts of violence in Kosovo, in particular those which are ethnically motivated and urges all political leaders in Kosovo to condemn these acts and to increase their efforts to create inter-ethnic tolerance. It reiterates the importance of resolving the problem of the missing and detainees and notes that this would be a major confidence-building measure. It welcomes the initial steps taken by the Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in this regard.

            The Security Council remains concerned about the security situation in certain municipalities in Southern Serbia as a result of the violent actions of ethnic Albanian armed groups. It welcomes the ceasefire agreements signed on 12 March 2001 and calls for strict compliance with their provisions. It stresses that a peaceful settlement of this crisis can only be achieved through substantial dialogue. It commends the continued restraint of the authorities of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and Serbia. The Security Council welcomes the plan of the Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia for Southern Serbia and supports its initiative to find a peaceful and durable solution through a process of dialogue and confidence-building measures. It expresses the opinion that the swift implementation of confidence-building measures would be an important element in a peaceful settlement, and underlines the importance of continued political and financial support for this process by the international community.

            The Security Council welcomes the decision taken by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to authorize the commander of KFOR to allow the controlled return of forces of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to the Ground Safety Zone as defined in the military-technical agreement signed in Kumanovo on 9 June 1999 referred to in Annex II of resolution 1244 (1999) as a first step in a phased and conditioned reduction of the Ground Safety Zone.

            The Security Council reiterates its strong support for the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia as set out in the statement of its President of 7 March 2001 (S/PRST/2001/7). It strongly condemns the continuing extremist violence in parts of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, supported from outside the country, which constitutes a threat to the stability and security of the entire region, and underlines the importance of maintaining the territorial integrity of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and all other States in the region. It supports efforts by the Government of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to cooperate with NATO and other international organizations to end this violence in a manner consistent with the rule of law.

            The Security Council will remain actively seized of the matter.

S/PRST/2001/9                   Agreement between Georgian and Abkhaz sides

                                                Date:  21 March 2001                           Meeting:  4300

            The Security Council welcomes the successful holding of the third meeting on confidence-building measures between the Georgian and Abkhaz sides in Yalta on 15 and 16 March 2001 and the resumption of dialogue between them, and notes the documents signed there (S/2001/242). It hopes that action flowing from the Yalta meeting will lead to a narrowing of the positions of the two sides and stimulate further constructive dialogue aimed at achieving a comprehensive political settlement of the conflict, including a settlement of the political status of Abkhazia within the State of Georgia and other key issues. The Council underlines the contribution that confidence-building measures can bring to the peace process and commends the efforts by the Government of Ukraine in ensuring the success of the Yalta meeting.

            The Security Council reaffirms its support for the efforts by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General to enhance contacts at all levels between the Georgian and Abkhaz sides, in close cooperation with the Russian Federation, in its capacity as facilitator, the Group of Friends of the Secretary-General and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

            The Security Council encourages the two sides to engage with renewed commitment in the peace process. The Council notes the stated willingness of the two sides to ensure favourable conditions for the continuation of the peace process, their stated commitment to the non-use of force and their stated determination to intensify efforts in order to create the necessary climate for the voluntary return of internally displaced persons and refugees in secure and dignified conditions. The Council also notes the important contribution that the United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia and the Collective Peacekeeping Forces of the Commonwealth of Independent States continue to make in stabilizing the situation in the zone of conflict.

            The Security Council underlines the unacceptability of the holding of self-styled local elections in Abkhazia, Georgia, on 10 March 2001, which it deems illegitimate and unhelpful. The organization of these elections represents an additional obstacle to the attempts to reach a comprehensive settlement of the conflict based on international law.

            The Security Council stresses the importance of negotiations on the core political questions of the conflict. In this regard, it looks forward to the briefing to be provided by the Secretary-General on the progress of the political settlement, including on the status of the draft paper his Special Representative intends to submit to the two sides, as referred to in paragraph 16 of its resolution 1339 (2001) of 31 January 2001.

            The Security Council will remain actively seized of the matter and reaffirms its commitment to advancing the peace process.

S/PRST/2001/10                                Implementation of September 2000 Summit commitments

                                                Date:  22 March 2001                           Meeting:  4302

            The Security Council recalls the decisions and recommendations contained in the declaration on ensuring an effective role for the Security Council in the maintenance of international peace and security, particularly in Africa, adopted at its meeting at the level of Heads of State and Government in the course of the Millennium Summit (resolution 1318 (2000) of 7 September 2000, annex), and the open debate held on 7 March 2001 to review its implementation. The Council takes note with interest of the important views expressed by non-members at this debate.

            The Security Council notes the progress achieved in translating the commitments made at its Summit meeting into practical results and expresses its determination to intensify efforts to this end. The Council underlines the importance of the Declaration as a contribution towards the development of a well-targeted strategy and shared vision in the maintenance of international peace and security and of the deeper and broader involvement of Member States and the wider international community in that regard.

            The Security Council will consider and take appropriate action on the Secretary-General’s forthcoming report on conflict prevention, his recommendations on the strengthening of the United Nations capacity to develop peace-building strategies, the report prepared by its Working Group on General Issues of Sanctions, and the recommendations on improving the three-way relationship between the Council, the troop-contributing countries and the Secretariat to be prepared by its Working Group on Peacekeeping Operations, and reiterates its intention to review periodically the implementation of its resolution 1327 (2000) of 13 November 2000 on strengthening peacekeeping operations.

            The Security Council underlines the need for closer cooperation and interaction within the United Nations system in addressing the challenges to peace and security, including the root causes of conflicts, and intends to continue taking concrete steps in advancing this goal. The Council also expresses its willingness to continue to develop productive working relationships with regional and subregional organizations in addressing conflict.

            The Security Council decides to conduct a further review, with the active participation of non-members, of the implementation of the commitments made at its meeting at the level of Heads of State and Government.

S/PRST/2001/11                                Welcomes briefing by High Representative in Bosnia and Herzegovina

                                                Date:  22 March 2001                           Meeting:  4304

            The Security Council welcomes the briefing by the High Representative for the implementation of the General Framework Agreement on Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the annexes thereto (collectively the Peace Agreement, S/1995/999, annex) on the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina and commends his efforts in implementing this agreement.

            The Security Council encourages further regional political and economic cooperation, in compliance with the principles of the sovereignty and territorial integrity and the inviolability of the borders of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the other States of the region.

            The Security Council welcomes the new state-level and entity-level governments formed after the general elections of 11 November 2000 and calls on them to take active measures to make further progress on the return of refugees, consolidation of the state institutions, and economic reform. It welcomes the progress on creating a State Level Defense Identity in full compliance with the relevant provisions of the Peace Agreement and encourages the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina to finalize the unresolved details without delay.

            The Security Council welcomes the establishment of Constitutional Commissions to protect the vital interest of the constituent peoples to facilitate the implementation of the ‘Constituent Peoples decision’ of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 1 July 2000 and calls upon the entity parliaments to engage in the debate about the necessary amendments to their respective constitutions in the light of proposals examined by the Constitutional Commissions.

            The Security Council notes the recent conclusion of the Agreement on a Special Relationship between the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Republika Srpska and urges the High Representative to monitor its implementation and any amendments to it, in order to ensure that it remains consistent with the territorial integrity and sovereignty of Bosnia and Herzegovina as a whole and with the Peace Agreement.

            The Security Council condemns recent unilateral moves by the so-called Croat National Congress to establish Croat self-rule in open contradiction of the provisions of the Peace Agreement, and calls on all parties to work within the legal institutions and constitutional framework of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the entities. It expresses its support for the High Representative in taking actions against persons holding public office who are found to be in violation of legal commitments made under the Peace Agreement or the terms for its implementation.

            The Security Council welcomes the progress made on the return of refugees and property law implementation in the year 2000, but remains concerned at the slow pace of refugee return, particularly in urban areas. The Council insists on the responsibility of the local authorities to accelerate the rate of return and property law implementation.

            The Security Council urges all political parties in Bosnia and Herzegovina and their respective leaders to engage constructively within the legal institutions of that country in order to implement fully the Peace Agreement.

S/PRST/2001/12                                Lack of progress in Abkhazia, Georgia, conflict

                                                Date:  24 April 2001                              Meeting:  4314

            The Security Council welcomes the briefing provided by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General, on 24 April 2001, in accordance with paragraph 16 of its resolution 1339 (2001) of 31 January 2001. It welcomes also the presence of the Minister for Special Affairs of Georgia at its meeting.

            The Security Council stresses that the continued lack of progress on key issues of a comprehensive settlement of the conflict in Abkhazia, Georgia, is unacceptable. It underlines the decisive importance of early negotiations on the core political questions of the conflict. It strongly supports, in this context, the efforts of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General to promote the achievement of a comprehensive political settlement based on the resolutions of the Security Council, which must include a settlement of the political status of Abkhazia within the State of Georgia.

            The Security Council strongly supports, in particular, the intention of the Special Representative to submit, in the near future, his draft paper containing specific proposals to the parties on the question of the distribution of constitutional competences between Tbilisi and Sukhumi. It calls on all those concerned to use their influence with a view to facilitating this process.

            The Security Council welcomes the intention of the Special Representative to submit the draft paper to the parties soon, as a starting point for negotiation, and not as an attempt to impose or dictate any possible solution. It calls upon the parties constructively to accept the paper in this light and work towards a mutually acceptable settlement.

            The Security Council will remain actively seized of the matter and reaffirms its commitment to advancing the peace process.

S/PRST/2001/13                                Illegal exploitation of Democratic Republic of Congonatural resources

                                                Date:  3 May 2001                                Meeting:  4318

            The Security Council recalls the statement of its President of 2 June 2000 (S/PRST/2000/20). It expresses its intention to give full consideration to the report of the Expert Panel on the Illegal Exploitation of Natural Resources and Other Forms of Wealth in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (S/2001/357). It takes note of the action plan of the Expert Panel for the extension of its mandate (S/2001/416).

            The Security Council notes that the report contains disturbing information about the illegal exploitation of Congolese resources by individuals, Governments and armed groups involved in the conflict, and the link between the exploitation of the natural resources and other forms of wealth in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the continuation of the conflict.

            The Security Council condemns the illegal exploitation of the natural resources of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and expresses its serious concern at those economic activities that fuel the conflict. It urges the Governments named in the report in this regard to conduct their own inquiries into this information, cooperate fully with the Expert Panel while ensuring necessary security for the experts, and take immediate steps to end illegal exploitation of the natural resources by their nationals or others under their control.

            The Security Council notes with concern the terrible toll the conflict is taking on the people, economy and environment of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

            The Security Council believes that the only viable solution to the crisis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo remains the full implementation of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement (S/1999/815) and the relevant Security Council resolutions.

