GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS 75 RESOLUTIONS ON SOCIAL, HUMANITARIAN ISSUES, INCLUDING OPTIONAL PROTOCOL TO CONVENTION AGAINST TORTURE

18 December 2002
GA/10124

GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS 75 RESOLUTIONS ON SOCIAL, HUMANITARIAN ISSUES, INCLUDING OPTIONAL PROTOCOL TO CONVENTION AGAINST TORTURE

18/12/2002
Press ReleaseGA/10124

Fifty-seventh General Assembly

Plenary

77th Meeting (AM)

GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS 75 RESOLUTIONS ON SOCIAL, HUMANITARIAN ISSUES, INCLUDING

OPTIONAL PROTOCOL TO CONVENTION AGAINST TORTURE

Action also taken on Human Rights, Refugees, Women’s Issues, Crime Prevention, Drug Control, Other Social Issues

Convinced that further measures were necessary to achieve the purposes of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, the General Assembly this morning adopted the Optional Protocol to the Convention, which will establish a preventive system of visits to places of detention in order to strengthen protection of persons deprived of their liberty against torture and other inhuman treatment (See Annex X).

Acting on the recommendations of its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian, Cultural) the General Assembly also adopted 74 other resolutions and 12 decisions, strongly endorsing the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and reaffirming the United Nations commitment to the rule of law and core international human rights treaties and instruments.

Overall, the fundamental nature of texts approved today reflected the Third Committee’s broad support of efforts to ensure the right to life, liberty and security of person, the right to a decent standard of living, freedom from torture, freedom of movement and protection from arbitrary detention -– all among the rights promoted in the Universal Declaration.

Reaffirming that freedom from torture is a right that must be protected under all circumstances, the text on the Optional Protocol -- adopted by a vote of 127 in favor to 4 against (United States, Marshall Islands, Nigeria, Palau), with 42 abstentions -- requests the Secretary-General to open the new instrument for signature, ratification and accession at Headquarters from 1 January 2003.  The full text of the Optional Protocol is appended to the resolution.  Article One states the protocol’s objective, namely to establish a system of regular visits undertaken by independent international and national bodies to places where people are deprived of their liberty.  The protocol will have no procedure for reservations by States parties.

Article Two of the Draft Protocol establishes a Subcommittee on Prevention to carry out, within the framework of the Charter and in cooperation with States parties to the Convention, functions laid down by the protocol.  Article Five details the Subcommittee’s structure.  That body will initially consist of 10 members, but at the fiftieth ratification or accession to the Protocol, the number will increase to 25.  Articles Twenty-five and Twenty-six detail the Subcommittee’s financial arrangements, and note that expenditures incurred in the Protocol’s implementation shall be borne by the United Nations and that a Special

Fund shall be set up to help finance the implementation of the Subcommittee’s recommendations.

Also today, the Assembly adopted a resolution on the human rights situation in Iraq by a vote of 97 in favour to 3 against (Sudan, Syria, Libya), with 77 abstentions (Annex XXXIV).  The text strongly condemns the systematic, widespread and extremely grave violations of human rights and of international humanitarian law by the Government of Iraq, resulting in all-pervasive repression and oppression sustained by broad-based discrimination and widespread terror.  The Assembly would also strongly condemn the repression faced by any kind of opposition, in particular the harassment and intimidation of and threats against Iraqi opponents living abroad and members of their families.

Before action was taken on the resolution as a whole, those provisions and two others, which would have the Assembly strongly condemn summary and arbitrary executions, and systematic torture, were retained by separate recorded votes (Annexes XXX through XXXII).

Recognizing that the accountability of individual perpetrators of grave human rights violations is one of the central elements of any effective remedy for victims of human rights violations and a key factor in ensuring a fair and equitable justice system, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to resume negotiations, without delay, to conclude an agreement with Cambodia's Government to establish Extraordinary Chambers for the prosecution of past international crimes such as acts of genocide and crimes against humanity, committed by the Khmer Rouge, under the terms of a text approved by a vote of 150 in favour, to none against, with 30 abstentions (Annex XXVIII).

Recognizing aspirations of the world’s people for justice, equality of opportunity for all, and for the enjoyment of human rights, the Assembly, under the terms of a text adopted by a vote of 116 in favour to 55 against, with 7 abstentions (Argentina, Mexico, Nauru, Panama, Peru, Fiji, Guatemala) resolved to take all measures within its power to secure a democratic and equitable international order (Annex XII).  The Assembly further urged all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on inclusion, justice, equality and equity, human dignity, peace and security, promotion of respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights, and to reject all doctrines of exclusion based on racism, racial discrimination and related intolerance.

Considering that 2003 will mark the tenth anniversary of the World Conference on Human Rights, and reaffirming its commitment to the fulfillment of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, the Assembly unanimously decided that its plenary session on 10 December 2003 -– set aside to observe the fifty-fifth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights -- will also be devoted to a commemoration of the anniversary of the World Conference.  Further, the Assembly will request the Secretary-General to make the necessary arrangements for awarding human rights prizes on that day.

The Assembly solemnly declared that the preservation of the right to peace and the promotion of its implementation constituted a fundamental obligation of each State, under the terms of a new resolution approved by a vote of 116 in favour to 53 against, with 14 abstentions (Annex XXII).  Further by its terms, the Assembly solemnly proclaims that the peoples of the planet had a sacred right to peace, and reaffirms that there was a close relationship between disarmament and

development, and that resources released through disarmament measures should be devoted to the economic and social development and well-being of all peoples, particularly those in developing countries.

Under the terms of a resolution on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of human rights –- adopted by a vote of 124 in favour to 52 against, with 5 abstentions (Turkey, Singapore, Guatemala, Argentina, Colombia) (Annex XI) -– the Assembly expressed profound concern that deepening poverty, particularly in developing countries, has adversely affected the full enjoyment of human rights.  It therefore reaffirmed that narrowing the gap between rich and poor countries is an explicit goal at the national and international levels as part of the effort to create an enabling environment for the full enjoyment of those rights.

The overall right to development was the topic of a resolution adopted by the Assembly, by a vote of 133 in favour, to 4 against (Marshall Islands, Australia, United States, Palau), with 47 abstentions (Annex XXV).  By the terms of the text, the Assembly would stress that the basic responsibility of all human rights lies with the States, and reaffirms that States have the primary responsibility for their own economic and social development and that the role of national policies and development strategies cannot be overemphasized.

Under the terms of a related text adopted by a vote of 176 in favour to one against (United States), with seven abstentions (Fiji, Australia, Canada, Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Israel), the Assembly urged States to give adequate priority in their development strategies to the realization of the right to food (Annex XXVI).  By that resolution, the Assembly reaffirms that hunger constitutes an outrage and a violation of human dignity and, therefore, requires the adoption of urgent measures at all levels towards its elimination.  The Assembly stressed the need to make efforts to mobilize and optimize the allocation and utilization of technical and financial resources from all sources, including external debt relief for developing countries, to implement sustainable food security policies.

The Assembly went on to unanimously adopt other texts recalling the principles of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights as well as the recommendations contained in the Vienna Declaration, notably on human rights and extreme poverty, human rights education, missing persons, strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation, as well as on the Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.

A text on respect for the purposes and principles contained in the Charter to achieve international cooperation in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and in solving international problems of a humanitarian character was adopted by a vote of 114 in favour to 54 against, with 15 abstentions (Annex XXIII).  Resolutions on the United Nations Decade for Human Rights Education, and on enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights were adopted without a vote.

Under the terms of a resolution on human rights and cultural diversity, the Assembly expressed its determination to prevent and mitigate cultural homogenization in the context of globalization, through increased inter-cultural exchange guided by the promotion and protection of cultural diversity.  Acting without a vote, the Assembly recognized that tolerance of cultural, ethnic

religious and linguistic diversities, as well as dialogue among and within civilizations, is essential for peace and understanding among different cultures and nations of the world.

Deeply concerned about persisting and growing racial discrimination, related intolerance and acts of violence, the Assembly reaffirmed its commitment to a global drive for the total elimination of those phenomena, under the terms of a resolution on the fight against racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action approved by a vote of 173 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United States, Palau), with 2 abstentions (Australia, Canada) (Annex VI).

Conscious of the fact that the history of humanity is replete with major atrocities as a result of gross violations of human rights and believing that lessons can be learned through remembering history to avert future tragedies, the Assembly decided to proclaim 2004 as the International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition.  The Assembly also emphasized that poverty, underdevelopment, marginalization, and economic disparities are closely associated with racism, racial discrimination and related intolerance and contribute to the persistence of racist attitudes and practices, which in turn generate more poverty.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a relevant text on the International Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.  Before the adoption of the resolution as a whole, operative paragraph 10 of Chapter I of the text was retained by a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 2 against (United States, Israel).  That paragraph “invited the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination to consider the relevant provisions of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action in the discharge of its work”.  (See Annex V)

Under the terms of a resolution adopted without a vote, the Assembly expressed alarm that serious instances of intolerance and discrimination on the grounds of religious belief, including acts of violence, intimidation and coercion were on the increase in many areas of the world.  Believing that intensified efforts were required to protect the right to freedom of thought, conscience, religion and belief, the Assembly urged States to take the necessary action to combat hatred and intolerance based on religion or belief, with particular regard to persons belonging to religious minorities.

The Assembly went on to adopt a series of other texts calling upon States to reaffirm their commitment to international human rights standards towards improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, and to uphold their obligations under international humanitarian law.

Adopted without a vote were relevant texts on the protection of migrants, hostage-taking and on the question of enforced or involuntary disappearances.  By the latter text, the Assembly reaffirmed that any act of enforced disappearance was an offence to human dignity and a grave and flagrant violation of human rights, and urged all governments to take appropriate action to prevent and suppress such practices.

Prior to that action, however the Assembly retained -- by a vote of 166 in favour to 1 against (United States) with 9 abstentions (Israel, Kazakhstan,

Honduras, Libya, Myanmar, Pakistan, Palau, Tunisia, Marshall Islands) (Annex XXI) -- preambular paragraph 7 of the text, which acknowledged that acts of enforced disappearances, as defined in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), come within the jurisdiction of the Court as crimes against humanity.

By a vote of 122 in favour to 55 against, with 1 abstention (Kazakhstan), the Assembly adopted resolution on unilateral coercive measures (Annex XXIV), by which it would urge States to avoid and refrain from such measures that would impede the full achievement of economic and social development of the population of the affected countries, in particular women and children, that hindered their well-being and created obstacles to the full enjoyment of human rights.

A new text forwarded to the Assembly this year concerning the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, was adopted without a vote.  By its terms the Assembly affirmed that States must ensure that any measure taken to combat terrorism complies with their obligations under international law, in particular international human rights, refugee and humanitarian law.  Further, the Assembly reaffirmed its unequivocal condemnation of all acts, methods and practices of terrorism wherever and by whomever committed, while stressing that everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms recognized in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Another new text, on respect for the right to universal freedom of travel and the vital importance of family reunification, was adopted by a vote of 109 in favour to 3 against (United States, Israel, Palau), with 71 abstentions (Annex XXVII).  That resolution would have the Assembly once again call upon States to guarantee the universally recognized freedom of travel to all foreign nationals legally living within their territory, and to allow the free flow of financial remittances by foreigners residing in their territory to their relatives in the country of origin.

Dismayed that in a number of countries, impunity prevailed and was often the main reason that extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions continued to occur, the General Assembly expressed the need for effective action to combat and eliminate those abhorrent practices, and demand that all Governments take effective action to eliminate them, under the terms of a resolution approved by a vote of 130 in favour, to none against, with 49 abstentions (Annex XX).

That action was taken after the Assembly held a series of seven separate votes on specific paragraphs -- bringing to eight the total number of votes taken on the text -- including its final approval.  One of today's actions involved a call for a joint vote on two paragraphs of the text (preambular paragraph 7 and operative paragraph 3), which would have the Assembly acknowledge the significance of the Rome Statute of the ICC.  That language was retained by a vote of 130 in favour to 4 against (United States, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau), with 31 abstentions (Annex XIV).

