COMMITTEE ON ELIMINATION OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION CONCLUDES SIXTIETH SESSION

22 March 2002
RD/971

COMMITTEE ON ELIMINATION OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION CONCLUDES SIXTIETH SESSION

22/03/2002
Press Release
RD/971


COMMITTEE ON ELIMINATION OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION CONCLUDES SIXTIETH SESSION


(Reissued as received.)


GENEVA, 22 March (UN Information Services) -- The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination this morning concluded its sixtieth session after examining reports on efforts by the Governments of Switzerland, Lithuania, Croatia, Austria, Qatar, Moldova, Denmark, Belgium, Jamaica, Costa Rica and Liechtenstein to implement the provisions of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.  Further, the Committee examined the situation of the implementation of the Convention in Papua New Guinea, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Solomon Islands and Turkmenistan whose periodic reports were seriously overdue.


The Committee, the first body created by the United Nations to review actions by States parties in fulfilling their obligations under a specific human-rights agreement, held question-and-answer sessions with Government delegations from the presenting countries.  All 161 States parties to the Convention are required to submit periodic reports to the Committee, which consists of 18 Experts.


During its three-week session, the Committee discussed issues pertaining to the follow-up to the Declaration and Programme of Action of the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance, and it issued a statement in which it stressed that measures taken to fight terrorism should not derogate human rights. 


It also adopted a General Recommendation on the follow-up to the World Conference against Racism, in which it recommended measures to States to strengthen the implementation of the Convention and the functioning of the Committee.  It also recommended, among other things, that States parties take into account the relevant parts and recommendations of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action when implementing the Convention in the domestic legal order, and to include in their periodic reports information on the action plans or other measures they had taken to implement the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action at the national level. 


In closed meetings during the session, the Committee Experts dealt with communications received from individuals or groups of individuals who claimed that their rights under the Convention had been violated by a State party and who had exhausted all available domestic remedies.  So far, 32 States parties have made the declaration under article 14.


The Committee's sixty-first session will be held from 5 to 25 August 2002 at the Palais des Nations at Geneva.  At the three-week session, Committee Experts will examine periodic reports from Canada, Senegal, Armenia, Uganda, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, New Zealand, Hungary, Estonia, Botswana and Mali.


Concluding Observations and Recommendations on Country Reports


Switzerland


The Committee welcomed the progress made by Switzerland since the consideration of the initial report in significantly advancing the implementation of the provisions of the Convention; it noted with satisfaction that a number of recent reforms of cantonal constitutions had included provisions prohibiting discrimination; that the Convention formed an integral part of the Swiss legal system; that some of its provisions might be directly invoked before the courts; and that the Federal Court had referred to the provisions of the Convention on several occasions.


Among its concerns and recommendations, the Committee wished to emphasize that despite the federal structure of the State party, which might render more difficult the full application of the State's obligations under the Convention in all parts of its territory, the Federal Government had the responsibility of ensuring the implementation of the Convention on its entire territory and should ensure that cantonal authorities were aware of the rights set out in the Convention and should take the necessary measures in order to respect them.


The Committee said that the persistence of negative attitudes and sentiments towards black people, Muslims and asylum-seekers was a subject of concern for it.  It recommended that the State party continue its efforts to prevent and combat such attitudes.  Further, the Committee said that it was deeply concerned about the expression of xenophobic and racist feelings in naturalization procedures, particularly those subjected to popular vote; it recommended that naturalization had to be made an integral part of the policy.


The Committee said that allegations of police abuse and excessive use of force against persons of foreign origin during arrest or in the course of deportations were also of utmost concern to it; and the State party should ensure that independent bodies with authority to investigate complaints against police officers were established in all cantons.


While commending the important work undertaken by the Federal Commission against Racism, the Committee noted that the Commission had limited powers of action; it recommended that the State party strengthen the powers and means of the Commission.


Lithuania


Among positive aspects, the Committee noted with satisfaction that since the independence of Lithuania, considerable progress had been achieved in the field of human rights.  It welcomed the efforts made by the State party to respect, protect and promote the realization of the cultural rights of persons belonging to national minorities; and the efforts made in the field of human rights education for state officials.