            The Security Council emphasizes the importance of a comprehensive approach addressing all the root causes of the conflict to achieve a lasting peace settlement in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

            The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to extend the mandate of the Expert Panel for a final period of three months, and requests also that the Expert Panel submit to the Council, through the Secretary-General, an addendum to its final report which shall include the following:

            (a)      An update of relevant data and an analysis of further information, including as pointed out in the action plan submitted by the Panel to the Security Council;

            (b)      Relevant information on the activities of countries and other actors for which the necessary quantity and quality of data were not made available earlier;

            (c)      A response, based as far as possible on corroborated evidence, to the comments and reactions of the States and actors cited in the final report of the Expert Panel;

            (d)      An evaluation of the situation at the end of the extension of the mandate of the Panel, and of its conclusions, assessing whether progress has been made on the issues which come under the responsibility of the Panel.

            The Security Council expresses its intention to examine and respond to the recommendations of the report in the light of the addendum submitted by the Panel, so as to advance the peace process in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

S/PRST/2001/14                                Call for access, freedom of movement for UN Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea

                                                Date:  15 May 2001                              Meeting:  4320

            Recalling all previous resolutions and statements of its President regarding the situation between Ethiopia and Eritrea, the Security Council emphasizes the importance of the commitments undertaken by the Government of the State of Eritrea and the Government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia to the Agreement of Cessation of Hostilities signed in Algiers on 18 June 2000 (S/2001/601) and the subsequent Peace Agreement between the parties (S/2000/1183) signed in Algiers on 12 December 2000 (“Algiers Agreements”).

            The Security Council reiterates its strong support for the Secretary-General’s role in helping to implement the Agreements, including through his own good offices, and for the efforts of his Special Representative. It further expresses its appreciation for the continued role of the Organization of African Unity in helping to implement the Algiers Agreements.

            The Security Council also reiterates its appreciation for the continued deployment of the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE) both to the troop-contributing countries and to those Member States that have provided UNMEE with additional assets.

            The Security Council encourages both parties to continue working towards the full and prompt implementation of the Agreements and, in this context, to take concrete confidence-building measures. The Council further reaffirms its continued commitment to a peaceful definitive settlement of the conflict. In this connection, the Council notes with satisfaction that the parties have agreed to the Secretary-General’s proposal of 1 May 2001, on the composition of the Boundary and Claims Commissions, critical components to the peaceful definitive settlement of the conflict. It now calls on the parties to fully cooperate with the Boundary Commission and to fulfil their financial responsibilities regarding the Boundary Commission’s work.

            The Security Council stresses that the parties must provide free movement and access for UNMEE and its supplies as required throughout the territories of the parties, without any restrictions, including within the Temporary Security Zone (TSZ) and the 15 km wide adjacent area. Free and unhindered access for UNMEE is a fundamental condition for the success of the peacekeeping operation. The Security Council emphasizes further that the purpose of the TSZ is to separate the parties’ armed forces. The TSZ must be completely demilitarized. The civilian populations inside the TSZ should be supported by an appropriate but limited number of Eritrean civilian militia and police.

            The Security Council calls on the parties to cooperate fully and expeditiously with UNMEE in the implementation of its mandate and to abide scrupulously by the letter and spirit of their agreements, particularly regarding the inviolability of the TSZ. It also calls on both parties to exercise restraint in their public statements.

            The Security Council further calls on the parties to continue to facilitate mine action in coordination with the United Nations Mine Action Service. It encourages the parties to exercise caution in returning civilians to the TSZ before it has been adequately demined. The Council further calls for the immediate establishment of a secure air corridor between Addis Ababa and Asmara that does not require a detour through other countries. It also calls on Eritrea to conclude the necessary Status of Forces Agreement for UNMEE.

            The Security Council notes that, in accordance with paragraph 16 of resolution 1298 (2000) of 17 May 2000, the arms embargo on the parties expires on 16 May 2001. The Council recognizes that the Algiers Agreements are consistent with paragraphs 2 through 4 of resolution 1298 (2000). Under the current circumstances, the measures imposed by paragraph 6 of the same resolution have not been extended by the Council beyond 16 May 2001.

            The Security Council urges the parties to ensure that efforts are redirected from weapons procurement and other military activities towards the reconstruction and development of both economies, and regional reconciliation, with a view to achieving stability in the Horn of Africa. The Council reiterates its encouragement of Member States to exercise the highest degree of responsibility in discouraging arms flows to countries and regions emerging from armed conflicts.

            The Security Council remains vigilant and expresses its intention to take appropriate measures if the situation between Eritrea and Ethiopia again threatens regional peace and security.

            The Security Council will remain seized of the matter.

S/PRST/2001/15                                Extension of UN Disengagement Observer Force

                                                Date:  30 May 2001                              Meeting:  4322

            In connection with the resolution just adopted on the renewal of the mandate of the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force, I have been authorized to make the following complementary statement on behalf of the Security Council:

                       As is known, the report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (S/2001/499) states, in paragraph 11: “... the situation in the Middle East continues to be potentially dangerous and is likely to remain so unless and until a comprehensive settlement covering all aspects of the Middle East problem can be reached”. That statement of the Secretary-General reflects the view of the Security Council.

S/PRST/2001/16                                Implication of HIV/AIDS on UN Peacekeeping

                                                Date:  28 June 2001                              Meeting:  4339

            The Security Council welcomes the successful holding of the Twenty-sixth Special Session of the General Assembly on HIV/AIDS, and encourages further action to address the problem of HIV/AIDS.

            The Security Council recalls its resolution 1308 (2000) of 17 July 2000, in which the Council, bearing in mind its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, and emphasizing the important roles of the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council in addressing the social and economic factors that lead to the spread of HIV/AIDS, inter alia, recognized that the HIV/AIDS pandemic is also exacerbated by conditions of violence and instability, and stressed that the HIV/AIDS pandemic, if unchecked, may pose a risk to stability and security.

            The Security Council therefore welcomes the fact that the declaration adopted at the Twenty-sixth Special Session of the General Assembly addresses HIV/AIDS in conflict and disaster affected regions, and contains a number of practical measures at the national and international levels, to be met within given time-frames, to reduce the impact of conflict and disasters on the spread of HIV/AIDS, including the provision of awareness and training for personnel employed by United Nations agencies and other relevant organizations, the development of national strategies to address the spread of HIV amongst national uniformed services, as required, and the inclusion of HIV/AIDS awareness and training into guidelines designed for personnel involved in international peacekeeping operations.

            The Security Council also recalls its open debate on 19 January 2001, taking stock of progress made since the adoption of resolution 1308 (2000). The Council notes the progress made in the implementation of the resolution, and commends the increased cooperation in this regard between the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) through the Memorandum of Understanding between them signed in January 2001. Further, the Council welcomes the efforts to develop practical measures, such as the planned joint United Nations field assessment missions to major peacekeeping operations, and the development of the HIV/AIDS Awareness Card for Peacekeeping Operations to be distributed to all peacekeeping operations after testing in the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone. The Council also welcomes the fact that the cooperation framework signed in May this year between UNAIDS and the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) expresses their intention to cooperate in the follow-up to resolution 1308 (2000), as well as resolution 1325 (2000) of 31 October 2000 on women, peace and security.

            The Security Council recognizes that further efforts are necessary to reduce the negative impact of conflict and disasters on the spread of HIV/AIDS, and to develop the capacity of peacekeepers to become advocates and actors for awareness and prevention of HIV transmission. The Council encourages continued efforts with regard to relevant training for peacekeeping, pre-deployment orientation, and increased international cooperation by interested Member States in areas such as prevention, voluntary and confidential testing and counselling, treatment for personnel, and the exchange of best practices and countries’ policies in this regard. The Council encourages UNAIDS and DPKO to further pursue the implementation of resolution 1308 (2000), including through the consideration of further efforts to enhance cooperation, such as the inclusion of HIV/AIDS advisers in peacekeeping operations, and revision, as required, of relevant codes of conduct.

            The Security Council expresses its intention to contribute within its competence to the attainment of the relevant objectives in the declaration adopted at the Twenty-sixth Special Session of the General Assembly in carrying out the Council’s work, in particular in its follow-up to resolution 1308 (2000).

S/PRST/2001/17                                Call for suspension of hostilities in Burundi

                                                Date:  29 June 2001                              Meeting:  4341

            The Security Council calls for an immediate suspension of hostilities in Burundi.

            The Security Council calls on the armed groups to enter into negotiations.

            The Security Council reiterates its profound concern at the continuation of the conflict in Burundi and its toll on the civilian population. In that context, the Security Council stresses once again its support for the Arusha process and the efforts of the Facilitator, Nelson Mandela.

            The Security Council strongly emphasizes to the parties to the Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agreement of August 2000 (Arusha Agreement) the need to implement, all the immediately applicable provisions of the Agreement, including the provisions for the establishment of new institutions.

            The Security Council calls upon the parties to the Arusha Agreement to continue searching, together with all parties concerned, forsolutions to outstanding issues in the Agreement.

            The Security Council expresses grave concern at continuing human rights abuses and violations of humanitarian law, and stresses the need for all parties to ensure respect for human rights and humanitarian law. In particular, it urges the belligerents to commit themselves immediately to the protection of civilians, in particular their life, physical integrity and the means necessary for their survival. It also reiterate its call for safe and unhindered access for the delivery of humanitarian aid to all people in need.

            The Security Council encourages the Secretary-General through his Representatives to continue to engage the armed groups and contribute to coordinated efforts to bring about a political settlement of the conflict.

            The Security Council reiterates its call to the donor community to increase its humanitarian and development assistance to the people of Burundi, in keeping with their pledges given at the Paris Donor Conference on 11-12 December 2000.

            The Security Council remains actively seized of the situation in Burundi and, in this context, will continue to receive regular reporting from the Secretariat on developments in and around the country. The Security Council stands ready to consider, in the light of progress in the above areas, further contributions to the peace process, and the implementation of the Arusha Agreement.

S/PRST/2001/18                                Situation in Central African Republic, killing of UN security coordinator

                                                Date:  17 July 2001                               Meeting:  4347

            The Security Council has examined the report of the Secretary-General of 2 July 2001 on the activities of the United Nations Peace-building Support Office in the Central African Republic (BONUCA) and the situation in the Central African Republic (S/2001/660).

            The Security Council expresses its appreciation to the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General, General Amadou Toumani Touré, for the mission he conducted in Bangui from 9 June to 1 July 2001. It notes with satisfaction that the mission has contributed to easing tensions in the Central African Republic.