The other votes retained language contained in preambular 3 on relevant resolutions of the Commission on Human Rights (Annex XIII); operative paragraph 6, on the obligation of governments to thoroughly investigate killings (Annex XV); operative paragraph 11, on the interim report of the Special Rapporteur (Annex XVI); operative paragraph 12, on the recommendations of the Rapporteur (Annex XVII); operative paragraph 18 on the Rapporteur (Annex XVIII), and operative paragraph 22 on the High Commissioner for Human Rights (Annex XIX).

The Assembly adopted without vote a comprehensive resolution on torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, as well as texts on the effective implementation of international instruments on human rights, including reporting obligations under such instruments, the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families, and, on strengthening the rule of law, thus expressing the firm conviction that the rule of law was an essential factor in the protection of human rights and should continue to attract the attention of the international community.

In other action today, the Assembly unanimously decided to continue the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) for a further period of five years from 1 January 2004.  The Assembly noted with deep appreciation the effective manner in which the High Commissioner's Office has been dealing with the essential humanitarian tasks entrusted to it.

The resolution would have the Assembly decide to review, not later than its sixty-second session (2007), the arrangements for the High Commissioner's Office with a view to determining whether the Office should be continued beyond 2008.  Under the terms of a related text approved today, the Assembly would decide to increase the number of members of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 61 to 64 States.  Also adopted were resolutions on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, a new international humanitarian order and a comprehensive text on the UNHCR.

The Assembly also endorsed the recommendations of the Working Group on the future of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW) and decided to link the Institute to the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) of the United Nations Secretariat, under the terms of another text adopted today by a vote of 136 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Republic of Korea, Netherlands, Japan, Israel, United States, Canada), with 29 abstentions (Annex I).

Under further terms of the text on INSTRAW, based on the recommendations of the Working Group, the Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs would have direct responsibility for the Institute.  Those recommendations would have the Assembly decide to establish a liaison unit of the Institute within the Department of Economic and Social Affairs, create the post of Deputy Director with specific fund-raising responsibilities, and allocate $500,000 from the regular budget to finance the Institute’s core activities.

The Assembly unanimously adopted two new resolutions related to the advancement of women and implementation of the outcome of “Women 2000”.  Under those texts, the Assembly would, respectively, call upon all States to intensify efforts to prevent and eliminate crimes against women committed in the name of honour by using legislative, administrative and programmatic measures, it would also express deep concern at the persistence of various forms of violence against women and girls listed in the outcome document to “Women 2000”, especially all forms of commercial sexual exploitation, or economic exploitation, including trafficking, racially motivated crimes, dowry-related violence and death, and harmful traditional or customary practices, such as female genital mutilation.

Other texts adopted on the advancement of women covered trafficking in women and girls, the situation of older women in society, the Convention on the

Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, improvement of the status of women in the United Nations system, and follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementations of the Beijing Declaration and the outcome of the Assembly’s twenty-third special session.

Also this morning, the Assembly adopted a seven-part resolution on the rights of the child -- by a vote of 175 in favour, with 2 against (United States and Marshall Islands) (Annex IV) –- expressing its profound concern that the situation of girls and boys in many parts of the world remains critical as a result of the persistence of, among other things, poverty, social inequality, pandemics and disease, armed conflict and exploitation, and its conviction that urgent and effective national and international action is called for.  That text would have the Assembly once again urge States that have not yet done so to sign and ratify or accede to the Convention on the Rights of the Child as a matter of priority.

Deeply concerned about the consequences, including psychological consequences, of Israeli military actions on the present and future well-being of Palestinian children, the Assembly adopted by a vote of 108 in favour to 5 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, United States, Micronesia, Palau), with 60 abstentions, a resolution on the situation of and assistance to Palestinian children (Annex II).  The Assembly demanded that Israel, the occupying Power, respect the relevant provisions of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and comply fully with the provisions of the Fourth Geneva Convention, in order to ensure the well-being and protection of Palestinian children and their families.

Under the terms of a resolution adopted without a vote, the Assembly expressed its concern about the discrimination against the girl child and violation of her rights, which often resulted in less access to education, nutrition and physical and mental health care.  It stressed the need for the full and urgent implementation of the rights of the girl child as guaranteed her and urged all States to institute legal reforms to ensure the full and equal enjoyment by girls of all human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Before the text was adopted as a whole operative paragraph 1, which stresses the need for full and urgent implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), was retained by a vote of 168 in favour to 2 against (United States, Marshall Islands) with 1 abstention (Israel) (Annex III).

When the Assembly turned to matters related to the right of peoples to self determination, it adopted a resolution on use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right to self-determination by a vote of 124 in favour to 21 against with 34 abstentions (Annex VIII).  By the terms of that text, the Assembly urged all States to take legislative measures to ensure that their territories and other territories under their control, as well as their nationals, are not used for the recruitment, assembly, financing, training and transit of mercenaries for the planning of activities designed to impede the right of peoples to self-determination or to destabilize or overthrow the Government of any State.

A resolution on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination was adopted by a vote of 172 in favour to 4 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, United States, Palau), with 3 abstentions (Tonga, Micronesia, Vanuatu) (Annex IX)

A text on the universal right of peoples to self-determination, by which the Assembly expressed its grave concern that millions of people have been and are being uprooted from their homes as refugees and displaced persons, and emphasized the need for concerted international action to alleviate their condition, was adopted without a vote.

In addition to the text concerning Iraq, the Third Committee also forwarded to the Assembly several country-specific resolutions, which referred to the human rights situations in various nations.  The Assembly subsequently approved resolutions on the situation of human rights in Afghanistan, Cambodia and Myanmar without a vote.  The text on the human rights situation in Sudan was approved by a vote of 80 in favour to 62 against, with 33 abstentions (Annex XXIX).

Encouraging the Congolese parties to use the present momentum to promote an all-inclusive conclusion to the inter-Congolese dialogue, the Assembly adopted a resolution on the human rights situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo by a vote of 92 in favour to 2 against (Uganda, Rwanda) with 81 abstentions (Annex XXXVI).  The text would also have the Assembly express its concern regarding breaches of freedom of expression and other violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms and international humanitarian law, primarily in the eastern part of the country.

Prior to that, an operative paragraph welcoming the Democratic Republic of the Congo's ratification of the Statute of the ICC was retained by a vote of 136 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 30 abstentions (Annex XXXV).

In a series of decisions related to the Programme of Activities of the International decade of the World’s Indigenous People, the Assembly this morning requested the Secretary-General to appoint a secretariat unit within the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) to assist the newly inaugurated Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in carrying out its mandate.

The Assembly also requested the Secretary-General to establish a voluntary fund for the Forum in order to support the implementation of recommendations made by the Forum through the Economic and Social Council, and further authorized an exceptional three-day pre-sessional meeting of the members of the Forum from 7 to 9 May 2003.  The programme budgetary implications of that text were also approved without a vote, as was the related text on the International Decade of the World's Indigenous People.

All the texts on matters related to social development and the world social situation were adopted without a vote, including those on implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the Assembly; the preparations for and observance of the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family; promoting youth employment; follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing, and on United Nations Literacy Decade:  Education for All.

Turning to matters related to crime prevention, criminal justice and international drug control, the Assembly unanimously adopted six resolutions.  By one of those texts the Assembly decided to hold a high-level political conference for the signing of the United Nations convention against corruption in Mexico by the end of 2003, when the elaboration of the instrument is expected to be completed.                         

By another draft approved today on preparations for the Eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and the Treatment of Offenders, the Assembly decided that the main theme for the Congress -- set for 2005 -- would be “Synergies and responses:  strategic alliances in crime prevention and criminal justice”.  It also accepted the offer of the Government of Thailand to host the Congress and requested the Secretary-General to initiate consultations with that Government.

Texts were adopted today on international cooperation in the fight against transnational organized crime; on follow-up to the plans of action for implementation of the Vienna Declaration on Crime and Justice; on the United Nations African Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders (UNIAFRI); and on strengthening the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity, and on International cooperation against the world drug problem.

The Assembly also adopted the resolution contained in the report of the Ad Hoc Committee on a comprehensive and integral international convention to promote and protect the rights and dignity of persons with disabilities (document A/57/357), thus deciding that the Ad Hoc Committee should hold, within existing resources, at least one meeting in 2003 of a duration of ten working days, prior to the Assembly’s fifty-eighth session.

The Assembly also approved the Third Committee’s draft biennial programme of work for 2003-2004, and in a series of decisions, took note of the relevant reports that had been before the Committee during its 2002 session.

Background

The General Assembly met this morning to take action on the reports of the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural).  The reports contain draft resolutions and decisions on a number of matters under the Committee’s purview, including social development, crime prevention and criminal justice, the advancement of women, the rights of children, indigenous persons, the rights to self-determination and questions related to human rights.

Implementation of Outcome of World Summit for Social Development

and of Twenty-fourth Special Session of General Assembly

The Assembly would consider the draft text included in the report on the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development (document A/57/544).

By the terms of the relevant text, the General Assembly would call for the speedy implementation of the goals and commitments contained in the outcomes of the World Summit for Social Development and the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly.

Social Development, Including Questions Related to World Social Situation

The Assembly would then consider the three draft texts included in the report on social development, including questions relating to youth, ageing, disabled persons and the family (document A/57/545).

By draft I, on the preparations for and observance of the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family, approved on 22 October, the Assembly would decide that major activities for the tenth anniversary in 2004 should be concentrated at the local, national and regional levels.  It would also call for a concerted promotional, informational and media campaign on behalf of the anniversary and call upon the United Nations and its agencies and funds as well as family oriented organizations from civil society to make every possible effort towards the implementation of the objectives of the anniversary by inserting the family perspective into planning and decision-making processes.

Draft resolution II, on promoting youth employment would have the Assembly encourage Member States to prepare national reviews and action plans on youth employment and to involve youth organizations and young people in the process of the high-level panel of the Secretary-General’s Youth Employment Network.  The text would also have the Assembly invite, within the context of the Youth Employment Network, the International Labour Organization in collaboration with other relevant specialized agencies, to assist and support the efforts of governments in the elaboration of national reviews and action plans, and to undertake a global analysis and evaluation of process made in this regard.

Draft resolution III, on the United Nations Literacy Decade:  Education

for All would have the Assembly appeal to all governments to reinforce political will, mobilize adequate national resources, develop more inclusive policy-making environments and devise innovative strategies for reaching the poorest and most marginalized groups and for seeking alternative formal and non-formal approaches to learning with a view to achieving the goals of the decade.  The Assembly would also urge all governments to take the lead in coordinating Decade activities at the national level, bringing all relevant national actors together in a sustained dialogue on policy formulation, implementation and evaluation of literacy efforts.

A draft decision is also contained in the report, which recommends that the Assembly take note of the Secretary-General’s report on the preparations for the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family in 2004 (document A/57/139 and Corr.1), as well as his report on the International Year of Volunteers (document A/57/352).

Follow-up to International Year of Older Persons:  Second World Assembly

on Ageing

The Assembly would next consider the Third Committee’s report on follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing (document A/57/546) which contains one draft resolution.

Approved 17 October, the draft resolution on the follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing, would have the Assembly recognize that the evolving process of global ageing should be integrated within the larger process of development and call upon governments to promote institutional follow-up to the Madrid Plan of Action, including the establishment of agencies and national committees on ageing.  The Assembly would also request the Secretary-General to allocate sufficient human and financial resources for the programme on ageing, including the establishment of a new professional post, to make it possible for the programme to effectively fulfil its task.

Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice

The Assembly would also consider the six draft resolutions and one draft decision contained in the Third Committee's report on crime prevention and criminal justice (document A/57/547).