Among concerns and recommendations, the Committee noted that the new Law on Citizenship was more restrictive and required the applicant to pass a Lithuanian language test and an exam on the provisions of the Constitution, which might exclude from citizenship certain minorities.  In that regard, the Committee requested the State party to include detailed information on the conditions of the new system in its next periodic report.


The Committee noted with concern that despite the adoption of a programme for the integration of the Roma in Lithuanian society for 2000-2004, the Roma experienced difficulties in enjoying their fundamental rights in the fields of housing, health, employment and education, and were the subject of prejudicial attitudes.  It recommended that the State party, in its next periodic report, include detailed information on the measures aimed at protecting Roma as well as the results of their implementation.


The Committee recommended that Lithuania consider ratifying the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness.


In relation to information regarding alleged discrimination against Afghan asylum-seekers, the Committee expressed concern about the disregard of basic procedural guarantees; it recommended that educational rights and assistance in administrative matters be granted to children of asylum-seekers, including those of Afghan nationality. 


Concern was expressed by the Committee about the denial of citizenship for persons affected by HIV/AIDS, who might belong to groups vulnerable to racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance.  The Committee was further concerned about xenophobic tendencies towards Chechen asylum-seekers and refugees; was also concerned about information relating to expressions of racial hate by politicians and by the media; and it recommended that the State party ensure the enjoyment of social rights, particularly housing and health, to all asylum-seekers and refugees in need without regard to their legal status. 


Croatia


Concerning factors and difficulties impeding the implementation of the Convention, the Committee noted that the State party was going through a difficult period of economic and social challenges in a framework of post war reconstruction, which had resulted in obstacles to the full implementation of the Convention.


The Committee welcomed, among positive aspects, the efforts of Croatia to introduce legislative reform in accordance with international standards, and to establish institutions, programmes and policies to promote equality; and noted with appreciation the State party's statement of cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia as well as appropriate United Nations bodies, including the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and regional organizations.


The Committee said it remained concerned about the limited representation of minorities in the Croatian Parliament; and recommended that the State party take further measures to ensure fair and adequate representation of all groups of minorities.  It also expressed concern at the continued practice of segregation of Roma children in the educational system and reports about discrimination against the Roma in access to employment, health, political representation and citizenship rights.


The Committee recommended that the State party introduce further measures to ensure fairness, consistency and transparency in the National Programme for Return; and it was strongly urged to take effective measures to prevent discrimination, especially against Croatian Serbs, particularly as regards the restitution of their property, tenancy and occupancy rights, access to reconstruction assistance and rights to residency and citizenship.


Moreover, the Committee expressed concern that many former long-term residents of Croatia, particularly persons of Serb origin and other minorities, had been unable to regain residency status despite their pre-conflict attachment to Croatia; it again strongly urged that the State party undertake measures to ensure that all provisions of the Croatian Law on Citizenship were in conformity with article 5 of the Convention, and that the law was implemented in a non-discriminatory manner.


The Committee was concerned about repeated claims of discriminatory application of the right to equal treatment before the law, particularly in the areas of property claims, where the courts reportedly continued to favour persons of Croat origin; and it recommended that the State party reinforce its efforts to ensure non-discrimination in the application of the right to equal treatment before the law, particularly in the area of repossession of property.


Austria


Among positive aspects in the report, the Committee welcomed recent developments that had taken place in the field of human rights in the country; it noted with satisfaction the establishment of the Immigrants Fund which assisted new immigrants in their integration; the continuation of the Reconciliation Fund for victims of national socialism; the inclusion of provisions aimed at combatting racism and xenophobia in national legislation; and the efforts undertaken by the State party to safeguard linguistic diversity in the country.


However, the Committee was of the view that the legislation in place to combat racism was not totally adequate to effectively combat discrimination;  while noting the existence of provisions in criminal legislation aimed at combatting racism, as well as aggravating circumstances for any crime committed with racist or xenophobic motivations, the Committee reiterated its recommendation for the State party to introduce general legislation prohibiting racial discrimination in all its forms.


The Committee said it had difficulties in understanding the distinction made by the State party between autochthonous and other minorities and the legal and practical consequences following from that; and it invited the State party to provide specific information in its next report in that regard.