            The Security Council welcomes the appointment of the new Representative of the Secretary-General in the Central African Republic. It looks forward to his assuming the active leadership of BONUCA at an early date.

            The Security Council reiterates its condemnation of the recent attempted coup in the Central African Republic. It recognizes the importance of the Central African Republic to subregional stability. It expresses its deep concern at the precarious situation in the country and the persisting acts of violence, in particular against certain ethnic groups. The Council notes that such a climate is not conducive to encouraging the continuation of the return home of the thousands of Central Africans that were displaced or took refuge in neighbouring countries as a result of the events at the end of May. It calls upon the Government of the Central African Republic to take urgent steps to bring an end to all acts of violence.

            The Security Council strongly condemns the killing of the security coordinator for the United Nations system in the Central African Republic. It takes note of the condemnation of this act by the Central African authorities and of their intention to carry out an investigation and urges them to bring those responsible to justice.

            The Security Council calls for respect for human rights, national reconciliation and political dialogue in the spirit of the 1998 National Reconciliation Pact (S/1998/219, appendix).

            The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to submit to it by 30 September 2001 recommendations on how the United Nations might further contribute to the recovery of the Central African Republic, paying particular attention to the following questions:

                       (a)      Strengthening BONUCA, in particular in areas such as human rights monitoring, assistance to the judicial system and capacity-building, and enhancing the effectiveness of its early-warning capacity;

                       (b)      Exploring with the Government of the Central African Republic, in cooperation with the relevant institutions, the provision of expertise in the area of public administration and finances, in particular by making available experts in such matters;

                       (c)      The continued and improved restructuring of the Central African armed forces and the implementation of an effective arms-collection programme.

            The Security Council expresses its willingness to study, in cooperation with the relevant institutions, particularly the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, the recommendations of the Secretary-General.

            The Security Council stresses that an enhanced international effort will be necessary to help in the recovery of the Central African Republic. It urges all States that made pledges at the special donor meeting in New York in May 2000 to fulfil them. It calls on the Bretton Woods institutions to take into account the specific nature of the situation in order to conclude programmes with the Central African authorities at an early date. The Council stresses the crucial importance of poverty eradication, debt payment and payment of arrears of salary for civil servants which requires in the long term heightened efforts on the part of the Government of the Central African Republic in the management of public finances and administration.

            The Security Council again recalls that responsibility for national reconciliation, stability and the reconstruction of the country lies primarily with the political leaders and the people of the Central African Republic. It emphasizes in this regard that the full effectiveness of the assistance of the international community depends on the implementation in parallel of appropriate structural reforms.

S/PRST/2001/19                                Call for cooperation with UN Organization Mission in Democratic Republic of Congo

                                                Date:  24 July 2001                               Meeting:  4349

            The Security Council takes note with satisfaction of the progress made so far in the peace process in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

            The Security Council calls on all the parties to the conflict to fulfil all their commitments, implement fully the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement (S/1999/815) and complete the disengagement and redeployment of their forces in accordance with the Kampala plan and the Harare sub-plans, which the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) will verify.

            The Security Council finds it unacceptable that more than one year after the adoption of its resolution 1304 (2000) of 15 June 2000 containing the demand to completely demilitarize Kisangani, reiterated in resolution 1355 (2001) of 15 June 2001, the Rassemblement Congolais pour la Démocratie has thus far failed to comply with it. The Council calls on the Rassemblement Congolais pour la Démocratie to implement fully and immediately its obligation under resolution 1304 (2000), and notes that continued failure to do so may have future implications.

            The Security Council reminds all the parties of their obligation to cooperate fully with MONUC and of their obligations with respect to the security of civilian populations under the fourth Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War of 12 August 1949. The Council urges the relevant parties to expedite the conclusion of their investigation into the killing of six International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) staff in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, to report their findings to the ICRC and to bring the perpetrators to justice.

            The Security Council calls on all parties to facilitate and support humanitarian efforts of the United Nations and non-governmental organizations. It stresses the importance of the work of the United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator.

            The Security Council reiterates its call for the cessation of the illegal exploitation of the natural resources of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In this regard, it calls on all parties to cooperate fully with the expert panel and, looking forward to the addendum to the report of the panel, reiterates its readiness to consider the necessary actions to put an end to this exploitation.

            The Security Council reiterates its demand on all parties to accelerate the finalization and the implementation of comprehensive plans for the orderly withdrawal of all foreign troops from the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the disarmament, demobilization, reintegration, repatriation and resettlement of all armed groups referred to in Annex A, Chapter 9.1, of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement.

            The Security Council expresses serious concern over the activities of the armed groups in the east of the country. It takes note with interest of the invitation by the President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo to MONUC to visit the camps where some members of the armed groups have reportedly been quartered by the Forces Armées Congolaises, and stresses the importance of MONUC assisting, within its capabilities, in the early implementation, on a voluntary basis, of the disarmament, demobilization, reintegration, repatriation and resettlement of these armed groups, in accordance with the authorization given in its resolution 1355 (2001). The Council requests in this regard the donor community, in particular the World Bank and the European Union, to provide financial and in-kind contributions as soon as possible to MONUC in the implementation of this mission.

            The Security Council reiterates its firm support for the Inter-Congolese Dialogue and the efforts of the Facilitator and his team in the field. It emphasizes the importance of an open, representative and inclusive dialogue, free from outside interference and involving civil society, leading to a consensus settlement. It calls on the Congolese parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement to cooperate fully with the Facilitator to enable him to conduct the process in a swift and constructive manner. It expresses the hope that the Dialogue can be held on Congolese soil, respecting the choice that the Congolese actors themselves will make. It encourages donors to continue to provide support to the Facilitator’s mission.

            The Security Council welcomes the recent high-level meetings between the Presidents of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda and Uganda and encourages them further to pursue the dialogue to find solutions to their common security concerns in accordance with the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement.

            The Security Council reiterates its commitment to support full implementation of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement. It reaffirms that the primary responsibility for implementing the Agreement lies with the parties. The Council urges them to demonstrate the necessary political will by cooperating with each other and with MONUC in achieving this goal. It expresses its readiness to consider, subject to necessary progress made by the parties and to recommendations of the Secretary-General the possible expansion of MONUC if and when the mission enters its third phase.

            The Security Council commends the Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Ambassador Kamel Morjane, for his outstanding work and invaluable contribution to the peace process in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

S/PRST/2001/20                                Implementation of agreement in former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

                                                Date:  13 August 2001                         Meeting:  4356

            The Security Council welcomes the signing of the Framework Agreement in The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia by President Trajkovski and the leaders of four political parties on 13 August 2001. The Council calls for the full and immediate implementation of the Agreement, which promotes the peaceful and harmonious development of civil society while respecting the ethnic identity and the interests of all Macedonian citizens.

            The Council calls for the full implementation of its resolution 1345 (2001) and reaffirms the sovereignty and territorial integrity of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

            The Council calls again on all those concerned, including on leaders of ethnic Albanian communities in the region, publicly to condemn violence and ethnic intolerance and to use their influence to secure peace. It reiterates its call to all who have contact with extremist groups to make clear to them that they have no support from any quarter in the international community. The Council condemns the ongoing violence by extremists and calls on all parties to respect the ceasefire. The Council rejects any attempt to use violence including the use of landmines to undermine the Framework Agreement, which has been negotiated by the democratically elected political leadership of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

            The Security Council supports the actions of the President and Government of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia aimed at resolving the crisis, and assuring a stable and democratic future for all of the citizens of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, including through continued dialogue with the full representation of all legitimate political parties to strengthen democracy and preserve the multi-ethnic character of Macedonian society and the stability of the country.

            The Security Council welcomes the efforts of the European Union, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in support of the Framework Agreement. It also calls on the international community to consider how best to assist the Government of The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia in facilitating its full implementation.

            The Security Council will continue to follow closely developments on the ground.

S/PRST/2001/21                                Small arms

                                                Date:  31 August 2001                         Meeting:  4362

            The Security Council reaffirms the statement of its President of 24 September 1999 (S/PRST/1999/28) and its Resolution 1209 (1998) of 19 November 1998, and notes with grave concern that the destabilizing accumulation and uncontrolled spread of small arms and light weapons in many regions of the world increases the intensity and duration of armed conflicts, undermines the sustainability of peace agreements, impedes the success of peace-building, frustrates efforts aimed at the prevention of armed conflict, hinders considerably the provision of humanitarian assistance, and compromises the effectiveness of the Security Council in discharging its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security. The Security Council expressed grave concern at the harmful impact of small arms and light weapons on civilians in situations of armed conflict, particularly on vulnerable groups such as women and children and recalls in this regard its resolutions 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000 and 1314 (2000) of 11 August 2000.

            The Security Council further notes with satisfaction the growing awareness within the international community of the problem of the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons as a challenge that involves security, humanitarian and development dimensions. In this regard the Council welcomes recent global and regional initiatives such as the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects; the Protocol against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, their Parts and Components and Ammunition, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime; the Document on Small Arms and Light Weapons adopted by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE); the Resolution on Small Arms of the Council of Ministers of the European Union; the Bamako Declaration on an African Common Position on the Illicit Proliferation, Circulation and Trafficking of Small Arms and Light Weapons; and the extension of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Moratorium on the Production and Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons.

            The Security Council welcomes the adoption of the Programme of Action of the United Nations Conference in the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in all its Aspects, and calls on all Member States to take the required measures to promptly implement the recommendations contained therein. The Council recognizes its responsibility in assisting in the implementation of this Programme of Action, and stresses that the success of this Programme depends on the political will and efforts of Member States to implement its measures at the national, regional and global levels, as well as on the provision of international cooperation and assistance and on the follow-up agreed by the Conference, including the convening of a Review Conference no later than 2006.

            The Security Council reaffirms the inherent right of individual or collective self-defence in accordance with Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations and, subject to the Charter, the right of each State to import, produce and retain small arms and light weapons for its self-defence and security needs. Bearing in mind the considerable volume of licit trade in small arms and light weapons, the Council underlines the vital importance of effective national regulations and controls for this trade. In this regard, arms-exporting countries should exercise the highest degree of responsibility in small arms and light weapons transactions, and all countries have the responsibility to prevent their illegal diversion and re-export, so as to stem the leakage of legal weapons to illegal markets. The Security Council also stresses the importance of international cooperation to enable States to identify and trace in a timely and reliable manner illicit small arms and light weapons.

            The Security Council underlines the importance of practical disarmament measures in averting armed conflicts and encourages States and relevant international and regional organizations to facilitate the appropriate cooperation of civil society actors in activities related to the prevention and combating of the excessive and destabilizing accumulation of and illicit trafficking in small arms and light weapons, including facilitating greater awareness and better understanding of the nature and scope of this problem.