Draft resolution I concerns international cooperation in the fight against transnational organized crime:  assistance to States in capacity-building with a view to facilitating the implementation of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the protocols thereto.  By that text, the Assembly would reaffirm that the adoption of the Convention and its protocols would be a significant development in international criminal law, and that they constitute important instruments for effective cooperation against transnational organized crime.  The Assembly would also request the Secretary-General to continue to provide the Centre for International Crime Prevention with the resources for the entry into force and implementation of the Convention and its Protocols.

Draft resolution II, on a high-level political conference for the purpose of signing the United Nations Convention against Corruption, would have the Assembly, mindful that negotiations on the draft convention are continuing in Vienna, decide to convene a high-level political conference in Mexico by the end of 2003.  The Assembly would, therefore, urge the Negotiating Committee to endeavour to complete its work by the end of 2003.

Draft resolution III addresses the follow-up to the plans of action for implementing the Vienna Declaration on Crime and Justice:  Meeting the Challenges of the Twenty-first Century.  That text would have the Assembly invite governments and relevant intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to consider carefully and use the plans of action as guidance for formulating legislation, policies and programmes in the field of crime prevention and criminal justice at the national and international levels.

Draft resolution IV,on preparations for the Eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justicewould have the Assembly decide that the main theme for the Congress would be “Synergies and responses:  strategic alliances in crime prevention and criminal justice”.  The Assembly would also suggest topics to be considered during the plenary of the Congress, including “effective measures against transnational organized crime”, “economic and financial crimes:  challenges to sustainable development” and “corruption:  threats and trends in the twenty-first century”.  It would also suggest issues to be considered in the workshops within the framework of the Eleventh Congress, including “human rights in criminal justice”, “cross-border law enforcement cooperation”, and “measures against money laundering”.

By draft resolution V on the United Nations African Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders (UNAFRI), the Assembly would urge States members of the Institute to make every possible effort to meet their obligations to the Institute; call upon all Member States and non-governmental organizations to adopt concrete practical measures to support the Institute in the development of the requisite capacity and implement its programmes and activities aimed at strengthening crime prevention and criminal justice systems in Africa.  The text would also have the Assembly request the Secretary-General to continue to mobilize the financial resources necessary to maintain the Institute with the core professional staff required to enable it to function effectively.

Draft resolution VI, on strengthening the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity, would have the Assembly urge States and relevant international organizations to develop regional and international strategies and other necessary measures which complement the work of the Programme in effectively addressing the significant problems posed by the smuggling of migrants and trafficking in persons.  It would also reaffirm the importance of completing the work of the Ad Hoc Committee for the Negotiation of a Convention against Corruption, and would urge the Committee to endeavour to finish its work by 2003.

The draft decision recommends that the Assembly take note of the reports of the Secretary-General on preparations for the Eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (document A/57/154) and on the prevention of corrupt practices and transfer of funds of illicit origin (document A/57/158 and Add.1 and 2).

International Drug Control

The Assembly would then take up the Third Committee's report on international drug control (document A/57/548), which contains one draft resolution.

By that text, on international cooperation against the world drug problem, the Assembly would express its grave concern that the drug problem is still a challenge of global dimensions, despite increasing efforts by States and international organizations.  The Assembly, deeply alarmed by the violence and economic power of criminal organizations and terrorist groups engaged in drug-trafficking and other criminal activities, would urge competent authorities, at regional, national and international levels, to implement the outcome of its twentieth special session within agreed time-frames.

Advancement of Women

The Assembly would then take up the Third Committee's report on the advancement of women, containing six draft resolutions (document A/57/549).

By draft resolution I, on the future operations of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW), the text would have the Assembly endorse the recommendations of the working group on the Institute’s future operations and decide to link the Institute to the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) of the United Nations Secretariat.  The Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs would have direct responsibility for the Institute.  The draft would also have the Assembly decide to establish a liaison unit of the Institute within DESA, create the post of Deputy Director with specific fund-raising responsibilities, and allocate some $500,000 from the regular budget to finance the Institute’s core budget.

Draft resolution II, on trafficking in women and girls would have the Assembly urge governments to take appropriate measures to address the root factors that encourage trafficking in women and girls for prostitution and other forms of commercialized sex, forced marriages and forced labour.  Governments would also be urged to strengthen existing legislation with a view to providing better protection of the rights of women and girls and to punishing perpetrators, through both criminal and civil measures.

The text would have the Assembly call upon all governments to criminalize trafficking in women and children, and to condemn and penalize all those offenders involved, including intermediaries, while ensuring that the victims of those practices were not penalized.  It would call upon governments to take steps to ensure that the treatment of victims of trafficking is applied with full respect for the human rights of those victims and is consistent with internationally recognized principles of non-discrimination.

Draft resolution III, on the situation of older women in society would have the Assembly urge governments to take measures to enable all older women to be actively engaged in all aspects of life by assuming a variety of roles in communities, public life and decision-making.  Governments would also be urged to develop and implement policies and programmes in cooperation with civil society to ensure that older women could achieve their full enjoyment of human rights and quality of life, with a view to contributing to the realization of a society for all ages.

Under draft resolution IV, on the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women, the Assembly would express its concern at the great number of reports that are overdue and continue to be overdue, in particular initial reports, which constitutes an obstacle to the full implementation of the Convention.  The draft would also have the Assembly encourage the Secretariat to extend further technical assistance to States to contribute to those efforts.

Draft resolution V, on the elimination of crimes against women committed in the name of honour would have the Assembly call upon all States to continue to intensify efforts to prevent and eliminate crimes against women committed in the name of honour by using legislative, administrative and programmatic measures to investigate promptly and thoroughly, prosecute effectively and document cases of crimes against women committed in the name of honour and punish the perpetrators.  States would also be urged to encourage the efforts of the media to engage in awareness-raising campaigns and to establish, strengthen or facilitate support services to respond to the needs of actual and potential victims by providing for them the appropriate protection.

Draft resolution VI, on the improvement of the status of women in the United Nations system would have the Assembly express its regret that the goal of    50/50 gender distribution was not met by the end of 2000, and urge the Secretary-General to redouble his efforts to realize significant progress towards that goal.  The text would further have the Assembly strongly encourage Member States to, among other things, support United Nations efforts to achieve the goal of     50/50 gender distribution, identify women candidates for assignment in peacekeeping missions, and identify and nominate more women candidates for appointment or election as judges or as other senior officials in international courts or tribunals.

The draft decision recommends that the Assembly take note of a note by the Secretary-General on the situation of INSTRAW (document A/57/129-E/2002/77).

The Assembly would then take up the Third Committee's report on the Implementation of the outcome of the Fourth World Conference on Women and of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, entitled "Women 2000: gender equality, development and peace for the twenty-first century (document A/57/550), which contains two draft resolutions.

Under draft resolution I, on the elimination of all forms of violence against women, including crimes identified in the outcome document of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, entitled “Women 2000:  gender equality, development and peace for the twenty-first century”, the text would have the Assembly call upon States to fulfil their obligations under the relevant human rights instruments and implement the Beijing Platform for Action as well as the outcome of the special session.

Further, the Assembly would also express deep concern at the persistence of various forms of violence against women and girls, especially all forms of commercial sexual exploitation, as well as economic exploitation, including trafficking in women and children, female infanticide, crimes committed in the name of honour, crimes committed in the name of passion, racially motivated crimes, the abduction and sale of children, dowry-related violence and death, acid attacks and harmful traditional or customary practices, such as female genital mutilation and early enforced marriages.

Draft resolution II, on the follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly had been submitted by the Chairman on the basis of informal consultations.  By that text, the Assembly would recognize that sustained political will and commitment at the national, regional and international levels are essential elements for the full and accelerated implementation of the Beijing Action Plan and the outcome of “Women 2000”.  It would also have the Assembly call upon governments to continue to integrate a gender perspective in the implementation and follow-up to recent United Nations conferences, summits and special sessions, and in future reports on the subject.

Report of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

The Assembly would next take up the five draft resolutions contained in the Committee's report on the activities of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/57/551).

Under draft resolution I, on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, the text would have the Assembly call upon States and other parties to armed conflict to observe scrupulously the letter and the spirit of international humanitarian law, bearing in mind that armed conflict was one of the principal causes of forced displacement in Africa.  It would also appeal to the international community to respond positively to the third country resettlement requests of African refugees.

Draft resolution II, on the new international humanitarian order would have the Assembly invite governments to provide the expertise and resources to identity the building blocks of such an order, to strengthen the early warning system at the national and international levels, to ensure the adequate preparedness for the prevention or containment of humanitarian crises and to take necessary additional measures in addition to ongoing measures.

Draft resolution III, on the enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees would have the Assembly decide to increase the number of members of the Executive Committee from 61 to 64 States, and would request the Economic and Social Council to elect the additional members at its resumed organizational session for 2003.

Draft resolution IV, on the continuation of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees would have the Assembly recognize the need for concerted international action and would decide to continue the Office for a further period of five years from 1 January 2004.  It would also have the Assembly decide, no later than its sixty-second session, the arrangements for the Office with a view to determining whether the Office should be continued beyond

31 December 2008.

Draft resolution V, on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, would have the Assembly welcome the important work undertaken by the Office.  The draft would have the Assembly strongly urge States and relevant non-governmental organizations, in conjunction with the Office to cooperate and to mobilize resources with a view towards enhancing the capacity of countries, and reducing the heavy burden borne by those that have received large numbers of refugees and asylum seekers.

Promotion and Protection of Children’s Rights

The Assembly was also expected to take up the Third Committee's report on the protection and promotion of the rights of children (document A/57/552), which contains three draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Draft resolution I, on the situation of and assistance to Palestinian children would have the Assembly express its condemnation of all acts of violence resulting in extensive loss of human life and injuries, including among Palestinian children.  It would also have the Assembly express its deep concern about the consequences, including psychological consequences, of Israeli military actions on the present and future well-being of Palestinian children.  The draft would have the Assembly demand that Israel, the occupying Power, respect the relevant provisions of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and comply fully with the provisions of the Fourth Geneva Convention, in order to ensure the well-being and protection of Palestinian children and their families.

Under draft resolution II, on the girl child, the text would have the Assembly express its concern about the discrimination against the girl child and violation of her rights, which often resulted in less access to education, nutrition and physical and mental health care.  The Assembly would also stress the need for the full and urgent implementation of the rights of the girl child as guaranteed her under all human rights instruments and urge all States to take all necessary measures and to institute legal reforms to ensure the full and equal enjoyment by girls of all human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Omnibus draft resolution III, on the rights of the child would have the Assembly urge States that have not yet done so to sign and ratify or accede to the Convention on the Rights of the Child as a matter of priority with a view to reaching the goal of universal adherence as soon as possible.  A section on protection and promotion of the rights of children would have the Assembly call upon States to take all appropriate measures to prevent, and protect children from, all forms of violence, including physical, mental and sexual violence, torture, child abuse, abuse by police and officials in detention centres or welfare institutions.

There is a section on the rights of children in particularly vulnerable situations and non-discrimination against children, which includes the plight of children working and/or living on the streets, refugee and internally displaced children, children with disabilities, and migrant children.  By the terms of the text, the Assembly would call upon all States and parties to conflict to give urgent attention to the fact that refugee and internally displaced children were particularly exposed to risks in connection with armed conflict.

In a section on the prevention and eradication of the sale of children and of their sexual exploitation and abuse, including child prostitution and child pornography, the Assembly would call upon States to enact, enforce, review and revise laws and to implement policies, programmes and practices to protect children from and to eliminate all forms of sexual exploitation and abuse, including commercial sexual exploitation, taking into account the particular problems posed by the use of the Internet in this regard.

The attention of the Assembly is drawn to the protection of children affected by armed conflict, through provisions which would have it condemn the abduction of children in situations of armed conflict and into armed conflict, and called upon all parties to such conflict to ensure that children affected by it receive timely, effective and unhindered humanitarian assistance.  Further to a section on the progressive elimination of child labour, the Assembly would call upon States to strengthen cooperation and coordination at the national and international levels to address effectively the problem of child labour.  Finally, the Assembly would decide to request the Secretary-General to prepare a report on progress achieved in realizing the commitments set out in the twenty-seventh special session of the Assembly, entitled "A World Fit for Children".