The Committee was concerned about a significant number of allegations that had been brought to its attention which reflected the existence of racist and xenophobic attitudes among some sections of the population; and it was further concerned about allegations of racist incidents involving police officers and other state employees. It recommended that the State party strengthen existing educational measures for civil servants who dealt with issues involving foreigners.


The Committee was also concerned about information that quite a considerable number of asylum-seekers were denied the receipt of public assistance from the Federal Care and Maintenance Programme and had to rely on assistance from private and other agencies for survival; and it recommended that the State party ensure the provision of basic and equal assistance to all asylum-seekers, without distinctions of race or ethnic and national origin.


Qatar


The Committee welcomed the process of political reform which Qatar had embarked on, and noted in particular the review of legislation on public freedoms, the lifting of censorship on the printed press, the first elections to the Central Municipal Council conducted under universal and equal suffrage in 1999, and the announcement of the forthcoming establishment of an elected parliament.


The Committee, however, expressed its concern over the repeated affirmation by the State party that it had no need to take action in implementation of articles 2, 3 and 4 of the Convention since there was no racial discrimination in Qatar; and it pointed out that States parties were required under the Convention to take legislative, judicial, administrative and other measures to give effect to its provisions, even in the apparent absence of racism.


Further, the Committee noted that the Provisional Constitution, as well as provisions of the Islamic Shari'a, the principal source of Qatari legislation, prohibit acts of racial discrimination.  Even so, the Committee reiterated that the mere statement of the general principle of non-discrimination in the Constitution or in the fundamental laws was not a sufficient response to the requirements of the Convention.


The Committee requested the State party to consider the possibility of modifying the provision that made distinction between nationals of Arab countries and others concerning the length of time they should reside in Qatar before they could submit an application for naturalization.  It noted with concern the distinction drawn between citizens by birth and naturalized citizens as regards access to public office and other kind of employment, as well as the right to vote and to stand for election. 


The Committee recommended that the State party institute training programmes on human rights and understanding among ethnic groups for law enforcement officials, including policemen, military and prison staff, and members of the judiciary; and the Committee requested the State party to include in its periodic report desegregated statistical data of migrants' national origin, which could allow a better understanding of the economic and social standing of non-Qatari nationals in relation to their national and ethnic origins.


The Committee requested that the State party take into account the relevant parts and recommendations of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action when implementing the Convention in the domestic legal order, and to include in its next periodic report information on the action plans or other measures it had taken to implement the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action at the national level. 


Moldova


Among the positive aspects, the Committee noted with satisfaction the efforts undertaken by the State party to ensure the promotion and protection of human rights through the adoption of the 1994 Constitution, which guaranteed a wide spectrum of human rights; the Committee also welcomed the establishment of specialized institutions demonstrating its commitment to combat racial discrimination; and the efforts undertaken by the State party to implement human rights education programmes.


The Committee noted that the State party was going through a difficult period of transition and was facing serious economic and social challenges; it said that the State party could not exercise its jurisdiction on part of its territory, the region of Transnistra, because of the ethnic conflict; and the Committee said it was concerned about the impact of such a conflict on the implementation of the Convention.


The Committee recommended that the State party take measures to guarantee more fully for ethnic minority groups economic, social and cultural rights; it said that landlessness had been reported among persons belonging to minorities and working in collective farms as a consequence of privatization of land held by collective farms of the Soviet era; and recommended that information be included in the next periodic report about the remedial measures to address the economic condition of the landless ethnic minorities.


The Committee said it was concerned by reports of police violence against persons belonging to minority groups, in particular the Roma population; it recommended that the State party take all necessary measures to prevent and punish excessive use of force by members of the security forces against minorities.  It also expressed its concern about reports that minorities experienced discrimination in the areas of employment, housing, education and health care; it recommended that the State party undertake effective measures to eradicate practices of discrimination against minorities and, in particular, the Roma population.