            The Security Council recognizes the important role of regional and subregional organizations in providing useful information and perspectives on the regional and subregional dimensions that characterize arms flows to conflicts, and underscores the importance of regional agreements and cooperation in this regard.

            The Security Council emphasizes the importance of the effective collection and control of small arms and light weapons, and of their storage and destruction, as appropriate, in the context of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) programmes, as well as other measures that may contribute to the effective disposal of small arms and light weapons, and to prevention of the spread of these weapons to other regions. To this end, the Council welcomes the publication by the Secretary-General of the Handbook on Environmentally Sound Methods of Destruction of Small Arms, Light Weapons, Ammunition and Explosives. The Council stresses the importance of incorporating, on a case by case basis, in the negotiation, consolidation and implementation of peace agreements, as well as in the mandates of United Nations peacekeeping operations, appropriate provisions for the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants, taking into account the special needs of child soldiers.

            The Security Council reiterates its call for the effective implementation of arms embargoes imposed by the Council in its relevant resolutions, and encourages Member States to provide the Sanctions Committees with available information on alleged violations of arms embargoes. The Security Council expresses its determination to continue to improve the efficiency of the arms embargoes imposed by the Council on a case by case basis, including through the establishment of specific monitoring mechanisms or similar arrangements as appropriate. The Council stresses the need to engage the relevant international organizations, non-governmental organizations, business and financial institutions and other actors at the international, regional and local levels to contribute to the implementation of arms embargoes.

            The Security Council stresses the need for cooperation and sharing of information among the Member States, and among the different Sanctions Committees on arms traffickers that have violated arms embargoes established by the Council. This information could also be provided to Interpol’s International Weapons and Explosives Tracking System (IWETS) database or any other relevant database that may be developed for this purpose.

            The Security Council stresses the need for innovative strategies to address the relationship between the illicit exploitation of natural and other resources and the purchase and trade in illegal weapons in those situations under its consideration. The Council expresses its intention to continue to consider employing effective measures to prevent the illicit exploitation of natural and other resources from fuelling those conflicts. In this regard, information on financial or other transactions fuelling the illicit flow of arms to those conflicts should be made available to the Council.

            The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to include in his reports regarding relevant situations under consideration in the Council, analytical assessments on the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons including, to the extent possible and within available resources, availability, stockpiling, lines of supply, brokering, transportation arrangements and financial networks for these weapons, as well as their humanitarian impact, especially on children.

            The Security Council recognizes the role of the Secretary-General in supporting the coordination of all United Nations activities to combat the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons. In this connection, the Security Council requests the Secretary-General to submit a report of the Council by September 2002 containing specific recommendations on ways and means in which the Council may contribute to deal with the question of illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in situations under its consideration, taking into account the views of Member States, recent experiences in the field and the contents of this Statement.

S/PRST/2001/22                                Success of preparatory meeting for inter-Congolese dialogue

                                                Date:  5 September 2001                      Meeting:  4365

            The Security Council welcomes the success of the preparatory meeting of the Inter-Congolese Dialogue, held in Gaborone on 20-24 August 2001.

            The Security Council reiterates its strong support for the Inter-Congolese Dialogue and for the efforts of the Facilitator and his team in the field. It calls on all the Congolese parties to further cooperate with each other and the Facilitator in the constructive spirit of Gaborone to ensure the successful outcome of the Inter-Congolese Dialogue starting on 15 October 2001, in Addis Ababa.

            The Security Council stresses the importance for the Dialogue to be free from outside interference, open, representative and inclusive, and emphasizes the need to ensure adequate representation of Congolese women in the process.

            The Security Council encourages donors to provide further support to the Facilitator for the Inter-Congolese Dialogue and, in due course, the process of implementing a new political dispensation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

            The Security Council urges all the parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement to press forward with the full and early implementation of that Agreement, including disarmament, demobilization, reintegration, repatriation and resettlement of the armed groups, and the withdrawal of foreign forces.

S/PRST/2001/23                                East Timor elections

                                                Date:  10 September 2001                    Meeting:  4368

            The Security Council recalls its previous resolutions and the statements of its President on the situation in East Timor.

            The Security Council warmly welcomes the successful staging on 30 August 2001 of the elections for East Timor’s first Constituent Assembly, in particular the orderly and peaceful conduct of the elections and the very high voter turnout, which demonstrated the wish of the East Timorese people to establish a full participatory democracy. In that regard, the Council recognizes with appreciation the important role of the East Timorese leadership and welcomes the cooperation extended by the Government of Indonesia during the election period.

            The Security Council expresses its appreciation to the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor for facilitating a smooth and representative election process. The Security Council calls on all parties to fully respect and implement the election results which provide the basis for a broad-based Constituent Assembly. The Security Council looks forward to the establishment on 15 September of the Constituent Assembly and the new Cabinet within the framework of resolution 1272 (1999). The Security Council calls upon all parties to work together to draft a constitution which reflects the will of the East Timorese people and to cooperate for the successful completion of the final steps towards independence, in a complex process of stabilization in East Timor which will take some time and will involve many actors.

            The Security Council reiterates the importance of a substantial international presence in East Timor post-independence.

            The Security Council looks forward to receiving the Secretary-General’s October report focusing on the transition and post-independence periods.

S/PRST/2001/24                                Terrorist attacks in Angola

                                                Date:  20 September 2001                    Meeting:  4377

            The Security Council remains concerned at the continuing conflict in Angola. It reiterates its position that the primary responsibility for the continued fighting lies with the leadership of the armed faction of the União Nacional para a Independência Total de Angola (UNITA) headed by Mr. J. Savimbi which is refusing to fulfil its obligations under the ‘Accordos de Paz’ (S/22609, annex), the Lusaka Protocol (S/1994/1441, annex) and relevant resolutions of the Security Council, which remain the only viable basis for political settlement of the conflict in Angola.

            The Council considers the four point agenda for peace proposed by the Government of Angola a useful indication of areas where an agreement or progress should be reached. It calls on UNITA armed faction headed by Mr. J. Savimbi to cease all military action and to enter into a dialogue with the Government of Angola on how to conclude the implementation of the Lusaka Protocol on this basis.

            The Security Council condemns in the strongest terms the terrorist attacks by UNITA forces on the civilian population of Angola. It stresses that such attacks are unacceptable and cannot be justified by any political goals. The Council reminds their perpetrators that such acts are in violation of international law and may have further implications.

            The Security Council reaffirms that the failure by the armed faction of UNITA to implement its obligations under the ‘Accordos de Paz’, the Lusaka Protocol, and its relevant resolutions remains the reason for the Security Council sanctions against UNITA. The Council is determined to keep sanctions in place until it is convinced that the conditions in its relevant resolutions are met. It reiterates its call on all States to implement strictly the sanctions regime against UNITA and urges them to strengthen, where appropriate, their internal legislation related to application of sanction measures imposed by the Council. The Council reaffirms its intention to keep sanctions under close monitoring and periodic review in order to raise their effectiveness, including as they relate to UNITA activity abroad.

            The Security Council notes with satisfaction that, at their recent summit, the Heads of States and Governments of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries undertook to prepare a report on how SADC countries implement Security Council resolution 1295. The Council encourages SADC countries to cooperate fully in their efforts to implement the Security Council’s measures against UNITA.

            The Security Council encourages the Government of Angola to promote the peace process and in this regard welcomes the initiatives by the Government of Angola, as well as by the Angolan people, including the Civil Society and the Churches. It calls on the Angolan authorities to continue efforts aimed at national reconciliation and stabilization of the situation in the country in consultation with all segments of the Angolan society, including the Civil Society and the Churches. These should focus on re-establishment of the state administration, improvement of the social and economic situation of the population, promotion of the rule of law, protection of human rights, the activity of the Interagency Committee and of the Peace and Reconciliation Fund.

            The Security Council supports the intention of the Government of Angola to hold elections as a part of the ongoing democratization process in Angola in conformity with the universally accepted democratic principles and standards. It stresses the need to create the necessary conditions for elections to be free and fair. The Council requests the Secretary-General to provide appropriate support, in coordination with the Government of Angola, in preparation of elections, including through the work of the ongoing United Nations technical assistance mission.

            The Security Council notes the positive contribution that the United Nations Office in Angola (UNOA) is making towards finding the solution to the Angolan conflict. It reiterates its full support for the work of UNOA and the Representative of the Secretary-General.

            The Security Council is seriously concerned with the plight of the Angolan population particularly the internally displaced persons and, in order to alleviate its suffering, calls again on all parties concerned to facilitate the delivery of emergency relief assistance. The work of the United Nations agencies and other international organizations delivering assistance to those in the affected areas is of the utmost importance and must continue unobstructed with the financial support of the international community.

S/PRST/2001/25                                Extension of UN Office in Central African Republic

                                                Date:  26 September 2001                    Meeting:  4382

            The Security Council has considered the report of the Secretary-General of 19 September 2001 (S/2001/886) submitted in accordance with the statement of its President on 17 July 2001 (S/PRST/2001/18), particularly his recommendations on how the United Nations might further contribute to the recovery of the Central African Republic.

            The Security Council expresses its appreciation of the continuing work of the Secretary-General’s representative, General Lamine Cissé, and of the United Nations Peace-building Support Office in the Central African Republic (BONUCA).

            The Security Council expresses its continued deep concern at the precarious situation in the Central African Republic. It reiterates its call on all parties for political dialogue, national reconciliation and respect for human rights in the spirit of the 1998 National Reconciliation Pact. In this respect it has taken note of the appeals for national unity made by the Central African authorities.

            The Security Council calls on the Central African authorities to follow the internationally accepted standards for due process in the course of investigations and court trials of individuals involved in the coup attempt in May 2001. These procedures should be transparent and should not be allowed to aggravate the inter-ethnic relations in the Central African Republic. The refugees who left the country after the failed coup should be able to return in safety without fear of persecution on ethnic basis.

            The Security Council encourages the international community to make a substantial and urgent contribution to the recovery of the Central African Republic and emphasizes that the efficiency of such a contribution will greatly depend on the efforts the Government of the Central African Republic itself makes to this end. The Council emphasizes that the crucial issues of external debt and payment of arrears of salary for civil servants need to be urgently addressed.

            The Security Council encourages the United Nations Development Programme and the international financial institutions, particularly the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the African Development Bank, to consider, in consultation with the Government of the Central African Republic and the Secretary-General’s Representative, ways of strengthening the capacities of the Government of the Central African Republic in the management of its economic and financial affairs, including through secondment of high-level experts. The Council invites the Secretary-General to keep it informed of actions taken in this regard when he presents his next report on the Central African Republic. In addition, the Council urges the Bretton Woods institutions to show exceptional solicitude towards the Central African Republic.