In the draft decision included in the report, the Assembly was recommended to take note of the report of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the report of the Secretary-General on the status of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Programme of Activities of International Decade of World's Indigenous People

Under this item, there is a report containing three draft resolutions and one Chairman's draft decision (document A/57/553). 

Draft resolution I, on the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues would have the Assembly request the Secretary-General to appoint a secretariat unit, to assist the Forum in carrying out its mandate; and to establish a voluntary fund for the Forum for the purpose of funding the implementation of recommendations made by the Forum through the Economic and Social Council.  By the terms of the text, the Assembly would urge governments, financial institutions and other intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to consider contributing to the voluntary fund for the Forum to be established by the Secretary-General and would decide to authorize an exceptional three-day pre-sessional meeting of the members of the Forum from 7 to 9 May 2003.

Draft resolution II, on the International Decade of the World's Indigenous People would have the Assembly request the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to give due regard to the dissemination of information on the situation, cultures, languages, rights and aspirations of indigenous people, and to consider the possibility of organizing projects, special events, exhibitions and other activities addressed to the public, in particular to young people.  Further to the text, the Assembly would encourage governments to support the Decade by:  seeking means, in consultation with indigenous people, of giving indigenous people greater responsibility for their own affairs and an effective voice in decisions on matters that affect them; and in establishing national committees or other mechanisms involving indigenous people to ensure that the objectives and activities of the Decade are planned and implemented on the basis of full partnership with indigenous people.  

Draft resolution III, on indigenous people and issues would have the Assembly invite the Secretary-General to establish, within the framework of the secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, the post of Special Adviser in order to provide independent advice and substantive assistance to the secretariat in carrying out its mandate in a successful manner.

The report also contains a draft decision proposed by the Chairman which would recommend to the Assembly that it take note of the report of the Secretary-General on the status of the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Populations (document A/57/296).

Elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination

Next, the Assembly would take up the report on the Elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination (document A/57/554) which contains two draft resolutions and one decision.

Draft resolution I, on the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination would have the Assembly call upon States parties to fulfil their obligation, under paragraph 1 of article 9 of the Convention, to submit their periodic reports on measures taken to implement the Convention in due time.  Concerning the financial situation of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to continue to ensure adequate financial arrangements and to provide the necessary support, including an adequate level of Secretariat assistance, in order to ensure the functioning of the Committee and to enable it to cope with its increasing amount of work.

Draft resolution II concerns the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance.  [At its sixtieth meeting on 25 November, the representative of Venezuela introduced a revised text of the draft, entitled "the fight against racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action", which was circulated as an informal paper.]

The draft would have the Assembly call upon all States resolutely to bring to justice the perpetrators of crimes motivated by racism and xenophobia, and call upon those that have not yet done so to consider including in their legislation racist and xenophobic motivation as an aggravating factor for the purposes of sentencing.  States would also be called upon to review and revise, where necessary, their immigration laws and policies and practices so that they were free from racial discrimination.  Further, the text would have the Assembly call upon States to formulate and implement without delay at the national, regional and international levels policies and plans of action to combat racism.  The Assembly would also decide to proclaim 2004 the International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition. 

The report contains a draft decision which would recommend that the Assembly take note of the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance (document A/57/443).

Right of Peoples to Self-determination

Under the item self-determination, the Assembly has before it a report containing three texts (document A/57/555).

Draft resolution I, on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination would have the Assembly urge all States to take the necessary steps and to exercise the utmost vigilance against the menace posed by the activities of mercenaries.  States would also be urged to take legislative measures to ensure that their territories and other territories under their control, as well as their nationals, are not used for the recruitment, assembly, financing, training and transit of mercenaries for the planning of activities designed to impede the right of peoples to self-determination, to destabilize or overthrow the government of any State or to dismember or impair, totally or in part, the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States conducting themselves in compliance with the rights of peoples to self-determination. 

Draft resolution II, on the universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination would have the Assembly express its deep concern at the acts or threats of military intervention and occupation that are threatening to suppress, or have already suppressed the rights of self-determination of peoples or nations.  It would also have the Assembly express its grave concern that as a consequence of the persistence of such actions, millions of people have been and are being uprooted from their homes as refugees and displaced persons, and emphasize the need for concerted international action to alleviate their condition.

Draft resolution III on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination would have the Assembly reaffirm the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, including the right to their independent State of Palestine and urge all States and the specialized agencies and organizations of the United Nations system to continue to support and assist the Palestinian people in the early realization of their right to self-determination. 

Human Rights Questions

Under this item, the Assembly would consider a report (document A/57/556), which contains a list of the relevant reports considered by the Committee during the 2002 substantive session, as well as a draft decision recommending that it take note of those reports as well as those considered under sub-items on the implementation of human rights instruments; alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms; report of special rapporteurs and representatives; and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action. 

Implementation of Human Rights Instruments

The Assembly would take up the four draft resolutions contained in the Committee's report on human rights questions:  implementation of human rights instruments (document A/57/556/Add.1).

By draft resolution I, on the optional protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, the text would have the Assembly adopt the optional protocol and request the Secretary-General to open it for signature, ratification and accession at United Nations Headquarters in New York from 1 January 2003. 

The draft includes an Annex, which contains the full text of the optional protocol.  Article One states the protocol’s objective:  to establish a system of regular visits undertaken by independent international and national bodies to places where people are deprived of their liberty, in order to prevent torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.  The protocol will have no procedure for reservations by States parties.

Article Two of the draft protocol establishes a Subcommittee on Prevention to carry out, within the framework of the Charter and in cooperation with States parties to the Convention, the functions laid down by the protocol.  Article Five details the Subcommittee’s structure.  That body will initially consist of

10 members, but at the fiftieth ratification or accession to the protocol, the number will increase to 25.  Due consideration will be given to equitable geographic distribution and to the representation of different forms of civilization and legal systems of States parties among members who should be persons of high moral character, having proven professional experience in the field of the administration of justice. 

Each State party may nominate up to two candidates (Article Six). Article Eleven of the draft protocol details the Subcommittee’s mandate.  Accordingly, that body should visit places of detention and make recommendations concerning the protection of detainees from torture or other cruel and degrading punishment.  It should also maintain direct, and if necessary confidential, contact with national preventive mechanisms and offer them training and technical assistance to help strengthen their capacities.

Article Thirteen describes the visiting procedures of the Subcommittee, and Article Fourteen details the obligations of States parties under those procedures including that those parties shall agree to unrestricted access to all information concerning the number of persons held in detention, as well as to information on their treatment.  It states that objection to a visit could be made only on the urgent and compelling grounds of national defence, public safety, natural disaster or serious disorder which would temporary prevent such a visit.  The existence of a declaration of a state of emergency as such shall not be invoked as a reason to object to a visit.

Articles Twenty-five and Twenty-six detail the financial provisions of the Subcommittee, noting that expenditures incurred in implementation of the protocol shall be borne by the United Nations, and that a Special Fund shall be set up to help finance the implementation of the Subcommittee’s recommendations.  

Draft resolution II on torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, would have the Assembly urge governments to take effective measures to provide redress and to prevent torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, including their gender-based manifestations.  The Assembly would also call upon States to take appropriate, effective legislative, administrative, judicial or other measures to prevent and prohibit the production, trade, export and use of equipment that is specifically designed to inflict torture.  The text would also have the Assembly request the Secretary-General to ensure, within the overall budgetary framework of the United Nations, the provision of adequate staff and facilities for the bodies and mechanisms involved in combating torture and assisting victims of torture, commensurate with the strong support expressed by Member States for combating torture and assisting victims of torture.  

Draft resolution III, on the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families would have the Assembly call upon Member States that have not yet ratified the Convention to consider urgently signing and ratifying or acceding to it.  The text would also have the Assembly request the Secretary-General to make all necessary provisions for the timely establishment of the Committee on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, as soon as the Convention enters into force.

Draft resolution IV, on the effective implementation of international instruments on human rights, including reporting obligations under international instruments on human rights, would have the Assembly call upon the Office of the High Commissioner to enhance awareness of the availability of technical assistance for States parties and urge States parties to make every effort to meet their reporting obligations.  The text would also have the Assembly urge each State party whose report had been examined by a human rights treaty body to translate, publish and make available in its territory the full text of the concluding observations and comments of the treaty body on its report and to provide adequate follow-up to those observations. 

Human Rights Questions

The Assembly would then take up the Committee's human rights report on alternative approaches for improving effective enjoyment of human rights fundamental freedoms (document A/57/556/Add.2), which contains 27 draft resolutions and one draft decision. 

Draft resolution I concerns the strengthening of United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity.  By its terms the Assembly would call upon States to base their activities for the promotion and protection of human rights on the United Nations Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and other relevant international instruments, and to refrain from activities that were inconsistent with that international framework. 

By the terms of draft resolution II, on human rights and cultural diversity, the Assembly would urge States to ensure that their political and legal systems reflected the multicultural diversity within their societies.  It would also have the Assembly affirm that intellectual dialogue essentially enriches the understanding of human rights and that the benefits to be derived from encouraging and developing international contacts and cooperation in the cultural fields are important. 

Draft resolution III, on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights, would have the Assembly call upon Member States, relevant United Nations agencies, intergovernmental organizations and civil society to promote equitable and environmentally sustainable economic growth for managing globalization so that poverty was systematically reduced and the international development targets met.  The Assembly would also express its deep concern that the widening gap between developed and developing countries has contributed to, among other things, deepening poverty and has adversely affected the full enjoyment of all human rights, particularly in developing countries.

Draft resolution IV, on human rights education, would have the Assembly express its conviction that human rights education and information contribute to the concept of development consistent with the dignity of women and men of all ages, which takes into account particularly vulnerable segments of society such as children, youth, older persons, indigenous people, minorities, rural and urban poor, migrant workers, refugees, persons with disabilities and persons with HIV/AIDS.

By the terms of draft resolution V, on missing persons, the Assembly would call upon States which were parties to an armed conflict to take immediate steps to determine the identity and fate of persons reported missing and request States to pay the utmost attention to cases of children reported missing.  It would also recognize that great technological progress has been pioneered in the field of DNA forensic sciences, which could significantly improve efforts to identify missing persons in conflict areas around the world.

Draft resolution VI, on the elimination of all forms of religious intolerance, would have the Assembly urge States to take all necessary action to combat hatred, intolerance, intimidation and acts of violence based on religion or belief.

Draft resolution VII, on the Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, often referred to as the draft on "human rights defenders", would have the Assembly express its grave concern regarding human rights violations committed against persons engaged in promoting and defending human rights around the world.  That text would have the Assembly condemn all human rights violations committed against human rights defenders and urge States to take all appropriate action, consistent with the Declaration and all other human rights instruments, to eliminate such violations.

By the terms of draft resolution VIII, on regional arrangements for the promotion and protection of human rights, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to continue to strengthen exchanges between the United Nations and regional intergovernmental organizations dealing with human rights and to make available adequate resources from within the regular budget, for technical cooperation, to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to promote regional arrangements.

Draft resolution IX, on extreme poverty would have the Assembly recognize that the eradication of poverty is a major challenge for the enjoyment of human rights within the process of globalization.  It would reaffirm that since the existence of widespread poverty inhibits the full and effective enjoyment of those rights, and might, in some situations, constitute a threat to the right to life, immediate alleviation and eventual eradication of poverty must remain a high priority for the international community.

Draft resolution X, on the United Nations Decade for Human Rights Education, 1994-2004 would have the Assembly urge all governments to contribute further to the implementation of the Decade's Action Plan, by, in particular, initiating and developing cultural and educational programmes aimed at countering racism, racial discrimination and xenophobia, as emphasized at the Durban World Conference against Racism.