Denmark


The Committee cited a number of positive aspects in the report, among which it welcomed the recent recommendations by the ministerial committee to incorporate the Convention into Danish law; the positive steps taken to implement the Act on Integration of Aliens (1998); the temporary suspension of the licence of the Radio OASEN owned by a neo-Nazi Association; the improvement of employment opportunities for minorities and refugees in the public sector; and the establishment of the Commission on Self-Government in Greenland to submit proposals for the amendment of the Home Rule Act.


The Committee said it was aware of reports of an increase in hate speech in Denmark; while it acknowledged the need for a balance between freedom of expression and racist abuse and stereotyping, the Committee recommended that the State party carefully monitor the violation of articles 2 and 4 of the Convention.


It said that policies and practices such as the housing dispersal policy, the quota system of admitting a defined percentage of minority children to certain creches and nurseries, and the reported prohibition on mother tongue use in some institutions might lead to indirect discrimination; and it requested the State party to provide it with further information on the issue in its next periodic report.


The Committee commended Denmark for having invested in its human rights institutions and in a number of non-governmental organizations, which had served human rights and the needs of minority groups but was concerned about plans to reduce their financial means and the potential impact of those plans on such organizations.


The Committee said it was concerned about reports of a considerable increase in cases of widespread harassment of people of Arab and Muslim backgrounds since 11 September 2001; and it recommended that the State party monitor that situation carefully, take decisive action in protecting the rights of victims and in dealing with perpetrators, and report on that matter in its next periodic report.


The Committee requested the State party to take into account the relevant parts and recommendations of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action when implementing the Convention in the domestic legal order, and to include in its next periodic report information on the action plans or other measures it had taken to implement the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action at national level. 


Belgium


The Committee welcomed recent developments that had taken place in Belgium in the field of human rights; and the declaration made by the State party under article 14 of the Convention.  The Committee noted with appreciation the State party's efforts in the field of legislative reform; the work of the Centre for Equal Opportunity and the Struggle against Racism; and the measures taken by the State party to raise the awareness of racism and racial discrimination.


The Committee was concerned that no legislation prohibited racist organizations and propaganda activities, and recommended that the State party provide information on the application of the 1998 law, taking into account the mandatory nature of article 4 of the Convention.  If the State party enacted legislation that would declare illegal and prohibit any organization which promoted or incited to racism and racial discrimination, it should consider withdrawing its reservation to that article.


The Committee expressed concern at the length of the investigation procedures of complaints of victims of racial discrimination; and recommended that the State party ensure that all acts of racism and racial discrimination be investigated and that the alleged perpetrators, if found guilty, be punished.


Concern was expressed about several cases of racist incidents in police stations by law-enforcement officials whose victims were immigrants and asylum-seekers; the Committee was also concerned about reports, according to which children belonging to ethnic minority groups experienced verbal violence; and it recommended that the State party take all the necessary measures to prosecute racially motivated acts of violence by law enforcement officials and to prevent such verbal offenses against persons belonging to ethnic minority groups and to continue in its efforts to promote inter-cultural tolerance, understanding and respect.


The Committee was concerned about the difficulties of access to employment and housing of members of ethnic minorities; and recommended that the State party provide in its next periodic report information on the situation concerning all regions of the State party, including complaints on cases of racial discrimination and the redress, if any, provided to the victims.


While noting the satisfactory measures taken in the State party, especially by the Centre for Equal Opportunity and the Struggle against Racism, following the events of 11 September, in order to promote tolerance between religious communities, the Committee regretted the occurrence of racial acts against persons belonging to ethnic minorities, especially those of the Muslim faith; and the Committee recommended that the State party include in its next periodic report detailed information on the development of the situation and the work of the Centre.


Jamaica


The Committee welcomed, as part of positive aspects, the enactment of the Public Defenders (Interim) Act (1999), which had created the Office of the Public Defender to protect and enforce human rights and provide a remedy for the infringement of those rights.


The Committee noted that Jamaica was undergoing a constitutional review process intended to, inter alia, provide for the enactment of a Ratification of Treaties Act to ensure the incorporation of international treaty obligations into domestic legislation; and it encouraged the State party to take further measures to finalize the review process and to submit relevant information concerning that matter in its next periodic report.