            The Security Council takes note with interest of the intention of the Secretary-General, in coordination with the Government of the Central African Republic, to extend the mandate of BONUCA and to strengthen it in accordance with paragraph 29 of his report of 19 September 2001 (S/2001/886).

            The Security Council underlines the need to continue the restructuring of the Central African armed forces to enable them to fulfil their role effectively, loyally and impartially, in the service of the Central African people. It also recalls the importance of implementing an effective arms-collection programme. In this regard, it supports the recommendations in paragraphs 17 and 18 of the report of the Secretary-General.

            The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to continue to keep it regularly informed of the activities of BONUCA and the situation in the Central African Republic, particularly in the areas of political dialogue, national reconciliation and respect for human rights.

S/PRST/2001/26                                Installation of transitional government in Burundi

                                                Date:  26 September 2001                    Meeting:  4383

            The Security Council reaffirms its strong support for the Facilitation of Former President Nelson Mandela, and urges all Burundians of goodwill to join in the cause of peace, democracy and national reconciliation in their country. It also calls upon all parties to cooperate fully with the Implementation Monitoring Committee.

            The Security Council looks forward to and strongly supports the 1 November 2001 installation of the transitional government in Burundi. The Security Council believes that this event, the creation of a broad-based and inclusive government, will mark a critical turning point in the Burundi peace process. It will also encourage the donors to provide additional assistance, including by honouring fully the pledges they made during the Paris Donors’ Conference in December 2000.

            The Security Council calls on the Burundian parties to reach agreement swiftly on the establishment of a special protection unit entrusted solely with the police function of providing personal security for politicians returning from exile. It welcomes the convening by the Facilitation of a pre-implementation stakeholders meeting in Arusha and urges the international community to provide, on an urgent basis, support for the training and deployment of this special protection unit.

            Deeply concerned by the increase of violence recently, the Security Council recalls the urgent need to bring about a negotiated settlement of the conflict and calls upon the Facilitation, the Regional Peace Initiative for Burundi, the Government of Burundi, the signatory parties and the armed groups to devote their full attention to the achievement of a definitive ceasefire. The Security Council once again calls on the Forces pour la Défense de la Démocratie and Forces Nationales de Libération to suspend hostilities, to continue negotiations and to join the peace process. The Council believes that the installation of a broad-based government on the basis of an internationally sanctioned peace process makes armed rebellion an unacceptable means of political expression. It calls on the FNL and FDD, together with the Burundi Government, to observe strictly the rights of the civilian population and other provisions of international humanitarian law.

            The Security Council calls on all States, in particular those in the region, to cease all forms of support to the FNL and FDD, and urges all Member States to encourage the armed groups to join the peace process.

            The Security Council calls on the States of the Regional Initiative to mark the installation of the transitional government by further enhancing their bilateral and regional cooperation with the new government. The Council believes that this cooperation is particularly important in the area of regional security and calls on the Governments of Burundi and its neighbouring States to increase their cooperation in this regard.

            The Security Council expresses its concern at the deteriorating humanitarian situation and calls on all parties to create the conditions for the voluntary return of refugees, and for the safe and unhindered activities of the humanitarian relief community. It also calls upon the donor community to increase their humanitarian assistance to Burundi and to accelerate its delivery.

S/PRST/2001/27                                Voting in Kosovo elections

                                                Date:  5 October 2001                          Meeting:  4388

            The Security Council welcomes the report of the Secretary-General (S/2001/926) and commends the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and the commander of the international security presence (KFOR) for their ongoing efforts to implement fully resolution 1244 (1999).

            The Security Council welcomes the elections to be held on 17 November as a basis for the establishment of democratic self-governing institutions as specified in the Constitutional Framework for Provisional Self-Government, under which the people of Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, will enjoy substantial autonomy in accordance with resolution 1244 (1999). It emphasizes the responsibility of Kosovo’s elected leaders to respect fully the final status provisions of resolution 1244 (1999). It reaffirms its commitment to the full implementation of resolution 1244 (1999), which remains the basis for building Kosovo’s future.

            The Security Council supports the continuing efforts by the United Nations Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) and KFOR to improve public security, including through the confiscation of weapons and the package of legislation to combat violence, and to facilitate the return of displaced Serbs and members of other communities. It calls on Kosovo Albanian leaders to actively support these efforts to promote security and return, and to combat extremism, including terrorist activities. It further calls on all Kosovo leaders to publicly condemn violence and ethnic intolerance. It calls on them to exert all their influence and assume their responsibility for actively ensuring that the campaign and the elections are peaceful, democratic and inclusive. It stresses the need for proper organization and adequate security for the elections on 17 November, and welcomes continuing steps taken in that regard.

            The Security Council calls on all women and men of Kosovo to vote in the elections of 17 November. This will provide for the broadest possible representation of views in the institutions of the provisional self-government. The Security Council commends the authorities of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, particularly President Kostunica, for their encouragement to the Kosovo Serb community to register, which confirms the multi-ethnic character of Kosovo, and calls on them to also actively encourage the fullest possible participation in the vote. It underlines the importance, for the Kosovo Serb community, to integrate in the structures set up by UNMIK. It encourages the further development of a constructive dialogue between UNMIK and the authorities of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

            The Security Council will remain actively seized of the matter.

S/PRST/2001/28                                UN, Secretary-GeneralNobel Peace Prize

                                                Date:  12 October 2001                        Meeting:  4390

            The Security Council today celebrates, together with the rest of the United Nations family, the award of the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize to the United Nations and to its Secretary-General, Kofi Annan.

            The United Nations is the embodiment of cooperation among States in safeguarding peace, advancing international development, and in combating common threats to the dignity and well-being of peoples everywhere.

            The United Nations remains today, in its activities around the world and in the ideals it sets, the best hope for a future in which peoples everywhere can work together to meet common challenges and to advance common goals.

            The Security Council today pays special tribute to all the men and women who work for the United Nations, whatever their tasks of duty, wherever they may be in the service of peace.

            The decision of the Nobel Committee to award the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize to the United Nations and to the Secretary-General reflects the high esteem shared by people throughout the world for Secretary-General Kofi Annan. It rightly honours his exceptional achievements in the service of the United Nations and of the entire international community as well as honouring the achievements of the United Nations itself.

            In warmly congratulating the Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, the Council reiterates its own strong support for his efforts in upholding the purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter and for his role in assuring to the Organization its full and rightful place in the world and in leading its search for new ways forward for all men and women in all countries to live their lives with dignity and peace.

S/PRST/2001/29                                Support for next phase of deployment in Democratic Republic of Congo

                                                Date:  24 October 2001                        Meeting:  4396

            The Security Council welcomes the recommendations of the Secretary-General on the next phase in the deployment of the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC), as contained in his report of 16 October 2001 (S/2001/970).

            The Security Council supports the initiation of phase III of the deployment of MONUC within the currently mandated ceiling and, in particular, its deployment towards the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

            The Security Council reminds the parties to the conflict that they are responsible for the continuation of the peace process. It is up to them to create and to maintain conditions conducive to the start of phase III of MONUC by fully implementing the commitments they have undertaken. The Council will take its decisions on the future of phase III of MONUC after ascertaining that the parties to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement (S/1999/815) are committed to continuing, in a spirit of partnership to make the efforts necessary to advance the peace process. The next meeting between the Security Council and members of the Political Committee established by the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement will provide an opportunity to discuss these issues.

            The Security Council recalls the importance it places on the implementation of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement and the relevant resolutions of the Council. In particular the Council:

            –        calls on those States which have not yet done so to withdraw from the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in accordance with the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement and the relevant Security Council resolutions;

            –        calls on all parties to cease any support for armed groups and to implement the process of disarmament, demobilization, repatriation, resettlement and reintegration of the groups referred to in annex A, Chapter 9.1 of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement;

            –        emphasizes the importance of the Inter-Congolese dialogue and calls on the Congolese parties to work together for the success of this process; and

            –        demands the demilitarization of Kisangani, in conformity with its resolution 1304 (2000).

            The Security Council expresses serious concern at the worsening humanitarian and human rights situation, particularly in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and reiterates its call for all the parties to urgently address the human rights abuses, including those raised in the ninth report of the Secretary-General (S/2001/970), in the Government controlled territory, the territory controlled by the Front de Libération du Congo and the territory controlled by the Rassemblement Congolais pour la Démocratie.

S/PRST/2001/30                                Comprehensive settlement in Somalia

                                                Date:  31 October 2001                        Meeting:  4401

            The Security Council, having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 11 October 2001 (S/2001/963) and having held a public meeting on 19 October 2001 (S/PV.4392 and S/PV.4392 resumption 1), reaffirms its commitment to a comprehensive and lasting settlement of the situation in Somalia, consistent with the principles of the Charter of the United Nations, and bearing in mind its respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia.

            The Security Council reiterates its support for the outcome of the Arta peace conference, the establishment of the Transitional National Assembly and the Transitional National Government. It encourages the Transitional National Government to continue, in the spirit of constructive dialogue, the process of engaging all groups in the country, including in the north-eastern and north-western areas, with the view to preparing for the installation of permanent governance arrangements through the democratic process.

            The Security Council believes that the Arta peace process continues to be the most viable basis for peace and national reconciliation in Somalia. It urges the Transitional National Government, political and traditional leaders and factions in Somalia to make every effort to complete, without preconditions, the peace and reconciliation process through dialogue and involvement of all parties in a spirit of mutual accommodation and tolerance. It calls on all parties to refrain from actions that undermine the Arta peace process. The Council emphasizes that while the search for a national solution continues, unwavering attention must be paid to achieving local political settlements as well.

            The Security Council expresses its support for the Transitional National Government’s ongoing efforts to enhance security in the Mogadishu area and to make operational the National Commission for Reconciliation and Property Settlement, which should be independent, as foreseen in the Transitional National Charter. The Council emphasizes the necessity for efforts against international terrorism in accordance with resolution 1373 (2001) of 28 September 2001 and welcomes the stated intention of the Transitional National Government to take steps in this regard. The Council urges the international community, including through the Counterterrorism Committee established pursuant to resolution 1373 (2001), to provide assistance to Somalia for the implementation of the aforementioned resolution.

            The Security Council calls on the concerned States in the Horn of Africa to contribute constructively to the peace efforts in Somalia. It emphasizes that the situation in Somalia and the objective of long-term regional stability can most effectively be addressed if neighbouring States play a positive role, including in the process of rebuilding national institutions in Somalia.