Under the terms of draft resolution XI, on the promotion of a democratic and equitable international order, the Assembly would urge all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on inclusion, justice, equality and equity, human dignity, mutual understanding and promotion of and respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights, and reject doctrines of exclusion based on racism, racial discrimination and xenophobia.

Draft resolution XII, on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions would have the Assembly express its dismay that, in a number of countries, impunity continues to prevail and often remains the main cause of continuing occurrences of extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions.  The Assembly would, therefore, demand that all governments ensure that those practices be brought to an end, and that they take effective action to combat and eliminate the phenomenon in all its forms.

Draft resolution XII, on the right to food would have the Assembly urge States to give adequate priority in their development strategies and expenditures to the realization of the right to food.

Draft resolution XIII, on the question of enforced or involuntary disappearances would have the Assembly call upon governments to take steps to ensure that human rights were protected when a state of emergency was introduced, in particular by preventing enforced disappearances.  By the terms of the text, the Assembly would also urge governments concerned to take steps to protect the families of disappeared persons against any intimidation or ill-treatment to which they may be subjected.

Draft resolution XIV, on the promotion of the right of peoples to peace would have the Assembly urge the international community to devote part of the resources made available by the implementation of disarmament and arms limitation agreements to economic and social development, with a view to reducing the ever-widening gap between developed and developing countries, and to promote the realization of human rights for all.

Draft resolution XV concerns the respect for the purposes and principles contained in the Charter of the United Nations to achieve international cooperation in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms and in solving international problems of a humanitarian character.  It would have the Assembly reaffirm that the enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights is essential for the full achievement of the purposes of the Charter and that human rights and fundamental freedoms were the birthright of all human beings.

Draft resolution XVI on the protection of migrants would have the Assembly reiterate the need for all States parties of relevant international conventions to protect fully the universally recognized human rights of migrants, especially women and children, regardless of legal status, and to treat them humanely, in particular with regard to assistance and protection.

Draft resolution XVII on protecting human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism would have the Assembly reaffirm its unequivocal condemnation of all the acts, methods and practices of terrorism as criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivation, wherever and by whomever they were committed.  The text would also have the Assembly call on States to take into account relevant resolutions and decisions on protecting human rights while countering terrorism, and encourage them to consider the recommendations of the special procedures of the Commission on Human Rights.

Draft resolution XVIII, on hostage-taking, would have the General Assembly condemn all acts of hostage-taking, anywhere in the world, and demand that all hostages be released immediately and without any preconditions.  The text expressed concern that, despite the efforts of the international community, acts of hostage-taking in different forms continued to take place at the hands of terrorist groups and had even increased in many regions.

Resolution XIX, on strengthening the rule of law, would have the Assembly express its firm conviction that the rule of law is an essential factor in the protection of human rights and should continue to attract the attention of the international community.  It would have the Assembly encourage the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to continue the dialogue between his Office and other organs and agencies of the United Nations system, taking into account the need to explore new synergies with a view to obtaining increased financial assistance for human rights and the rule of law and promoting inter-agency cooperation.

By the terms of draft resolution XX, on human rights and unilateral coercive measures, the Assembly would urge States to avoid and refrain from such unilateral measures that would impede the full achievement of economic and social development by the population of the affected countries, in particular women and children, that hindered their well-being and created obstacles to the full enjoyment of human rights.

Draft resolution XXI, on the right to development, based on the agreed conclusions of the last session of the Working Group on the Right to Development, held last April in Geneva, would have the Assembly endorse the conclusions of the Working Group and recognize that the realization of the right to development is critical to achieving the objectives, goals and targets of major United Nations conferences, summits and special sessions and those undertaken at the Millennium Assembly.

By the terms of draft resolution XXII, on the enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, the Assembly would urge all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on inclusion, justice, equality and equity, human dignity, mutual understanding and promotion of and respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights.

Under the provision of draft resolution XXIII, on the human rights situation in Cambodia, the Assembly would recognize that the tragic history of Cambodia required special measures to ensure protection of the human rights of all the people of the country and the non-return to policies and practices of the past.  It would urge the Government of Cambodia to expedite the adoption of laws and codes that were essential components of the basic legal framework, including a penal code, a criminal code and a new civil code, and to enhance the training of judges and lawyers.

By the terms of draft resolution XXIV, on the right to food, the Assembly, considering it intolerable that there were around 840 million undernourished people in the world, would urge States to give adequate priority in their development strategies and expenditures to the realization of the right to food.

Draft resolution XXV concerns respect for the right to universal freedom of travel and the vital importance of family reunification.  That text would have the Assembly call upon States to allow the free flow of financial remittances by foreign nationals residing in their territory to their relatives in the country of origin, and also would call upon States to refrain from enacting, and to repeal if it already existed, legislation intended as a coercive measure that discriminated against individuals or groups of legal migrants by adversely affecting family reunification and the right to send financial remittances to relatives in the country of origin.

Draft resolution XXVI, on Khmer Rouge Trials, would have the Assembly request the Secretary-General to resume negotiations, without delay, to conclude an agreement with the Government of Cambodia, based on previous negotiations on the establishment of the Extraordinary Chambers to try those suspected of being responsible for the atrocities committed by the Khmer Rouge.  It would further request the Secretary-General to include in his report recommendations for the efficient and cost-effective operation of the Extraordinary Chambers, including the amount of voluntary contributions of funds, equipment and services to the Extraordinary Chambers through the offer of expert personnel that might be needed from States, intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations.

Draft resolution XXVII, contained in the report of the Ad Hoc Committee on a comprehensive and integral international convention to promote and protect the rights and dignity of persons with disabilities (document A/57/357), is recommended for adoption by the Assembly.  That draft would have the Assembly decide that the Ad Hoc Committee should hold, within existing resources, at least one meeting in 2003 of a duration of 10 working days, prior to the Assembly’s fifty-eighth session.

Under this item, the Assembly will consider a draft decision on the award of human rights prizes in 2003, by which the General Assembly, considering that   2003 would mark the fifty-fifth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and recalling the Assembly’s resolution 2217 (XXI) of 1966, in which it approved the awarding of prizes in the field of human rights, would decide to request the Secretary-General to make the necessary arrangements for the awarding of human rights prizes in a plenary meeting on 10 December 2003.

Human Rights Situations and Reports of Special Rapporteurs

and Representatives  

The Assembly would next take up the Third Committee's report on human rights situations and reports of Special Rapporteurs and Representatives (document A/57/556/Add.3), which contains five draft resolutions.

Under the terms of draft resolution I on the situation of human rights in the Sudan, the Assembly would urge all parties to the conflict to seize the prospect of peace to ensure continued progress in the fields of human rights, democratization and the rule of law.  The Assembly would also express its deep concern at the impact of the ongoing conflict on the situation of human rights and its adverse effects on the civilian population, particularly women, children and internally displaced persons.  The Assembly would further express deep concern at the occurrence of torture and other ill-treatment of civilians, detention without trial and the cruellest forms of corporal punishment, in particular, amputations.  The Assembly would also call upon the Government of the Sudan to comply fully with its obligations under international law, to end impunity for human rights violations and to try perpetrators in accordance with the rule of law.

By draft resolution II, on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, the text would have the Assembly express its grave concern at the ongoing systematic violation of human rights, including civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of the people of Myanmar.  The text of the draft would have the Assembly strongly urge the Government of Myanmar to end the systematic violations of human rights in Myanmar, to end impunity, and to investigate and bring to justice any perpetrators of human rights violations.

By the terms of draft resolution III, on the human rights situation in Iraq, the Assembly would call upon the Government to end all human rights violations and to put a moratorium on all executions, as recommended by the Rapporteur.  The text

also calls upon the Government to cooperate further with international agencies and non-governmental organizations to provide humanitarian assistance and monitoring in the northern and southern areas of the country.

Under draft resolution IV, on the human rights situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Assembly would recall the ceasefire agreement signed at Lusaka, as well as the Kampala disengagement plan and the peace agreement signed at Pretoria, and encourages the Congolese parties to use the present momentum to promote an all-inclusive conclusion to the inter-Congolese dialogue.  The Assembly would also express its concern regarding breaches of freedom of expressions and other violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms and international humanitarian law, primarily in the eastern part of the country.  The text urges all parties to the conflict to cease military activities in the country in order to re-establish the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

By draft resolution V on the human rights situation in Afghanistan, the Assembly would affirm the primary responsibility of the Afghan Transitional Authority, supported by the United Nations, to establish an environment of good governance, democracy and the rule of law.  The text would have the Assembly urge the Transitional Authority, the international community and the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan, to provide the commissions established under the Bonn Agreement.  The text would also have the Assembly urge the Transitional Authority to continue its efforts to re-establish the rule of law, including by ensuring that law enforcement agencies respect and uphold human rights and fundamental freedoms.  Further to the text, the Assembly would also express grave concern about the recent reports of ethnically motivated violence, as well as about recent cases of arbitrary arrest and detention and of summary trials in some areas of the country.

Here, the Assembly will also take up a report of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), which contains a draft decision on the programme budget implications of the text on the human rights situation in Myanmar (document A/57/647).  That decision informs the Assembly that should it adopt that text, additional appropriations would be required for the 2002-2003 programme budget, in the amount of $163,000, under section 3, “Political Affairs”, and an amount of $65,200 under section 32, “staff assessment” -– offset by some $65,200 under income section 1, “income from staff assessment”. 

Comprehensive Implementation of and Follow-up to Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action

The Assembly will then consider a report on follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action (document A/57/556/Add.4), which contains a draft decision on the commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the World Conference on Human Rights in 2003.

Report of High Commissioner for Human Rights

The Third Committee’s report under this item (document A/57/556/Add.5) notes that the High Commissioner addressed delegations on 4 November.  This year, no action was taken under this sub-item.

Follow-up to Outcome of Special Session on Children

Also before the Assembly is the Third Committee’s report on the follow-up to the special session on children (document A/57/557), which details delegations’ relevant discussions during the 2002 substantive session.  This year, no action was taken on this item.

Report of Economic and Social Council

The Assembly finally would consider the report of the Economic and Social Council, which contains two draft decisions.

Draft decision I would recommend that the Assembly adopt the organization of work of the Third Committee and draft biennial programme of work of the Committee for 2003-2004.

Draft decision II would recommend that the Assembly take note of Chapters I, III, IV, V, VII (sections A, B, C and I) and IX of the report of the Economic and Social Council (document A/57/3/Rev.1).

Introduction of Reports

OKSANA BOIKO (Ukraine), Rapporteur of the Third Committee, introduced the reports before the Assembly.  The reports contained draft resolutions and decisions on a number of matters under the Committee’s purview, including social development, crime prevention and criminal justice, the advancement of women, the rights of children, indigenous persons, the rights to self-determination and questions related to human rights.

Action on Texts

The Assembly first took up the report on implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly (document A/57/544), which contained one resolution.  That text was adopted without a vote.

Next, the Assembly took up the report on social development, including questions related to the world social situation, and the three resolutions and one decision included therein (document A/57/545).

The Assembly adopted draft resolution I, on the preparations for and observance of the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family, without a vote.

It also adopted the report’s other two texts; draft resolution II, on promoting youth employment, and draft resolution III, on the United Nations Literacy Decade:  Education for All, respectively, without a vote.

The draft decision recommending that the Assembly take note of the Secretary-General’s report on the preparations for the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family in 2004 (document A/57/139 and Corr.1), as well as his report on the International Year of Volunteers (document A/57/352) was also approved without a vote.

The Assembly next considered the Third Committee’s report on follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing (document A/57/546), which contains one draft resolution.  That text was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly next considered the six draft resolutions and one draft decision contained in the Third Committee's report on crime prevention and criminal justice (document A/57/547).

Draft Resolution I, on the international cooperation in the fight against transnational organized crime:  assistance to States in capacity-building with a view to facilitating the implementation of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the protocols thereto, was adopted without a vote, as was draft text II, on a high-level political conference for the purpose of signing the United Nations convention against corruption.