The Committee said that it had difficulties in accepting the assertion made by States parties as to the absence of racial discrimination in their territories; the Committee reminded the State party that the absence of complaints by victims of racial discrimination could indicate a lack of awareness of available legal remedies; it encouraged the State party to consider its position concerning racial discrimination in its territory and to implement effective measures to address direct and indirect discrimination; and it recommended that the State party take appropriate measures to inform the public of the availability of legal remedies for victims of racial discrimination.

The Committee was concerned about the absence in Jamaica of specific legislative, administration and such measures, which aimed to give effect to article 4 of the Convention, especially article 4 (b), prohibiting racist organizations; and it underlined the obligations of the State party under the Convention and reiterated its view as to the preventive role of such legislation.


The Committee again suggested that the State party consider withdrawing its reservation to article 4 of the Convention; it recommended, among other things, that the State party include in its forthcoming report information concerning the measures taken to implement article 5 of the Convention; and it recommended that the State party consider the possibility of making a declaration on article 14 of the Convention.


And the Committee requested the State party to take into account the relevant parts and recommendations of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action when implementing the Convention in the domestic legal order, and to include in its next periodic report information on the action plans or other measures it had taken to implement the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action at the national level. 


Costa Rica


Cited among positive aspects in the report were the precedence of international treaties over constitutional provisions and that international human rights treaties could be invoked directly before the courts; the adoption in May 1999 of article 76 of the Constitution, according to which the State party ensured that the national indigenous languages were safeguarded; and that the President of Costa Rica had publicly apologized for past errors committed against Afro-Costa Ricans.        


The Committee was concerned about the situation of indigenous people, in particular about information according to which indigenous people living in remote regions suffered, among other things, from the lack of health care, education, drinking water and electricity.


The Committee noted with concern the shortcomings of the State party in its activities on behalf of indigenous peoples, as reported by the Office of the Ombudsman, in particular the failure on the part of the authorities to maintain communication with the indigenous population and the absence of specific government plans for them.


The Committee was also concerned about the living and working conditions of all immigrants, most of them from Nicaragua, who might become victims of discrimination in terms of article 5 of the Convention; it recommended that the State party continue its efforts to ensure the rights of the immigrant population as regards discrimination on the grounds of race, ethnic or national origin.


It was also concerned about the lack of representation of minorities at judicial and government level; and recommended that the State party undertake affirmative action to ensure minorities representation at that level.


The Committee recommended that Costa Rica continue to undertake educational campaigns to raise awareness of human rights and in particular of issues

concerning racism, xenophobia and intolerance in order to prevent and combat all forms of discrimination.


And the Committee requested the State party to take into account the relevant parts and recommendations of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action when implementing the Convention in the domestic legal order, and to include in its next periodic report information on the action plans or other measures it had taken to implement the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action at the national level. 


Liechtenstein


Among positive aspects in the initial report of Liechtenstein, the Committee expressed appreciation for the fact that the State party had amended relevant national legislation to be in line with the Convention.  It expressed satisfaction with measures undertaken by the State party to address the phenomenon of right-wing extremism, which was reported to be on the increase in the country; and the efforts undertaken by the State party to ensure the integration of refugees and asylum-seekers in society.


With regard to its concerns and recommendations, the Committee noted that, while a Police Treaty between the State party and its neighbouring countries provided for police cooperation concerning right-wing groups promoting racial discrimination, there did not seem to be particular training of law-enforcement officers in that field; the Committee recommended that the State party attempt to develop such training courses for law enforcement officers, which would increase the State party's capacity to combat effectively all forms of racial discrimination.


The Committee noted that the State party was supporting efforts made by non-governmental organizations to help foreigners to integrate into society; it recommended that the State party continue to lend its support to such organizations in their work of integrating foreigners into society.


The Committee requested the State party to provide, in its next periodic report, information on access to social security and health care by non-nationals. 

It also requested the State party to take into account the relevant parts and recommendations of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action when implementing the Convention in the domestic legal order, and to include in its next periodic report information on the action plans or other measures it had taken to implement the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action at the national level. 


Concluding Observations and Recommendations on Country Situations


Turkmenistan


After reviewing the situation in Turkmenistan in the absence of a report from that State party, the Committee noted with concern that Turkmenistan, which acceded to the Convention in 1994, had not yet reported to the Committee; and drew the attention of the State party that reporting was an obligation under article 9 of the Convention.