            The Security Council acknowledges Djibouti’s major contribution to the Arta peace process and welcomes its continued role in this regard. It encourages the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD), the Organization of African Unity/African Union and the League of Arab States to enhance their efforts to promote peace in Somalia.

            The Security Council calls on all States and other actors to comply scrupulously with the arms embargo established by resolution 733 (1992) of 23 January 1992. The Council insists that all States, in particular those of the region, should not interfere in the internal affairs of Somalia. Such interference could jeopardize the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia.

            The Security Council insists that the territory of Somalia should not be used to undermine stability in the subregion.

            The Security Council strongly condemns the attack on 13 October 2001 on a police station in Mogadishu, in which a number of officers and civilians were killed. It reiterates its condemnation of the attack on 27 March 2001 on the compound of Medicins sans Frontieres in Mogadishu and the subsequent abduction of international personnel, and demands that those responsible must be brought to justice. The Council notes that these attacks were launched at the same time as the consideration of a possible United Nations peace-building mission for Somalia.

            The Council emphasizes that no measure of violence can alleviate the plight of the Somali people nor bring stability, peace or security to their country. It calls for an immediate end to all acts of violence in Somalia. Deliberate acts of violence should not be allowed to prevent the rehabilitation of Somalia’s governing structures and the restoration of the rule of law throughout the country. In this context, the Council condemns the leaders of those armed factions who remain outside the peace process and continue to be obstacles to peace and stability in Somalia.

            The Security Council expresses concern about the humanitarian situation in Somalia, in particular in southern areas, and in the Bay, Bakool, Gedo and Hiran regions due to the expected food insecurity and lack of rainfall in the October-December period. It draws attention to the urgent need for international assistance, inter alia, in covering food and water shortfalls, thereby also combating potentially further destabilizing stress migration and prevalence of disease. Noting that problems in livestock exports have also been a major influence in worsening the economic and humanitarian situation, the Council calls on all States and on all authorities within Somalia to cooperate in efforts to allow the resumption of such exports.

            The Security Council notes with satisfaction that the United Nations, the Red Cross movement and non-governmental organizations continue to provide humanitarian and development assistance to all areas of Somalia. The Council calls upon all parties in Somalia to respect fully the security and safety of personnel of the United Nations, the International Committee of the Red Cross and non-governmental organizations, and to guarantee their complete freedom of movement and access throughout Somalia. The Council calls on Member States to respond urgently and generously to the United Nations Consolidated Inter-Agency Appeal for 2001, for which only 16 per cent of the identified needs have been financially provided thus far.

            The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to take the following steps in support of the peace process in Somalia:

(i)   Dispatch a headquarters-led inter-agency mission to carry out a comprehensive assessment, based on the existing general United Nations standards, of the security situation in Somalia, including in Mogadishu;

(ii)  Prepare proposals for how the United Nations may further assist in the demobilization of militia members, and the training of police personnel from the Transitional National Government;

(iii)Invite donors to make contributions to the trust fund for peace-building in Somalia, to be put in place as proposed in the 19 December 2000 report of the Secretary-General (S/2000/1211), with a view to facilitate targeted activities in line with proposals developed pursuant to paragraph (ii) above;

(iv)Consider the scope for adjustments, as appropriate, to the mandate for the United Nations Political Office for Somalia;

(v)  Consult all concerned on finding practical and constructive ways of achieving the following objectives:

                       (a)      promoting coherency of policy approaches towards Somalia and consolidating support for peace and reconciliation in the country;

                       (b)      facilitating exchange of information; and

                       (c)      finding ways and means of drawing attention to Somalia’s needs related to national reconciliation and development.

The effort to achieve the objectives stated in subparagraphs (a), (b) and (c) above should have a focus in the region and include close interaction with IGAD and its Partners Forum (IPF), the Organization of African Unity/African Union, the League of Arab States and the Security Council;

(vi)Intensify, through urgent contacts with donor countries and relevant non-governmental organizations, the efforts for humanitarian and development assistance in Somalia; and

(vii)          Submit reports, at least every four months, on the situation in Somalia and the efforts to promote the peace process, including updates on the scope and contingency planning for launching a peace-building mission for Somalia. The next report, due on 31 January 2002, should provide an update on the activities undertaken pursuant to paragraphs (i) to (vi) above.

            The Security Council remains seized of the matter.

S/PRST/2001/31                                Women’s role in conflict prevention, conflict resolution

                                                Date:  31 October 2001                        Meeting:  4402

            The Security Council reaffirms its commitment to the implementation of its resolution 1325 (2000) of 31 October 2000 and welcomes the efforts by the United Nations system, Member States, civil society organizations and other relevant actors in promoting the equal participation and full involvement of women in the maintenance and promotion of peace and security and in implementing the provisions of resolution 1325 (2000).

            The Council further reaffirms its strong support for increasing the role of women in decision-making with regard to conflict prevention and resolution and renews its call on States to include women in the negotiations and implementation of peace accords, constitutions and strategies for resettlement and rebuilding and to take measures to support local women’s groups and indigenous processes for conflict resolution. In this regard it recognizes the efforts of the Mano River Women’s Peace Network in facilitating peace and dialogue in the Mano River Union region. It is also encouraged by the inclusion of women in the political decision-making bodies in Burundi, Somalia and in East Timor.

            The Security Council underscores the importance of promoting an active and visible policy of mainstreaming a gender perspective in all policies and programmes while addressing armed conflicts, in particular peacekeeping operations in keeping with the statement of the President of the Security Council on 8 March 2000.

            The Council therefore reiterates its request to the Secretary-General to include, where appropriate, in his reporting to the Security Council, progress in gender mainstreaming throughout United Nations peacekeeping missions and on other aspects relating to women and girls. It expresses its intention to give full consideration to these reports and to take appropriate action. The Council also reaffirms its call for the inclusion of gender components as appropriate, in peacekeeping operations.

            The Security Council renews its support for gender-sensitive training guidelines and material on the protection, rights and the particular needs of women, as well as on the importance of involving women in all peacekeeping and peace-building measures. The Council calls upon all troop-contributing countries to include these elements in their national training programmes for peacekeepers.

            The Council welcomes the specific proposals made by the Secretary-General aimed at strengthening the Best Practices Unit of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations with the appointment of gender advisers at sufficiently senior levels.

            It also welcomes the practical efforts including the preparation of complementary reports, already made by the United Nations and its agencies, funds, programmes and regional bodies, in particular those participating in the Administrative Committee on Coordination (ACC) Inter-agency Task Force on Women, Peace and Security to implement all aspects of resolution 1325 (2000), as well as the timely issuance of the publication Gender Perspective in Disarmament, which gives a clear indication of ways in which women can be fully involved and the benefits to the parties concerned.

            The Security Council notes with satisfaction that the Secretary-General’s study requested under paragraph 16 of its resolution 1325 (2000) on the impact of armed conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution is under way and welcomes the coordinated comprehensive input of the United Nations and all the relevant agencies, funds and programmes of the United Nations system and looks forward to its review.

            The Security Council is concerned that there are still no women appointed as Special Representatives or Special Envoys of the Secretary-General to peace missions, and urges Member States to redouble their efforts to nominate women candidates to the Secretary-General. The Council also urges the Secretary-General to appoint women as Special Representatives and Envoys to pursue good offices on his behalf in accordance with his strategic plan of action (A/49/587, para. 2).

            The Security Council recognizes the need to implement fully international humanitarian and human rights law that protects the rights of civilians including women and girls during and after conflicts and calls on all parties to armed conflicts to take special measures to protect women and girls from gender-based violence, and all other forms of violence.

            The Security Council remains actively seized of the matter and expresses its willingness to consider as appropriate, the gender dimensions of armed conflict in carrying out its responsibility of maintaining international peace and security under the Charter of the United Nations.

S/PRST/2001/32                                Endorses date for East Timor independence

                                                Date:  31 October 2001                        Meeting:  4404

            The Security Council welcomes the Secretary-General’s report of 18 October 2001 (S/2001/983 and Corr.1).

            The Security Council expresses its appreciation to the Secretary-General’s Special Representative in East Timor and to the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) for their efforts in developing detailed plans for the future United Nations presence in East Timor.

            The Security Council welcomes the political progress achieved to date towards establishing an independent East Timorese state and endorses the recommendation by the Constituent Assembly that independence be declared on 20 May 2002.

            The Security Council recalls resolutions 1272 (1999) of 25 October 1999 and 1338 (2001) of 31 January 2001 and other relevant resolutions. It agrees with the Secretary-General’s assessment that premature withdrawal of the international presence could have a destabilizing effect in a number of crucial areas. It further agrees with the Secretary-General’s assessment that the United Nations should remain engaged in East Timor to protect the major achievements so far realized by UNTAET, to build upon those achievements in cooperation with other actors, and to assist the East Timorese government in ensuring security and stability.

            The Security Council takes note of the Secretary-General’s observation that the mandate of UNTAET should be extended until independence and endorses his plans for adjusting the size and configuration of UNTAET in the months prior to independence.

            The Security Council endorses the Secretary-General’s recommendations for a continued and appropriately reduced United Nations integrated mission in the post-independence period, and requests the Secretary-General to continue planning and preparation for this mission, in consultation with the East Timorese people, and to submit further and more detailed recommendations to the Council. The Council agrees that the successor mission would be headed by a Special Representative of the Secretary-General and comprise of a military component, a civilian police component and a civilian component, including experts who would provide crucial assistance to the emergent East Timorese administration. The Council notes that a core number of civilian positions will be critical to the stability of the independent East Timorese government and agrees that these limited positions will require assessed funding for a period of between six months and two years after independence. The Council agrees that the new mission should be based on the premise that operational responsibilities should be devolved to the East Timorese authorities as soon as this is feasible, and it supports a continuing process of assessment and downsizing over a period of two years, starting from independence. In this regard, the Council recognizes the essential role of the General Assembly in peace-building and expresses its intention to continue planning for peace-building in close cooperation with the General Assembly. The Council acknowledges the importance of a strong focus on justice and human rights in the successor mission and, where appropriate, in other assistance provided to East Timor.

            The Security Council agrees with the Secretary-General’s assessment that it will be vital that the United Nations contribution is supplemented by multilateral and bilateral arrangements. The Council looks forward to receiving information on the financial implications of the follow-on mission and a detailed assessment of shared responsibilities among the principal interacting players i.e. the United Nations system, international financial institutions, regional mechanisms and national donors in their efforts to assist East Timor in its unprecedented transition to self-government.