Draft Resolution III, on the follow-up to the plans of action for implementation of the Vienna Declaration on Crime and Justice:  Meeting the Challenges of the Twenty-first Century, was adopted without a vote, as was draft text IVon preparations for the Eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice.

Draft Resolution V, on the United Nations African Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders (UNAFRI) was also approved without a vote.  And Draft Resolution VI, on strengthening the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity, was also unanimously adopted.

The Assembly then approved the draft decision recommending that it take note of the reports of the Secretary-General on preparations for the Eleventh United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (document A/57/154) and on the prevention of corrupt practices and transfer of funds of illicit origin (document A/57/158 and Add.1 and Add.2)

The Assembly next took up the Third Committee's report on international drug control (document A/57/548), and adopted without a vote the one text therein, on international cooperation against the world drug problem.

The Assembly then took up the Third Committee's report on the advancement of women, which contained six draft resolutions and one draft decision (document A/57/549).

Resolution I, on the future operations of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW), was adopted by a recorded vote of 136 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, Netherlands, Republic of Korea, United States), with 29 abstentions (Annex I).

Resolution II, on trafficking in women and girls, and Resolution III, on the situation of older women in society, were adopted without a vote.

Resolution IV, on the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women, and Resolution V, on working towards the elimination of crimes against women committed in the name of honour, were also adopted without a vote.

Resolution VI, on the improvement of the status of women in the United Nations system, was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly approved the draft decision recommending that it take note of a note by the Secretary-General on the situation of INSTRAW (document A/57/129-E/2002/77).

The Assembly then considered the report on implementation of the outcome of the Fourth World Conference on Women and of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, entitled "Women 2000:  gender equality, development and peace for the twenty-first century” (document A/57/550), which contained two draft resolutions.

Both texts -- resolution I, on the elimination of all forms of violence against women, including crimes identified in the outcome document of the twenty-third special session on the General Assembly, entitled “Women 2000:  gender equality, development and peace for the twenty-first century”, and resolution II, on the follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of “Women  2000” –- were adopted without a vote.

The Assembly next took up the five draft resolutions contained in the Committee's report on the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/57/551).

Resolution I, on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, was adopted without a vote, as were text II, the new international humanitarian order, and text III, on the enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. 

Resolution IV, on the continuation of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, was also adopted without a vote.

Resolution V, on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, was also adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then took up the report on the protection and promotion of the rights of children (document A/57/552), which contained three draft resolutions and one draft decision.

Resolution I, on the situation of and assistance to Palestinian children, was adopted by a vote of 108 in favour to 5 against (United States, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia and Palau), with 60 abstentions (Annex II).

The Assembly then took up Resolution II, on the girl child.  Before action was taken on the text as a whole, operative paragraph 1, which stresses the need for full and urgent implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) Convention, was retained by a vote of 168 in favour to 2 against (United States, Marshall Islands), with 1 abstention (Israel) (Annex III).

The text as a whole was then adopted without a vote.

Resolution III, on the rights of the child, was adopted by a vote of 175 in favour to 2 against (United States, Marshall Islands) (Annex IV).

The Assembly adopted the draft decision included in the report recommending that it take note of the report of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the report of the Secretary-General on the status of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. 

Turning next to the report on the programme of activities of the International Decade of the World's Indigenous People (document A/57/553), the Assembly took up the three draft resolutions and one draft decision contained therein. 

Draft Resolution I, on the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues was adopted without a vote.

Draft Resolution II, on the International Decade of the World's Indigenous People, was adopted without a vote.  

Draft Resolution III, on indigenous people and issues, would have the Assembly invite the Secretary-General to establish, within the framework of the secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, the post of Special Adviser, in order to provide independent advice and substantive assistance to the secretariat in carrying out its mandate in a successful manner.  The resolution was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then took note of the report of the Secretary-General on the status of the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Populations (document A/57/296).

Next, the Assembly turned to the Third Committee’s report on the Elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination (document A/57/544), which contained two draft resolutions and one decision.

Draft Resolution I, on the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, was approved without a vote.

Prior to that action, the Assembly retained operative paragraph 10 of section one of the text by a vote of 168 in favour to 2 against (United States, Israel) (Annex V).

Draft Resolution II, on the fight against racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action, was adopted by a vote of  173 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United States, Palau), with 2 abstentions (Australia, Canada) (Annex VI).

The Assembly then took note of the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance (document A/57/443).

Under the item on the right of peoples to self-determination, the Assembly had before it a Third Committee report containing three draft texts (document A/57/555).

Resolution I on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination was adopted by a vote of 124 in favour to 21 against with 34 abstentions.  (Annex VIII.)  (There is no Annex VII.)

Resolution II, on the universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination, was approved without a vote.

Resolution III, on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, was approved by a vote of 172 in favour to 4 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States) with 3 abstentions (Micronesia, Tonga, Vanuatu) (Annex IX.)

NASSER AL-KIDWA, Observer of Palestine, expressed his deep concern at the negative vote cast by Israel on the resolution.  Such a vote served only as additional proof that the Israeli Government indeed rejected a real peace settlement based on the existence of two States.  Even worse, the vote was inconsistent with the mutual recognition concluded at the beginning of the Oslo peace process between the government of Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization.  Reneging on the mutual recognition by one side was not only dangerous and tragic, but, if established, would lead to the nullification of that recognition not just by one side, but in its entirety.

The vote by the United States was also very disappointing and unfortunate, he noted.  That was particularly so in light of its special responsibilities and the role it played in international politics, including in the Middle East.  In fact, it was impossible to reconcile statements made by the United States President on his vision of a region with two States, Israel and Palestine, on the one hand and the negative vote by the United States on the resolution on the other hand. 

To achieve peace in the Middle East, a solution was needed that recognized and guaranteed the basic and national rights of both peoples, he added.  The recognition of the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, including the right to their independent State of Palestine, was the first step in that direction.

On human rights questions, the Assembly has before it a report (document A/57/556), which contains a list of the relevant reports considered by the Committee during the 2002 substantive session.

The Assembly took note of a draft decision therein on those reports as well as those considered under sub-items on the implementation of human rights instruments; alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms; report of special rapporteurs and representatives; and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action. 

The Assembly then took up the four draft resolutions contained in the Committee's report on human rights questions:  implementation of human rights instruments (document A/57/556/Add.1).

MOHAMMED SALEH MOHAMMED SALEH (Bahrain) wanted to express his views regarding the application of human rights instruments and regarding the optional protocol on the Convention on Torture.  Bahrain was making efforts, particularly in the area of democratic process and the establishment of institutions to advance the cause of its people.  It had consistently condemned discrimination against its citizens on any basis.  He supported the adoption of the optional protocol to the Convention.  He also supported the draft resolution on the optional protocol, while expressing his reservations regarding expenses in connection with the protocol.

Resolution I, on the optional protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, was adopted by a vote of 127 in favour to four (Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, United States) against with 42 abstentions (Annex X).

Resolution II, on torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, was adopted without a vote, as was Resolution III on the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families.

Resolution IV, on the effective implementation of international instruments on human rights, including reporting obligations under international instruments on human rights, was also adopted without a vote. 

MASAHIRO TOMOSHIGE (Japan) said that he had abstained on the vote on the text on the optional protocol.  He had expressed serious concern about the voting procedure followed in the elaboration of the protocol as well as the financial issues arising from the implementation of the protocol.  He stressed once again that such a manner of negotiations should not be repeated in the elaboration of future human rights instruments.  The optional protocol was adopted in three previous forums and finally adopted by the Plenary. 

The Assembly then took up the Third Committee's report on alternative approaches for improving effective enjoyment of human rights fundamental freedoms (document A/57/556/Add.2), which contained 27 draft resolutions and one draft decision. 

Before action was taken, CARLA SERRAZI (Chile) said that bringing those responsible to justice for crimes against humanity was absolutely necessary.  In the case of the Khmer Rouge Tribunals, the minimum standards to due process must be respected.  Costa Rica had seen the difficulties involved in bringing those responsible for those crimes to justice.  She believed that it was up to the Government of Cambodia to ensure the utmost transparency and adherence to the rule of law.  Unfortunately, the text before the Assembly was unclear on the standards and principles that would be observed in the Khmer Rouge Tribunal.  Costa Rica would therefore abstain in the vote.

BRUNO STAGNO (Costa Rica) said that his delegation supported the draft on human rights and cultural diversity.  However, acceptance of the that principle required respect for the intrinsic dignity of all the world’s inhabitants –- there could be no justification for limiting the rights of others guaranteed under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights or other international human rights instruments.

Mr. AL-MURRI (Qatar) said that his delegation supported the resolution on extrajudicial punishment.  However, the text mentioned capital punishment, a practice that was beyond the scope of enquiry of the Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights.  Qatar would therefore vote against the resolution.

OUCH BORITH (Cambodia) expressed thanks to all interested States that had worked toward drafting the text that would request the Secretary-General to resume negotiations to establish extraordinary chambers to investigate crimes against humanity committed under the Khmer Rouge.  Cambodia would support the text as proof of its intention to cooperate with the United Nations efforts in that regard.  Indeed, the Government remained committed to work with the United Nations to bring about a final resolution to this tragic situation.  He called on all delegations to support the draft.

Turning to the drafts, resolution I, on strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity, was adopted without a vote, as was Draft Resolution II, on human rights and cultural diversity.

Draft resolution III, on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights, was adopted by a vote of 124 in favour to 52 against, with   5 abstentions (Turkey, Singapore, Guatemala, Argentina and Colombia) (Annex XI).

Following that action, draft resolution IV, on human rights education, and draft resolution V, on missing persons, were adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution VI, on the elimination of all forms of religious intolerance, was adopted without a vote.

Draft text VII, on the Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, often referred to as the draft on "human rights defenders", was adopted without a vote.

Draft resolution VIII, on regional arrangements for the promotion and protection of human rights, and Resolution IX, on extreme poverty, were next adopted without votes.

Draft resolution X, on the United Nations Decade for Human Rights Education, 1994-2004, was adopted without vote.

The resolution on the promotion of a democratic and equitable international order (draft XI), was adopted by a vote of 116 in favor to 55 against, with       7 abstentions (Argentina, Mexico, Nauru, Panama, Peru, Fiji, Guatemala) (Annex XII).

The Assembly then took up Resolution XII, on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions.

Language contained in the third preambular paragraph, on relevant resolutions of the Commission on Human Rights, was retained by a vote of 97 in favour to 30 against, with 42 abstentions (Annex XIII).

Next, the Assembly held a joint vote on two paragraphs (the seventh preambular paragraph and operative paragraph 3) of the text, which would have the Assembly acknowledge the significance of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC).  That language was retained by a vote of 130 in favour to   4 against (United States, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau), with 31 abstentions (Annex XIV).

Then, operative paragraph 6, on the obligation of governments to thoroughly investigate killings, was retained by a vote of 104 in favour to 37 against, with 29 abstentions (Annex XV).

Following that, operative paragraph 11, on the interim report of the Special Rapporteur, was retained by a vote of 99 in favour to 33 against, with           39 abstentions (Annex XVI).

The Assembly then adopted operative paragraph 12, on the recommendations of the Rapporteur, by a vote of 100 in favour to 33 against, with 36 abstentions (Annex XVII).

It then adopted operative paragraph 18, on the Rapporteur, by a vote of    78 in favour to 41 against, with 50 abstentions (Annex XVIII).

Operative paragraph 22, on the High Commissioner for Human Rights, was retained by a vote of 103 in favour to 25 against, with 40 abstentions (Annex XIX).

The text on Extrajudicial, Summary or Arbitrary Executions as a whole was then adopted by a vote of 130 in favour to none against, with 49 abstentions (Annex XX).

The Assembly then took up Resolution XIII, on the question of enforced or involuntary disappearances.