The Committee expressed deep concern about grave allegations of human-rights violations in Turkmenistan, both in civil and political, as well as social, economic and cultural domains; and in connection to article 5 of the Convention, the Committee wished to receive information from the State party.


The Committee was also concerned about alleged discriminations affecting persons belonging to minorities in the field of employment, education, as well as freedom of thought, conscience and religion; it said it had received information alleging that the State party's present policy of promotion of Turkmen identity led to discrimination against non-ethnic Turkmen.


It strongly urged the Government of Turkmenistan to avail itself of the technical assistance offered under the advisory services and technical assistance programme of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with the aim of drawing up and submitting as soon as possible a report drafted in accordance with the reporting guidelines.


The Committee decided that a communication should be sent to the Government of Turkmenistan setting out its reporting obligations under the Convention, and urging that the dialogue with the Committee start as soon as possible.


Saint Vincent and the Grenadines


The Committee, in its final afternoon meeting on 22 March, adopted its conclusions on the situation in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines in which it reiterated its regret that Saint Vincent and the Grenadines had not submitted a report since the submission of its initial report in 1983; it reiterated its concern that the initial report of the State party did not comply with the requirements of article 9 of the Convention as it consisted a single sentence asserting that there was no form of racial discrimination practiced in the country and that protection from such discrimination was provided in the basic clauses of the Convention. 


In that connection, the Committee took note of the reports regarding the human rights situation in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, including alleged discrimination against certain minorities such as the Amerindians and Asians.  Reports further indicated that those groups were over-represented at the lower-income levels of the State economy and that members of some minorities considered that they were discriminated against by the majority.


The Committee urged the Government of the State party to avail itself of the technical assistance offered under the advisory services and technical assistance programme of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, with the aim of preparing and submitting, as soon as possible, a report drafted in accordance with the reporting guidelines.


Decision on Situation in Solomon Islands


The Committee reiterated its regret that the Solomon Islands had not responded to its invitations to participate in the meeting and to furnish relevant information.  A report had not been submitted to the Committee since the State party's initial report in 1983.

The Committee noted the challenging economic and social conditions faced by the Solomon Islands as well as the political and ethnic conflicts which had exacerbated the situation there.  Internal displacement, hostage taking, killings, torture, rape, looting and the burning of village homes had been reported by a number of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. 


The Committee said it was concerned that despite several attempts at securing peace, favourable results had been limited, as tension between the rival conflicting groups remained high.  The Committee hoped that the successful elections held in December 2001 and the new ruling party's stated promise to rehabilitate the country politically and economically and to ensure better security would lead to sustainable peace and security in the country.


The Committee strongly urged the Government of the Solomon Islands to avail itself of the technical assistance offered under the advisory services and technical assistance programme of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with the aim of drawing up and submitting as soon as possible a report drafted in accordance with the reporting guidelines.


Decision on Situation in Papua New Guinea


The Committee said that despite its repeated requests, Papua New Guinea had not resumed its dialogue with the Committee since 1984; it had submitted neither its periodic reports nor the additional information requested about the situation in Bourgainville; thus the State party had not fulfilled its obligation under article 9 of the Convention concerning submission of periodic reports.


The Committee once again urged the State party to submit its report under article 9, paragraph 1, of the Convention, as well as to supply information specifically on the present situation in Bourgainville.  In particular, the report should provide information on the demographic composition of the population, as well as the economic, social and cultural situation of the different ethnic groups.  In that connection, the Committee wished again to draw the State party's attention to the possibility of availing itself of the technical assistance offered under the advisory services and technical assistance programme of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.


The Committee drew the attention of the State party to the provisions of the Declaration and the Programme of Action of the World Conference against Racism, according to which the Committee was the principal international instrument for the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, and States were urged to cooperate with the Committee in order to promote the effective implementation of the Convention.


The Committee decided that, in the absence of any indication on the part of the State party that it will comply with its obligation under article 9, paragraph 1, of the Convention, it will consider the implementation of the Convention in Papua Guinea in March 2003.


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For information media. Not an official record.