S/PRST/2001/33                                Welcomes Transitional Government in Burundi

                                                Date:  8 November 2001                      Meeting:  4408

            The Security Council welcomes the 1 November 2001 inauguration of Burundi’s Transitional Government, and calls on all Burundians to support it and work together to ensure the success of this broad-based and inclusive government’s fulfilling its functions in accordance with the agreements that led to its establishment.

            The Security Council welcomes the continued engagement of the Regional Initiative and, in this regard, also welcomes the deployment of the first elements of the multinational security presence tasked with the protection of returning political leaders. The Council calls on all the Burundian parties to support this undertaking, and expresses its gratitude to the Government of South Africa for its contribution to the cause of peace in Burundi.

            The Security Council expresses its deep appreciation to former President Nelson Mandela for his dedicated service as Facilitator of the Arusha Peace Process, and reiterates its hope that the region and the international community may continue to rely on his moral leadership. The Council welcomes the efforts of the Secretary-General and his Special Representative for the Great Lakes, through the Implementation Monitoring Committee.

            The Security Council condemns the recent attacks by the FDD and FNL on civilians, and is gravely concerned that the frequency of such attacks has increased. The Council once again states that the installation of a broad-based government in accordance with an internationally supported peace process makes armed rebellion an unacceptable means of political expression.

            The Security Council reiterates its call for an immediate suspension of hostilities in Burundi and for the armed groups to enter into negotiations to reach a definitive ceasefire, which is the priority issue. In this regard, the Council welcomes the involvement of President Bongo of Gabon and Deputy President Zuma of South Africa and expresses its full support for their efforts.

            The Security Council expresses its concern at the human rights and humanitarian situation in Burundi and once again calls on the responsible parties to ensure full compliance with the relevant international conventions.

            The Security Council calls on the international community to increase its humanitarian assistance, as well as to assist in Burundi’s economic recovery and development through, inter alia, honouring the pledges made at the Paris donors’ conference.

S/PRST/2001/34                                Call to vote in Kosovo elections

                                                Date:  9 November 2001                      Meeting:  4409

            The Security Council welcomes the progress made in preparing the Kosovo-wide elections on 17 November 2001 and calls on the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and all parties concerned to continue to strive for full implementation of resolution 1244 (1999) of 10 June 1999. It further calls upon all women and men of Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, to vote.

            The Security Council welcomes the helpful role played by the President of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Governments of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Republic of Serbia in recommending Kosovo Serb participation in the elections. Participation will allow them to take part in shaping Kosovo’s multi-ethnic future.

            The Security Council welcomes the signing on 5 November 2001 of the UNMIK-FRY Common Document by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and the Special Representative of the President of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Government of the Republic of Serbia. This document is consistent with resolution 1244 (1999) and the Constitutional Framework for Provisional Self-Government in Kosovo.

            The Security Council reaffirms the statement of its President of 5 October 2001 (S/PRST/2001/27). It encourages the further development of a constructive dialogue between the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) and the authorities of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. It emphasizes the responsibility of the provisional institutions of self-government and all concerned to respect fully the final status provisions of resolution 1244 (1999). It underlines its continued commitment to the full implementation of resolution 1244 (1999), which remains the basis for building Kosovo’s future.

S/PRST/2001/35                                Commends Nelson Mandela for commitment in Burundi

                                                Date:  15 November 2001                    Meeting:  4417

            The Security Council expresses its deep gratitude to Madiba Nelson Mandela of South Africa for his dedicated service to the people of Burundi and the cause of peace in Central Africa. Building on the work of his predecessor, the late Mwalimu Julius Nyerere of Tanzania, Madiba has helped to give Burundi a chance for lasting peace, democracy, economic development and national reconciliation.

            The Security Council had in the statement of its President on 8 November 2001 (S/PRST/2001/33), welcomed the 1 November 2001 inauguration of Burundi’s Transitional Government and expressed its appreciation for the instrumental role played by Madiba towards the creation of the Transitional Government. The Security Council had also expressed the hope that the region and the international community could continue to rely on his moral leadership and ingenious spirit that are essential for progress towards peace in Burundi.

            The Security Council acknowledges the sterling contribution of Madiba as Facilitator of the Arusha Peace Process in bringing together all the Parties, including the armed groups to engage in dialogue in order to facilitate an early cessation of hostilities in accordance with the Arusha Agreement. The Security Council commends Madiba for his tenacity and unwavering commitment towards political reconciliation in Burundi.

            The Security Council expresses its appreciation to Madiba and the South African Government for initiating the deployment of the first elements of the multinational security presence tasked with the protection of returning political leaders, without which the conditions would not have been conducive for the inauguration of the Burundi Transitional Government. These key successes have confirmed the trust and confidence which the Security Council and the international community have always had in Madiba.

            The Security Council expresses its concern about the recent increase in violence and reiterates its call for an immediate cessation of hostilities in Burundi. The Security Council calls on all Burundians to reject violence and to pursue their objectives through the institutions and mechanisms of the transition process. The Security Council appeals to all Burundians and United Nations Member States to build on the momentum created through the efforts of Madiba and to support the Regional Peace Initiative and the Transitional Government and the Implementation Monitoring Committee.

S/PRST/2001/36                                Effectiveness of sanctions against rebel group in Angola

                                                Date:  15 November 2001                    Meeting:  4419

            The Security Council remains deeply concerned about the ongoing conflict in Angola. It holds Mr. Jonas Savimbi and the armed faction of the União Nacional para a Independência Total de Angola (UNITA) primarily responsible for the failure to implement the Lusaka Protocol. It expresses its deep concern at the resulting human rights and international humanitarian law violations, and the humanitarian crisis.

            The Security Council reaffirms that the Lusaka Protocol remains the only viable basis for a political settlement of the conflict in Angola. The failure by UNITA to implement the Lusaka Protocol (S/1994/1441, annex), the “Accordos de Paz” (S/22609, annex), and the relevant resolutions of the Security Council are the basis for the continuation of the Security Council sanctions against UNITA.

            The Security Council once again reaffirms its intention to keep sanctions under close and ongoing monitoring with a view to improving their effectiveness until it is convinced that the conditions in the relevant resolutions are met. It welcomes, in this regard, the ongoing review by the Sanctions Committee of the recommendations of the Monitoring Mechanism on sanctions against UNITA.

            The Security Council reiterates its call on Member States to comply fully with the implementation of the sanctions regime against UNITA. The Council notes the positive contribution of the Security Council Sanctions Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993) and, in this regard, calls upon the Member States to cooperate fully with the Security Council Committee and the Monitoring Mechanism on sanctions against UNITA.

            The Security Council supports the Government of Angola in its efforts to implement the Lusaka Protocol including through the Fund for Peace and National Reconciliation. The Security Council supports the Government’s intention to hold free and fair elections when appropriate conditions are in place. It encourages the Angolan authorities to continue, in consultation with all the political parties and the full participation of the civil society, their efforts for peace, stability and national reconciliation. The Council further encourages the Government of Angola to work for economic reform and to ensure transparent and accountable governance to provide a positive climate for peace.

            The Security Council expresses its concern that the continuing conflict in Angola is leading to a large number of internally displaced persons and a dire humanitarian situation. It welcomes the efforts of the Government of Angola to improve the humanitarian situation and the resettlement of the displaced population and calls upon it to increase its efforts to this end. It also calls upon the international community to continue to provide necessary humanitarian assistance. It stresses that humanitarian assistance should be provided to the population in need, throughout Angola.

            The Security Council supports the efforts of the civil society and the churches to alleviate the humanitarian situation and to facilitate national reconciliation.

            The Security Council welcomes the upcoming visit of the Secretary-General’s Special Adviser on Africa to Angola for consultations with the Government, political parties and civil society representatives on how the United Nations could help in the advancement of the peace process. It also reiterates its support for the work of the United Nations Office in Angola in finding the solution to the Angolan conflict.

S/PRST/2001/37                                Extension of UN Disengagement Observer Force

                                                Date:  27 November 2001                    Meeting:  4428

            In connection with the resolution just adopted on the renewal of the mandate of the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force, I have been authorized to make the following complementary statement on behalf of the Security Council:

                       As is known, the report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (S/2001/1079) states, in paragraph 12: “... the situation in the Middle East continues to be potentially dangerous and is likely to remain so, unless and until a comprehensive settlement covering all aspects of the Middle East problem can be reached”. That statement of the Secretary-General reflects the view of the Security Council.

S/PRST/2001/38                                Office of Special Representative of Secretary-Generalfor West Africa

                                                Date:  19 December 2001                     Meeting:  4440

            The Security Council has considered, during its public meetings of 14 May and 18 December 2001, the report of the Inter-Agency Mission to West Africa (S/2001/434).

            The Security Council welcomes with satisfaction the above report and fully supports initiatives taken with a view to implementing its recommendations. It welcomes, in particular, the establishment of the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for West Africa to ensure, inter alia, the strengthening of harmonization and coordination of the activities of the United Nations system in an integrated regional perspective and to the development of a fruitful partnership with the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), other subregional organizations and international and national actors, including civil society.

            The Security Council emphasizes that greater subregional integration must remain a key goal for the United Nations system in the search for lasting solutions to the conflicts in West Africa and to the human suffering to which these give rise. It stresses the need to further strengthen the capacities of ECOWAS in the areas which should enable it to act as the engine of subregional integration and increased cooperation with the United Nations system.

            The Security Council underlines the importance of taking steps to develop cooperation and coordination among the intergovernmental bodies and entities of the United Nations system which can influence the situation in West Africa, and expresses its intention to consider measures to coordinate its action with these bodies and entities.

            The Security Council emphasizes the need to maintain regional peace and stability and, in that connection, welcomes the progress made in the Mano River Union area. It also emphasizes the need to see to the effective implementation of the confidence-building and cooperation measures agreed on by Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone and strongly encourages these three countries to do their utmost to hold a summit meeting of their heads of State and to ensure its success. It commends the role of the civil society particularly the Mano River Union Women’s Peace Network for their instrumental role in facilitating dialogue among the leaders of the region.

            The Security Council also emphasizes the need to strengthen the capacity of ECOWAS to monitor and to stem the illicit flows of small arms and the establishment of militia. In this connection it welcomes the extension for a period of three years, starting on 5 July 2001, of the Moratorium on the Importation, Exportation and Manufacture of Small Arms and Light Weapons in West Africa. It appeals to the international community to provide appropriate financial assistance to the Programme for Coordination and Assistance for Security and Development and to the national mechanisms involved in the fight against the proliferation of small arms in West Africa.

            The Security Council also emphasizes the urgent need to solve the problem of refugees and displaced persons in the subregion by permitting voluntary returns as soon as possible, under acceptable security conditions.