It first adopted the seventh preambular paragraph of that text by a vote of 166 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 9 abstentions (Honduras, Israel, Kazakhstan, Libya, Marshall Islands, Myanmar, Pakistan, Palau, Tonga) (Annex XXI).

Resolution XIII as a whole was adopted without a vote after that.

Resolution XIV, on the promotion of the right of peoples to peace, was adopted by a vote of 116 in favour to 53 against, with 14 abstentions (Annex XXII).

Resolution XV, on the respect for the purposes and principles contained in the Charter of the United Nations to achieve international cooperation in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms and in solving international problems of a humanitarian character, was adopted by a vote of 114 in favour to 54 against, with 15 abstentions (Annex XXIII).

Resolution XVI, on the protection of migrants, and Resolution XVII, on protecting human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, were adopted without votes.

Resolution XVIII, on hostage-taking, and Resolution XIX, on strengthening the rule of law, were then adopted without votes.

Resolution XX, on human rights and unilateral coercive measures, was adopted by a vote of 122 in favour to 55 against, with 1 abstention (Kazakhstan) (Annex XXIV).

Following that action, draft resolution XXI, on the right to development was adopted by a vote of 133 in favour to 4 against (Australia, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 47 abstentions (Annex XXV).

Draft resolution XXII, on the enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, and resolution XXIII, on the human rights situation in Cambodia, were then adopted without votes.

Draft resolution XXIV, on the right to food, was adopted by a vote of 176 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 7 abstentions (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Israel, Marshall Islands) (Annex XXVI).

Resolution XXV, on the respect for the right to universal freedom of travel and the vital importance of family reunification, was adopted by a vote of 109 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Palau, United States), with 71 abstentions (Annex XXVII).

Following that action, resolution XXVI, on the Khmer Rouge Trials, was adopted by a vote of 150 in favour to none against, with 30 abstentions (Annex XXVIII)

The Assembly then approved without vote resolution XXVII, contained in the report of the Ad Hoc Committee on a comprehensive and integral international convention to promote and protect the rights and dignity of persons with disabilities (document A/57/357).  That draft would have the Assembly decide that the Ad Hoc Committee should hold, within existing resources, at least one meeting in 2003 of a duration of 10 working days, prior to the Assembly’s fifty-eighth session.

The Assembly also adopted a draft decision on the award of human rights prizes in 2003, which states that, considering that 2003 would mark the fifty-fifth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and recalling the Assembly’s resolution 2217 (XXI) of 1966, in which it approved the awarding of prizes in the field of human rights, it decided to request the Secretary-General to make the necessary arrangements for the awarding of human rights prizes in a plenary meeting on 10 December 2003.

JARGALSAIKHANY ENKHSAIKHAN (Mongolia) said he had voted in favour of the resolution on promotion of the right of peoples to peace, since Mongolia stood firmly for promoting that right.  In 1984, it was his country that had initiated consideration by the Assembly and adoption of the Declaration of the Right of Peoples to Peace.  Bearing that in mind, he expressed concern about bringing that issue, essentially of war and peace, to the Assembly in the context of human rights, and thus narrowing substantially the scope of the right, as envisaged in the original Declaration.  While underlining the indispensable link between peace and human rights, he felt that the issue of the right of peoples to peace would be better dealt with in some other, more appropriate, forums, as he had suggested to the original sponsors of the text.

KOICHI HARAGUCHI (Japan) expressed deep appreciation to Member States for their support of the resolution on the Khmer Rouge trials, whose adoption was of great significance, as it would reopen the process of bringing to justice those responsible for the crimes committed during that period, when almost a quarter of the Cambodian people had been killed.  It was the duty of the international community to bring those perpetrators to justice.  The adoption of the resolution was an important step towards that goal.  However, it was but one step.

The next step, he continued, would be a resumption of the negotiations between the United Nations and the Cambodian Government on the establishment of a tribunal.  He appealed to the Secretariat to ensure that a credible tribunal was established, as soon as possible, in accordance with the resolution just adopted.  With the clear mandate of the resolution, the Secretariat was now in a better negotiating position.  Now that the resolution had been adopted by a large number of supporters and without any opposition, he called on all Member States to join in the endeavour.  The Secretary-General needed the broad support of the international community as he undertook that important task.  Also, he appealed to the Cambodian Government to commit itself to hold credible trials.

Mr. OUCH (Cambodia) expressed his gratitude to all Member States who voted in favour of the resolution on the Khmer Rouge trials and reiterated his commitment to bring justice to his people.

AMR MOHAMED ROSHDY (Egypt) said he wanted to comment on document A/57/556/Add.2.  It had been his understanding that his comments in the Committee on rule 89 of the Rules of Procedure would be duly reflected in the report, but they had not been.  He reiterated that rules of procedure should be followed always and not on request.  Starting next year, he would invoke rule 89 on any resolution voted on.

ANDREY A. NIKIFOROV (Russian Federation) said that his country knew the suffering terrorism caused.  It was important to take into account that the measures taken by governments to combat terrorism were of an exceptional nature.  It had been necessary to examine the text to ensure that it reflected, in a more balanced way, the need of States to combat terrorism, as well as the issue of human rights in the context of combating terrorism.

MANUEL E. FÉLIX (Dominican Republic), on a point of order, said that in draft resolution XXV in document A/57/556/Add.2, concerning respect for the right of travel and the importance of family reunification, his country’s name had appeared as a co-sponsor.  Although he did vote in favour of that text, his country was not a co-sponsor.  He hoped that the Secretariat would take note of that clarification.

The Assembly next took up the Third Committee's report on human rights situations and reports of Special Rapporteurs and Representatives (document A/57/556/Add.3), which contained five draft resolutions.

In explanation of vote before the vote on the human rights situation in Iraq, Mr. SALLAM (Saudi Arabia) supported paragraphs in the text concerning Iraq’s cooperation with the subcommittee on the identification and plight of missing Kuwaiti nationals.

ELFATIH MOHAMED AHMED ERWA (Sudan), regarding the draft resolution on the human rights situation in his country, said he was certain that everyone had been following the recent activities under way to restore peace in the country.  The Sudan was in full agreement with human rights and humanitarian objectives, so long as they were undertaken with complete transparency and impartiality.  The Sudan rejected the resolution before the Assembly and would vote against it, as the

language was not objective or constructive.  He urged other delegations to act likewise, noting that what was really needed was words of encouragement and support.  The text before the Assembly was highly politicized.

Resolution I, on the situation of human rights in the Sudan, was adopted by a vote of 80 in favour to 62 against, with 33 abstentions (Annex XXIX).

Resolution II, on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, was adopted without a vote.

Before action was taken on the draft resolution on Iraq as a whole, the Assembly, through four recorded votes, retained language in specific sections of operative paragraph 4.

Operative paragraph 4 (a), which strongly condemns the systematic, widespread and extremely grave violations of human rights and of international humanitarian law by the Government of Iraq, was retained by a vote of 83 in favour to 7 against (Russian Federation, Sudan, Viet Nam, Libya, Syria, Cuba, China) with 81 abstentions (Annex XXX).

Operative paragraph 4 (b), which strongly condemns the repression faced by any kind of opposition, in particular the harassment and intimidation of and threats against Iraqi opponents living abroad and members of their families, was retained by a vote of 82 in favour to 7 against (Russian Federation, Sudan, Viet Nam, Libya, Syria, Cuba, China), with 83 abstentions (Annex XXXI).

Operative paragraph 4 (e), which strongly condemns summary and arbitrary executions and political killings in Iraq was retained by a vote of 84 in favour to 7 against (Russian Federation, Sudan, Viet Nam, Libya, Syria, Cuba, China), with 80 abstentions (Annex XXXII).

Operative paragraph 4 (f), which strongly condemns widespread systematic torture, was retained by a vote of 85 in favour to 7 against (Russian Federation, Sudan, Viet Nam, Libya, Syria, Cuba, China), with 79 abstentions (Annex XXXIII).

The Assembly then adopted a resolution on the human rights situation in Iraq by a vote of 97 in favour to 3 against (Libya, Syria, Sudan), with 77 abstentions (Annex XXXIV).

Operative paragraph 1 (i), welcoming the Democratic Republic of the Congo's ratification of the Statue of the International Criminal Court (ICC), was retained by a vote of 136 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 30 abstentions (Annex XXXV).

The Assembly next adopted resolution IV, on the human rights situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, by a vote of 92 in favor to 2 against (Rwanda, Uganda) with 81 abstaining (Annex XXXVI).

Resolution V, on the human rights situation in Afghanistan, was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then took up the report on follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action (document A/57/556/Add.4), and adopted the draft decision contained therein on the commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the World conference on Human Rights in 2003.

The Assembly also took note of the Third Committee’s report on the Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights under this item (document A/57/556/Add.5), as it did for the report on the follow-up to the special session on children (document A/57/557), which details delegations’ relevant discussions during the 2002 substantive session.

The Assembly finally took up the report of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) (document A/57/588), which contained two draft decisions.

The Assembly adopted draft decision I, which recommended that it adopt the organization of work of the Third Committee and draft biennial programme of work of the Committee for 2003-2004.

It also adopted draft decision II, taking note of Chapters I, III, IV, V, VII (sections A, B, C and I) and IX of the Report of the Economic and Social Council (A/57/3/Rev.1).

(annexes follow)

ANNEX I

Vote on Future Operation of INSTRAW

Resolution I, on the future operation of INSTRAW (document A/57/549), was adopted by a recorded vote of 136 in favour to 7 against, with 29 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, Netherlands, Republic of Korea, United States.

Abstaining:  Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Russian Federation, San Marino, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, El Salvador, Fiji, Guinea-Bissau, Iran, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Madagascar, Marshall Islands, Nicaragua, Niger, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

(END OF ANNEX I)

ANNEX II

Vote on Assistance to Palestinian Children

Resolution I, on assistance to Palestinian children (document A/57/552) was adopted by a recorded vote of 108 in favour to 5 against, with 60 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.

Abstaining:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, El Salvador, Fiji, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Madagascar, Nicaragua, Niger, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

(END OF ANNEX II)

ANNEX III

Vote on Operative Paragraph 1 of Resolution on Girl Child

Operative paragraph 1 of Resolution II, on the Girl Child (document A/57/552) was retained by a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 2 against, with     1 abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Marshall Islands, United States.

Abstaining:  Israel.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Iran, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Palau, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

(END OF ANNEX III)

ANNEX IV

Vote on Rights of the Child

Resolution III, on the rights of the child (document A/57/552) was adopted by a recorded vote of 175 in favour to 2 against, with 0 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Marshall Islands, United States.

.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Fiji, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Palau, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

(END OF ANNEX IV)

ANNEX V

Vote on Convention on Elimination of Racial Discrimination

Operative paragraph 10 of Section one of Resolution I, on the Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (document A/57/544), was retained by a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 2 against, with 0 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, United States.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Niger, Palau, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

(END OF ANNEX V)

ANNEX VI (There is no Annex VII)

Vote on Fight Against Racism

Resolution II, on the fight against racism and racial discrimination (document A/57/554), was adopted by a recorded vote of 173 in favour to 3 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, Palau, United States.

Abstaining:  Australia, Canada.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Chad, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

(END OF ANNEX VI)

ANNEX VIII (There is no Annex VII)

Vote on Mercenaries and Human Rights

Resolution I, on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights (document A/57/555) was adopted by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 21 against, with 34 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, Georgia, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Marshall Islands, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstaining:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Malta, Monaco, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Turkey, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia.

Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Republic, Chad, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.

(END OF ANNEX VIII)

ANNEX IX

Vote on Right of Palestinians to Self Determination

Resolution III on the right of Palestinians to Self-Determination (Document A/57/555) was adopted by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 4 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.

Abstaining:  Federated States of Micronesia, Tonga, Vanuatu.

Absent: Chad, Fiji, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu.