            The Security Council reiterates its condemnation of the use, by State and non-State actors, of children as combatants in violation of the relevant International Instruments on the rights of the child and the Accra Declaration on War-Affected Children in West Africa and the related Plan of Action. It calls for the immediate demobilization of all child soldiers.

            The Security Council welcomes the holding in New York, on 16 November 2001, of the fifth meeting of the United Nations-ECOWAS-Sierra Leone coordination mechanism and the progress made in the peace process in Sierra Leone. It appeals to the international community for substantial financial assistance for the programme for the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of former combatants and other peace consolidating activities in Sierra Leone.

            The Council welcomes the holding of the twenty-fifth conference of heads of States and of Government of ECOWAS. It pays tribute to that organization for its major contribution to the restoration of peace, stability, democracy and development in West Africa.

            The Council will remain actively seized of this matter.

S/PRST/2001/39                                Condemns plundering of natural resources in Democratic Republic of Congo

                                                Date:  19 December 2001                     Meeting:  4441

            The Security Council notes with concern that the plundering of the natural resources and other forms of wealth of the Democratic Republic of the Congo continues unabated. The Security Council strongly condemns these activities, which are perpetuating the conflict in the country, impeding the economic development of the DRC and exacerbating the suffering of its people, and reaffirms the territorial integrity, political independence, and sovereignty of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, including over its natural resources.

            The Security Council stresses that:

            –        No external parties, or groups or individuals under their control, should benefit from the exploitation of the DRC’s natural resources at the DRC’s expense;

            –        The DRC’s natural resources should not serve as an incentive for any State, group or individual, to prolong, the conflict;

            –        External parties, and groups or individuals under their control, must not use the natural resources of the DRC to finance the conflict in the country;

            –        The resources should be exploited legally and on a fair commercial basis to benefit the country and people of the DRC.

            The Security Council thanks the Expert Panel for its recommendations on the institutional, financial and technical aspects of the issue, and for its advice on possible measures to be imposed by the Security Council. It reaffirms its support to the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, and reiterates its commitment to take any appropriate action to help put an end to the plundering of the resources of the DRC, in support of the peace process, once it has been established that such actions will have no serious and unmanageable negative impact on the disastrous humanitarian and economic situation of the country.

            The Security Council stresses the importance of continuing the monitoring of the situation regarding the illegal exploitation of the natural resources of the DRC and the link between the exploitation of these natural resources in the DRC and the continuation of the conflict, in order to keep the necessary pressure to put an end to the illegal exploitation of the resources of the DRC, including the exploitation of human resources, at the expense of the Congolese people and of the peace process.

            Therefore, the Security Council, having heard the views expressed at its open debate on 14 December 2001, requests the Secretary-General to renew the mandate of the Expert Panel for a period of six months at the end of which the Expert Panel should report to the Council. The panel should submit an interim report after three months.

            The next reports of the panel should include the following elements:

            –        An update of relevant data and an analysis of further information from all relevant countries, including in particular from those which thus far have not provided the panel with the requested information;

            –        An evaluation of the possible actions that could be taken by the Council, including those recommended by the panel in its report (S/2001/357) and in its addendum (S/2001/1072), in order to help bring to an end the plundering of natural resources of the DRC, taking into account the impact of such actions on the financing of the conflict and their potential impact on the humanitarian and economic situation of the DRC;

            –        Recommendations on specific actions that the international community, in support of the Government of the DRC, might take, working through existing international organizations, mechanisms and United Nations bodies, to address the issues in the report and its addendum;

            –        Recommendations on possible steps that may be taken by transit countries as well as end users to contribute to ending illegal exploitation of the natural resources and other forms of wealth of the DRC.

            The Security Council stresses the importance of the panel maintaining a high level of collaboration with all the Congolese players, governmental as well as non-governmental, throughout the national territory.

            The Security Council once again urges the Governments named in the previous reports to conduct their own inquiries, cooperate fully with the Expert Panel and take, on an urgent basis, the necessary steps to end all illegal exploitation of the natural resources of the DRC, by their nationals or others under their control, and inform the Council accordingly. The Security Council also calls on those countries that have not yet provided the panel with the requested information to do so as a matter of urgency.

* * *

PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS SUBJECT TO SECURITY COUNCIL ACTION IN 2000

BONUCA                      United Nations Peace-Building Support Office in Central African Republic

MINURSO                     United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara

MONUC                        United Nations Organization Mission for the Democratic Republic of the Congo

UNAMSIL                     United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone

UNDOF                          United Nations Disengagement Observer Force

UNFICYP                       United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus

UNIFIL                           United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon

UNMEE                         United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea

UNMIBH                       United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina

UNMIK                          United Nations Interim Administration in Kosovo

UNMOP                         United Nations Mission of Observers in Prevlaka

UNOA                            United Nations Office in Angola

UNOGBIS                      United Nations Peace-Building Support Office in Guinea-Bissau

UNOMIG                       United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia

UNTAET                       United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor

-  137  -

INDEX

Subject                                                                                                                                                                                                  Page

Afghanistan,

                Sanctions monitoring mechanism                                                                                                                                         50

                Support for transitional administration                                                                                                                                75

                Endorsement of interim arrangements                                                                                                                                  92

                Authorization of security force                                                                                                                                             94

Angola

                Extension of sanctions monitoring mechanism                                                                                                                     2

                Extension of sanctions monitoring mechanism                                                                                                                   25

                Extension of sanctions monitoring mechanism                                                                                                                   69

                Condemnation of terrorist attacks                                                                                                                                       120

                Effectiveness of sanctions                                                                                                                                                   131

Bosnia and Herzegovina

                Extension of Mission until 21 June 2002                                                                                                                              41

                Response to High Representative briefing                                                                                                                        109

Burundi

                Support for peace agreement                                                                                                                                                 71

                Condemnation of attacks                                                                                                                                                      104

                Call for suspension of hostilities                                                                                                                                         113

                Installation of transitional government                                                                                                                              122

                Welcomes Transitional Government                                                                                                                                  130

                Gratitude to Nelson Mandela                                                                                                                                               131

Central African Republic

                Concerned by rising tension                                                                                                                                                  98

                Situation, killing of security coordinator                                                                                                                            114

                Extension of peace-building office                                                                                                                                      121

Children and armed conflict                                                                                                                                                                   77

Conflict prevention                                                                                                                                                                                  56

Croatia

                Extension of Prevlaka Peninsula Mission until 15 July                                                                                                        1

                Extension of Prevlaka Peninsula Mission until 15 January 2002                                                                                      48

Cyprus

                Extension of Mission until 15 December                                                                                                                              35

                Extension of Mission until 15 June 2002                                                                                                                              93

-  139  -

Democratic Republic of Congo

                Reaffirms Mission                                                                                                                                                                      9

                Extension of Mission until 15 June 2002                                                                                                                              36

                Phase III deployment                                                                                                                                                              72

                Illegal exploitation of resources                                                                                                                                           110

                Call for cooperation                                                                                                                                                               115

                Preparatory meeting for inter-Congolese dialogue                                                                                                           119

                Support for next phase of deployment                                                                                                                               124

                Condemns plundering of natural resources                                                                                                                      134

East Timor

                Extension of Transitional Administration until 31 January 2002                                                                                        5

                Elections                                                                                                                                                                                  120

                Independence date                                                                                                                                                                129

Ethiopia and Eritrea

                Extension of Mission until 15 September                                                                                                                             19

                Extension of Mission until 15 March 2002                                                                                                                           60

                Welcomes peace agreement                                                                                                                                                 100

                Call for access, freedom of movement                                                                                                                                111

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

                Condemnation of violence                                                                                                                                                     21

                Condemnation of violence                                                                                                                                                     65

                Condemnation of violence                                                                                                                                                   105

                Implementation of agreement                                                                                                                                               117

Georgia

                Extension of Mission until 31 July                                                                                                                                          7

                Extension of Mission until 31 January 2002                                                                                                                        52

                Welcomes agreement                                                                                                                                                            107

                Lack of progress                                                                                                                                                                    109

HIV/AIDS                                                                                                                                                                                                112

International Court of Justice, 12 October date to fill vacancy                                                                                                        48

International Tribunals

                Nominations of judges for Yugoslav                                                                                                                                      9

                Nominations of judges for Rwanda                                                                                                                                      24

                Ad litem judges                                                                                                                                                                        27

Iraq

                Extension of “oil-for-food” programme for 180 days until 3 July                                                                                     28

                Extension of “oil-for-food” programme for 150 days                                                                                                         46

                Extension of “oil-for-food” programme for 180 days                                                                                                         81

Kosovo

                Condemns ethnic violence                                                                                                                                                   106

                Voting in elections                                                                                                                                                                 123

                Call to vote                                                                                                                                                                              130

Lebanon

                Extension of Mission until 31 July                                                                                                                                          3

                Extension of Mission until 31 January 2002                                                                                                                        54

Middle East

                Extension of Syrian Golan Force until 30 November                                                                                                          28

                Extension of Syrian Golan Force until 31 May 2002                                                                                                           81

                Complementary statement on Syrian Golan extension                                                                                                     112

                Complementary statement on Syrian Golan extension                                                                                                     132

Millennium Summit commitments                                                                                                                                                        108

Nobel Peace Prize                                                                                                                                                                                   124

Peace-building, comprehensive approach                                                                                                                                         102

Peacekeeping operations, working group                                                                                                                                            99

Secretary-General, appointment                                                                                                                                                            45

Sierra Leone

                Demands Liberia cease support for rebels                                                                                                                           14

                Extension of Mission until 30 September                                                                                                                             22

                Extension of Mission until 31 March 2002                                                                                                                           63

                Extension of prohibition of rough diamonds                                                                                                                       83

Small arms                                                                                                                                                                                               117

Somalia

                Exemptions from weapons embargo                                                                                                                                     40

                Commitment to peace                                                                                                                                                              97

                Comprehensive settlement                                                                                                                                                   125

Sudan, lifting of sanctions                                                                                                                                                                     66

Terrorism

                Condemnation of attacks on United States                                                                                                                         60

                Anti-terrorism measures                                                                                                                                                         67

                Declaration on global efforts to combat                                                                                                                               74

Troop-contributing States, strengthening partnerships                                                                                                                   29

West Africa, Special Representative                                                                                                                                                  133

Western Sahara

                Extension of Mission until 30 April                                                                                                                                      13

                Extension of Mission until 30 June                                                                                                                                       26

                Extension of Mission until 30 November                                                                                                                             45

                Extension of Mission until 28 February 2002                                                                                                                      81

Women’s role in conflict prevention                                                                                                                                                  127

Yugoslavia, arms sale prohibition                                                                                                                                                         59

* *** *

For information media. Not an official record.