(END OF ANNEX IX)

ANNEX X

Optional Protocol to Convention against Torture

Resolution I, on the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture (document A/57/556/Add.1), was adopted by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to     4 against, with 42 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Marshall Islands, Nigeria, Palau, United States.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Australia, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Belize, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cameroon, China, Cuba, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Grenada, Guyana, India, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mauritania, Myanmar, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Guinea-Bissau, Iran, Iraq, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Maldives, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates.

(END OF ANNEX X)

ANNEX XI

Vote on Globalization and Human Rights

Resolution III, on globalization and its impact on human rights (document A/57/556/Add.2), was adopted by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 52 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Yugoslavia.

Abstaining:  Argentina, Colombia, Guatemala, Singapore, Turkey.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Seychelles, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Uzbekistan.

(END OF ANNEX XI)

ANNEX XII

Vote on Promotion of Democratic International Order

Resolution XI, on the promotion of a democratic, equitable international order (document A/57/556/Add.2), was adopted by a recorded vote of 116 in favour to 55 against, with 7 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Yugoslavia.

Abstaining:  Argentina, Fiji, Guatemala, Mexico, Nauru, Panama, Peru.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.

(END OF ANNEX XII)

ANNEX XIII

Vote on Extrajudicial, Summary on Arbitrary Executions

The third preambular paragraph of resolution XII, on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions (document A/57/556/Add.2) was retained by a recorded vote of 97 in favour to 30 against, with 42 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia.

Against:  Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Burundi, Chad, China, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.

Abstaining:  Angola, Belize, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Israel, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Morocco, Namibia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Uganda, Vanuatu, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mongolia, Mozambique, Seychelles, Suriname, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Zambia.

(END OF ANNEX XIII)

ANNEX XIV

Vote on Reference to International Criminal Court

The seventh preambular paragraph and operative paragraph 3, on the significance of the International Criminal Court Statute, in resolution XII, on extrajudicial executions (document A/57/556/Add.2), were retained by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to 4 against, with 31 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sudan, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.

Abstaining:  Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Cuba, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Tonga, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Bahrain, Burundi, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Seychelles, Suriname, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.

(END OF ANNEX XIV)

ANNEX XV

Vote on Government Obligations Regarding Extrajudical Executions

Operative paragraph 6, on the obligation of governments, in resolution XII, on extrajudicial executions (documents A/57/556/Add.2), was retained by a recorded vote of 104 in favour to 37 against, with 29 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia.

Against:  Algeria, Bahrain, Brunei Darussalam, Chad, China, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Gambia, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Togo, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.

Abstaining:  Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea, Haiti, India, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, Papua New Guinea, Russian Federation, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Tonga, Turkey, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Burundi, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mozambique, Seychelles, Suriname, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam.

(END OF ANNEX XV)

ANNEX XVI

Vote on Report of Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial Executions

Operative paragraph 11 of resolution XII, on the recommendations of the Special Rapporteur on Extrajudical Executions (document A/57/556/add.2), was retained by a recorded vote of 99 in favour to 33 against, with 39 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia.

Against:  Bahrain, Bangladesh, China, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Egypt, Gambia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iran, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United States, Yemen.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Federated States of Micronesia, Ghana, Guinea, Guyana, India, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lebanon, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Namibia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Russian Federation, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Tonga, Turkey, Vanuatu, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Mozambique, Niger, Seychelles, Suriname, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam.

(END OF ANNEX XVI)

ANNEX XVII

Vote on Recommendations of Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial Executions

Operative paragraph 12, on the recommendations of the Special Rapporteur in resolution XII, on extrajudicial executions (document A/57/556/Add.2), was retained by a recorded vote of 100 in favour to 33 against, with 36 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia.

Against:  Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, China, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Egypt, Gambia, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Togo, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bhutan, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, India, Israel, Kazakhstan, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Namibia, Papua New Guinea, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Tonga, Turkey, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Burundi, Central African Republic, Colombia, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Mozambique, Niger, Seychelles, Suriname, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam.

(END OF ANNEX XVII)

ANNEX XVIII

Vote on Operative Paragraph 18 on Special Rapporteur for Extrajudicial Executions

Operative paragraph 18, concerning the Special Rapporteur, in the resolution on Extrajudicial Executions (document A/57/556/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 78 in favour to 41 against, with 50 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia.

Against:  Bahrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, China, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, Eritrea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Indonesia, Iran, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Myanmar, Nauru, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Sudan, Syria, Togo, Tonga, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United States, Yemen, Zimbabwe.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Ethiopia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, India, Israel, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Namibia, Nepal, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tunisia, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Zambia.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mozambique, Niger, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Suriname, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam.

(END OF ANNEX XVIII)

Annex XIX

Vote on Paragraph on High Commissioner for Human Rights in Resolution on Extrajudicial Executions

Operative paragraph 22, on the High Commissioner for Human Rights, contained in resolution XII, on Extrajudicial Executions (document A/57/556/Add.2), was retained by a recorded vote of 103 in favour to 25 against, with 40 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia, Zambia.

Against:  Bahrain, China, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Egypt, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United States, Yemen.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Haiti, Indonesia, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lebanon, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Russian Federation, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Burundi, Central African Republic, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Madagascar, Mozambique, Niger, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Suriname, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam.

(END OF ANNEX XIX)

ANNEX XX

Vote on Extrajudicial, Summary or Arbitrary Executions

Resolution XII, on Extrajudicial, Summary or Arbitrary Executions (document A/57/556/Add.2), was adopted by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to none against, with 49 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  None.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, China, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Gambia, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Nauru, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Yemen.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Somalia, Turkmenistan.

(END OF ANNEX XX)

ANNEX XXI

Vote on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances

Preambular paragraph 7, referring to the International Criminal Court, of resolution XIII on enforced or involuntary disappearances (document A/57/556/Add.2) was retained by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 1 against, with 9 abstentions as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  United States.

Abstaining:  Honduras, Israel, Kazakhstan, Libya, Marshall Islands, Myanmar, Pakistan, Palau, Tonga.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Maldives, Federated States of Micronesia, Morocco, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu.

(END OF ANNEX XXI)

ANNEX XXII

Vote on Right to Peace

Resolution XIV on the Right of Peoples to Peace (document A/57/556/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 116 in favour to 53 against, with 14 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Yugoslavia.

Abstaining:  Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ethiopia, Fiji, Guatemala, India, Madagascar, Nauru, Samoa, Singapore, Tonga, Uruguay, Uzbekistan.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Seychelles, Turkmenistan.

(END OF ANNEX XXII)

ANNEX XXIII

Vote on Respect for Charter Principles

Resolution XV on respect for the purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter (document A/57/556/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 114 in favour to 54 against, with 15 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Yugoslavia.

Abstaining:  Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Fiji, Guatemala, Latvia, Madagascar, Nauru, Peru, Philippines, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Singapore, Thailand, Tonga, Uruguay.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.

(END OF ANNEX XXIII)

Annex XXIV

Vote on Human Rights and Coercive Measures

Resolution XX on human rights and unilateral coercive measures (document A/57/556/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 55 against, with one abstention, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Yugoslavia.

Abstaining:  Kazakhstan.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Maldives, Niger, Rwanda, Seychelles, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu.

(END OF ANNEX XXIV)

ANNEX XXV

Vote on Right to Development

Resolution XXI on the right to development (document A/57/556/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to

4 against, with 47 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Australia, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.

Abstaining:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom, Yugoslavia.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Uzbekistan.

(END OF ANNEX XXV)

ANNEX XXVI

Vote on Right to Food

Resolution XXIV on the right to food (document A/57/556/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 176 in favour to one against, with

7 abstentions as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  United States.

Abstaining:  Australia, Canada, Fiji, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Uzbekistan.

(END OF ANNEX XXVI)

ANNEX XXVII

Vote on Right to Freedom of Travel

Resolution XXV on respect for the right to freedom of travel (document A/57/556/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 109 in favour to 3 against, with 71 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  Israel, Palau, United States.

Abstaining:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Mozambique, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Yugoslavia.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Tonga, Turkmenistan.

(END OF ANNEX XXVII)

ANNEX XXVIII

Vote on Khmer Rouge Trials

Resolution XXVI on Khmer Rouge Trials (document A/57/556/Add.2) was adopted by a recorded vote of 150 in favour to none against, with 30 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  None.

Abstaining:  Belarus, Belgium, Botswana, Canada, Costa Rica, Croatia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Kenya, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.

Absent:  Central African Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.

(END OF ANNEX XXVIII)

ANNEX XXIX

Vote on Human Rights in The Sudan

Resolution I on human rights in the Sudan (document A/57/556/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 80 in favour to 62 against, with 33 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia.

Against:  Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, China, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.

Abstaining:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Belarus, Bhutan, Botswana, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Dominica, Eritrea, Ghana, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mongolia, Philippines, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Zambia.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Armenia, Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Niger, Seychelles, Tonga, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Yemen.

(END OF ANNEX XXIX)

ANNEX XXX

Vote on Human Rights in Iraq

Operative paragraph 4(a) condemning systematic, extremely grave violations in resolution III on the human rights situation in Iraq (document A/57/556/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 83 in favour to 7 against, with 81 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia.

Against:  China, Cuba, Libya, Russian Federation, Sudan, Syria, Viet Nam.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Iran, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Maldives, Niger, Seychelles, Suriname, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Yemen.

(END OF ANNEX XXX)

ANNEX XXXI

Vote on Human Rights in Iraq

Operatic paragraph 4(B), condemning the repression of opposition groups in Iraq, of resolution III on human rights in Iraq (document A/57/556/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 82 in favour to 7 against, with 83 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia.

Against:  China, Cuba, Libya, Russian Federation, Sudan, Syria, Viet Nam.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Iran, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Maldives, Niger, Seychelles, Suriname, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Yemen.

(END OF ANNEX XXXI)

ANNEX XXXII

Vote on Human Rights in Iraq

Operative paragraph 4(E), condemning summary executions in Iraq, of resolution III on human rights in Iraq (document A/57/556/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 84 in favour to 7 against, with 80 abstentions as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia.

Against:  China, Cuba, Libya, Russian Federation, Sudan, Syria, Viet Nam.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Maldives, Niger, Seychelles, Suriname, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Yemen.

(END OF ANNEX XXXII)

ANNEX XXXIII

Vote on Human Rights in Iraq

Operative paragraph 4(f), condemning widespread systematic torture in Iraq, of resolution III on human rights in Iraq (document A/57/556/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 85 in favour to 7 against, with 79 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia.

Against:  China, Cuba, Libya, Russian Federation, Sudan, Syria, Viet Nam.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Maldives, Niger, Seychelles, Suriname, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Yemen.

(END OF ANNEX XXXIII)

ANNEX XXXIV

Vote on Human Rights in Iraq

Resolution III, as a whole, on the situation of human rights in Iraq (document A/57/556/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 97 in favour to

3 against, with 77 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Mongolia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia.

Against:  Libya, Sudan, Syria.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Angola, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Benin, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Iran, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Niger, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Suriname, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Yemen.

(END OF ANNEX XXXIV)

ANNEX XXXV

Vote on Human Rights in Democratic Republic of the Congo

Operative paragraph one, welcoming ratification of the International Criminal Court Statute, of the resolution on the human rights situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (document A/57/556/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 136 in favour to 1 against, with 30 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sudan, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Yugoslavia, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against:  United States.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bhutan, Cameroon, Comoros, Dominica, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Libya, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Palau, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Bahrain, Central African Republic, China, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Liberia, Maldives, Federated States of Micronesia, Morocco, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Seychelles, Suriname, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Yemen.

(END OF ANNEX XXXV)

ANNEX XXXVI

Vote on Human Rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

The resolution, as a whole, on the human rights situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (document A/57/556/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 92 in favour to 2 against, with 81 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Mongolia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Yugoslavia.

Against:  Rwanda, Uganda.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Angola, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Iraq, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Niger, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Suriname, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Yemen.

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For information media. Not an official record.